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Thursday, March 26, 2015

mar26 Wellfleet-Eastham-Truro-Provincetown

CapeCast: Ten beaches in two minutes

On today's CapeCast: It was such a beautiful morning we decided to visit ten Outer Cape beaches and get psyched up for summer!



mar26 Wellfleet

State to install rumble strips on sections of Route 6 in Wellfleet

Installation of centerline rumble strips on sections of Route 6 in Wellfleet to help curb head-on crashes caused by driver distraction is expected to be completed by Memorial Day. A handful of citizens have expressed concerns, though, about the noise of the rumble strips, their location and whether they will help. "I believe in rumble strips, but they need to put them where the accidents are," resident Sylvia Smith said. The rumble strips will be installed in three sections, according to a presentation given by representatives of the state Department of Transportation's highway division on Tuesday at a Board of Selectmen's meeting. The first section will be from the Eastham town line to Castagna Drive, the second will run from Lieutenant Island Road to Old County Road and the third from north of Main Street to north of Wellfleet Woods Lane. The installation comes after recent meetings between town and county officials, highway division representatives and state police in the wake of four crashes in August and November. Two people were killed in the crashes, and one nonfatal crash resulted in an hours-long traffic tie-up from the Orleans Rotary to Truro. The rumble strips allow state highway officials to avoid studies that could take longer, Department of Transportation assistant project development engineer Bill Travers said. Route 6 is two lanes through Wellfleet, with wide, paved shoulders. Vehicles from private properties and side streets have direct access to the highway, and the speed limit is 45 mph. There are a mix of passing and no-passing zones along the 7-mile stretch. The four selectmen present Tuesday voted unanimously to ask state highway officials to proceed with the rumble strips. "This was viewed as an experiment," board Chairman Paul Pilcher said before the vote. "There might be more extensive work done in the future. This is not necessarily the final product." The centerline rumble strips are 1-inch grooves ground into the pavement. The work will take a couple of weeks to complete, Travers said. Rumble strips are a "proven method" for distracted drivers because those drivers hear the noise of their tires on the strips and feel the vibration, he said. But the biggest complaint could come from residents along the the road about that noise. "They make noise, and that's the intent," Travers said. The distance that the sound will carry depends, in part, on the level of quiet overall in an area of town, the time of day and the types of screening from the road such as trees, Travers said. "There are a lot of neighborhoods in that area," resident Donna McCaffery said Tuesday. "I don't know how far the sound travels." Resident Curt Felix wondered about the data that support the use of rumble strips to reduce crashes, and about the location of the strips. "Some of the recent fatalities occurred in areas where the rumble strips are not going to be installed," he said. "Clearly that's a concern for me." The contributing factors for accidents include driver inattentiveness, driver medical conditions, the older design of the road and the increased number of vehicles, local public safety officials said. On Aug. 16, an hours-long traffic jam from Eastham to Truro resulted from a head-on collision at Wendon Way in South Wellfleet. That area will not receive the strips, according to informational materials provided by the state highway division. That area is excluded because passing is allowed, Wellfleet Police Chief Ronald Fisette said. On Aug. 19, Wende Harrison, 54, of North Eastham, died when the taxi she was driving southbound on Route 6 crossed into the northbound lane near Kerouach Road, striking two vehicles, likely because she had a medical condition. That area will receive the strips. On Nov. 15, a two-car crash caused a rollover, with minor injuries, in a section of the highway just south of the Route 6 and Main Street intersection. In the same area, two hours later, another two-car crash, at 2586 Route 6, led to the death of Lucille Francoeur, 76, of Warwick, Rhode Island. Both crashes occurred in an area of Route 6 that will not receive the strips. The town will ask state highway officials to look at the Route 6 passing zones in the future, Fisette said.


mar26 Wellfleet

Songwriter Stage: Catie Flynn & Out Late with Diane Di Gioia

Catie Flynn is a singer songwriter born and raised on Cape Cod, and winner of the 2010 "Cape Cod Songwriters Competition. She attended Berklee College of Music in Boston where she studied voice and music business. Upon graduating from Berklee Catie moved to Nashville Tennessee. While in Nashville Catie toured with her Americana group The Fireman's Daughter. The Fireman's Daughter released an EP entitled "Road to Tennessee"(available on itunes.) Now back on the Cape, Catie can be seen playing locally and around the northeast region both solo and with her new ensemble, The Catie Flynn Band. In 2013, Catie release her solo album entitled "Let Me Down Slow". Out Late's Diana Di Gioia is known for smart, funny and irreverent lyrics. The Cape Cod times calls her songs "Finely honed narratives with telling deails sung with confidence and determination."


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mar26 Wellfleet

Contemporary folk meets country at Prez Hall

Two favorite local singer-songwriters, Catie Flynn and Diana Di Gioia, share the stage at Wellfleet Preservation Hall on Saturday, March 28. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Born and raised on the Cape, Flynn attended Berklee College of Music before touring the country as a solo artist and with the ensemble The Catie Flynn Band. In 2013, she released her solo album "Let Me Down Slow" and signed with a Nashville-based publishing company. Di Gioia is known for her smart, irreverent lyrics. She and her band Out Late recorded two albums, the first of which was featured on the American Public Radio series "This Way Out." Tickets, $12, are available at the door. Prez Hall is located at 335 Main St. in Wellfleet. For details, go to wellfleetpreservationhall.org or call (508) 349-1800.


mar26 Wellfleet

Independent Documentary Series: THE WRECKING CREW

Prez Hall is pleased to announce 2 screenings of this wonderful film about the talents behind some of the greatest songs produced in the 1960's. When it first came up on our radar we just knew audiences here on the Cape would love to see this film about great musicians and great music. The Wrecking Crew were a group of Studio Musicians in Los Angeles in the 60s who played on hits for the "Beach Boys, Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, Jan & Dean, The Monkees, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, Mamas and Papas, Tijuana Brass, Ricky Nelson, Johnny Rivers and were Phil Spector's Wall of Sound. The amount of work that they were involved in was tremendous. They were also involved in groups that I like to call, The Milli Vanilli's of the day. A producer would get the guys in and lay down some instrumental tracks. If it became a hit, they would record an album and put a group together to go on the road. This happened many times with groups like the Marketts, Routers, and T-Bones. The next day they would do the same thing and call it another name. Same musicians, but different group Name. At the time the record industry was primarily in New York, London and Detroit in the late 50's and early 60s. Then there was a surge towards the mid-60s that pushed the recording to the west Coast. So these musicians were recording around the clock for a good 8 years. It's hey day for this group was in 1967 when the charts turned to the west.


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mar26 Wellfleet

SPAT Proposal Approved - 15th Annual Wellfleet OysterFest is On!

The Wellfleet Board of Selectmen approved the proposal submitted by SPAT at Town Meeting on Tuesday evening. SPAT offered to pay a town use fee of $3000 with an additional contribution from $10,000 - $15,000 toward a project that is both consistent with SPAT's mission and benefits the taxpayers of Wellfleet. Prospective projects will be collaboratively identified and reviewed by the Wellfleet Select Board and SPAT. SPAT will have final determination, as this project must also fulfill the organizational mission.


mar26 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Harbor Stage Company 2015 Season

Subscriptions on sale here. A lyrical, classical text An experimental, new work A modern, edgy drama: There's something for everyone in our 2015 summer season.


By Henrik Ibsen adapted and directed by Robert Kropf
June 18 - Jul 11
By Jonathan Fielding and Brenda Withers
a world premiere
July 16 - Aug 8
by Lisa D'Amour
a Boston regional premiere directed by Daisy Walker
Aug 14 - Sept 4
Torvald and Nora have finally found wedded bliss and financial security - but Nora's great secret threatens to uproot their happiness. This elegant new version of an enduring classic explores the struggle for authenticity within the confines of an artificial society. Trapped underground after a deadly collapse, a miner finds his salvation in the arrival of an adventure-seeking first responder. An intimate portrait of mortality, memory, and redemption, this original play is written expressly for the Harbor Stage Company. Good neighbors are hard to find. In this fiercely funny, Pulitzer Prize-nominated take on the dissolving American Dream, two very different couples try to bridge the gap between suburban civility and our hearts' desires.

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mar26 Wellfleet

Fasten your seat belts, it's going to be an exciting season in Wellfleet

Edgy. That's the word Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater audiences have come to associate with the shows that grace its Julie Harris stage. But what does that mean? For the 2015 season, it means innovative productions that should make you laugh, cry and especially think. "We've always been looked at as cutting edge, and stuff like that," says Jeffry George, WHAT's executive artistic director. "I like to think that we're not about being cutting edge, but we are risk takers." The theater has a jam-packed season with six plays on the Harris stage plus a WHAT for Kids show in its outdoor tent, a music series and a variety of other offerings. As for the plays, the season launched with "Around the World in 80 Days," which premiered March 12, and runs through March 29. "One of the hottest tickets on Broadway [in early 2012]," says George, Theresa Rebeck's "Seminar" runs May 14-June 13. WHAT's artistic associate Christopher Ostrom says he's very excited to be part of the show's production here, having designed and run the sound and lights for a 2013 production at the Stoneham Theatre north of Boston. "Anyone in any creative field will be able to relate to the politics of getting ahead," says Ostrom. A new stage adaptation by James Armstrong, "Moby Dick" gets a world premiere June 18 through July 18. "This version is different than your standard storytelling of it," says Ostrom. "The writing is brilliant. It has a theatrical flair when you hear the words. We didn't want it to sound like an audio-book, but the writing supports the beautiful theatricality of it all on stage." On July 6, "The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship" opens in the WHAT for Kids tent. Written and directed by What for Kids impresario Stephen Russell, the show runs through Aug. 27. "It's rare that Stephen repeats things," says George, "but this was so popular, the audience enjoyed it so much we decided to bring it back, and there have been a few updates and some tweaks since its 2008 run." Back in the main theater, "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill," by Lanie Robertson, runs July 23 through Aug. 22. Ostrom and George say they wanted to do "Lady Day" because it is the 60th anniversary of Billie Holiday's performance at the Atlantic House in Provincetown, and it would have been her 100th birthday this year.


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mar26 Wellfleet

The Lowdown by Ira Wood: Joan Anderson and Laura Goodenow of "A Year By The Sea"

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



mar26 Wellfleet

Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: March, the In-between Time, Brings a Test of Patience

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. He has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday morning at 8:35am and Tuesday afternoon at 5:45pm. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.





This is the waiting time, the in-between time, when the advancing sun tells us that the back of this endless winter is broken, but the concrete signs of spring are still far and wee: a few ghost-like calls of clustered peepers in the bogs; the sole cardinal or a Carolina wren's strident song, the first scattered flashes of daffodil sprouts on a still-sere hillside. Spring has officially taken possession of our land this week. Temperatures stay up above 40 at night, a southwest wind roars like a black river around the house, and the new moon sails higher, fuller, and later each night through the bedroom window. Winter's melted snow waters the earth in rivulets. In the bog at the bottom of the kettle hole the last of the old ice lies under a half foot of new meltwater, yellowed and rotten like moldy cheese. The water is as sweet and clear to the taste, though as yet nothing moves on its surface but the fingers of the wind. Early spring is a time of disappointment and impatience, especially here, where the ocean is so reluctant to cool down during our long, warm autumns, but now just as stubbornly resists giving up the chill of winter. Our trees still show no sign of greening, or yellowing, or red-budding. Their limbs and twigs seem somehow even more bare than they did a month ago when we had no expectations of them. There is an unsettling sense of openness at this season. The climbing sun creates more space, shortening winter's long shadows, so that we are more aware of the inadequacy of the few visual and audible signs of the new season to fill it up. The land lags behind the light here and the high sun makes everything look tardy. Part of this sense of emptiness comes from the unmuffling of our senses, as we slough off our winter coats, hats, scarves, gloves, boots, parkas, sweaters, and long johns. Our newly-exposed flesh is more open to sounds, sights, touch, and smell, but that only makes us more aware of the dearth as yet of things to fill up our expectations. We long to exercise our newly-minted senses. Having molted our wintery filters, we want to gorge on this openness, feast on this new sharpness of perception. We want to hold the newly-unfrozen soil in our palms, to crush and smell its earthy perfume. Early spring is the time of awakening, not just of the earth's plants and animals, but of ourselves as well. We become aware, not just of what is around us, but of ourselves, as individuals. At this season every creature becomes sharply self-aware, asserting its distinct identity through song or display, sheer joy or rapt emergence. We want to sacrifice ourselves to the season's newness, to be scarred and bruised again by direct contact with the earth, for we somehow already sense that summer will come soon enough with its heavy warmth and thick foliage, cloaking and muffling the known world, shutting us up inside ourselves once again.


mar26 Wellfleet-Eastham-Truro-Orleans-Chatham-Harwich

Comment period extended for herbicide use along Cape Cod power lines

The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources has extended the comment period on a utility's plan to use herbicides to control vegetation along its power lines on Cape Cod. Comments had been due March 27 but the deadline has been extended by 45 days. The new deadline to submit comments is by the close of business on Monday, May 11. As part of its Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) program, NStar - which has since changed its name to Eversource - seeks to apply herbicides along rights-of-way on its transmission and distribution lines. According to MDAR, Cape towns where herbicide use is planned include: Sandwich, Bourne, Falmouth, Mashpee, Barnstable, Dennis, Yarmouth, Harwich, Chatham, Eastham, Orleans, Truro and Wellfleet. The Kenerson Group of Athol has submitted a Yearly Operational Plan (YOP) to the state on behalf of the utility. The plan is consistent with a five-year Vegetation Management Plan (VMP) which was approved in 2013. Questions or comments regarding the YOP should be addressed to: William Hayes, senior transmission arborist, NStar, A Northeast Utilities Company, Vegetation Management, One NStar Way, SE-370, Westwood, MA 02090-9230.


mar26 Wellfleet

New Addition to My Library: Cape Cod Modern

One of my most favorite things to do is to read interior design magazines, blogs, and books. After sleep, it's my favorite stress management tool. When I am overwhelmed with all I have to do, I can be found standing at my kitchen counter in front of my laptop, scrolling through blog after blog of dazzling light-filled spaces, stunning homes, and unusual buildings. On Instagram, I follow interior designers, museums, and artists so my downtime is filled with beauty. When the work-a-day life is too much, I dream about a new career as an interior design. I hoard Elle Décor, House Beautiful, Domino, and other shelter magazines in my guest bathroom, stacking them up in a tall pile that threatens to break the countertop on which they rest. When my husband once innocently suggested I recycle the ones I "didn't need anymore," I looked at him, aghast. Having never forgiven myself for getting rid of the original Domino magazines, I hold on to these new ones like they are solid gold. Interior design books are a new addition to my collection. Not only do they fuel my wishful thinking, but they are gorgeously published, perfect for displaying in color-coordinated piles in my living room and den. The newest addition to my library arrived at Christmas, a gift from my husband (and a gift I gave my brother for the same holiday, our family's twist on The Gift of Magi). The book is Cape Cod Modern: Midcentury Architecture and Community on the Outer Cape. The book first piqued my interest because of its focus on two things I love: Cape Cod, the place where my husband grew up and where we were married, and midcentury design. For the past four years, I have lived with my family in a home designed in 1959 and built in 1960, at the height of midcentury movement. (For a quick primer on midcentury modern design, see this summary.) I have long gravitated to this period and was looking forward to exploring Cape Cod Modern to expand my knowledge and to find inspiration as we prepare for renovations to our home. It's a fabulous book. Stunningly photographed and rich in history, the book captures a time of artistic expression that is not especially well known. Consulting archives from libraries, universities, the Cape Cod Modern House Trust, and other sources, McMahon and Cipriani uncover never before seen stories, personal photographs, and information about the rich midcentury architectural legacy of the outer Cape, with a focus on Wellfleet and Truro. In a fortuitous stroke of luck, I was able to attend a lecture about the book given by the authors last week. Sponsored by the Friends of Modern Architecture in Lincoln, the talk was held on a rainy Sunday afternoon in the Lincoln Public Library and had a great turnout. Everyone present had a real appreciation of modern architecture, with enthusiastic support for the book and its goal of capturing a special time in the field of architecture and design.


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mar26 Wellfleet

Local Food Report by Elspeth Hay: Selective Breeding Moves into Local Oyster Industry

Elspeth Hay is an avid locavore who lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30am on Morning Edition and Thursdays at 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30am.


Selective breeding is not a new thing in the food world; humans have been selecting for desirable traits in plants and animals for thousands of years. But it is getting more sophisticated. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay talks with a Wellfleet oysterman who's growing oysters with three sets of chromosomes instead of the normal two. You can read more about "triploid" oysters on Elspeth's blog, Diary of a Locavore, and ask questions in the comments section below.





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mar26 Wellfleet

Wellfleet 2015 Annual Town Meeting and Annual Town Election Warrant Posted

The warrant for the 2015 annual town meeting on April 27, 2015 and annual town election on May 4, 2015 has been posted.  The warant has been sent to the printer and will be mailed to each registered voter no later than April 13, 2015. A copy of the complete warrant has been posted on the Town web site here.


mar26 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Recreation Department's 2015 Easter Egg Hunt


mar26 Wellfleet-Eastham-Truro-Provincetown

Outer Cape detectives awarded citation

Lower Cape Drug Detectives have been very active and through their outstanding efforts have made some significant arrests and drug seizures. Many of these events have been reported in the press and they speak volumes of the success of this regional venture. On Monday, the Police Chiefs from the lower cape Towns of Eastham, Wellfleet, Truro and Provincetown gathered formally to recognize those officers who have participated in this initiative by hosting an appreciation and recognition ceremony at the Eastham Town Hall. Each member was issued a citation of the joint unit commendation.


mar26 Eastham

Sandwich teacher named Eastham principal

William Crosby, a fourth-grade teacher at Oak Ridge School in Sandwich, will take over July 1 as the new principal at Eastham Elementary School. Richard Hoffmann, superintendent of schools for Nauset Regional School District, announced the appointment on March 20. Hoffman said he and the search committee screened 27 applicants for the position that became open when Scotti Finnegan, principal for the past four years, announced last fall her intent to retire in June. Hoffmann said Crosby has taught at Oak Ridge School for 19 years and served as the administrator in the absence of the principal. "Bill has significant experience and expertise in literacy and is an active member of the Lesley University Collaborative," Hoffmann said. He added that Crosby has organized professional development for his colleagues in the use of Smart Boards, "and is a proponent of harnessing the power of technology as an important tool of teaching and learning." Crosby is also trained in the Responsive Classroom, a program that enhances students' social and emotional growth and is a centerpiece at Eastham Elementary School," Hoffmann said. Prior to working as a classroom teacher, he worked with students with special needs. Crosby has a master's degree in education from Lesley University and a bachelor of arts from the UMass Dartmouth. He lives in Yarmouth Port with his wife, who is also an educator. Hoffmann praised the search committee who screened 27 applicants, and held eight initial interviews, then picked three for final interviews before picking Crosby as their top choice. Finnigan, who met all three candidates when they visited the school and had lunch with the second-graders, said she thought Crosby was "very kid-centered and will be a really good fit for Eastham. She said she would spend time with him before she leaves "to teach him the ropes." Ann Crozier, chair of the Eastham School Committee and member of the search committee, said her granddaughter had lunch with Crosby and the other finalists and told her he should be the new principal. "I asked her why, and she said, "He's funny, he made us laugh" Crozier said. Crozier said teacher she has talked to are pleased that he was the top choice of the search committee. "I think he will be a good fit for Eastham," she said. "He lives on the Cape, and he's raised his family here."


mar26 Eastham


"A Passion for Birds" with Henry Lappen at Salt Pond Visitor Center




mar26 Eastham

Student Marine Art Exhibit in April at Cape Cod National Seashore

A display of winners from the 2014 Marine Art Contest sponsored by Massachusetts Marine Educators will be on display at Cape Cod National Seashore's Salt Pond Visitor Center from April 2 until April 28. The artwork, created by students from schools across Massachusetts, captures some of the diversity of species found in nearby Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS). The show includes prize winning art and some honorable mention recipients from all five contest categories - high school, middle school, elementary school, scientific illustration (all grades), and computer graphics (all grades). Several students from the Cape and Islands are represented in the exhibit, including Provincetown Schools, Eddy Elementary School, Oak Bluffs School, Nauset Regional High School and Falmouth High School. The 2015 Marine Art contest is now underway with a deadline of May 1, 2015. Rules for the contest can be found at the MME website at www.ma-marine-ed.org or the Stellwagen Bank sanctuary website, stellwagen.noaa.gov. Winning artwork from the past few years can also be viewed at the sanctuary website. The annual Marine Art contest is a program of the Massachusetts Marine Educators (MME), a nonprofit grass-roots organization of teachers, informal educators, students, educational institutions, and others dedicated to the goals of developing a marine literate society and promoting awareness of the ocean world by integrating marine studies into existing curricula. The contest theme is "Amazing Ocean Creatures of Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary." "The contest is an exciting way of encouraging interdisciplinary education by integrating marine science with art," said Anne Smrcina, contest director. "Through this creative effort, students learn more about some of the local marine life found in their own ocean backyard." Co-sponsors for the annual art contest include SBNMS, New England Aquarium, Center for Coastal Studies, and Whale and Dolphin Conservation. The traveling art exhibit is sponsored by the sanctuary and MME. For more information on the art contest, contact Anne Smrcina, Education Coordinator at SBNMS, 781 545-8026 x204


mar26 Eastham

Creative Gardens of the Outer Cape sponsored by the Eastham Public Library Building Fund

Hydrangea Fest on Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Join our Master Gardeners and tour 8-10 creative gardens in Eastham filled with the art and the artists of Cape Cod. Enjoy lemonade in a treehouse or Prosecco on the porch on Tuesday, July 14th while you experience some truly unique landscaping. Garden details to come!


mar26 Eastham

WOMR: This Place Matters with Susan Lindquist - Fisherman's Alliance CEO John Pappalardo

Susan Lindquist of the Community Development Partnership interviews people promoting economic stability and environmental sustainability because This Place Matters. This Place Matters can be heard Wednesday afternoons from 12:30 to 1:00 pm. In addition to her work with the CDP, Susan has worked with many other organizations as an advocate for low and moderate income families and children. She is a former Executive Director of the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History and a current Trustee of the Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank. She is also an active member of WOMR's Development and Program Committees.



mar26 Eastham-Provincetown

Rabies clinics this weekend on the Outer Cape

Two one-year rabies vaccinations for dogs and cats are being offered on the Outer Cape this weekend. One, at Herring Cove Animal Hospital, 83 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown, is from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 28. Cost is $10. Call (508) 487-6449 (note corrected number) for more information. Another in Eastham, held by Lower Cape Veterinary Services at the Eastham Police Dept., 2600 Route 6, also takes place from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. Call (508) 246-7920 for more info. With official proof of a current vaccination, a three-year booster will also be available. Dogs must arrive at the clinic on leashes, and cats in pet carriers.


mar26 Truro

No contested races in Truro election

Incumbents Janet Worthington and Jay Coburn will face no competition as they seek re-election to the Board of Selectmen in the annual town election. Both open seats on the board are for three-year terms. The town election is May 12. Rebecca Townsend and incumbent Michelle Jarusiewicz will run for the two open seats on the School Committee. Sally Brotman and incumbent S. Keith Althaus will run for two openings on the library trustees, and incumbent Robert Masson will run for the open position on the Cemetery Commission. All three of those races are for three-year terms. Incumbent Lisa Tobia will run for re-election to a five-year term on the Planning Board; no one returned nomination papers for the second open seat. Incumbent Jeannette de Beauvoir will run for a five-year term on the Housing Authority.


mar26 Truro

Truro police & fire departments treat seniors to dinner

The Truro Police Association and Truro Fire Association held the 22nd Annual Senior Dinner on Sunday at the Truro Public Safety Facility. Close to 50 seniors attended the feast, which included a three-course chicken dinner prepared by members of the Associations. Prizes, donated by local businesses, were raffled off, and "no one went home empty-handed," the police department said.


mar26 Provincetown

Earl put to work in Provincetown manager search

The board of selectmen has chosen Joellen Earl to serve as search consultant as the town once again attempts to hire a new town manager. Earl, a former resident of Dennis who described herself as very familiar with Provincetown, is the co-owner of GovHR USA, an Illinois-based firm with a long track record in public sector executive recruitment. She has worked in Massachusetts, North Carolina and Illinois, in places with populations ranging from 15,000 to 150,000, according to her company profile. Earl's contract with the town is for $17,500, according to Acting Town Manager David Gardner. She will help the town find and screen candidates for the position and work with a 12-person search committee through the process of narrowing down the pool of applicants to several finalists. As Provincetown's search for a new town manager gets underway, Earl acknowledges that the town's location, size and well-known seasonal character are potential challenges and will require careful consideration by any prospective candidate. "It will be very important for us to be up front with the candidates about the community and its attributes so the candidates can be informed before they apply and are considered for the position," said Earl after meeting with selectmen last Thursday. As the search proceeds, Selectman Cheryl Andrews points to another challenge: a very limited pool of applicants. "The pool of folks out there having the resumé to even qualify for the job is getting smaller each year," said Andrews, interviewed after the meeting with Earl. "Further, Provincetown is, shall we say, a very unusual little town, with great challenges and great opportunities. Finding everything we want, all in one person, will be difficult." "Will we be able to find a candidate who can bring new tools like public-private partnerships to the table, and be able to execute against those proposals [as well as] find someone who is comfortable with the salary and is able to find appropriate housing?" asked selectmen chair Tom Donegan. The selectmen must now create a 12-person search committee, which is scheduled to be ready to go in about a month and fully operational with applicants' resumés in their hands by late May. When asked what the two most common mistakes are that a search committee might make, Earl was quick to point out that she generally has not worked with these types of committees in the past. "I cannot comment on this as I have generally worked directly with [policy-setting boards like the selectmen] in other states when conducting manager searches," said Earl via e-mail. Critical to the eventual success of the search process is the careful vetting of the finalists. When it comes to identifying the two most important attributes that Earl is looking for, she leaves that up to her clients.


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mar26 Provincetown

Historic district commission in Provincetown voices qualified support for solar power

The use of solar power was endorsed by the historic district commission at its March 18 meeting as part of its attempt to make renewable energy more prevalent in Provincetown. However, the commission did not issue a blanket approval for solar panels and will instead grant approvals "on a case-by-case basis," said HDC chair Thom Biggert. Austin Brandt, Provincetown's energy manager and conservation agent, and Lydia Hamnquist, chair of the town's recycling and renewable energy committee, told the commission why Provincetown's many small rooftops are ideally suited for solar panels. After pointing out that more than 60 people have signed up for site evaluations in just a few short weeks since the town's launch of the "Solarize Massachusetts" initiative, Brandt talked about the minimal impact of solar panels on historic character and prized architectural features for structures that fall under the purview of the commission. Overall, he portrayed the deployment of solar panels on houses in Provincetown as a win-win situation. "These panels can be easily installed and easily removed, too. All the installers involved in this project work for Cape Cod companies, and they all have experience with historic buildings," Brandt said. "What would be helpful would be for you to spell out what is acceptable to the HDC as far as the view from a public way so we can pass that information along." Biggert started by clarifying the commission's stance on solar power in general. This was his attempt to dispel some misinformation, he said, that sought to portray the commission as not welcoming solar panels. While the abundance of tiny roofs here lends itself to a possible visual overload, he said, the need for cooperation and coordination was underscored. "We are not against solar power at all. We just do not want [the solar panels] to be so conspicuous," Biggert said. "We can work together." At the same time, Biggert sought to broaden the discussion to include ground-mounted solar arrays, or so-called "solar farms," as well as the feasibility of wind power here. Brandt agreed that ground-mounted solar arrays offered advantages such as greater efficiency, but said that Provincetown was not awash in large tracts of land where these multi-panel arrays could be situated. "What about wind? What are we doing about it? What about small [wind] turbines?" Biggert asked. New kinds of small wind turbines are emerging, said Hamnquist. In fact, at a meeting of the town's bicycle committee earlier that same afternoon, a brief discussion of lighting options for remote areas included a new tree-like array of tiny, yet productive wind turbines.


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mar26 Provincetown

Exhibits show Provincetown's role in U.S. history

Considering the town's tiny size, a lot of events related to important American history and culture have happened at the end of Cape Cod in Provincetown. That was the thinking behind the theme for the new season at the Provincetown Museum, which opens Wednesday. The exhibits for "Small Town, Big History! Provincetown's Role in American History and Culture" will bring together 400 years of history under one roof. The season includes two new exhibitions -- one on Wampanoag history, the second on an art style developed there - alongside permanent exhibits on the Pilgrims landing and an extended special exhibit on whaling and conservation. "Captured 1614: Our Story (A Wampanoag History)" is a traveling exhibition that uses video and text to explore how the kidnapping of 27 Wampanoag natives affected the tribes, and later contributed to the survival of the Pilgrims. Commissioned by Plymouth 400, "Captured 1614" was conceived and produced by Paula Peters through her company SmokeSygnals Marketing and Communication, with the Indian Spiritual and Cultural Training Council. According to Peters, an active member of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, the exhibition is groundbreaking, because "the Wampanoag story has never been told in our own voice." Four hundred years ago, the area that would become Plymouth was the village of Patuxet, home to a community of nearly 2,000 indigenous Wampanoags. In 1614, six years before the Mayflower arrived off the coast of Provincetown, 20 Wampanoags from Patuxet and seven members of the Nauset tribe from Cape Cod were kidnapped by Captain Thomas Hunt to be sold as slaves in Spain. Hunt took the men in defiance of orders by fleet commander John Smith, who lamented "after my departure, he . betrayed twenty and seven of these poore innocent soules." The "Captured 1614" exhibit tells the story of the captured men and those they left behind. Those captured included Squanto, the only one of the 27 Wampanoag to return from Europe. Squanto returned to Patuxet five years later, to find his home devastated by plague. He eventually came to act as a vital liaison for the Pilgrims who settled on the abandoned site. Panels outlining these events will be accompanied by six short videos, in which present-day tribe members play the roles of their ancestors. These videos were produced entirely by Wampanoag tribe members. According to Peters, the idea was to humanize the events that occurred, and the production process began with ceremonial gatherings honoring tribal ancestors and immersing the role-players in history. "It's been great for the community," she explains about the project. In "I Must Save Hope," for example, Christian Wessling plays the kidnapped Squanto, and in "Who Will Teach My Son To Be A Man?" Nitana Hicks Greendeer plays a young wife left without a husband. "Season of the Corn" features John Peters, Jr. as a tribal leader, who relates how the men were tricked. Through June 30th, the "Captured" show will be installed in the museum's Mayflower Gallery, alongside permanent exhibition "The First Landing of the Pilgrims in Provincetown." Through that juxtaposition, visitors will be able to make connections between the events of the past. "Contrary to conventional wisdom it was (in Provincetown) that the Pilgrims first landed and interacted with Native Wampanoag before they discovered Plymouth," notes John McDonagh, executive director of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum. Along with an 18-foot replica of the Mayflower ship created by Truro artist Courtney Allen, "The First Landing of the Pilgrims in Provincetown" exhibit includes several mural-scale paintings created by Chatham artist Al Whittaker. They depict the experiences of the Pilgrims during their explorations of the Outer Cape. The second exhibition that's new this season is "Fine White Line: Faces Behind the Prints," which shifts the focus to Provincetown's history as an important art colony in the 20th century. In 1915, Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt developed a new process in white-line woodcut prints, allowing the artist to create a full-color print with a single block. These became known as "Provincetown Prints," and the practice was adopted by a group of prominent local artists. To commemorate the centennial of Nordfeldt's innovation, curator Bill Evaul, a contemporary master of the woodblock print and an art historian, has created a series of 16-inch x 20-inch white-line print portraits of the printmakers. According to Evaul, the process, which involves applying watercolor paint to the woodcuts, offers a full palette and is " the most like painting of any kind of printmaking." Every print produced is unique, and the exhibition will feature side-by-side displays of prints made from the same block employing different color schemes, including four versions of Evaul's portrait of Agnes Weinrich. Other artists depicted include Blanche Lazzell, Ethel Mars, Maude Squire and Edna Hopkins. The exhibit also includes a video demonstration by Evaul and a block used in the printing process. Completing the quartet of exhibits is "Forgotten Port: Provincetown's Whaling Heritage," which opened last year and tells the story of how Provincetown evolved from hunting whales to saving whales.


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mar26 Provincetown

Beautifully staged new drama proves a 'Gift' to Provincetown theater community

In a town known for showcasing original work by emerging playwrights, The Provincetown Theater's world premiere of Steve Lyon's "The Gift" far from disappoints. Playing through Sunday, April 4, the two-act play is set during the 1960s in St. Heaven, a fictional, once robust community at the foothills of Appalachia. Outer Cape audiences are no strangers to the nuances of small-town living, and while the story is set in another time and culture, the dynamics of living close to your neighbor will feel familiar. When Dr. Thomas Jay Riddle Jr. (Beau Jackett), an intrepid young doctor with a shadowy past, returns home to restore his father's medical practice, he falls in love with Eshie Montgomery (Gabrielle Calixte), a beautiful black Evangelist. Their ensuing clandestine romance causes a series of events that challenge the role of race, religion and science in St. Heaven - issues that make the play relevant for contemporary audiences in small and big towns alike. Is Eshie's gift of tongues a gift from God or something else? Can a traditional black preacher and a long-suffering white widow stop fighting over their young charges? To what lengths will they go to maintain their own beliefs and sense of right and wrong? These universal questions keep the audience engaged throughout "The Gift." Directed by the critically acclaimed David Drake ("The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me"), the greatest strength of the production is Drake's deft casting and production team, including Margaret Van Sant as associate director. By creating a tight ensemble of Provincetown actors, Drake pulls out some of their best performances to date. Jackett takes risks with a character that is rich in its moral complexity. Calixte, seen most recently in last summer's Peregrine Theatre Ensemble production of "Rent," confronts her disparate loyalties with grace. Virgie Riddle, the doctor's widowed mother, sensitively portrayed by Jane MacDonald, struggles to understand her son's actions. Sallie Tighe as Millie Moses, the Riddles' hired help, is marvelous in her comedic timing, adding levity to a play weighted with the age-old struggle of science versus religion. Actor Jimi Little is commanding in his role as the controlling pastor Joe Bertram. Acting like a father to the once-impoverished Eshe, his investment in her future is both redeeming and scary in its zeal. The set design by Tristan DeVincenzo is sparse in the experimental black box style. Rough, wooden exterior walls are echoed in the simple set and props, which move from scene to scene by the actors themselves. The transitions are smooth and strengthen the flow of the play. Movement choreographed by Bart Murell uses the stepped stage environment to create intimate tableaus. Carol Sherry's costuming adds to the class distinctions of the characters with the vintage flair that Sherry is known for. The frequency of costume changes is well timed by stage manager Bretten Burger.


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mar26 Provincetown

Haunting heartland drama & writers workshop in Provincetown

Playwright and filmmaker Will Sheffer, co-creator of the HBO series "Big Love" and "Getting On," is coming to Provincetown to speak at the screening of his new film, "Easter," and to lead a writing workshop. A darkly poignant heartland drama about a woman with a haunting past that leads her to set a trail of country churches on fire, "Easter" is based on Sheffer's own play by the same title and is a Telluride IndieFest award winner. The screening starts at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 28, at Waters Edge Cinema. Scheffer introduces the film and leads a Q&A session after the screening, which is followed by a reception with complimentary hors d'oeuvres and bubbly at Sage Inn & Lounge, 336 Commercial St. On Sunday, March 29, from 1 to 4 p.m. Sheffer leads a dramatic writing workshop, "Writing from Life," at Waters Edge. Tickets to the screening events and workshop are sold separately and are $35, $25 for film society members and $15 for Film Art Series pass-holders; they are available at watersedgecinema.org. The cinema is located at 237 Commercial St. The Provincetown Film Society is hosting both events.


mar26 Provincetown

Catch seized and man arrested by environmental police in Provincetown

A 28-year-old Whitman man was arrested in Provincetown on Tuesday after the fishing boat he was on was found in an area off the coast of Provincetown where it is illegal to dredge for surf clams, according to Massachusetts Executive Office Energy and Environmental Affairs spokeswoman Katie Gronendyke. Matthews Collins was onboard the Aimee Marie in coastal waters of Provincetown within the 12-foot contour, Gronendyke wrote in an email. Vessels cannot dredge for surf clams shoreward of the 12 foot contour, with the exceptions of Chatham, Nantucket and Gay Head, from Nov. 1 to April 30, according to Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries regulations. Environmental police seized the Aimee Marie's surf clam catch and will issue a summons for the violation, Gronendyke wrote. The captain of the Miss Maegan, who was also in the area where dredging for surf clams is prohibited, will be issued a summons as well, she wrote. The Aimee Marie was one of four boats that were issued a cease and desist order by the Provincetown Conservation Commission for fishing within 40 feet of the shoreline. Along with the other boats, the Aimee Marie was, according to the commission, illegally dredging for clams. They were using the practice of shooting water into the sand to uproot clams, according to the commission. But one of the fishermen who was also served a cease-and-desist order claimed Provincetown was out of line. Monte Rome, owner of the Tom Slaughter, said the town could not enforce the 40-foot offshore rule because that area falls under the jurisdiction of the Division of Marine Fisheries. The regulation Collins is accused of violating pertains to depth, not distance from the shore. The Aimee Marie belongs to Patricio Palacios, David Kelley and Mark Smith, according to the Conservation Commission. The Miss Maegan belongs to T.M. Terra Fisheries INC, according to the U.S. Coast Guard vessel database. Collins also had an outstanding warrant for breaking and entering into a building in the nighttime for a felony, and larceny from a building, according to Gronendyke.


mar26 Provincetown

Equipment failure triggers Provincetown power outage

Over 1,300 Eversource customers lost power for several hours early Thursday morning in Provincetown. The problem was reportedly traced to a faulty lightning arrestor on the power lines. Linemen were working to restore service as soon as possible.


mar26 Provincetown

WOMR: Arts Week with Jeannette de Beauvoir - Writer Director Will Scheffer



mar26 Provincetown

Jewels Appear in Melting PTown Snow

Melting snow and ice turns into heaps of diamonds when the light is just right, in the early morning on one mound of snow, and late afternoon on another. As the days slowly warm a little, and when the sun hits just the right angle, the light refracts through snow that's been turned to ice by varying temperatures and the rain we've had between snow storms, turning all these banks of snow and ice into potential piles of jewels for anyone paying attention at just the right moment. Keep an eye out for these crystals, appearing briefly, and gone in an instant.


mar26 Provincetown

Scheffer leads screening, writing workshop in Provincetown

The Provincetown Film Society will present events hosted by Will Scheffer - a playwright, filmmaker and co-creator of the HBO series "Big Love" and "Getting On" - Saturday and Sunday at Waters Edge Cinema, 237 Commercial St. Scheffer will introduce a 7 p.m. Saturday screening of "Easter," the film adaptation of his play about a Middle-America woman haunted by her past, and host a Q&A afterward. A reception will follow at Sage Inn & Lounge, 336 Commercial St. Admission is $35; $25 for PFS members; $15 for Provincetown Film Art Series pass-holders. Scheffer will then lead "Writing for Life," a dramatic writing workshop, from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $35; $25 for PFS members; and free for Provincetown Film Art Series pass-holders. Tickets for both events: watersedgecinema.org.


mar26 Provincetown

1602: Gosnold Sailed from Falmouth, England, and stopped in Provincetown, and named the Cape for the abundance of Cod encountered here

On this day in 1602, almost two decades before the Pilgrims arrived in Provincetown in November of 1620, explorer Bartholomew Gosnold sailed from Falmouth, England bound for Northern Virginia, as New England was then known, intent on establishing the first permanent British colony in North America. Forty-nine days later after cruising along the coast of Maine, Gosnold and his 32-sailor crew landed at the island at the foot of what eventually became known as the Elizabeth Islands. Whether Gosnold named the site Elizabeth Island after his wife or the queen of England is uncertain; we know it today as Cuttyhunk. By then Gosnold and his crew had already stopped at present-day Provincetown and gone ashore, becoming the first English explorers to set foot in New England. Codfish was so plentiful in the harbor where his vessel, the Concord, was anchored that Gosnold decided against his original name for the peninsula - Shoal Hope - and named it Cape Cod instead. The name stuck. After leaving Provincetown, Gosnold skirted the coast to the south, turning west after Monomoy Island south of Chatham and sailing across the body of water eventually known as Nantucket Sound. Another trip ashore to one of the islands resulted in it being named "Martha's Vineyard" for the bountiful grapes found there and, it is believed, his deceased daughter. After exploring Elizabeth Island and building a small fort, Gosnold and his men decided against remaining for fear of insufficient provisions to last them the winter. They stayed for only a month on Cuttyhunk (on the right) before returning home. Five years later, Gosnold served as commander of one of three vessels to land at Jamestown, Virginia, where the first permanent British colony in North American was established. His presence there was short-lived, however; Gosnold died only three months after the colony was founded. Read about Gosnold in Wikipedia here. Read a day trip to Cuttyhunk here.


mar26 Orleans

Blaze damages Orleans home

A two-alarm fire caused considerable damage to a Standish Road home, and one of the responding firefighters was taken to the hospital with a minor injury. The Orleans Fire Department responded to 13 Standish Road in the Nauset Heights section of town at 1:30 p.m. after a passer-by reported that the home was in flames, Orleans Fire Chief Anthony Pike said. When crews from the Orleans, Brewster, and Eastham fire departments arrived on the scene, the wood frame home was well involved, and Pike called for a second alarm, which signaled for the response of Chatham and Harwich departments. One firefighter was treated at Cape Cod Hospital for an orthopedic injury and later released, according to Pike. The fire was extinguished in about 40 minutes, but the second floor of the home had considerable damage, he said. The cause of the fire remains under investigation by the Orleans Fire Department, but it is believed to be electrical in nature, Pike said. Nobody was home at the time of the fire; the owners live in California, the fire chief said. According to a 2015 assessor record, the three-bedroom Cape-style home is valued at $2,693,500.


mar26 Orleans

Firefighters Knock Down Two-Alarm Fire in East Orleans

Orleans firefighters knocked down a two-alarm blaze yesterday afternoon at a Nauset Heights area home in East Orleans. The fire caused major damage to the second floor of 19 Standish Road, according to Orleans Fire Chief Anthony Pike. Pike said the home is still salvageable and repairs could cost well over $100,000. The cause of the fire is still being investigated but is believed to be accidental and could have been from an electrical issue, according to Pike. There were no residents home at the time of the fire, which was reported by a woman walking by the home, but a firefighter suffered minor injuries and was treated and released from the hospital. Pike said the fire was knocked down in about 40 minutes after firefighters arrived on scene. Crews from Brewster, Eastham, Harwich and Chatham assisted on scene.


mar26 Orleans

Police: Orleans man faces charges in ax attack

An Orleans man was arrested Monday on charges of home invasion and attempted murder with an ax after police went to a home on Pond Road for a reported assault, according to a statement from police. A woman was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis with non-life-threatening injuries as a result of the incident. The alleged attack appeared to be targeted, among people who knew each other, police Lt. Kevin Higgins said. The suspect, Jamie Hempel, 43, is also charged with one count of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (an ax), four counts of assault with a dangerous weapon (an ax), two counts of intimidation of a witness and two counts of malicious destruction of property of more than $250, as well as resisting arrest, according to the statement. Police responded to a call at 4:44 p.m. reporting that the alleged assailant was using an ax and a knife to assault people inside the home. Officers found a female inside the home with injuries that police said were consistent with an edged weapon, according to the statement. Hempel was inside the house as well and was being restrained by two other people, according to police. After a brief struggle, police arrested Hempel. Hempel was also the subject of an outstanding arrest warrant in Orleans District Court from the town of Eastham, Higgins said. On Tuesday morning, Hempel was awaiting an arraignment in Orleans District Court. The investigation into the incident is continuing, according to police.


mar26 Orleans

Orleans man arrested for attempted murder

Jamie Hemple, 43, of Orleans was arrested last night after an incident on Pond Road and charged with attempted murder, police say. Lt. Kevin Higgins said the matter is still under investigation, but the four people who were at the home when Hemple arrived knew him. "They were all acquaintances," Higgins said. "It wasn't a random home invasion." The event unfolded on Monday March 23, at approximately 4:45 p.m., officers from the Orleans Police Department were sent to a residence on Pond Road for a reported assault in progress. The officers were told the suspect was armed with an axe and a knife and was actively assaulting the occupants inside. Upon arrival officers made entry to the residence and were met by a female victim who had sustained injuries consistent with an edged weapon, police say. Officers then located the suspect further inside who was being restrained by two other victims of the assault. After a brief struggle the suspect was taken into custody. One female victim was transported to Cape Cod Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. "Thankfully it wasn't worse," said Higgins, adding that the motive is "murky" but the department is conducting further interviews. Hemple was charged with home invasion, attempted murder, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (axe), assault with a dangerous weapon (axe) four counts, intimidation of a witness, two counts, malicious destruction of property over $250, two counts and resisting arrest. At the time of his arrest Hemple was also the subject of an outstanding arrest warrant, on an assault and battery charge out of Eastham, police say.


mar26 Orleans

Orleans Man Wielding an Ax Charged with Home Invasion, Attempted Murder

An Orleans man was arrested on multiple charges Monday afternoon including attempted murder and home invasion. Jamie Hemple, 43, was scheduled for arraignment today in Orleans District Court. Orleans police were called to a Pond Road home around 4:45 and were told the suspect was wielding an ax and a knife. A woman was found with cuts consistent with an edged weapon after officers entered the home, according to police. Police said Hemple was found in the home being restrained by two other victims and was taken into custody after a brief struggle. One woman was taken to Cape Cod Hospital with injuries described as not life-threatening. Hemple was charged with home invasion, attempted murder, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (ax), four counts of assault with a dangerous weapon (ax), two counts of intimidation of a witness, two counts of malicious destruction of property over $250 and resisting arrest. He was also found to have an outstanding arrest warrant. Police are continuing to investigate.


mar26 Orleans

Documents shed light on alleged kidnapping, ax attack

Court documents released on Wednesday provided more details about an ax attack allegedly carried out by an Orleans man on Monday afternoon, as well as the violent assaults and kidnapping of his girlfriend that she says preceded it. On Monday at about 1:30 p.m., Jamie Hempel's girlfriend met with an Eastham police detective to discuss the two days that she was held captive in a commercial garage bay that Hempel, 43, rents on Holmes Road, according to Orleans District Court documents. The woman, who the Times' is not identifying, told the detective that she and Hempel were arguing at the garage from Saturday through Monday and he would not let her leave despite several requests. Hempel, who has a history of arrests for charges of domestic abuse and assault on multiple women, allegedly held her down on a bed with a knife in his hand and choked her until she had difficulty breathing, according to a police report. While he was choking her, she said, he dropped the knife and when he picked it back up he sliced her left forearm. Hempel also pushed the woman down on a different bed located downstairs in the garage area and kicked her in the thigh, according to the report. During the whole incident, Hempel kept the woman's cellphone from her so she couldn't call police, according to the documents. The two have been dating for about five years, she said during his arraignment in Orleans District Court on Tuesday. About three hours after the assaults were reported, police were called to 24 Pond Road in Orleans where Hempel allegedly kicked in the front door of the apartment where his girlfriend was staying with friends and attacked them with an ax. Two of the four people at the home during the attack told police that they were sitting in the house when they heard several "loud bangs" and then Hempel's girlfriend screamed "Jamie, no." They told police that Hempel chased her through the apartment swinging an ax. He then allegedly struck another woman in the shoulder and chest in an attempt to get to his girlfriend. She was also struck again in the arm with the handle of the ax, according to another police report. Two other occupants in the home then tackled Hempel and held him down until police arrived, according to the report. When the officers were leaving the station, a car sped into the parking lot and Hempel's girlfriend, who was in the backseat, told police, "He's there, he's killing them all right now. Please help." When officers arrived at the house, Hempel was being held face-down on the ground by two people, according to police. When police tried to take Hempel into custody, he resisted until they threatened to use a stun gun on him, according to police. Hempel then relaxed and was placed into a cruiser. Officers found a knife underneath him, according to the report. While being transported to the police station, Hempel spit blood at the plastic prisoner cage and urinated and bled on the floor of the car, according to the report. On Tuesday, Hempel pleaded not guilty to home invasion, attempted murder, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, four counts of assault with a dangerous weapon, two counts of intimidation of a witness, two counts of malicious destruction of property of more than $250 and resisting arrest, as well as strangulation or suffocation, kidnapping, assault with a dangerous weapon, and two counts of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon. Orleans District Court Judge Robert A. Welsh III ordered Hempel held without bail on both cases at his arraignment, and a dangerousness hearing was scheduled for Monday. A dangerousness hearing is used to determine whether a defendant is considered a danger to the community or himself and enables a judge to order the defendant to be held for up to 90 days before trial.


mar26 Orleans

Orleans Man Charged In Ax Attack, Home Invasion

A man armed with an ax and knife attacked three people inside a home in Orleans on Monday, sending one woman to the hospital. Jamie Hemple, 43, of Orleans, is facing charges including home invasion, attempted murder and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon. Orleans police were called to a home on Pond Road at 4:44 p.m. for a report that a man was inside attacking people with an ax and a knife. When officers arrived, they found the front door smashed open. Hemple was being restrained by two victims of the assault, and was taken into custody after a brief struggle, police said. Police say it was a targeted attack. One of the victims, Susan Finn, told WBZ-TV's Bill Shields Hemple was trying to get to a woman who had taken out a restraining order against him. "I was scared to death," Finn said. "This is something that happens in the movies, not in my house." The woman was staying at the Pond Road home, when Hemple allegedly burst in and tried to get her. Finn was hit in the shoulder with the ax. She needed more than two dozen stitches to fix the wound. "I fell down and I screamed 'Jamie no' and I turned and I rolled over and he hit me again, got me in the arm," Finn said. "And then as I was running away, he swung one last time and got me in the back of my leg." Finn's boyfriend, Kevin Eldridge, tackled Hemple, preventing him from reaching his intended target. Eldridge said he thought they were all going to die. "I jumped him," he said. "I jumped on his back as he was coming forward, I jumped forward against him and tackled him." Hemple was the subject of an outstanding arrest warrant at the time, police said.



mar26 Orleans

Orleans startup launches restaurant-delivery service

Cape restaurant food at your fingertips. That's what a new, independent startup is promising to deliver later this spring. Ryan Marcus, his fiancée, Emily Brecia, and future mother-in-law, Margaret Ferrara, all of Orleans, are combining their skills and resources to launch Cape Delivery LLC, a company that aims to connect restaurants with customers who don't want to cook or venture out for lunch or dinner. "Until now, there were only two ways of getting a restaurant meal," Marcus said. "Call in an order, throw your clothes on, get in your car, drive to the local restaurant and pick it up, or eat at the restaurant." What Cape Delivery will do is handle all of the details, from offering a centralized place online to look at diverse menus from a range of restaurants to ordering and paying to transporting meals to customers' doorsteps. If the system sounds familiar, it may be because it will work a lot like GrubHub, the food ordering company that operates in more than 800 U.S. cities, including Boston, and offers delivery services for 30,000 takeout restaurants system wide. "We're a mini-me version of GrubHub," Marcus said. And online restaurant review company Yelp purchased a GrubHub-like company in February, paying $134 million for San Bruno, California-based Eat24, which was founded in 2007. So this kind of Web-based service can prove lucrative. Marcus, who comes from the financial advising world, moved to Orleans in November from New Jersey with Brecia, a former pediatric nurse who now works at Willy's Gym in Orleans. They were looking for a better style of life, not necessarily a new business venture. But it didn't take long for them to see there were few food home delivery options or to recognize the potential for such a business. The couple and Ferrara, a special education teacher, have been in overdrive the last few months putting together the pieces to make Cape Delivery work. As of late March, they had built a slick, user-friendly website at www.capedelivery.com, complete with an animated how-it-works video featuring "Ryan and Emily," and also have been active on social media. They created Apple and Android interactive ordering mobile apps, which are available for free download from the iTunes App Store and Google Play, and they put together a web-based system for dispatching drivers and tracking driver locations. "It's sort of like Uber," Marcus said, referring to the on-demand livery business where people use mobile phones to request a ride and Uber sends the nearest available driver to do the pickup. Cape Delivery, however, plans to have its own drivers while GrubHub and Uber rely on independent contractors. "We need to be sure we have proper drivers, with food handling certificates and background checks," Marcus said. Now that the online and mobile platforms are pretty much squared away, the company is turning its attention to lining up restaurants to join the service. They have a lot to gain by doing so, according to Marcus. "We market the heck out of this service and provide restaurants with a ton of exposure through fliers, door hangers, commercials, Facebook," he said. "Restaurants tell us what they want to promote on our site and we create their Cape Delivery menus." Customers will pay Cape Delivery a fee between $5 and $9.99, depending on their distance from the restaurant. It costs restaurants nothing to sign up to have their menus displayed online, although they will pay Cape Delivery a percentage fee, which varies depending on the kind of restaurant involved, for each food order processed through the website or through the company's call center. "It doesn't cost them a dime to do business if we don't bring them business," Marcus said. "Right now, no one around here has delivery and part of something is more than all of nothing. We're bringing them new orders and new clients through our system and we're doing that year-round." Rik Morse, who, with his wife Caren, owns Zia Pizzeria & Café at the Windmill Plaza in East Orleans on the road to Nauset Beach, said Monday that he was in negotiations with Cape Delivery and was impressed by what he'd seen. "I think it's pretty exciting. We've known Maggie (Ferrara) for awhile, and Ryan has a good idea as well as the experience and infrastructure to make it work," he said. "I think it will be a success because the people behind it have the drive and the know-how." But Morse acknowledged the tough realities of making a new business work on the Cape, especially in the summer. "Delivery is complicated. We tried it a few years ago. It's easier now to find addresses, but there's a lot of traffic and a lot of demand," he said. "They'll need a lot of staff." On his end, Morse had some concerns about increasing demand during Zia's peak summer months. "It's a challenge for smaller restaurants to keep up with orders," he said. Marcus has an app for that. "We have the ability to throttle down the order capacity," he said. "We can cap the number of orders per hour and offer customers an alternative restaurant choice when Zia's is at capacity. Our system is smart enough to do that and the restaurants can do it themselves online if they get too busy." This is not the first time someone has tried to start a restaurant delivery service on the Cape. Most recently, Falmouth-based Number One Restaurant Delivery Service gave it a shot on the Upper Cape. Customers could call in their orders by phone and the company made the arrangements and deliveries. But a message on the phone line Monday indicated that Number One had closed up shop. Cape Delivery has big aspirations. Marcus said the company's goal is to sign up 150 restaurants from Provincetown to Bourne within the first year, but to do so incrementally to be sure it can handle demand and provide reliable customer service. The plan is to start from the principals' home base of Orleans, sign up a dozen local restaurants and launch delivery service within about a 10-mile radius from each restaurant, which could include homes in Harwich, Eastham, Chatham and Brewster. "Then we'll add drivers and focus on the next town, probably Eastham, and continue to replicate that," Marcus said. "The demand for this service is huge and we want to ensure quality service. We want growth, but we want controlled growth." Another component of Cape Delivery's business model is charitable giving, something Ferrara championed. Her daughter and Brecia's sister, Caroline Brecia, has Down's syndrome and is a client of Community Connections, the South Yarmouth-based program that promotes independence for people with disabilities. Cape Delivery plans to work with at least three nonprofits to provide online customers with the opportunity to click a button at checkout to donate to the charity of their choice. Housing Assistance Corp., which focuses on housing issues ranging from operating the NOAH Shelter in Hyannis to helping first-time home buyers, is the first to sign on. "Ryan's business idea is cool, fresh, and young for the Cape," said Julie Wake, director of communications and development for the authority. "And his vision is so clear. Progress like that is great for this area." While access to potentially thousands of new, small-scale donors is welcome, Wake said that exposing people, especially tourists, to the existence of local nonprofits is equally exciting. Each time people get to the pay screen on Cape Delivery, a window pops up with the three nonprofits' logos and links to their mission statements. "The thing I was most attracted to was the awareness-raising part of it," Wake said. "It lets visitors know we have a community here and sometimes people here are in need."


mar26 Orleans

Orleans Selectmen Asking for Input on Old Kings Highway

The Orleans Town Meeting warrant will include an article to remove the town from the Old Kings Highway Regional Historic District. The Orleans Board of Selectmen is holding a public hearing on the issue next Wednesday evening at Orleans Town Hall to receive public input. The Annual Town Meeting is scheduled for May 11. The district, established in 1973, encompasses the area north of Route 6 from Sandwich to Orleans and is the largest historical district in the country. The hearing will begin Wednesday, April 1, at 6:45 p.m. in the Nauset Room at Orleans Town Hall.


mar26 Orleans

Skaket Beach, Frozen In Spring

This is spring on Cape Cod - a frozen tundra where once there was a beach. It will change. We believe that. Perhaps this is blind faith. More likely, our brains are now frozen and look like these photos. While we lost our fingers on Megansett Beach in North Falmouth weeks ago, it seems our ears are now on Skaket Beach. If you find either, we suggest you saute them in garlic and olive oil and serve over pasta. Did we mention our brains are frozen?


mar26 Orleans-Brewster

Ex-Orleans-officer cited in Brewster motor vehicle crash

Travis Tebbetts, the former Orleans police officer at the center of a preferential treatment scandal in 2011, is being cited for leaving the scene of a motor vehicle accident and operating to endanger after police found his car crashed into trees on Gages Way Sunday night. Around 7:50 p.m. Sunday, the Brewster police received a 911 call about a car that had crashed into some trees on Gages Way, Brewster police Capt. Heath Eldredge said. When police arrived, they couldn't find a driver or anyone else with the vehicle. The car is registered to Tebbetts, 35, who lives nearby at 35 Park Lane, Eldredge said. "Officers were initially unable to locate or make contact with Mr. Tebbetts," Eldredge said. But a couple of hours after the crash, they were able to speak with him. Police would not elaborate on how or where they reached Tebbetts. The accident report and the police investigation is not open to the public until a clerk magistrate's hearing can be held on the charges issued by the police. The charges - leaving the scene of a motor vehicle crash and operating to endanger - are not arrestable offenses, Eldredge explained. Tebbetts has a right to a hearing before the magistrate, who will determine whether there is enough evidence for the case to go forward. The hearing has not been scheduled. If the magistrate rules there is probable cause, the details of the police report will become public. This is Tebbetts' third brush with the law, beginning in 2011 when he was still an Orleans police officer. That March, Tebbetts was stopped by state Trooper Steven Culver on Route 6 in South Dennis after several reports of erratic driving through South Yarmouth and on the highway. Tebbetts, who was off-duty, admitted to having consumed eight beers and the trooper described him as intoxicated, according to an Orleans police internal investigation report released to the Times after a public records request. But Culver never arrested him. Instead, he called the Orleans police to get Tebbetts a ride home. The Orleans police disciplined Tebbetts but he was not fired. Tebbetts resigned from the Orleans Police Department in June 2012 for "personal reasons," Orleans Police Chief Scott MacDonald said at the time. A state police spokesman told the Times the state trooper who had stopped Tebbetts had violated departmental rules by not following procedures for a drunken driving stop. In August, Brewster police arrested Tebbetts for operating under the influence of alcohol. Drivers had reported that Tebbetts' Volvo SUV forced two vehicles off the road as the driver was speeding toward Brewster on Route 6A in Dennis. Police found Tebbetts lying on the ground next to his driveway. He told them he had been asleep for an hour, but when officers felt the vehicle, it was warm. Tebbetts appeared unsteady and his speech was slurred, according to court documents. Tebbetts automatically lost his license for 180 days after that incident because he refused to take a Breathalyzer test. The state Department of Motor Vehicles had just reinstated his license on March 9, according to DMV records. At the time of his August arrest, Tebbetts had been employed as a residential supervisor at the Latham Centers Inc., a Brewster-based residential school for students with moderate to severe special needs. No one from Latham Center immediately returned a call to confirm if he still worked there. Tebbetts could not be reached for comment. The August operating-under-the-influence charge is scheduled to be decided by a jury trial on April 14 at Orleans District Court, according to court records.


mar26 Brewster

Brewster Water Department work may delay traffic on Route 6A

The Police Department is warning motorists that delays can be expected beginning Tuesday as the Brewster Water Department replaces 150 water service connections along Route 6A. Crews will be working between 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. starting at the Brewster-Dennis town line and moving east toward Orleans. The project could last until late May. Depending on the layout of the water service and the roadway, traffic may be affected, with one lane being closed at times. This work is in conjunction with the ongoing gas project on Route 6A. Both projects need to be completed before the state begins repaving the Brewster portion of the highway. The paving work is scheduled to begin after Labor Day.


mar26 Brewster

Water main work to cause delays on Route 6A in Brewster

The Brewster Police Department reports that beginning next Tuesday, March 31st, the Brewster Water Department will begin replacing 150 water services along Route 6A. Work crews will be out working between 7:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. The work will begin near the Brewster/Dennis town line and move east towards Orleans. The project may last into late May. Depending on the layout of the water service and the roadway, traffic may be impacted as a result, with one lane being closed at times. Traffic officers will be on scene assisting motorists. This work, in conjunction with the ongoing gas project on Route 6A, could make for delays in travel. Both projects need to be completed before the state begins repaving the Brewster portion of Route 6A. The paving work is scheduled to begin after Labor Day.


mar26 Brewster

Brewster Route 6A Water Project Begins

The Brewster Water Department and their contractor, JW Dubis & Sons, Inc., will begin work on Route 6A in Brewster on Tuesday, March 30. A portion of iron water service lines installed between 1972 and 1976 will be replaced from the water main along 6A to the curbside shut off valve. This section, referred to as a "stub" is the financial responsibility of the Brewster Water Department and residents will not be charged for this replacement. Approximately 158 residences will receive a stub replacement. Included in this project will be the installation of water main stubs to side roads off of 6A that are not currently serviced. Work is planned to begin on the west end (Dennis) of Route 6A and will work toward the east end (Orleans). The work is scheduled to be completed before Memorial Day, May 25. Working hours will be 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday with the possibility of some Saturday work. No water construction work will take place during the Brewster in Bloom weekend. This work, in conjunction with the ongoing gas project on Route 6A could make for delays in travel. Both projects need to be completed before the State begins repaving the Brewster portion of Route 6A. The paving work is scheduled to begin after Labor Day. The department tanks residents for their patience as they complete the project before the MassDOT repaving project. Please contact the Brewster Water Department with any questions or concerns: 508-896-5454.


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mar26 Brewster

Brewster Skippers host Regionals

The Brewster Bayside Skippers Competitive Jump Rope team, comprised of 20 kids from Brewster and the Nauset district, has been competing for over 25 years. The team features 2014 Grand National winner Adam Jernberg of Brewster, the best single rope jumper in the United States. The team is are supported in part by the Town of Brewster, proceeds from Brewster Whitecaps Cape Cod Baseball League home game concession sales and by a dedicated group of relentlessly fundraising parents. They're an educational non-profit sports organization affiliated with the USA Jump Rope www.usajumprope.org and are the hosts of the Regional event for the 3rd straight year. It will take place March 28, at Nauset High School from 8:30 a.m. until 6p.m. It should attract over 150 jumpers from all over the northeast. Two parents will compete in the freestyle pairs event. For more information visit the Facebook page www.facebook.com/brewsterbaysideskippers. to see the kids in action.


mar26 Chatham

Chatham Bars Inn fence not neighborly, selectmen say

John Huether is perplexed about the town's frequent imbroglios with the Chatham Bars Inn. He said for the last several years there has been spat after spat and the town recently had to take by eminent domain some of the resort's parking to protect the town's fishing industry. Now the town is again in an adversarial relationship with the posh tourist mecca, which wants to further fence off its shoreline property next to the fish pier. "Why are there such problems?" he asked selectmen earlier this month. "The business kind of relies on the name of Chatham." The selectmen had no answer, but members said they had asked and gotten no response. "If there is no CBI we'd still be Chatham," Huether, a member of the waterways committee continued, but "if there was no Chatham there wouldn't be CBI." So he said he can't imagine why the inn was always at odds with the town. John Speers, general manager of CBI didn't return calls by press time, but when he went before the zoning board of appeals to extend the fence that has bordered the fish pier parking lot for decades, he said he had tried to work with officials on the project. So far at least, CBI has been unable to add an aluminum section to the existing chainlink fence - an earlier extension, that officials said was installed without a permit, was knocked down a couple of years ago when a pick-up truck backed into it. Earlier this month, the zoning board of appeals unanimously denied the request for a special permit to extend the fence closer to the water - about 10 landward feet from mean high tide. "To me this fence says exclusion," said member zoning board member David Veach at the March 12 meeting. He said he understood that CBI had rights as private property owner, but the public had rights as well and the fence would make it difficult for people to walk along the beach - a right guaranteed under the Colonial Ordinances which protects fishing, fowling and navigation between the high and low water mark. Members of the zoning board said the revetment was so close to where the fence was proposed to be built that people would be scrambling over it - or over the fence - at high tide. Selectmen also spoke out against the fence at an earlier meeting and in a letter to the zoning board. "I'm absolutely, unabashedly opposed to this fence," said Selectman Seth Taylor. He said fishermen had historically stored dinghies on that beach and the fence would interfere with that tradition and the livelihoods of those who depend on access to the sea.


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mar26 Chatham

Chatham church fails to make selectmen's CPC cut

Selectmen unanimously voted to keep church and state separate, but town meeting will make the final decision. A recommendation by the community preservation committee that $147,000 be used to fund the restoration and protection of St. Christopher Church's exterior architecture was the only project not supported by the board. Community preservation committee chairman John Kaar said his board had struggled with the request as well, but many historic churches across the Commonwealth had benefited from community preservation act funds. "We have invested in the streetscape of Main Street," he said, adding the church was built in 1879. "And preserving that structure looking like Chatham was important, (as well as) keeping the façade and keeping the street view." Projects that were supported by selectmen included $15,000 in administrative costs, $250,000 for the affordable housing trust fund, $8,500 to supplement fund-raising for a World War II memorial and $28,500 to improve access to a "newly accreting beach" on Water Street. Kaar said there used to be a beach there but it eroded away close to 25 years ago. Now with changes in the shoreline it's back and the funds, coupled with about $20,000 from the Old Village Association, will go toward installing stairs and a viewing area of Chatham Harbor. "The steps are actually removable in case of expected damaging wind and weather," said Kaar. As it has done on three other occasions, the CPC recommended funding a historical survey requested by the Chatham Historical Commission. The $75,000 will help finish the survey of high priority properties, including researching the oyster shucking buildings at Barn Hill and Pilgrim Village Colony on White's Pond. The CPC also recommended funding $300,000 of a $900,000 request made by the town to create more parking at the so- called Marconi triangle at Ryder's Cove and create a park there as well. The $300,000 would fund a walking trail along the waterfront, as well as the parking and access required for the trail. The allocation would also fund restrooms and Kaar said the committee is asking officials to look at the now unused garage on the property, so the building of another structure could be avoided. Town meeting will also vote on a separate article for the $600,000 required to complete the proposal that has been discussed for years. Selectman Florence Seldin said she would only support the $300,000 if the $600,000 was supported as well. She didn't want the project to be done piecemeal, she said. The rest of the board also voiced support for the entire project, which has drawn some criticism from residents who say the area should be left in a natural state. Selectman Seth Taylor said public access to landings needs to be improved and over the years a lot of parking has been lost, but none has been added, and that doesn't bode well for a community that is defined by the sea.


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mar26 Harwich

'Tango' show combines percussion, music and dance

What started out as a way for percussionists from marching bands, in the early 1970s, to stay sharp in the off months has turned over the decades into a national sensation called Winter Percussion, with competitions drawing hundreds of groups from all over the country. Among those is the Orleans-based Spirit of America percussion ensemble, an award-winning group of students ages 10 to 22 from all over the Cape. The ensemble will perform two free looks at its new show "TANGO" Friday night at the Cape Cod Regional Technical High School in Harwich. The performance includes drums and other percussion instruments, as well as dancing and elaborate costumes. Amanda Schuman, a member of the front ensemble, had to learn to tango for the show. "Just learning to tango has been a struggle, but super fun," Schuman says. "I've taken some dance but this is (completely different). It involves a whole body commitment, both emotion and body." The show is only seven minutes long because it was developed for the upcoming Winter Guard International championships in Dayton, Ohio, which only allows competitors 10 minutes to set up, perform and break down equipment. Because of the show's brevity, the group will perform it twice in a row Friday night. TANGO "is based on exploring the emotions of love, anger and indifference," ensemble member Dan Pfieffer says. "For our first (section), we explore the more positive aspects of love. The second (section) starts with the question 'Is anger the enemy of love?'" The conclusion reached: No. Anger and love are not enemies because they are both aspects of passion. It's indifference that is the enemy. "Everything has been designed carefully to reflect those concepts," Pfieffer says of the show. "It is definitely a challenge to communicate that much depth in such a short time." The musical aspects of "TANGO" draw from a variety of Latin composers, including Michel Camilo, Julio Iglesias and Astor Piazzolla. For the first time, the group has added cajon drums, six-sided box-like drums, and were trained in their use by artist Damon Grant. Pfieffer, who performs on the snare line, says this new show, although brief in performance, took hundreds of hours to create from concept, design and rehearsal to final show. "There's a marching component, there are props, there's lots of choreography and artistry and creativity involved," says percussion director Ian Hale. Sharon Tingley, a member of the front ensemble, also took a leadership role in the design of the costumes and the show. "It's really exciting to get into the design aspect of the show," Tingley says. "Personally, the costume design was a great experience because it was way more complicated than I imagined." Although short, the show promises to be an evening of energy and excitement, according to Jennifer Lynch, marketing director. "It's a very active, vibrant program," she says. "This is a fun night, it's a great opportunity for kids to come out. It's amazing how many people just love drumming." Like many winter percussion groups, Spirit of America began as a way for marching band members to stay sharp in the winter months. It later evolved, Lynch says, into an award-winning ensemble that has marched and performed all over the world. Because of the large age range in the group, many performers stay in Spirit for a long time and pass on their knowledge to newer members." We grew up kind of in the group and now's our chance to share what we know with the younger people," Tingley says. The Winter Guard International World Championships will take place April 9-18, drawing 12,000 competitors from across the country. In 2012, Spirit of America took the gold medal in its division.


mar26 Harwich

Dog rescued off ice in Harwich

Widgeon a 10-month-old Labrador went chasing geese on Grassy Pond in back of his house Wednesday around 1 p.m. Of course, he fell through the ice. Harwich Fire and Rescue was dispatch to the scene to help with the rescue. Upon arrival, firefighters saw that the owner of the dog, David Nicholson, had already launched his kayak to save the animal.


mar26 Harwich

Largest Food Pantry on Cape Sees Growing Need

The mission of the Family Pantry of Cape Cod is simple: to provide food and clothing to those in need. But as the pantry has grown, so have its offerings and the need continues, according to Mary Anderson, the executive director of the pantry. "There are still challenges. . . . I certainly see improvement in the economy but I think as some people get on their feet and don't need us, somebody else gets their electric bill that just went up 30 percent," Anderson said. The pantry just celebrated 25 years last fall. It was started by a small group of volunteers of the St. Vincent de Paul Society out of Holy Trinity Church. They were giving out food vouchers and were having trouble keeping up with the need, so they decided to open a food pantry, Anderson said. From those humble beginnings, the pantry has grown to operate out of a 12,000 square foot warehouse. Since 2005, the number of people the pantry serves is up 70 percent, Anderson said. From a fish distribution to a garden, to a new large thrift shop, the pantry is growing to meet the need. The Family Pantry, which is the largest food pantry on Cape Cod, has clients from Bourne to Provincetown, with the largest number of clients coming from the town of Barnstable. The pantry has recently embarked on a program called Fish for Families, a partnership with the Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen's Alliance and through the alliance, the pantry distributed dogfish this winter. A distribution of skate wings is expected to take place in April. Amy Camenga, president of the board of directors of the Family Pantry, said, "We're able to afford this because of the price that they give us." A survey of pantry clients showed they would eat fish frequently if they could afford it. "It was pretty clear from the survey that people would eat a lot more fish if they could afford it," Anderson said. One of the statistics that often takes people by surprise, Anderson said, is that approximately two-thirds of the clients who come to the Family Pantry for food have at least one person in the household who is working and in many cases there are two people working. They just don't make quite enough to cover the cost of living here. About a year and a half ago, the pantry started a satellite pantry at Cape Cod Community College, which is managed by the college's Legacy Club under the pantry's operating principles. New this year, the Family Pantry is planning to start a mobile pantry using a grant it recently received from Blue Cross Blue Shield. Anderson said a business plan will be put together for the new program, which will likely begin on the Outer Cape with stops at the senior centers. "I think the seniors are probably our most under served population," she said. Mary Anderson, executive director of the Family Pantry of Cape Cod, and Amy Camenga, president of the board of directors of the Family Pantry, speak about the pantry's programs in the interview below.



mar26

Calling All Beach Lovers!

Do you love to walk along Cape Cod's ocean beaches, watch the magnificent marine wildlife, surf, sunbathe, kayak, SUP (stand up paddle board), canoe, swim or engage in any other type of recreational ocean activity? If so, your help is needed! The Northeast Ocean Plan is in development and decision-makers need more information on how visitors and residents enjoy New England's coast. This survey is a proactive opportunity for beach lovers who are 18+ years old to provide that missing information, to help identify New England's recreational areas and uses so they are part of the ocean planning process. If you don't identify your special coastal place, who will? Take the survey today and share the link with your friends!


mar26

Homeowners urge state to relax rules in fight against erosion

Regulations are too stringent, dredge materials should be used to renourish beaches not dumped at sea and environmental agencies should allow the use of more rock to hold back surf. Those were some of the comments made by the nearly 50 people who attended a public hearing Wednesday at Barnstable Town Hall sponsored by the Massachusetts Coastal Erosion Commission. The panel was created by the state Legislature to review the state's changing coastline and make recommendations on ways to stem the tide. The commission issued its report in January and is accepting public comments through April 7. Bruce Carlisle, director of the state's Office of Coastal Zone Management and a member of the commission, facilitated the hearing, which drew town leaders and homeowners from all over the Cape who largely praised the efforts. The hearing is the last of five held across the state seeking feedback on the report. The Cape meeting was originally scheduled for February but was delayed by a storm. "Cape Cod is at ground zero for coastal erosion," Ed Dewitt, executive director of the Association to Preserve Cape Cod, said. Hal Krause, former chairman of the Summer Residents Advisory Committee in Chatham and a retired geologist, said groins, revetments and breakwaters shouldn't be looked upon as poison. "God put a lot of rock on the earth, so we ought to use it," he said. But Kevin Galligan of East Orleans was critical of some of the materials approved to protect beaches. "Do we realize what we're doing?" he said. "We have to be mindful of the materials we're putting into resources that we're trying to protect."



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mar26

Business and Professional Women of Lower Cape Cod Scholarship Information

The Business Professional Women's group of Lower Cape Cod provides a scholarship each year. The application for this scholarship can be downloaded from this site. The Business and Professional Women of Lower Cape Cod will be awarding a $1000 scholarship in June. The purpose of this scholarship is to recognize local women in transition as they obtain training and education leading to career advancement, either in their present profession or business, or to their endeavor toward a new profession or business. Candidate Criteria:

  1. Candidate must live on the Lower or Outer Cape for a minimum of two (2) years.
  2. Candidate must be currently enrolled in a degree program or a certificate program
  3. Candidate should include a statement of financial need in their cover letter
  4. Candidate must be a female at least 21 years of age.
  5. Candidate must provide detail of course program, schedule and goals, including completion criteria.

BPWScholarshipApp


mar26

Hot tub: The perfect centerpiece for outdoor living

For a few years in the recent past, hot tubs fell out of favor (although they did star in quite a few jokes). Then came the rise in popularity of outdoor rooms - deck- or patio-type creations that provided a comfortable environment for relaxation, casual entertaining, and just plain enjoying the fresh air. Since a hot tub or Jacuzzi offers the ultimate in outdoor relaxation, it makes the perfect centerpiece for this kind of space. Type of tub: If you are considering buying a home spa system, you'll have a number of options - in-ground versus portable, atop a deck or discreetly built in. Although an in-ground spa looks fantastic, it is the costliest route. Should you choose a portable model, you can craft a custom look with a hot tub case that matches your decking material. Be sure to select a comfortable size, and one that your deck can safely support - they range from two-seaters to units that can accommodate 10 or more.
Surroundings: Whichever model you go for, always, always, have your hot tub installed to face a glorious view. No natural panorama to gaze at as you relax in the balmy water? No problem, just create your own. Install the hot tub as part of a sleek swimming pool. Alternatively, build an adjoining pond, stream, or waterfall, or a handsome fire pit or trendy fire-and-water feature. LED lighting adds a dramatic touch when you use your spa by night, and enhances the outdoor view from your window too.
Costs and maintenance: Cost to install a mid-range hot tub starts at about $2,000 and can run up to "the sky's the limit" for a luxurious multi-featured home spa. The expertise involved in lifting the heavy appliance into place and setting up its electrical components make this a job for professionals only. Once the tub has been installed, it will add approximately $25-50 per month to your electric bill in winter if you keep it warm all the time. A hot tub is easy to maintain. There's no need to drain after use, although you may want to change the water once or twice a year. A chemical cartridge system ensures that the water will be kept sparkling clean and odor-free. Simple-to-use test strips allow you to check the water quality on a regular basis. You will occasionally need to clean or replace the filter.
Keeping it green: The same eco-friendly technology that you use to save energy inside your home can be applied to your home spa. Use a solar thermal system to warm the water for less, and insulate the base of the tub to minimize heat loss. Turn down the default temperature a degree or two, and be sure to set the thermostat on "vacation" mode when you will be away from home for a while.
Spa stay-cation: An enormous advantage of a home spa is that it allows you to access the ultimate stay-cation whenever you want. The warm water, combined with hydro jets, provides relaxation that will benefit physical and emotional health. It seems to naturally lower blood pressure and ease stiff joints and sore muscles. Of course, anyone who is pregnant or has a health problem must consult his or her physician regarding hot tub use. While hot tubs do have a well-deserved reputation for inspiring a romantic atmosphere, they also provide wholesome family fun. When spa water is kept at a temperate 90 degrees Fahrenheit, it is safe for all ages. (Healthy adults can enjoy settings of up to 104 F.) Be sure to close up your tub with a locked cover when you're not using it to keep children and pets out. Your spa can be used year-round. In fact, when you're feeling next winter's chill, you'll be able to go outside to warm up! Just be sure that your hot tub install includes a sheltering windbreak such as a wall or nearby grove of trees. For summertime relaxation, construct a pergola to shade your spa from the sun's strongest rays. (www.networx.com/article/hot-tub-perfect-centerpiece-for-outdoor)


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