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Monday, January 26, 2015

jan26 Wellfleet

Upcoming public meetings focus on road changes in Wellfleet

Two public meetings are planned for proposed changes to four roads that lie in the Herring River floodplain, where a $30 million to $40 million salt marsh restoration project is planned. A meeting planned for Feb. 4 will address the reasons sections of Pole Dike Road, Old County Road and Bound Brook Island Road would need to be elevated, and the need for culverts under the roads to be widened, according to Friends of Herring River President Don Palladino. A new tide gate at Pole Dike Road will also be discussed at the Feb. 4 meeting. A meeting planned for Feb. 9 will address reasons the flow of the river needs to be widened at High Toss Road, Palladino said. All the roadways where changes are planned are in the northwestern corner of Wellfleet. "The culverts are too small, and in certain sections the roadway is too low," Palladino said. "The most important part of these meetings is to hear from the public any of their ideas, how they use these roads and concerns they have that might contribute to the ultimate design and any construction," Palladino said. The design firms for the roadway projects have been chosen but no design plan or engineering has begun, he said. The friends group will take notes at the two meetings and publish the notes on its website for public viewing. The design firms will use the notes to inform their initial designs, Palladino said. The nonprofit Friends of Herring River acts as contract manager for the project, which is owned by the towns of Truro and Wellfleet and the National Park Service. Begun in 2005, the project is on target to become the largest salt marsh restoration from Maine to New York, covering 1,100 acres in Wellfleet and Truro. The goal is to reverse the drying-out effects on the river's floodplain from construction of the Chequessett Neck Road dike in 1909 at the mouth of the river. The restoration would improve water quality and fish habitat throughout the floodplain, restore native species, reduce mosquitoes and build up the marsh to better protect it against sea level rise, according to the draft environmental impact statement. The release of the final environmental impact statement is expected this year. The proposed roadway changes are part of the project's capital construction plans, which also include a new bridge to replace the 1909 dike, a new tide gate at Mill Creek and about two dozen structures like berms to protect private properties. The total cost of the capital construction plans has not been determined, according to project coordinator Margo Fenn and Palladino. But funding will come from a number of federal, state and private funding sources, Fenn said. The town of Wellfleet would not be asked to pay for anything except in-kind services, Fenn and Palladino said.


jan26 Wellfleet

Cock-eyed noise bylaws need update in Wellfleet

The Wellfleet selectmen have renewed many of the town's holders of entertainment licenses without conditioning these licenses for noise levels. It is wonderful that Wellfleet has a vibrant business community with many lively restaurants as part of it, and anyone who cares for the economic vitality of the town welcomes this. Five of these entertainment licenses are for town center businesses. In Wellfleet, a person is forbidden to have a rooster in the central district. And yet these five establishments in the central area are permitted under the current noise control bylaw to blast out amplified music from 8 in the morning until 10 at night, all at the same time if they wish. I think Wellfleet is due for a change in the noise laws.

Rachel Brown
Wellfleet


jan26 Eastham-Harwich

Emergency shelters in Eastham and Harwich to open for storm

With the looming storm forecast for Monday night, the Barnstable County Regional Emergency Planning Committee will have its six regional shelters open, according to a statement from the committee. After a conference call Sunday, the committee decided the high winds, possible heavy wet snow, and "high probability of widespread power outages" warranted the opening of the shelters, according to the statement. The shelters will be staffed and open depending on when the storm hits. The shelters are located as follows:

  • Nauset Regional High School, 100 Cable Road, Eastham.
  • Cape Cod Regional Technical High School, 351 Pleasant Lake Avenue, Harwich.
  • Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School, 210 Station Avenue, South Yarmouth.
  • Barnstable Intermediate School, 895 Falmouth Road, Barnstable.
  • Sandwich High School, 365 Quaker Meetinghouse Road, Sandwich.
  • Falmouth High School, 874 Gifford Street, Falmouth.

There is a blizzard warning in effect for most of the state starting Monday night, including Cape Cod where wind gusts could reach up to 75 mph, according to the National Weather Service.


jan26 Eastham

Chinese New Year fete planned at Nauset

On Feb. 9, Nauset Regional High School will host a cultural celebration in honor of the Chinese New Year. Chinese language students from Nauset and Barnstable high schools will perform songs, dance and a poem for the audience, according to Taidje Tang, a Mandarin Chinese teacher at Nauset. The event runs from 6 to 8 p.m. and is open to the public. Food and prizes will be offered and student achievements exhibited, Tang said.


jan26 Provincetown

Provincetown chef co-authors sweet new book in time for Valentine's baking

Ever yearn to create scrumptious, scratch pastries, gooey cakes or fruit-laden tarts? Don't fret about possibly betraying New Year's resolutions. Find yourself a copy of "Sugar Rush," co-authored by Far Land Provisions head chef Wes Martin with award-winning pastry chef Johnny Iuzzini. "Sugar Rush" serves to please beginning as well as experienced dessert cooks. Carefully structured, it features 250 color photos offering step-by-step techniques as well as inspirational images of final results. In nine sections, "Sugar Rush" takes readers from making caramel and basic butter cakes to creating the ultimate sin - a sticky caramel date cake - to meringues glides, crafting over-the-top marshmallows, airy soufflés and macaron sandwich cookies. Ambitious bakers can find terrific recipes adapted for home cooks to challenge and expand repertoires. According to Martin, the book was developed from the ground up. "Johnny had volumes and volumes of restaurant recipes from his many years as an executive pastry chef in some of the greatest restaurants in NYC," Martin says. "However, these recipes were not well-suited for the home baker. We really wanted to teach people the procedures and techniques he had mastered over the years. Working as a team, we brainstormed desserts and developed them together. We took Johnny's creations and molded them into recipes friendly to the home kitchen. I was responsible for writing the recipes, testing them again, and helping organize and execute the photo shoot. I wrote all of the text after chatting with Johnny about his past experiences with the ingredients and recipes we came up with." The book's completion in the spring of 2014 signaled a perfect time for Martin to take a breather from the crazy pace of life in New York City. Trained originally in San Francisco, Martin had moved east in 2000 to find himself working for and with some of the biggest stars in the television and food publishing world, including Rachel Ray, Martha Stewart, Tyler Florence, Paula Deen, Jacques Torres, Jamie Oliver and Nigel Lawson. He spent two years as Martha Stewart's kitchen manager and TV chef on her daytime talk show, and worked as a consultant, recipe developer and tester for numerous publishing houses. However, though Martin has styled more than 25 cookbooks, his greatest professional joy, he says, rests in actual hands-on, roll-up-your-sleeves cooking. This is where his story connects to Provincetown and Far Land Provisions. Before recently moving here full time, he'd been a steady, if occasional visitor. "Every time I drove out of town and looked back in the mirror," he says, "I always felt a little sad. There's something magical about this town - the combination of history, architecture and, more than anything, natural beauty all around. I will never tire of the skies, sunset and colors."


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jan26 Provincetown

Second part of film arts series in Provincetown focuses on fringes of culture

Being an artist blacklisted by the House Un-American Activities Committee in the mid-20th century may carry a certain cachet for those of us looking back from our free-speech era of Charlie Hebdo. But for a filmmaker like Jules Dassin, perhaps best known for his 1960 romantic comedy "Never on Sunday," it amounted to a decades-long, one-way trip out of America. A young idealistic Dassin joined the Communist party in 1930 but dropped out after becoming disillusioned following the Hitler-Stalin pact of 1939. Nevertheless, in 1950, while shooting the noir classic "Night and the City" in London, a fellow Hollywood director turned him in to HUAC. Dassin made most of his subsequent films in Europe. Every scene in "Night and the City," on screen Wednesday, Jan. 28, at Waters Edge Cinema as part of the Provincetown Art Association & Museum's Film Arts series, is imbued with the sense of a man on the run. It's more than the story of a hustler clawing for his last trick; it's the work of a great film artist expressing his own sense of the despair of persecution. It's a tough film, but, "it's a great noir, for those who love the genre," says the series' curator Howard Karren (who also writes the Banner's DVD review column "This Week's Rent.") "All of the characters are morally compromised, and except for the martyr-like [Gene Tierney] they're all difficult and basically unlikable, which, for a Hollywood movie, is extraordinary and courageous. "The script is snappy and the direction is subversive and fresh," Karren says. "It's clearly something that Dassin, who knew the HUAC was coming after him, could infuse with desperate energy. He apparently never even read the source novel before shooting, he was in such a rush to get it done before he was blacklisted." The location shooting in London, Karren adds, is superb. "Dassin really made use of the city - and the night - remaining faithful to the title. The last sequence was shot primarily at dawn and is one of the most visually stunning things I've ever seen. It's a pinnacle of black-and-white cinematography." What's more, the film's leading actor, Richard Widmark, is sensational, Karren says. "There's just no one like him in the movies," he says. "No one could have made [Widmark's character] Harry Fabian as bitter and angry and shameless, and as utterly mesmerizing, as Richard Widmark."


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jan26 Orleans-Brewster-Chatham-Harwich

Grants available for lessons related to Pleasant Bay

Brewster elementary schools will hold kindergarten registration for the 2015-2016 academic year from 9 to 11 a.m. March 3 and March 5 at Stony Brook Elementary, 384 Underpass Road, Brewster. Children must be age 5 on or before Aug. 31. A complete packet of registration forms will be available at the school office after Feb. 2. For more information, email barnesl@nausetschools.org or call 508-896-4545, ext. 1106.


jan26 Brewster

Brewster Man loses finger, flown to Boston

A man was flown to a Boston hospital Sunday after he severed a finger, Brewster fire Capt. Anthony Dalmau said. Rescuers responded to Tubman Road around 3 p.m. to an incident with multiple injuries to a man's hand, he said. The man was then flown from the Barnstable Municipal Airport to Tufts Medical Center in Boston to see a hand specialist, he said. The injury was being considered serious but non-life threatening, Dalmau said.


jan26 Brewster

Kindergarten registration for Brewster schools

Brewster elementary schools will hold kindergarten registration for the 2015-2016 academic year from 9 to 11 a.m. March 3 and March 5 at Stony Brook Elementary, 384 Underpass Road, Brewster. Children must be age 5 on or before Aug. 31. A complete packet of registration forms will be available at the school office after Feb. 2. For more information, email barnesl@nausetschools.org or call 508-896-4545, ext. 1106.


jan26 Chatham

Scientists seek sick seals in Chatham

While flu season is upon us humans, scientists spent last week testing gray seals for the flu, among other diseases. Close to 30 biologists and associates from the Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Massachusetts Institute for Technology and elsewhere descended on Musketget Island off Nantucket and Monomoy off the coast of Chatham to tag and test gray seal pups. "They are truly sentinels of human health," explained Andrea Bogomolini, a Reaseach Associate at the Woods Hole Oeanograhic Institute. "They're similar animals (to us), in the same aquatic environment where they eat similar things, obviously otherwise they wouldn't be issues with competition. If the population does become less healthy we should pay attention because it tells us something about ourselves.' High cancer levels could indicate water pollution and earlier work by Bogomolini showed seals can act as reservoirs for disease pathogens that can be transmitted to beachgoers or fishermen. Many human viruses originate in other species, influenza among them. "There's no special issue in relation to the health of gray seals," noted Gordon Waring, head of the seal program at the NFSC's Woods Hole lab. "We're collaborating with researchers at M.I.T. on an ongoing project they have on understanding the ecology of avian influenza in marine animals." In 2013 researchers collected samples from 100 gray seal pups on Muskeget Island. Last year NMFS helped them tag and sample 103 seals, again on Muskeget Island. "This year, based on data from an aerial inventory survey, it looked like seal pup production was increasing on Monomoy so we sent teams to Monomoy and Muskeget and had them on the islands at the same time," Waring said. "We started on the eleventh and completed the survey on the fifteenth. Originally we were going to work through the seventeenth but since everything we do depends on small boats we ended the program with the [storm] forecast." Why pick a week in mid-January? The pups are born starting in December and they're the right size to handle a few weeks later. "We only handle pups that are weaned," Waring said. "The mothers nurse the pups for two and a half weeks so now there are a sufficient number of weaned pups. While MIT researchers will test for the flu, Waring and his team have National Marine Fisheries Service permits to handle the seals. "The refuge allows us to go out and capture the animals and we have lots of experience with capture," he said. "Each time you handle a seal you go through protocols. You first collect blood, then mucus swabs. We do measurements and collect a skin patch from the hind flipper and put a tag on. I work on tagging and collecting the skin. Others collect blood. There are people who do data recording. We have a team of five people. Each has a particular skill."


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Sunday, January 25, 2015

jan25 Wellfleet

Attorney seeks task force on controversial marina sign in Wellfleet

How did a huge sign touting the virtues of Wellfleet that exceeds by almost four times the allowable size get approved by a volunteer committee and the town administrator? The history of this "massive blunder," as one zoning board of appeals member put it, unfolded at a hearing held by the ZBA on Thursday, Jan. 15. The selectmen in November ordered that the sign be removed from the marina and taken to a safe place for storage until its future fate could be determined. It was taken to the police station, where it remains today. Jennifer Pierce, executive director of the Wellfleet Chamber of Commerce, and attorney Bruce Bierhans, representing the chamber, went before the ZBA for relief in the form of variances last Thursday. Pierce came up with the idea for the sign and, over a two-year period of time, working with the citizens economic development committee, came up with a proposal that the committee agreed to fund with two economic development grants totaling $4,750. The grants were matched by chamber of commerce and Harborfest funds. Town Administrator Harry Terkanian, as required by the rules governing disbursement of the economic development funds Town Meeting approved, reviewed the grant requests and approved them. It was later called to his attention that the sign exceeded the size allowable by the zoning bylaw, and requests for zoning relief were filed. At the ZBA meeting, Bierhans asked the board to continue the hearing so that a task force, assembled by Terkanian, could be formed to see if "this monster sign can be saved, all or in part." "A task force has no use for this board," Bruce Drucker, acting chair of the ZBA, told Bierhans. ZBA member Sharon Inger said the town went through a two-year process with this sign "and no one bothers to look at the zoning bylaws. A sign can be 24 square feet and this one is 153 square feet. I don't think there's much sympathy on this board for a continuance." "There are things that fit in Wellfleet and there are things that don't fit," said ZBA member Mick Lynch. "This doesn't fit in Wellfleet. It's not a mistake, it's a massive blunder." Board member Roger Putnam said the sign was placed at the marina abutting a public way, and it was also placed in an Area of Critical Environmental Concern. "Are you allowed a sign in the ACEC? I don't think so. Did anyone see that this was a site within an iconic viewshed of the community, and it's the ugliest thing blocking the view. How in the world does the chamber of commerce have the right to request use of public land? I'd just as soon light a fire to it and blow the whole thing up."


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jan25 Wellfleet

SPAT Calling All Arts & Crafts Vendors

SPAT - Shellfish Promotion & Tasting, Inc. produces two events each year that support the shellfishing and aquaculture industries: the SPAT SummerFair and the Wellfleet OysterFest. The seventh annual SPAT SummerFair will take place on the Windmill Green in Eastham on July 22 & 23 and the fifteenth annual Wellfleet OysterFest will be held on October 17 & 18, 2015. Both events begin at 10am and conclude at 5pm each day. Fine Art and Craft applications are now being accepted for both shows in the categories of ceramics, fiber arts wearable and non-wearable, glass, jewelry, metalsmithing, mixed media, painting, printmaking, photography, specialty foods and wood. SPAT is going green and the only way to apply to either show is through an electronic application process, there is no longer a mail-in paper option. Through a competitive blind jury process, approximately 50 artists will be chosen to exhibit in this summer show and 90 in the fall show. For the second year, the SPAT SummerFair will take place mid-week. The event is an outgrowth of the OysterFest featuring approximately 50 fine arts and crafts vendors and several food vendors including a raw bar. Applications for the SPAT SummerFair are due by midnight April 1 and the application fee is $10, late applications for the SummerFair will require an additional $20 fee and will be considered for the wait list. Click here for participation information or to apply for the seventh annual SPAT Summer Fair.


jan25 Wellfleet

Upcoming Herring River Meetings

Two meetings have been scheduled to discuss planning for roadway alterations within the project area. The public is invited to attend and participate. A "zero percent design" public design forum to discuss approaches to elevating and replacing culverts under Pole Dike Road, Old County Road and Bound Brook Road and a tide control structure at Pole Dike Creek will be held on February 4, 2015 at 6:00 PM at the Council on Aging, 715 Old Kings Highway. A "zero percent design" public design forum to discuss approaches to improving tidal flow over High Toss Road will be held on February 9, 2015 at 6:00 PM at the Wellfleet Library, West Main Street.


jan25 Eastham-Harwich

Snowy roads cause multiple crashes

Snowy Roads led to several early morning crashes. One crash happened on Route 6 eastbound between exit 12 and the rotary. A rollover crash was reported in Eastham by the Methodist Church. Another crash was reported on Queen Anne Road in Harwich. A car vs pole crash was also reported in Harwich on Long Pond Drive at Kettle Pond Drive. No serious injuries were reported in any of the crashes. Officials are urging motorists to use extra caution.


jan25 Eastham

Boys hockey: Dennis-Yarmouth 5, Nauset 2

Senior Tyler Baker scored two goals as the Dolphins took an early lead and held off the Warriors at the Tony Kent Arena in South Yarmouth. Baker, sophomore Pat McDowell and senior Tom Slovak netted goals in the opening seven minutes of play for Dennis-Yarmouth (4-4-4, 3-2-1 Atlantic Coast League) but Nauset (4-8-3, 1-4-2 ACL) outshot the Dolphins 13-7 over the final two periods. Warriors' junior Tyler Nickerson finished off an individual effort tally late in the first period to pull Nauset within 3-1. After senior Jason Finn and Baker's second goal upped D-Y's lead to 5-1, junoir Jake McGrath finished off passes from junior Tyler Baker and senior Rich Emerson to pull the Warriors back within three. Junior Justin Servidori held off Nauset down the stretch to help D-Y earn the win. Junior Hunter Ohnmeiss and sophomore Patrick Baker were strong in goal for the Warriors. The Dolphins also got strong play from Ian Crosby, Jack Harney and Egan on defense while Finn, Gleason and Jack Conway sparked the offense.


jan25 Provincetown

1934: Provincetown in danger of becoming an island

On this day in 1934, as reported by The Daily Courier of Connellsville, Pa., "Encroaching waters of the restless Atlantic may create a new island off the Massachusetts coast during the next 10 years." Last spring a three-day storm ate away several feet of embankment and inundated the Pamet River coast guard station, and now 13 miles of Cape Cod between Truro and Provincetown is in danger of being sliced from the rest of the cape. The ocean has only to advance a stone's throw at the point in question to connect with the terminus of Pamet River, a small stream which crosses the cape and joins Cape Cod Bay at Truro.


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jan25 Orleans

Swimming solution found in Orleans

Swimming lessons at Meetinghouse Pond will continue, just slightly to the north. In recent years, concerns about motorboats pulling up to the docks children were jumping off, as well changes in state regulations, made some selectmen question the safety of swimming lessons at the popular pond. The board had staff search out other safe salt -water swimming spots, but to no avail. The attachment to Meetinghouse was strengthened because the pond had a 40-year history of giving lessons so Natural Resources Director Nathan Sears was tasked with solving the problem. He was before selectmen last week with plan that proposed moving eight moorings, so the state regulation of having a 75-foot buffer around lessons was met. He also moved the lessons to the right, so they wouldn't be plagued with boat traffic. The board approved the changes for a trial run this year. "If we have a successful season we may even look at having a swim platform within the area," said Sears. "It's a lot safer than the situation we are in now." Selectman John Hodgson, chairman of the parks commissioners, was perhaps the most concerned about the safety situation at Meetinghouse Pond and brought the matter up to his board. "Your task was to find a place for swimming lessons in Meetinghouse Pond and to do it safely and within the regulations, you seem to have done that," he told Sears.


jan25 Chatham

"Finest Hours" to debut earlier

"Finest Hours" fans will have to wait quite a few hours less to catch the Coast Guard thriller as Disney Studios has moved the release date to Oct. 9. The movie, based on the nail-biting 1952 Pendleton rescue, was slated for an April 2016 release date, but last week it was announced it was to swap its debut with a remake of "The Jungle Book," a family movie. Cast and crew from "The Finest Hours" spent just over a week in town this past December shooting scenes depicting what has been called the "greatest small boat rescue in Coast Guard history." The movie, with Chris Pine as the lead, tells the story of Guardsman Bernie Webber and his crew heading out in a February gale in the CG36500. Despite seas the size of small buildings and frigid temperatures, the crew on the 36-foot wooden boat saved 32 men on the stern of the tanker Pendleton, which had broken apart in the storm was sinking. A few stars did get a ride on the 36500, which was not in the movie, when they visited Chatham. The boat, which was rescued and restored through the efforts of the Orleans Historical Society, is on the National Register of Historic Places and still plies the waters of the Cape.


jan25 Harwich

Trial begins in stabbing death of Harwich native Tony Spaulding

Two years ago an argument over noise at a party spiraled out of control and a Brighton man allegedly stabbed Harwich native Tony Spaulding to death outside his Allston apartment. A second-degree murder trial begins Monday. The worst dreams are the happy ones. In those dreams, Cate Van Gelder said, her younger brother, Tony Spaulding, is alive. "And then you wake up and you're sad because it's not real." Tony Spaulding was bright, creative, sensitive, funny and caring, according to his family. "He was raised with two moms and three sisters. He knew how to be polite and gentle. That's who he was. Even hearing about him fighting, that's not who he was," said his mother Chris Spaulding. But that is what he was doing in his final moments on earth. Fighting for his life as an argument over noise at a New Year's Eve party spiraled out of control and a 26-year-old Brighton man allegedly stabbed him to death in the street in front of Spaulding's Allston house at 2:20 a.m. on Jan. 1, 2013. After two years of court maneuverings, Brian MacDonald's trial for second-degree murder begins Monday with jury selection in Boston Superior Court. Spaulding's family has been told it could last weeks. MacDonald's attorney, Thomas Hoopes, declined to comment on the case for this story, but has indicated in statements during his defendant's arraignment that he intends to argue self-defense and that Spaulding was the aggressor. "We'll hear things and some of it will be true and some of it won't," said Chris Spaulding. "If you talk to people who knew him, or check into his life, that is not who he was." Tony Spaulding was 21. A self-taught musician who had mastered five instruments, he was in the final semester of a two-year program leading to a degree in audio recording at Boston's New England Institute of Art. He was passionate about his music and music production and had become well known in the Boston band scene for his production work. He told family he wanted to move to Maine, rent a house and set up a studio so that bands could focus on their music away from the distractions of the city. "He was on the brink of the rest of his life," Chris Spaulding said. The Spauldings, including Chris and her wife, Randi, their daughter Cate and two younger sisters, are a close-knit family. They all went into Boston on Christmas Eve that year to pick up Tony at his job at Staples. Cate still has his last text to her in which he calls her the best sister in the world. "He called New Year's Eve and we both told him that we loved him, and I told him to be safe," said Randi Spaulding. "That's the last thing I said to him in his life." "He knew he was adored and I can always have that peace," said Chris Spaulding. In her written statement about the case, Suffolk County Assistant District Attorney Holly Broadbent said that MacDonald was a stranger to Spaulding and his roommates. He came for a New Year's Eve party with two friends, and his girlfriend, who was known by the roommates. Spaulding himself had just returned from a different party with his girlfriend, and they went upstairs to his bedroom. MacDonald and his company also went upstairs, to a landing outside Spaulding's bedroom, where witnesses said they saw MacDonald pull a knife from his pocket and open a champagne bottle, according to Broadbent's case report. When Spaulding opened his door to tell them to lower their voices, a verbal confrontation became physical and witnesses said MacDonald punched Spaulding, who was nearly 6 feet tall but weighed only 125 pounds, in the face. The fight continued as the two fell down the stairs to the first floor when other partygoers separated them and ejected MacDonald from the house. According to Broadbent's account, MacDonald's girlfriend kept asking him for his knife, but he refused. Spaulding then came outside to apologize to MacDonald's girlfriend, but the two men began fighting again, although witnesses couldn't say who started that altercation. They did say that, at one point, MacDonald was on top of Spaulding, punching him repeatedly before he was pulled off.


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jan25 Harwich

Boys hockey: Monarchs win 5-2, still unbeaten

Mashpee/Monomoy's red line of junior Nick Simkins, senior James Hinesley and eighth-grader Noah Tambolleo had its best game of the season, helping the Monarchs stay undefeated with a 5-2 win over St. John Paul II at the Hyannis Youth & Community Center on Saturday evening. Senior co-captain Aidan Sullivan gave Mashpee/Monomoy (9-0) a 1-0 lead 8:13 into the game and Andrew Vinitsky helped the Monarchs retake the lead 2-1 late in the second period. Lions junior Brian Bradley sandwiched a goal in between with 30 seconds to play in the opening period on an assist from classmate Peter Barker. After Vinitsky got Mashpee/Monomoy the lead in the second, Simkins finished off an assist from Hinesley and senior co-captain Colin Fader knocked home an assist from junior Ben Daigneault for a 4-1 lead after two periods. St. John Paul II junior Sawyer Horan finished off assists from sophomores Pat Connolly and Liam Gregory with 2:28 to play, but Fader iced the win for the Monarchs off assists from Sullivan and Daigneault.


jan25

NSTAR to Change Its Name

NSTAR is changing its name. The company has announced they will be known as Eversource Energy beginning February 2. They're asking customers to make bills payable to Eversource instead of NSTAR, and add that those who are billed electronically will simply see a name change. The name change will not affect account numbers.


jan25

Birding: Only the tough survive winter's chill

Winter for plants and animals in the Northeast is about survival. Prolonged cold temperatures have periodically turned tidal and near shore saltwater habitats into an ice kingdom wonderland. It is beautiful to look at but treacherous and life-threatening for waterfowl. The past two weeks have seen things go from bad to worse for many species of waterfowl. Dead ducks, geese and swans have all been encountered in the last few weeks. Common eiders, which winter in large numbers, are the most frequently encountered, expired along area shores. Mortality is part and parcel of life especially in the natural world. Should the deep freeze continue, keeping the food locked away by ice buildup from increasingly hungry (i.e. starving) waterfowl, things will only get worse. As this is being written the forecast is for moderating conditions that literally will be a lifesaver for many ducks. Is it unusual for birds to perish during the middle of the winter you may ask? Not at all is the answer. This is nature's way and a basic and necessary part of life for all species involved. Evolution at work is precisely what we are observing. Surviving winter's worst is a big part of determining a species range, numbers and entire existence. Several species of blackbirds, American robins and a few other species form large roosts at night during the winter months. They do this out of habit but also for protection from predators. The safety in numbers thing works only so well, however. These roosts are hot spots for both hawks and owls at sunset as they attempt to procure a late or early meal to sustain them through these coldest months. Birds are the most mobile of life forms. Capable of truly staggering flights and annually making stupendous migrations, birds have the ability to move to avoid severe winter weather. The catch is they must move (i.e. migrate) before the onset of said weather while abundant food and warm weather allow them to gather enough energy to make the trip. We hear a great deal about global warming. It seems apparent that winters in the Northeast have been getting milder for several decades. This is not to say that it doesn't get cold and nasty but it certainly does so with less frequency than it did 50 years ago. Consequently many birds have been lingering farther north, pushing the outside of the envelope so to speak, reducing their energy requirements by not migrating as far south as previously. The good news for most common species is that there is a great deal of latitude and diversity amongst individuals and their respective wintering grounds. For example, let's take a look at the small diving duck known as bufflehead. On the Eastern Seaboard they winter from the Maritime Provinces all the way to Mexico. The species is scarce in Florida but winters in much more commonly along the Gulf Coast.


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jan25

Meghan Trainor's star keeps rising

Meghan Trainor doesn't really dance. Onstage at Madison Square Garden for her allotted four minutes at the iHeartRadio Jingle Ball in mid-December, she fluttered her jazz hands and feinted at some hip swings, but a quartet of backup dancers in leather miniskirts did most of the moving. Trainor, in standout sequins, relied instead on her widening theater-kid eyes and high notes, keeping up with her steps deliberately, if not smoothly. She's still new at this. "You ready for the bass?" she soon asked the crowd, transitioning into her big hit to cheers of recognition. Trainor, who grew up on Nantucket (where her parents own a jewelry store) and the Cape, started last year as a behind-the-scenes songwriter but ended it as something of an accidental sensation thanks to "All About That Bass," a song originally recorded on a whim for someone else - Beyoncé, maybe? - to perform. When labels balked at the demo, telling her they did not have the right delivery vehicle for the song's mix of '50s-inspired novelty doo-wop and bubblegum hip-hop - "Yeah it's pretty clear, I ain't no size 2," she half-raps, "but I can shake it, shake it like I'm supposed to do" - Trainor herself turned it into a body-positivity smash. ("That bass" refers to her lower end.) The song quickly became a cultural phenomenon, the kind of catchy tune parents and children alike mouthed the words to, while critics considered the complications of its body politics. At the Jingle Ball, the Super Bowl of Top 40 radio, her newness was apparent next to performances by 2014's other pop titans, like the sneakily self-assured Ariana Grande, the unsinkable Iggy Azalea and, of course, Taylor Swift, the reigning queen of them all. But Trainor was formidable company on paper, with "All About That Bass" having spent eight weeks atop the Billboard Hot 100 chart and earning a Grammy nomination for record of the year and song of the year. The video has been viewed more than 450 million times on YouTube. "Lips Are Movin'," a follow-up with a similarly playful sound (and a reference to "this bass"), reached No. 4 on the charts before the release of her major-label debut, "Title" (Epic), which came out on Jan. 13 and has hit No. 1 on the Billboard Top 200. Now comes the really hard part, as Trainor attempts to transform one megahit into a performing career - one not entirely dependent on the very young fan base she's attracted thus far with her Everygirl demeanor and bright melodies. Combining the retro sound and technical proficiency of Adele and Amy Winehouse (if they wore more pastels), with the relatively safe, singsong rhymes of Azalea (sans the rap music signifiers), Trainor is a musical chameleon, fluent in many styles from her time as a hired gun writing for other artists. She also recently turned 21 and won't pretend otherwise. "I didn't want to be a Disney girl or put in that category," Trainor said over sushi at her downtown hotel the day before her brief arena showcase. "We didn't know little girls would gravitate so much to 'The Bass.'" Beyoncé recently told the singer that Blue Ivy, her 3-year-old daughter, is a big fan. "Another famous girl tweeted me the other day: 'Caught my son singin' the song - too bad I didn't catch him before the swear,'" said Trainor, who often drops her Gs and sprinkles curse words befitting her age in song and conversation. "I said, 'Sorry, boo, didn't know the babies would love it.'" "Title" has the same innocent sound - rich throwback harmonies and hand claps, ukulele and rollicking acoustic bass - but also dips further into more ribald themes on songs like "Bang Dem Sticks." "I ain't talkin' dirty," she promises self-consciously, before revealing that her "drummer" can "play all night." Other album cuts include "3 a.m.," about late-night texts, and "Walkashame," which Trainor says is based on a true story that includes an awkward 6 a.m. phone call to her father. ("He was like, 'What are you doing up so early?'" she said.) On "Dear Future Husband," Trainor tells her would-be lover, "I be sleeping on the left side of the bed," and breaks the rhyme pattern by adding coyly, "Open doors for me and you might get some kisses."


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Saturday, January 24, 2015

jan24

Growing Pats



jan24 Wellfleet

Matters of Opinion by Ira Wood: The Price Of Public Entertainment

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



jan24 Wellfleet

Public Forums on Herring River Restoration Roadway Alterations

Two Public Forums on Roadway Alterations Related to the Herring River Restoration Will be Held February 4 and February 9. Two open public meetings have been scheduled to discuss planning and design for roadway alterations in Wellfleet as part of the Herring River Restoration Project. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. "Input from the public is important before any design activities begin," says Don Palladino, President of the Friends of Herring River. The need for alterations to the roadways before normal tides are returned in the Herring River Estuary will be presented. However, the main theme of the meetings is to hear and record issues and questions from the public so these matters can be considered before any actual design begins. The first, on Wednesday February 4th will be held at 6 pm at the Wellfleet Council of Aging, 715 Old Kings Highway. The subject is a "zero percent design" to discuss approaches to elevate and replace culverts under Pole Dike Road, Old County Road and Bound Brook Road and to construct a tide control structure at Pole Dike Creek. The second open public meeting is also a "zero percent design" meeting to discuss improving tidal flow in the Herring River at High Toss Road. This meeting will be held Monday, February 9th at 6 pm at the Wellfleet Public Library, West Main Street. For information about the overall restoration project see the Friends of Herring River website - www.friendsofherringriver.org or contact the Friends' group at info@friendsofherrinngriver.org.


jan24 Wellfleet

The Original WiFi, Born On Cape Cod In 1903





It couldn't be more commonplace today, but the idea that a radio signal could be both sent through the air - and received - was an astounding technological achievement. And a crucial step towards accomplishing it was taken right here in the Bay State. The fact that you can hear WGBH News on your radio is thanks, at least in part, to an obituary. When the influential German physicist Heinrich Hertz died suddenly in 1901, the press coverage lit a spark for a brilliant young would-be inventor in Italy named Guglielmo Marconi. "He read about a laboratory experiment in which Hertz had managed to generate some kind of electronic wave which could then be picked up on the other side of his lab," said Gavin Weightman, author of Signor Marconi's Magic Box. "And it was miraculous. That gave him the idea that you could use that for communication." And so Marconi's tinkering began. Retrofitting the equipment of the day - and designing his own - Marconi figured out how to send and receive radio signals. First across a mile. Then two. Eventually, even across the English Channel. "He was intent on creating a commercial system which at one level would rival the existing electric telegraph system that already existed," Weightman said. The world was indeed wired at the time. But cables were expensive and they broke. But if Marconi's system was going to compete, he'd have to work out how to transmit across the vast Atlantic Ocean. In 1903, he came to Wellfleet on Cape Cod, determined to do just that. "It was kind of an interesting time. This foreign gentleman was coming here and negotiating with the locals to buy land and supplies. It was a big deal," said Frank Messina, vice president of the Marconi Maritime Center in Chatham. Marconi erected four huge, though crude, antennas and a transmitting station. "What was being transmitted was not voice, but was Morse Code," Messina said. "That's all he could do, there was a long dash and a short dot. A year earlier, Marconi had successfully sent a signal from Cornwall, England to Newfoundland in Canada. All he could manage was a single letter: S. But on January 18, 1903, Marconi broke the future wide open. From his station in Wellfleet, Marconi sent a full message - more than 300 letters - from U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt to King Edward VII in London. The era of real wireless communication had begun. "Very quickly it became apparent that this communication system, in a addition to the business application, competing with the cable company could be something which could communicate to ships," Messina said. Marconi's wireless was a game changer and a lifesaver for ships. They could now communicate with each other, and with stations ashore. In 1912, as the Titanic began to sink, the distress signal sent out from it's Marconi wireless was picked up by the RMS Carpathia, which rescued more than 700 survivors. "After the Titanic was lost, there was an international convention, which mandated that all ships with 50 or more passengers had to have a Marconi radio," Messina said. Breakthroughs in radio technology came fast and furious, from all quarters after 1903. As early as 1906, Reginald Fessenden was broadcasting voice and music. And while there is no shortage of trailblazers in the field, from Fessenden to Nicola Tesla, Weightman says that above them all stands Marconi. "There's no doubt, Marconi was the man who turned science, and a laboratory experiment into a huge successful industry," he said. The age of wireless communication was ushered in when Guglielmo Marconi sent the first real transatlantic message through the air to England from Cape Cod right here in Massachusetts, 112 years ago this week.

jan24 Wellfleet

What To Do in Wellfleet in the Winter?

Lots going on in Wellfleet during the quiet season this year:

  • The parking lot is always full for WHAT's winter offerings.  Check out the schedule here.

  • One more week to take in the Justice Matters exhibit honoring Martin Luther King, Jr., at Prez. Hall: Andrea Pluhar writes, "This exhibition is personal, political, spiritual, and universal. These provocative and visionary images express protest, hope, inequality, peace, justice, freedom, and outrage - harnessing the spirit of the moment and the lessons of the past."

  • Got kids? Take them bowling on January 31, 2015, 10 to 1, three hours of fun and joy at the Orleans Bowling Center. (Candlepin bowling, kid's, adult and 50/50 cash raffle. The funds raised will benefit the Wellfleet Montessori Preschool.)

  • Lola's Local Food Lab and Preservation Hall present Food On Film, which started last week with "Babette's Feast." The February film will be shown on the 12th: "Moonstruck." (For full details visit the Wellfleet Preservation Hall Web site.)

  • Amit Peled and Noreen Cassidy-Polera will present an hommage to Pablo Casals, "Same Program, Same Cello, 100 years later." Sunday, February 8th, at 2 pm, to benefit Outer Cape Health Services. First Congregational Church is the venue. There will be a Meet The Artists reception afterwards. These concerts do sell out, so purchase your tickets early.

  • Attend a wine tasting at PB, to benefit the Wellfleet Alzheimer's Association. March 2, 5-7. $35/person.

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jan24 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Cultural Council awards $7,500 for 2015

The Wellfleet Cultural Council recently announced the recipients of their 2015 grants. This year's $7,500 in funding marked the largest amount ever awarded by the council. Funds for the grants were provided by the Massachusetts Cultural Council ($4,300) and the Town of Wellfleet ($2,000). The 25 recipients represent a wide array of organizations and individuals.
Wellfleet Cultural Council Co-Chairs Paula Erickson (left) and Michelle Olem (right) recently announced the winners of the 2015 WCC grants.
The council supports the work of individual artists as well as local art groups, non-profits and community and cultural groups. Every three years the council seeks input from the community which is used to develop annual priorities. For 2015, the priorities included dance, the local and global environment, literature and poetry and music. Programs for or created by adolescents were also given priority status, according to the WCC website.

  • Alzheimer's Family Caregiver Center - Multi-Generational Chorus - $400
  • Andre Lima - Capoeira Besouro - $400
  • Barry Hellman - Celebration of National Poetry Month - $200
  • Betsy Williams - Winter Community Dances - $200
  • Broadsided Press - Broadsides on the Bus - $200
  • Cape & Islands Community Development - ArtsApp Cape Cod - $100
  • Cape Cod Children's Place - Inter-Generational Arts Enrichment - $350
  • Cape Cod Film Society - Festival of Arab/Middle Eastern Cinema - $300
  • First Congregational Church - Music in Early New England - $200
  • Harbor Stage Company - Beacon New Play Reading Series - $300
  • Herring River Restoration Project- Adventures of Allie the Alewife - $375
  • Jay DiPrima, PhD - Henry David Thoreau Lyceum Lecture Tour - $200
  • Jennifer Moller - Pools Mighty Plenitude - $300
  • Kazzrie Jaxen Jazz Quartet - Wellfleet Performance - $300
  • Mass Audubon Wellfleet Bay Sanctuary - Flying Wild Festival - $300
  • Payomet Performing Arts Center - Circus Camp - $400
  • Peregrine Theatre Ensemble - Whale Tale Theatre for Youth - $400
  • Quirky Circus/Ellen Anthony - Alphabet Soup - $200
  • Quirky Circus/Ellen Anthony - Work in Progress - $200
  • Sustainable CAPE - Wellfleet Farmer-in-the-School - $300
  • Wellfleet Elementary School - Rob Rivest Stress Reduction Show - $200
  • Wellfleet Farmer's Market - Live Music - $400
  • Wellfleet Harbor Actor's Theatre - WHAT for Kids - $400
  • Wellfleet Historical Society & Museum - Traditional Music Concert - $300
  • Wellfleet Preservation Hall - Kids at the Hall - $300
  • Wellfleet Recycling Committee -Plastic in Our Oceans Solution Kit - $275

"We were impressed with the diversity and quality of this year's applicants and congratulate all of the winners," said Wellfleet Cultural Council Co-Chair Michelle Olem. The council will host a grantee reception in the spring to honor the recipients. For more information about the Wellfleet Cultural Council, visit their website here and their Facebook page here.

jan24 Wellfleet

Hebdo: Free speech is not a damsel in distress by Brent Harold

About the Charlie Hebdo massacre, what is to be said beyond the widespread righteous indignation over what seems to most in the West a shockingly-and tragically- out-of-proportion reaction to mere cartoons? One thing seems clear, Charlie Hebdo exposes the limits and naivete of the old saying: "Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me." As the Paris tragedy shows, it is naïve to draw a distinction between real weapons and mere words. Sometimes, words-or a mocking portrayal of Prophet Muhammad- can hurt more than sticks and stones and will be reacted to accordingly. (And if we say, Come on,, words don't actually wound, who gets to decide whether they do or not? Probably those wounded.) "Use your words" is the standard parental advice to their kids in the settling of playground disputes. Civilized people do not resort to physical violence. But when the words are mocking cherished beliefs of other people, they may have the opposite of a tranquilizing effect. Presumably it would have been more sportsmanlike for Muslims wounded by insults to respond with cartoons of their own, perhaps mocking the Christian god. But in choosing between words or sticks and stones, it's naive to think that we get to dictate the choice of weapons. One limit to free speech even in a society that cherishes free speech is the exception of yelling "fire"in a crowded theater. It seems clear that mocking Islam or its prophet is in fact-to them- the equivalent of yelling fire. After a touchdown in the NFL the little dance of celebration by the one who scored is free speech; but taunting, a variety of that celebrating, is penalized, as inciting to violence. Edward Snowden's free speech in leaking secrets has been determined by the U.S. to be the equivalent of yelling "fire." Wikileaks are just words, but are deemed by those who are supposed to know such things to have the effect of sticks and stones which can hurt our nation. Free speech in this case is treason. It was a terrible ordeal for author Salman Rushdie when he fearfully hid out all those years of the fatwa against him for having exercised his free speech in a novel in a way Muslims saw as insulting and harmful to their religion. But it was perhaps naive of him to think the Muslims he had hurt would turn the other cheek. (Wrong religion, for one thing.) It seems worth asking: What's the difference between the Muslim fatwa on Rushdie and ours on Snowden, forced into hiding for his treasonous free speech? "The pen is mightier than the sword" according to another relevant old saw, and indeed why would we bother writing if there were not the chance of a sword's effectiveness? But don't be surprised if such effective speech is reacted to with a sword. Can't have it both ways. If words can have the real world efficacy of real weapons, writer's can't claim innocence and harmlessness. In the war between , say, French secular culture, with which we of the "West"-even the majority of religious among us- identify, and Islam, or at least some versions of it, both words and swords are weapons, one not more innocent than the other. As one on the side of secularity in this battle, I honor the journalists on the front line making points that I agree need to be made, fighting a worthy fight. But free speech is a warrior, not a damsel in distress, and shouldn't think of itself that way. Don't expect those whom you intend to hurt and defeat by your free speech to play by your rules. Don't expect to be able to dictate the choice of weapons.


jan24 Eastham

Cape Associates eyes church property in Eastham

A proposal to turn the former Our Lady of Visitation Catholic Church on Massasoit Road into a retail complex and to provide six single-family homes on the almost three acre site will be decided when the zoning board of appeals meets on Feb. 5 at 5 p.m. at town hall. Tom Wingard, building inspector, said the proposal, made by Matthew Cole, president of Cape Associates, and his attorney, Duane Landreth, would require variances. The property is now zoned for single family homes, not for the retail and multi-family uses proposed. Cole and Landreth appealed that decision to the ZBA on Dec. 11. Cole has a purchase and sale agreement to buy the property, for $700,000. At that hearing, proponents and opponents of the proposal voiced their views, along with the board's planner, Michael Pessolino, who said in his opinion, the building inspector was correct. Pessolino asked the applicants what they hoped to get from the board with their appeal. "I'm trying to get a decision that ultimately this project can be done by special permit, " Landreth said. "We are not seeking a variance." He argued that the former church was once an allowed use in this zone, but is now a non-conforming use, and said "non-conforming uses can be altered by special permit." Wingard's finding leaves them frustrated in their attempt to use the property, which has been vacant since 2011. It had been discontinued as Our Lady of the Visitation in 1999 and had been vacant since Our Lady of Lourdes opened in 2011 in Wellfleet. Ever since then, "it has been a problem for the town and for the Bishop of Fall River," Landreth said. "The building inspector has taken a position that doesn't make it useful to us to make an investment in this, as we would be whistling in the wind," Landeth said. The Bishop of Fall River wants to recover the investment the church made in the property, Landreth said. "It is an eyesore, a deteriorating building on more than an acre of blacktop." The church building is sound. Cole said it would cost $30,000 to demolish the church building, but he wants to reuse it, rather than take it down. Frank Szedlak, former chairman of the Eastham Affordable Housing Committee, and a member of the Our Lady of Lourdes congregation, spoke in favor of the project. The new church in Wellfleet was built with the hope that the diocese would be able to sell the former Eastham church for $700,000 and use that money, he said. "It's a hardship for the 400 members of the church to have a $2.4 million debt," Szedlak said. "I see this project as very similar to the one at Brackett Landing, which was a beautiful thing for the town. We have a drastic need for more housing in Eastham and this would give us more good housing."


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jan24 Eastham

High School Wrestling: Nauset falls to Barnstable

The Nauset boys wrestling team fought the good fight, but eventually fell to Barnstable 45-30 in a home match for the Warriors on Wednesday. Despite the loss, Nauset battled throughout including four wins by wins by pin despite being down three starters due to injury and illness. "I'm happy with the way we wrestled overall tonight. We had some good, strong performances, and that's what we were looking for." Leading the way for the Warriors was senior captain Kyle Cambone, who made quick work of his opponent in the 145-pound match, winning by way of pin less than a minute into the first period. Also winning by way of pin was Parker Morris, who won his 160-pound match in the first period as well. "He's (Morris) really wrestled well for us this season. He should do well at sectionals." Competing as a 195-pounder, LeVane Harrington also managed to pin his opponent in the opening period to score an easy win for Nauset. Other winners include Ben Parkington, who won his 138-pound match on points, defeating his opponent 13-11. Nauset's Neil Connell also out pointed his opponent, winning the 170-pound match 4-0. Coming off a tie with Sandwich last week, the Warriors will compete in the 12-team Cape Cod Invitational tournament this weekend as they now prepare for the final stretch of the regular season and the postseason beyond. Nauset will return two who placed at sectionals last year with Cambone, who placed third, and Jake Colson, who finished fourth. Colson wrestled well in a tight match on Wednesday, but eventually fell in points in the 220-pound match. "He lost but I'm happy with how he wrestled against his opponent." "We're hoping to have five guys place at sectionals this year, that's our goal." As a program, Nauset continues to look to grow, but according to Hirst, it can be difficult because of a lack of a youth and/or feeder program. "It can be tough to compete against some of the schools off-Cape that have youth programs. Another disadvantage for us is that we can't start eighth-graders, which a school like Barnstable can because they have eighth-graders in their building, we don't." Despite the lack of experience coming into the program, Hirst said he's encouraged by the high number of talented freshman who joined the team this season. "We had three freshman starting varsity for us tonight. They're coming off football season, so they were in good shape and ready to compete. In a few years, they'll be very good." The Warriors will also look to sophomore Wyatt Walker, who's accumulated a 12-1 record in the 106-pound weight class after dropping down from 113 to start the season. He also picked up the Warriors first win in the opening match against Barnstable on Wednesday night, and he also won his weight class at the Cohasset Invitational tournament last week. Nauset is 8-9-1 as a team this season, and will wrestle in a number of both dual and quad meets before the start of the Div. 3 sectional tournament, which starts Feb. 20. According to Hirst, Nauset has a shot at hosting the Div. 3 tournament next season. "It's something they're (tournament organizers) looking at."


jan24 Eastham

High schools: Warriors swimming sweeps Barnstable

The Nauset Warriors won all but three events, handing Barnstable a 112-57 loss in Friday afternoon's boys swim meet at Willy's Gym. Junior co-captain Kevin Johnson led the way for Nauset (5-0) with a pair of wins while also joining two winning relay teams. Liam Russo led the Red Raiders with a pair of wins. Johnson won the 50 freestyle in 25.07 and the 100 butterfly in 1:04.03 while joining classmate Jake Avery, freshman Jack Johnson and senior co-captain John McLoughlin in winning the opening 200 medley relay in 1:50.15, the quartet's best time of the season. The same quartet won the 200 freestyle relay with another season best time of 138.34 while the team of junior Bryan Gass, senior Tim Muse and freshman Carlisle Nash and Coleman Norton won the 400 relay in 4:07.6. Also coming away with wins for the Warriors were Jack Johnson in the 100 freestyle, in 53.9, senior Nick Smith in the 500 freestyle, in 5:55.72 and Avery in the 100 breast stroke, in 1:06.48. Barnstable senior co-captain Russo won the 200 in 1:58.41 while also capturing the 100 backstroke in 1:00.78. Alex Damiecki, a junior co-captain, won the 200 individual medley in one of the day's closer races, touching out Nauset's Jack Johnson 2:05.14 to 2:05.75. Stephen Yezukevicz, Russo, Damiecki and Connor Rogan finished second in the 200 medley relay. The Nauset girls swim defeated defeated Barnstable 118-52.Senior co-captains Hannah Walsh and Whitney Knowlton-Wardle and junior Hannah Johnson won two events each in a win for the Warriors girls over the Red Raiders. Walsh won the 100 butterfly in 59.89 and the 500 freestyle in 5:56.48, narrowly beating Barnstable eighth grader Hannah Geoffrion (5:58.17). Knowlton-Wardle won the 200 freestyle in a state qualifying time of 2:10.87 and the 100 freestyle in 59.89. Johnson took the 50 freestyle, edging out Red Raiders' junior Caroline Ells 26.09 to 26.95 while also winning the 100 backstroke in 1:03.83. Walsh and Johnson joined sophomores Brooke Linnell and Nika Dadoly in winning the opening 200 medley relay in 2:03.55 while Walsh and Johnson combined with senior co-captain Kara Smith and freshman Katie Walters in taking the 400 relay in 4:05.68. Nauset also won the 200 freestyle relay with the team of Knowlton-Wardle, Linnell, Dadoy and Smith with a time of 1:53.85. Walters added a win in the 200 IM for the Warriors with a time in 2:31.07. Ells earned the Red Raiders' lone win, taking the 100 breast stroke in 1:17.89. The team of Kylie Sheehan, Ells, Grace Kilroy and Hannah Lancaster finished second in the 200 freestyle relay for Barnstable with a sectional qualifying time of 2:07.58. The Red Raiders also qualified for sectionals in the 400 freestyle relay.


jan24 Truro

Truro's Highland Light to receive first phase of repairs this winter

Highland Light is more than a Truro treasure. It is a national treasure. Considered one of the most important destinations within the Cape Cod National Seashore, the historic lighthouse was recently found to have some serious structural damage, but the good news is that it will be open to visitors this summer. Sue Moynihan, chief interpreter for the Seashore, said the lighthouse, which was built in 1857, has several major structural problems that the Seashore is addressing in a phased approach. The Seashore, which took ownership of the lighthouse soon after it was moved back from an eroding cliff in 1996, last year secured funding to have a team of experts examine the structure, which was exhibiting telltale cracks. Working over a period of 10 months in 2014, the team installed censors to measure temperature and humidity and monitor cracks, and drilled into the walls to examine mortar and masonry. What they discovered was a third wall between the exterior and interior walls that had been built into the lighthouse when it was constructed (to replace an earlier lighthouse built in 1797) in order to provide ventilation. That structural ventilation system was inadvertently compromised when the lighthouse was moved in 1996. In preparation for the move, workers inserted a grout layer between the walls to stabilize the base. What took years to discover is that the additional grout caused a ventilation problem, allowing moisture to built up between the walls. In addition, a ventilation system at the top of the tower stopped functioning, and at the same time, many of the layers of paint coating the exterior of the tower are of a non-breathable variety that caused more moisture to be trapped in the walls. "It really does come down to moisture," Moynihan said. While "The lighthouse is not in danger of falling," one structural problem caused by the moisture is a corroding support beam that makes it unsafe for visitors to climb the tower. Seashore officials put together a phased plan of attack, scheduling the most critical work - stabilizing that support beam - for this winter so that the lighthouse can be reopened to visitors in time for summer. Moynihan said the Seashore was able to secure $50,000 in "outside funding" from the National Park Service's Philadelphia office, to perform the first phase of the work. "They realized that having the lighthouse open was of great importance," she said. During the Seashore's last fiscal year, from Oct. 1, 2013 to Sept. 30, 2014, the lighthouse hosted 28,000 visitors who came to climb the tower. Moynihan said Seashore officials will request funding over the next three fiscal years to complete the rest of the work, which will include addressing the ventilation issues, repairing windows and removing all the layers of outer coating and repainting it with breathable coating.


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jan24 Provincetown

Solar project to debut Monday at Provincetown landfill

A new solar project is about to begin collecting rays and saving dollars at the transfer station. At a ceremony Monday at 3:30 p.m., town officials will mark the completion of the 152-kilowatt photovoltaic project at the town's capped landfill. The solar energy will feed into the electric grid, and NStar will give the town credit for the energy created. Credits are expected to save the municipality $400,000 over the next 20 years, said Austin Brandt, Provincetown's energy manager. The upfront cost of the project to the town? Zero, he said. But the developer, New York-based G&F Solar Installers LLC, will be paid 7 cents per kilowatt-hour, said Liz Argo, special projects coordinator for the Cape and Vineyard Electric Cooperative. With the credits given for the electricity created by the solar project, the town will still save money. Provincetown now joins nearly every Cape Cod town by having solar arrays on their capped landfills, Argo said. Most towns - except Truro and Wellfleet - are also members of CVEC, she said. These members are expected to benefit from a surplus of solar power. Towns such as Harwich, for example, have such large photovoltaic projects that they cannot use all of the credits, so they can give away extra net metering credits, Argo said. Those benefiting from excess credit, known as off-takers, will be able to save even more, Argo explained. As one of the off-takers or benefactors of the excess credits, Provincetown is projected to save over $1 million in electricity costs over the next 20 years, Brandt said. "The Provincetown one is pretty small, relative to other projects," Brandt said. "Some of our projects are over 1 megawatt." One megawatt equals 1 million watts, and a kilowatt equals 1,000 watts, he explained. "There was not a lot of opportunities to build in Provincetown because there's not a lot of public land, so this was a creative solution," Argo said. The solar power market in Massachusetts has boomed following incentive programs offered under former Gov. Deval Patrick's administration, Argo said. The state's Clean Energy Center this week announced the end of the Commonwealth Solar II program, an incentive program targeting residential solar development. The program provided rebates for more than 13,000 solar electric systems at homes, public buildings, and small businesses across the commonwealth since 2010, according to an announcement from MassCEC. But the incentives are no longer necessary since installation prices for small-scale solar systems have fallen nearly 30 percent since the program's inception, according to the announcement. "This program was launched to help drive down the price of small solar electric systems in Massachusetts, and with prices dropping significantly over the past several years, the time is right to phase out this successful program," said Alicia Barton, MassCEC chief executive officer.


jan24 Provincetown

New to the Provincetown Art Association & Museum collection

During the past year, the Provincetown Art Association & Museum has been acquiring 100 new pieces for their permanent collection in honor of its centennial year. The goal is nearly complete and the results are on display. A potluck opening reception for the show, "Recent Gifts to the Collection, Part IV," begins at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 23. The Art Association is located at 460 Commercial St. The show runs through March 15.


jan24 Provincetown

What's the deal with diatoms?

What's it all about, algae? You might never have wondered that but Beth Larson, research assistant at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, does. Next week she'll be speaking on "Phytoplankton, Cirque du Soleil in Cape Cod Bay," a talk she described as "Phytoplankton 101." Larson's prime work is whale research but when the opportunity arises she likes to sample the plankton in Cape Cod Bay to see what is there and when. "We've done some monitoring of and on over the years," Larson explained. "I've been working the last five years in identifying and getting population density changes because the species change over time. But I also have to set it aside to focus on right whales feeding and then the focus is on zooplankton." The right whales feed primarily on copepods, especially of the species Calanus, that are in the zooplankton. They aren't vegetarians; they don't eat phytoplankton, which are too small to be caught by their filtering process. The Center has done occasional phytoplankton surveys but since their focus is on whales the attention has gone to whale food. Larson coordinates with the water quality program and right whale program to get data and then compares it to other seasons, the zooplankton levels and right whale behavior. Phytoplankton contain chlorophyll and other pigments and actually have a lot more variety in their make-up and lifecycles than conventional land plants. "They are the basis for the food web," Larson noted. "I don't know if people appreciate how complex they are. It's a miracle what they do. They turn sunlight into sugar. We are so dependent on primary producers. Phytoplankton in the ocean are responsible for 50-percent of the oxygen in the atmosphere." It was green algae, migrating onto land, that gave rise to he mosses, trees and wildflowers. Why if brown algae or red algae had thrived on land perhaps all our lawns would be crimson. "I want to learn more," said Larson. "Given the chance to do that I'd monitor the phytoplankton systematically and see what happens in the spring bloom compared to other years." Getting good samples isn't that easy. "We can use a plankton tow net but generally the nets get clogged up and you're not going to get good numbers for density," she explained. "So we do a whole water sample and drop a Niskin model sampler to a depth to see what's going on deeper. We have to let it settle so we can concentrate the sample. There are more advanced ways but there's value to the old fashioned way. It's a bit slower to count under the microscope but it's a good accurate look. But it's just a snapshot of a snapshot."


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jan24 Provincetown

Provincetown Police Blotter

During the 4-week period of Monday, December 8, 2014 to Monday, January 5, 2015, the officers of the Provincetown Police Department responded to 1,131 calls for service. Over the four weeks, there was one reported assault, 7 disturbances (one arrest) and one report of harassment. Seven summons services were attempted (2 made), three warrant services were attempted (one arrest) and two restraining order services were attempted (2 made). There were 16 suspicious activity calls including one in a car on Province Lands Road and one involving hot dogs. Officers were called in to keep the peace on one occasion. There were 8 reports of larceny/forgery/fraud (one arrest for shoplifting) and 2 reported burglaries/break-ins, one having taken place in the past. Officers investigated one open/unsecured door. There were 56 medical/emergency calls, one rescue assist and one medical/psychological call. There was one sudden death and one unattended death during the month. There were 22 complaints, including one hunting complaint. There were 5 bike-related calls, one license revocation notification, one reported IRS phone scam and one report of syringes found on Route 6. There were 32 general alarms, 2 residential burglar alarms, one commercial burglar alarm, 8 fire alarms and one medical alert alarm. There were 2 reports of property damage and 9 landlord tenant disputes. There were 20 animal calls including 2 injured foxes, one dead seal, one dead fox, one dog bite, one loose dog, one report of a seal stuck on the breakwater and one report about someone feeding wildlife. Officers assisted the Truro Police Department on 2 occasions and other agencies/mutual aid on 13 occasions (one arrest). There were three fires (one structural, one structural/electrical and one chimney). Officers conducted 4 bar checks and 73 park, walk and talks. Twenty-one citizens were assisted including 3 well being checks and one reassurance check. Fifty-four motorists were pulled over and 6 citations were issued. There was one OUI arrest. There were 115 additional motor vehicle-related calls including traffic observation, hazards and disabled vehicles (one citation). There were 11 motor vehicle complaints (one arrest) and 7 parking complaints (2 citations). There were 7 arrests and 9 motor vehicle accidents.


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jan24 Brewster

Brewster Ice Rink Returns

After a year or two off due to warm weather the Brewster Community Ice Rink is back in front of Town Hall on Route 6A. The rink rules and policies include: skate at your own risk, rink is open during daylight hours, use caution when entering or exiting the rink, no street shoes on the ice, no horseplay or speed-skating, no food or drink on ice, no drugs or alcohol. The rules may change to provide safe skating for all enjoy. The rink may not be reserved for private use. Please contact the Brewster Recreation Department with any questions or comments.


jan24 Brewster

Environmental Art Program in Brewster

The Barnstable County AmeriCorps Cape Cod are running an after-school program at Eddy Elementary titled "Creative eARTh." Each day AmeriCorps volunteers will have fun projects for kids to create with recycled materials and learn about the environment. Register at Brewsterrecreation.com. The programs are free, but you must register and space is limited. Grades 3 through 5 are invited to try out the program in two drop-in dates; Wednesday Feb. 4, creating a pencil/toothbrush holder from cedar and on Wednesday Feb. 11, creating recycled art with a Valentine's Day theme. Both days will be held at Eddy Elementary, from 2 to 3 p.m. Kids will be signed out from school by the Brewster Rec Staff. This 6-week afterschool program ncludes activities about camouflage, creating nature scenes, bees and pollination, water and the aquifer, and more and will run from March 4, to April 8.


jan24 Brewster

Art Exhibit at Brewster Library

During February the Brewster Ladies' Library will present an art exhibition by Liz Perry and Carl Ahlstrom. The exhibit features watercolors, monotype prints, collagraph prints, and oil and acrylic paintings, mostly inspired by the artists' gardens. The public is invited to a reception on Sunday, Feb. 1 from 2 to 4 p.m.


jan24 Brewster

Input on Brewster Cemetery Rules Sought

The Cemetery Commission is in the process of reviewing and upgrading the rules and regulations for the cemeteries within their jurisdiction. They are requesting input from the citizens of Brewster. Suggestions to improve the appearance of town cemeteries would be appreciated. Interested parties can mail comments to Tom Rogers, Chairman Cemetery Commission, 2198 Main Street, Brewster, MA 02631.


jan24 Brewster

Brewster Swap Shop Closed

The Brewster Swap Shop is temporarily closed, as of Jan. 15. They are awaiting a new wood stove and expect to reopen sometime in February.


jan24 Chatham

Chatham Fire ice rescue training

Chatham Fire Rescue's Surface Water Rescue Team (SWRT) spent the last two days training for cold and ice water rescues. This intensive two day Ice Rescue Technician program was a recertification for most. Team members use multiple tools and techniques to rescue people and animals on or through the ice. Remember no ice is safe ice unless you are at the skating rink.


jan24 Chatham

Chatham COA cinema

On Monday, Jan. 26, at 1:15 p.m. the council on aging will sponsor a showing of "Calendar Girls." The comedy/drama is based on a true story that depicts the adventures of a group of British homemakers who decide to pose for a nude calendar to raise money for the local hospital after one of the women loses her husband to cancer. The cast includes Helen Mirren. For those who want lunch before hand it is $7 and includes Chicken and Shrimp Alfredo, mixed green salad with a balsamic vinaigrette. Call the COA to register for both by the Friday before by calling 508-945-5190.


jan24 Chatham

Missing puppies in Chatham

A reader has reported her two year-old Lab pups have been missing from South Chatham since Monday, Jan. 12, litter siblings, Lucy, yellow female and Toby, a black male. The puppies are not wearing collars but are microchipped. There were two sightings, unconfirmed last Wednesday and Thursday in Harwich. The owner is worried the puppies may have fallen through ice on a local pond, are trapped somewhere, are injured or have been stolen. She is offering a reward. If you have any information, call 508 246-9334.


jan24 Harwich

Retiree started new life as Cape pantry founder

Some people take up golf or bird watching when they retire. D-Day veteran and telephone company manager George Morris helped start a food pantry that has fed thousands and thousands of Cape Codders since opening 25 years ago. People associated with the Family Pantry of Cape Cod in Harwich said Friday that Morris, who died at his Harwich home Wednesday at age 89, will be remembered for his selfless ways. "Truly he was a saint living among us. He gave up his retirement for his fellow Cape Codders," said Richard Waystack of Harwich, who serves on the pantry's board. "He didn't believe in turning people away," said Amy Camenga, president of the pantry's board. "George just had a really sweet unique way about him." Morris started the pantry at a small storefront on Route 28 in Harwich with three other parishioners from the Holy Trinity Church a quarter of a century ago and eight to 10 volunteers. Two moves later, the 12,000-square-foot pantry building now located on Queen Anne Road contains a warehouse that serves as a distribution point for the Greater Boston Food Pantry on Cape Cod as well as gardens and a free clothing "boutique," Waystack and Camenga said. It has 400 volunteers and serves about 1,200 households a month, Camenga said. Morris, whose daughter Mary Morris Anderson now runs the pantry, has served as pantry president, general manager, director and warehouse manager. "George did everything at that pantry," Waystack said. "He just slowed down in the last two years." According to Morris' obituary, he tapered off his work after heart surgery. Camenga said the pantry board named him "director emeritus" so he could continue to attend board meetings when he chose. "He was a tremendous example of what you need to do to help others," Camenga said. A graduate of Putnam High School in Springfield, Morris enlisted in the Navy in 1943 and served aboard the USS Davis in the North Atlantic during the D-Day operation, according to his obituary. On his return home Morris went to work for the New England Telephone Company, ending up in Yarmouth close to where he retired with his wife Mary, who shared the Barnstable County's Human Rights Commission Cornerstone Award with him. In addition to his wife and daughter, Morris is also survived by a son, Stephen Morris, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by an infant son. The funeral Mass is being held at 11 a.m. today at Holy Trinity Church in West Harwich.


jan24 Harwich

Swan release in Harwich

A swan, rescued from the ice by Harwich firefighters a couple of weeks ago, was released at Hinckleys Pond in Harwich on 1/23/15 after a stint in rehab at Wild Care Cape Cod.



jan24

As surf claws into Cape and Islands beaches, state looks for solutions

Six out of 23 "hot spots" for erosion in the state are on the Cape and Islands and the region accounts for more than half of the coastline vulnerable to pounding surf and wind, according to a new study. The Massachusetts Coastal Erosion Commission issued the report earlier this month that it hopes will provide a better understanding of the shrinking shoreline. The exhaustive 134-page report was compiled over the past year by the 12-member commission, which includes two Cape members - Paul Schrader of Sandwich and Patricia Hughes of Brewster. The commission is accepting written feedback on its report over the next three months and is holding a series of five public hearings, including one next month at Barnstable Town Hall. "I've been extremely impressed by the quality of people involved," said Schrader, who joined the commission while its work was in progress. "There's an incredible amount of work... Lots of questions were raised and the answers were exquisite from what I saw." Hughes was not available for comment. The commission was established in 2013 by the Legislature to investigate and document the levels and impacts of coastal erosion. The commission is responsible for developing strategies to "reduce, minimize or eliminate the magnitude and frequency of coastal erosion and adverse impacts on property, infrastructure, public safety, and beaches and dunes." According to the report, Cape Cod and the Islands have the largest stretch of shoreline of the five regions identified in the report. The Cape, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket account for 615 miles of shoreline, more than half of the 1,115 total miles of shoreline identified in the report. Some 27 percent of the state's coastline is protected by engineered structures but, despite its vast shoreline, only 13 percent of the Cape and Islands coast is protected by publicly or privately owned seawalls, jetties, revetments or groins, according to the report.



An analysis of short-term erosion rates shows Yarmouth has experienced the most significant loss of coastline at 8.7 feet per year and West Tisbury the least at .99 feet per year, but there are some areas within cities and towns that are particularly hard hit by erosion, and in all instances beaches that face northeast are more susceptible to pounding wind and waves. Hot spots for erosion on the Cape and Islands identified in the report include Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Chapin Beach in Dennis, Siasconset on Nantucket, Wasque Point in Edgartown, Inkwell Beach in Oak Bluffs and Barges Beach on Gosnold. Coastal damage since 1978 has cost $370 million in property damage, according to the report, which looked at both Federal Emergency Management Agency and flood insurance claims. The bulk of that damage was done by the Blizzard of '78 and Hurricane Bob in '91. The report also looks ahead and estimates the potential for $7.2 billion in damages, though that figure includes the total replacement cost for all buildings in harm's way. The commission concludes that climate change and sea level rise must be factored into any plans for dealing with erosion issues. Feedback from public hearings will be used to "identify themes or needs (that) should be emphasized or included," Peter Lorenz, a spokesman for the state Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, wrote in an email. Schrader said he believes the report will result in action. "I'm going to have to believe that somewhere we're going to have to come up with the money," he said. "I would encourage those in coastal communities to read the reports and if they have questions to go to one of these meetings. I see this as another step forward in making progress with these issues."





jan24

Grants aid innovative programs at Cape Cod schools

Teachers from 43 Cape and Islands schools received small but important financial boosts for a range of educational initiatives at a recent ceremony at Cape Cod Community College. The Cape Cod Five Foundation's 15th annual Educational Mini-Grants program distributed 89 gifts of between $125 and $500, totaling approximately $40,000. "The idea is to provide small grants to teachers who want to do creative things," said David Willard, community relations director of the Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank, which operates the foundation. He said the selection committee combed through about 165 applications this year, choosing a variety of programs aimed at improving literacy, community service, extracurricular opportunities, and a host of other educational goals. "There really are very few not-good applications, so it's.a challenge," said Executive Vice President Bert Talerman. "They range from clever ways to show kids how important math is, to science projects, to art projects, to renewable projects. It runs the gamut." Thanks to the grants, students of various levels will have new incentives and opportunities to read. Wellfleet Elementary will continue distributing free books to young readers through its Early Literacy Fundamentals program, and West Barnstable Elementary's Read to Me system will encourage parents to read to their children by rewarding students with book charms. The West Tisbury School will focus on early intervention for children with trouble reading. The Little Library Trail Houses program at Cape Cod Regional Technical High School will establish small outdoor structures filled with books and other learning materials for preschoolers, in the process giving students at the high school a chance to practice carpentry, horticulture, and early childhood education. Barnstable High School's Poetry Slam Team will host visiting poets, hold workshops, and travel to public readings and competitions. The library at Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School will begin building a collection of books suitable for eighth-graders, who joined the school last year. Students newspapers at Wareham High School and The Edgartown School also received funds. The grants will also make possible programs geared toward science and technology. A number of schools will use the increasingly complex LEGO engineering kits and software to engage students. Funds will contribute to students at Monomy Regional High School building and testing their own remotely operated underwater vehicles, which will then be entered in a regional competition. Stargazing will be aided at Barnstable High and Harwich Elementary Schools, and students at D-Y will design and build rockets. The Cape Cod Collaborative's Waypoint Academy at Joint Base Cape Cod will have both a science fair and a system to collect rainwater for the school's vegetable garden, avoiding the area's polluted aquifer. The Henry T. Wing School in Sandwich will hold a program for preschoolers at the Cape Cod Children's Museum called I Am a Scientist, promoting critical thinking, problem solving, and scientific concepts.


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jan24

WCAI Weekly News Roundup: Cape Wind's Future Uncertain; More Church Abuse Lawsuits; Ferry Rate Hike


WCAI News Director Sean Corcoran and local journalists review the top regional news stories of the week. Sean's guests include Cape Cod Times reporter George Brennan; Cape Cod Chronicle Editor Tim Wood; Mashpee Enterprise reporter Geoff Spillane; Nelson Sigelman, editor of the Martha's Vineyard Times; New Bedford Standard Times Editorial Page Editor Jim DeArruda; and Provincetown Banner Editor Sally Rose. Among the stories they discuss this week: the future of the Cape Wind project remains uncertain; Orleans changes the rules for dogs on the beach; a new coastal erosion report seeks answers to the changing seashore; the coordinator of the Barnstable County Human Rights Commission keeps her job; the cost of a Chatham airport garage could top $1 million; and a Youth Task Force report has some interesting numbers about drug and alcohol use on Martha's Vineyard.




jan24 Plymouth

Denial of petition to close reactors raises ire of Pilgrim watchdogs

Federal regulators have denied a petition, filed a month after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011, that called for suspending the licenses for the 22 GE Mark 1 boiling water reactors operating in the U.S., like the one at Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth. Spokesman Neil Sheehan said, via email, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based its denial "on the fact that all of the concerns have been evaluated and do not pose any immediate safety concerns at the Mark 1 plants." Federal regulators issued a series of orders requiring numerous changes at the Mark 1 plants in reaction to what happened in Japan, Sheehan said. "Some of these requirements have since been acted upon, while others are still in the process of being implemented," the spokesman said, citing the seismic and flooding reassessments that are underway. Sheehan noted other changes, such as installation of a hard venting system needed to channel combustible gases in a severe accident, take longer to design and install. "Nevertheless the work is continuing," he wrote. Petitioners disagreed. "The long recognized public health and safety hazards of these reactors, so vividly and tragically demonstrated by the events at Fukushima, are far from being resolved," said Paul Gunter in a written statement. Gunter is director of reactor oversight at Beyond Nuclear, the group that initiated the petition. Ultimately that petition drew 10,000 co-signers, including the Cape Downwinders, a citizens group opposed to Pilgrim. Gunter characterized changes instituted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as "inadequate half measures that need not be fully implemented for years to come, if ever." Diane Turco, co-founder of the Downwinders, expressed her frustration at the fate of the petition when contacted Friday. "The NRC is criminally negligent to allow Entergy to continue operating the GE Mark 1 Pilgrim reactor, knowing that it has the same failed designed containment structure as the damaged Fukushima reactors," Turco wrote in an email. The Downwinder said the Plymouth nuclear plant should be closed. "Our government has failed the people by not demanding so."






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