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Saturday, May 23, 2015

may23
Wellfleet-Eastham-Provincetown Orleans-Brewster-Chatham-Harwich

Memorial Day events on Outer & Lower Cape

Wellfleet: Ceremony will begin at 9 a.m. at Town Hall, 300 Main St., sponsored by American Legion Post 287.

Eastham: Ceremony will begin at 9 a.m. at Windmill Green across from Town Hall. Dave Schropfer will be master of ceremonies.

Provincetown: The ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. at the Provincetown Cemetery on Cemetery Road and will continue at 11 a.m. at the Doughboy Monument in front of Town Hall.

Orleans: Brief service and laying of wreath in Town Cove (near yacht club) will begin at 9:45 a.m., followed by march to the memorial stones at Academy Place for 10 a.m. ceremony featuring a brief speech and prayer. Orleans Police and Fire honor guards, Brewster VFW, Boy Scouts and the Nauset Regional Middle School band will take part. Refreshments served afterward at the Methodist Church, Main Street and Academy Place.

Brewster: The Brewster Veterans of Foreign War No. 9917 will hold a parade beginning at noon on Route 6A from the Brewster Baptist Church to the Council on Aging.

Chatham: Participants will assemble at Veterans Field Road parking lot at 9:30 a.m. and begin their walk to five different memorial sites at 9:55, with each stop featuring a brief ceremony, wreath placement, rifle salute and playing of taps. Stops are the World War I Memorial to the left of the Community Center; Nickerson Park; Oyster Pond parking lot, where a wreath will be laid on the water; the Civil War Memorial at Seaview and Main streets, where Scott Hamilton will recite the Gettysburg Address; and Veterans Circle, where Scouts will lead the Pledge of Allegiance, Laura Barabe will sing the national anthem, We Are the Men, an all-male choir, will perform and Sarah Marchio will play "Amazing Grace" on the bagpipes. World War II Memorial will be unveiled and dedicated afterward at Nickerson Park. Guest speaker for this event will be Coast Guard Capt. John T. Kondratowicz, commander of Sector Southeastern New England. In case of rain the Memorial Day ceremony will be at 10 a.m. in the Community Center.

Harwich: Ceremony will begin at 9:40 a.m. at Brooks Park in Harwich Center and feature music by the Harwich Town Band.


may23 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Energy Fair on June 20

The Wellfleet Energy Committee (WEC) is sponsoring an Energy Fair on Saturday, June 20th, from 11am - 4pm at the Wellfleet Council on Aging (715 Old Kings Highway). Vendors across a range of energy-related technologies including solar, heat pump hot water heaters, geothermal, heat exchangers, insulating curtains and shades, insulation, energy conservation and energy efficiency will display. Non-profit and community organizations will also display. The the Community Garden will be open for people to browse and ask questions. There will be speakers throughout the day. The goal of the Energy Fair is to provide an information clearinghouse for Wellfleet and Lower Cape residents looking to conserve energy, become more energy efficient and adopt sustainable policies. WEC members are very excited about the opportunity for Wellfleet to continue its tradition as a leader in energy conservation and energy efficiency. The Solarize Wellfleet program held in 2013 was extremely successful. The town of Wellfleet is now ranked #2 in the state of Massachusetts as measured in terms of the percentage of residence homes with solar installations. Furthermore, WEC has been working towards attaining a Net Zero Electrical Energy status for the town of Wellfleet, which may make it the first town in the country to do so.


may23 Wellfleet

Birdhouse auction at Prez Hall

The eighth annual Birdhouse and Garden Auction at Wellfleet Preservation Hall is set for Saturday, May 23. Live and silent auctions are from 4 to 6 p.m.; doors open for prevews at noon. Artists, artisans, builders, community members and woodworkers have created unique hand-painted and crafted designs for birdhouses as well as other garden inspired art including paintings, sculpture, photography and more. Works by noted Cape Cod artists Ellen LeBow, Craig Converse, Dorothy Strauss, Paul Suggs and Lois Hirshberg are among this year's lineup of participants. The Keltic Kids, an Irish music band made of kids from across the Cape, will be featured as well. This is the eighth year of the project that began as a fund-raiser for the restoration of Prez Hall. Proceeds from the event now support year-round programming at Preservation Hall. Admission is free. "The Birdhouse Project started with the idea of recycling some of the old materials from the building as a part of a our green building project. Building habitat for our nearest neighbors - the birds that inhabit the lovely garden park behind the hall- out of some of the materials inspired a lot of creativity in the community," says Anne Suggs, founding board member of the hall. "The birdhouses and garden art become little pieces of history from the hall," she adds. For more information, call 508-349-1800 or visit wellfleetpreservationhall.org/. Cape Air and 3 Harbors Realty and are the sponsors of the event.


may23 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Preservation Hall's auction features handmade birdhouses and garden art

w and bid on handmade birdhouses and eclectic works of garden-inspired art by local artists and creative community members. Among this year's participants: artists Ellen LeBow, Craig Converse, Dorothy Strauss, Paul Suggs and Lois Hirshberg. The event will feature silent and live auctions; live musicians, including the Keltic Kids; hors d'oeuvres; and a cash bar. All proceeds help support year-round programming at the hall.

When: 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday
Where: Wellfleet Preservation Hall, 335 Main St.
Admission: Free
Information: wellfleetpreservationhall.org or 508-349-1800


may23 Wellfleet

Yard Sale & Birdhouse Auction Planned in Wellfleet

Memorial Day weekend always brings lots of visitors, who stream onto Cape Cod, braving heavy traffic, for a first taste of summer. But this Saturday will feel more like winter with a high temperature of only sixty degrees. Yikes! There are two events of note this Saturday. Don't miss the yard sale at the Transfer Station, organized by Cape Cool from 8 to 12. The funds raised go toward a scholarship for a local student who is interested in environmental work. Then, at noon, head over to Preservation Hall for a first look at the birdhouses created by Wellfleet artists and non-artists alike. I love this annual event, which raises funds for activities at Preservation Hall. (Above, a "birdhouse" imagined by Paul Suggs, for auction two years in a row.) The live auction will take place this year from five to seven. So, plan to attend both of these events, one organized by Cape Cool and the other by Prez. Hall, two Wellfleet institutions which deserve your support.


may23 Wellfleet

Kim Shkapich goes organic in Wellfleet

When someone who is both tenacious and talented creates a new business, success is likely, particularly if that someone is Kim Shkapich and the business is Lola's Local Food Lab in Wellfleet. After years of research, experimentation and selling her wares at farmers markets, she will open a shop in Wellfleet this weekend. It's been a long haul to get there between finding the right location and getting the permitting. She is known for her drinkable shrub vinegars and spice rubs along with traditional jams and jellies. Everything is made from fresh, local, organic products. Drinking vinegar sounds odd but the practice dates back to colonial times when certain "shrubs" were used to create a common tonic. Today, people mix them with soda water to create a tart and fruity beverage. Shrubs are also used in trendy craft cocktails. Before moving to the Cape, the architect and graphic designer lived near the Twin Towers in New York. She left after 9/11, when colleagues were fighting over the new construction project that would allow parking for 300 buses. "The city had changed," she says. And she wanted to live by the sea. "I went to every beach from New Jersey to Maine. Maine was too rocky and cold. Rhode Island was for sailors," says Shkapich. But Wellfleet was just right, with its beautiful beaches and a lively arts community. Seven years ago, she began pondering how she could use her skills on the Cape. "My mother was a working woman in Chicago. When I was 7, she taught me to cook. I was always interested in food." She also learned preservation techniques from her grandmother. And Shkapich had a restaurant for a few years when she was between colleges and switching her major from Russian to architecture. The answer came in the form of a hobby. She made a blend of spices, playfully named Universal Magic Dust, that she gave to friends. "People started calling me for it. It's the typical entrepreneur story," she says with a grin. Shkapich describes her product as "sunny, saucy, seductive," and it is the mix that put her on the map at the farmers markets. "First you taste the smoke from Spanish paprika, next the sweet heat of chili vibrates; the taste of thyme is followed by the sassy pop of mustard and celery seeds," says the enthusiastic saleswoman. She chose the name Lola's Local Food Lab because she liked the alliteration and it also went with her location "under the Lighthouse Restaurant." Although Lola is a fictitious name, she uses her mother's portrait on her products. Savvy in how to market things, she says, her real name, Betty, didn't have the right ring to it.


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may23 Wellfleet-Provincetown-Orleans

Cool Tunes in Wellfleet, a new band in Orleans and jazz in P'Town

Holy moly, can you believe it's Memorial Day Weekend?! Why it seems like just last week I was shoveling and complaining about the snow. Before we know it, I'll be complaining about the humidity. It's the official beginning of the floodgates opening here on our little spit of land. There will be much merriment and fun to be had by all, so let's see what kind of shenanigans we can get up to this weekend.
Beachcomber

The iconic beach bar, The Beachcomber is opening this weekend! I was down there a couple of weeks ago, and, thanks to winter, it's closer than ever to the water! They have a great weekend of music, food and drink, so make sure you get yourself down, way down, to Wellfleet to Cahoon Hollow and welcome the season on opening night, Thursday. They will have the Ticks, the Greenheads, and Earth Jr.
VB and the Buzz

There's a new band in town you should go check out on Saturday night at the Land Ho! located at 38 Main Street, Orleans. VB and the Buzz will have the place rocking from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. It's a band of local musicians, so come on out and show them your support!
The Bert Jackson Quartet

If you are head to Provincetown on Sunday make sure to hit the Red Inn which will be featuring the Bert Jackson Quartet playing at brunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Red Inn is located at 12 Commercial St.


may23 Wellfleet

The VIP Lounge: Jimmy Tingle

Comedian Jimmy Tingle can't get enough of Cape Cod. The Cambridge resident and his wife, Catherine, spend as much time as possible at their summer home in Wellfleet. We caught up with the hard-working stand-up comic, commentator, and founder of Humor for Humanity (more information on his website www.jimmytingle.com) to talk about all things travel. Favorite vacation spot? Wellfleet. My wife, Catherine, and I fell in love with Wellfleet back in the '90s when I did a month run at the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater. I've been back every summer since to perform on the Cape, and about 10 years ago, we bought a house there. That's a commitment. The area is not only beautiful, with great ponds, beaches, and dunes protected by the National Seashore, but the theater audiences are a really eclectic mix of Cape locals, New Englanders, New Yorkers, and Canadians who really appreciate theater and love to laugh.


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may23 Eastham

'Dr. Beach' Names Coast Guard Beach Number Seven on Top Beaches List

The coastal science professor known as Dr. Beach has named Coast Guard Beach in Eastham as the 7th best place to grab some sun and surf. Florida International University Professor Stephen Leatherman ranks beaches based on water and sand quality, safety and management. Coast Guard Beach gets high marks for its view, bike and shuttle bus accessibility and the nearby old Coast Guard station. "The two most important criteria are clean water and clean sand. Without that, you don't have anything and Cape Cod jutting far out in the Atlantic Ocean certainly meets that criteria," said Leatherman. He also said the size of Coast Guard Beach is a major attraction. "A huge beach really. You can walk quite a distance along the sea cliffs or down to the Nauset Spit, down to the inlet." Dr. Beach says the Cape has a special place in his heart as he once lived on the Lower and Outer Cape. He also wrote a book about the shifting sands here, "Cape Cod Field Trips: From Glaciers to Beaches," and says there is a long history to our beaches. "In fact, there are maps of the area going back to the 1600's. Early explorers mapped this area because they thought it was such an important area," he said. Coast Guard Beach is among six contained within the boundaries of the Cape Cod National Seashore. The others include Nauset Light, also in Eastham, Maconi Beach in Wellfleet, Head of the Meadow in Truro and Race Point and Herring Cove Beaches, both in Provincetown. The Cape Cod National Seashore was established as a national park in 1961, signed into law by President John F. Kennedy. It has become one of the most popular destinations for summer visitors, attracting more than 4.5 million people each year. Waimanalo Bay Beach Park on Oahu, Hawaii, received Dr. Beach's top ranking this year. Leatherman says Waimanalo Bay has the longest stretch of beach on Oahu and boasts powdery white sand with bright turquoise water. Combined with cleanliness and safety, it beat out Barefoot Beach in Florida as the top pick for 2015. Hamoa Beach on Maui also made this year's list. Leatherman has been ranking the nation's beaches for a quarter of a century.


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may23 Eastham

CapeCast: Why we love Coast Guard Beach

On today's CapeCast: Coast Guard Beach in Eastham has been named one of America's Top Ten Beaches in 2015 by beach guru Dr. Beach--find out why he loves it and why we do too!



may23 Eastham

Presentation on preventing B&Es in Eastham

Presented by two of Cape Cod's "professional" house breakers - and a guy who helped nab them. You'll hear first, via specially produced video, from two men who have committed dozens of recent home breaks on the Cape. They'll be on tape because when it was filmed less than three months ago they were doing time at the county jail in Bourne. Out of business then. Back on the street now. Up next will be John Szucs, who currently runs the Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) in Barnstable Village. Working closely with Eastham police detectives and under the direction of Sheriff Jim Cummings, himself a former State Police detective, Szucs will explain the forensics utilized to bring home breakers and other burglars to justice. It seldom happens quickly, of course, and it can leave dozens of break-in victims frustrated and far from whole. Truth be told, it's why we're bringing you this presentation! Sponsored by Eastham Police in cooperation with their Neighborhood watch group, and the Barnstable County Sheriff's Office: Striving cooperatively to make this a safer place to live.


may23 Provincetown

A Wampanoag welcome at Pilgrim Monument on Thursday, May 28

Clam fritters, smoked salmon, fresh oysters and other Native American specialties are on the menu for a reception with members of the Wampanoag Tribe at the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum. The celebration is connected to an exhibition titled "Captured 1614: A Wampanoag History," the story of the abduction of Wampanoag men 400 years ago. That abduction was a prelude to events leading to the historic voyage of the Mayflower in 1620. The event will feature the "Wampanoag Nation Honor Song" performed by James Moreis, a native interpreter at Plimoth Plantation; and guest speaker, Paula Peters, Mashpee Wampanoag tribal member and executive producer of the "Captured 1614" exhibition.

When: 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday
Where: Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum, One High Pole Hill Road
Tickets: $15; members: $10
Information: www.pilgrim-monument.org


may23 Provincetown

Restoring weathered but beloved Fisherman's Wharf photos

The huge photographs on Fisherman's Wharf, as faded as the weather-beaten shingles on which they hang, are about to be replaced after a GoFundMe campaign raised the necessary cash in less than four hours. The installation, titled "They Also Faced the Sea," include four of what was originally five black-and-white, 10-by-14-foot prints of older Portuguese women photographed by the late Norma Holt in the 1970s. Holt, who died in 2013, photographed and interviewed Provincetown's women, who kept the town running while the isolated community's men were at sea, said Pamela Mandell, the photographer's close friend who has written about her work. "The women, who were between the ages of 85 and 100, talked about the hardships they had faced, some of which included beatings from hard-drinking fishermen," Mandell wrote in Provincetown Arts last year. '"Poverty was the norm,' Holt wrote in her journal," Mandell wrote. "But she noted, too, how these women kept the town running by working, for example, as telephone operators or pharmacy clerks, while also caring for their children when the men were at sea." In 2003, Holt took a suggestion from gallery owner Ewa Nogiec and had black-and-white photographs of Almeda Segura, Eva Silva, Mary Jason, Bea Cabral and Frances Raymond blown up and placed on the end of the wharf so their weathered visages are literally facing the sea. The project struck people, whether they were in Provincetown for three days or three generations, said Jennifer Cabral, (no relation to Bea Cabral), who has led the effort to restore the prints. They were only supposed to last two weeks, Jennifer Cabral said. But four of the five are still in place 12 years later, though faded by the sun and weather. The image of Segura was blown down during a storm. Cabral did not want to see them fade further and become emblematic of the disappearing Portuguese fishing community. "They were becoming holograms for a way of life that once was," she said. So, as a member of the community group Provincetown 365, which is seeking long-term community improvements, Cabral suggested restoring the photographs as a project. But she had no idea how dear the images were to people until she launched the GoFundMe campaign on May 15. "It was crazy," she said. "It was like watching an auction. There were tears running down my face." Donations ranging from $5,000 to $10 reached the $10,000 goal in 3.5 hours, she said. In the end, 84 donors put up more than $12,000. Cabral will keep the extra cash in case of repairs or emergencies. And now Holt's negatives, held by the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum, will be scanned by volunteer archivist Dave Drabkin into a digital format, said Abby Clayton, account executive for Seaport Graphics. Seaport Graphics in Boston, which owns a 16-foot wide printer, will print them on vinyl mesh, Clayton said. "It's all pretty straightforward as long as you have a giant printer," Clayton said. Cabral hopes to have an unveiling at the end of June, during the annual Portuguese Festival.


may23 Provincetown

Big visions come to fruition in Provincetown's little barn on the hill

"We don't want to be [seen as] the 'ivory barn' on the hill," says Julia Glass, cofounder of Twenty Summers. Yet the Provincetown arts series now in its second season, which runs through June 15, is, in fact, housed in a barn. The barn is indeed located on the top of a hill - the historic art studio "barn" that Charles Hawthorne built on a sandy bluff in 1907. And it's historic, of course, because the art classes Hawthorne taught became the foundation of the Provincetown Arts Colony. Glass's allusion to academia's proverbial ivory tower isn't far off the mark either. Its 2015 series of events is geared toward the thinking crowd, if not the unabashedly academic. But that doesn't mean they're no fun. Not with a season featuring the blunt charm of former U.S. Congressman Barney Frank talking about his new book "Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage." Or the bubbly harmonies of the Cape's own Parkington Sisters or the urban folk of singer-guitarist Patty Larkin. Then there's a "docudrama" presented by screen star Mary Stuart Masterston ("Fried Green Tomatoes," "Law & Order: SVU"), who's directing the piece, and her husband, Jeremy Davidson, who wrote it. The fun typically takes on an eclectic tone. This Saturday, May 23, there's a program called "Good-Bye Sailor: An Evening of Fond and Not-So-Fond Farewells, Spoken and Sung." Starting at 7 p.m., it's billed as "an evening of classical music and readings about nautical wanderlust," with dramatic music by L'Académie chamber orchestra and literary experts ranging from Homer to Robert Browning read by National Book Award-winners M.T. Anderson ("The Pox Party") and Glass ("Three Junes"). Also this weekend, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Provincetown regular Michael Cunningham joins New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik in an intimate conversation with each other and the audience. Topics promise to range from the lofty to the lowbrow. The evening, called "No Passport Needed: Canada to California, Paris to Provincetown," begins at 7 p.m. Sunday, May 24. There's also an off-site event at 5 p.m. Sunday, May 31, at The Schoolhouse Gallery - a conversation and audience Q&A with photographer David Hilliard and Hunter O'Hanian, director of the Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay & Lesbian Art in New York City and former executive director of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. The Schoolhouse is located at 494 Commercial St., Provincetown.


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may23 Provincetown

Twenty Summers Underway for Second Year in Provincetown

The second summer of Twenty Summers, the month-long nonprofit arts center in Provincetown located in the historic Hawthorne Barn, is underway through June 15. The lineup includes concerts, talks and a play. The concerts will feature iconic singer-songwriter Stephin Merritt of The Magnetic Fields, local guitar visionary Patty Larkin, Wellfleet's own Parkington Sisters, and the Boston-based L'Académie Chamber Orchestra. Several of the events have already sold out and those have been marked below. On the literary side over the next four weekends, there will be a discussion between legendary writers Michael Cunningham and Adam Gopnik, gay-rights activist and former congressman Barney Frank will discuss his new book, and wordsmiths Stephin Merritt and Rives will hash out the beauty of two-letter words. Other events include a docudrama by Jeremy Davidson and Mary Stuart Masterson, a conversation with photographer David Hilliard, and, to close out the series, a symposium on the work and teachings of artist Hans Hofmann. Attending events at Twenty Summers is an intimate affair. The room holds up to 60 guests, so each event is a magical experience. On Saturday, May 23 is Good-Bye, Sailor: An Evening of Fond and Not-So-Fond Farewells, Spoken and Sung. This is an evening of classical music and readings about nautical wanderlust. The musical performance by L'Académie chamber orchestra will feature dramatic pieces by Henry Purcell, Marc-Antoine Charpentier, Elisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre, Marin Marais, and others. Literary excerpts, ranging from Homer to Robert Browning, will be read by National Book Award-winning authors M. T. Anderson and Julia Glass. The show is at 7 p.m. and costs $25. The following event is SOLD OUT. On Sunday, May 24 is No Passport Needed: Canada to California, Paris to Provincetown . . . with Tour Guides Michael Cunningham and Adam Gopnik. Pulitzer prize-winning novelist Michael Cunningham (a Ptown regular) and the Canadian-American New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik (who's partial to Wellfleet) will unite onstage for the first time ever, to talk of matters newsworthy and intimate, factual and imaginary, lofty and lowbrow. Learning to drive, channeling Virginia Woolf, parenting in a foreign country, trespassing in the forbidden forest of the fairy tale-no topic will be off limits. An audience Q&A session and book signing will follow the conversation. This event is at 7 p.m. and costs $20. On Friday, May 29 is "the little things": A Docudrama by Jeremy Davidson, directed by Mary Stuart Masterson. This is a reading of a documentary theater piece about one family's journey through the enigma of Lyme disease, based on transcribed conversations with the Elone family of Poughkeepsie, New York. The piece stars Marcel Spears, Brandon Michael Hall,Jean-Remy Monnay, and Kellie Overbey. This event is at 7 p.m. and costs $25. Storyhorse, the entity behind "the little things" was created by Jeremy Davidson and Mary Stuart Masterson. It is a documentary theater project based on transcribed conversations with people in the Hudson Valley, focusing on the social, environmental, and medical issues in our communities. On Saturday, May 30, is The Parkington Sisters in Concert. When Ariel, Sarah, and Rose Parkington of the Parkington Sisters pick up their instruments to strike up a song, the air begins to buzz. Hailing from Wellfleet, Massachusetts, the Parkington Sisters cut their teeth on music from the very beginning. Daughters of a prog rock musician and a classically trained guitarist and songwriter, they were raised playing music on picturesque Cape Cod. They became a band performing on the streets of Provincetown and since then have shared the stage with artists ranging from Mavis Staples and Bruce Springsteen to Dispatch and the Dropkick Murphys, performing in radio studios and stages across the US, Canada and Europe, including New York's Radio City Music Hall. The event is at 7 p.m. and costs $20, but it's sold out.



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may23 Provincetown

Triple tribute at the Berta Walker Gallery in Provincetown

Three treasured, late Provincetown artists are the focus of a triad of shows at the Berta Walker Gallery, 208 Bradford St., Provincetown. The shows, "Selina Trieff: A Celebration of Life through Color," "Hans Hofmann: Made in Provincetown" and "Blanche Lazzell: 2015, Lazzell's Centennial in Provincetown, open from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 22, and run through June 14.


may23 Provincetown

Seth Rudetsky talks about hosting Rosie and other stars

As summer approaches, the eastern-most point in Massachusetts once again turns a little bit New York City. Provincetown is 300 miles from the Big Apple, but what theatrical type doesn't want to be out of the concrete jungle and frolicking at the Cape's No. 1 adult playground? No doubt, many of the actors call their time on the Outer Cape a working holiday. One of the great places they've got to work - that is, to sing and chat - is now at Provincetown Town Hall, with the expansion of the Broadway @ The Art House series, still happening at the 110-seat theater, to include a new Broadway @ Town Hall schedule at the 650-seat town hall auditorium. The series -- one of three Broadway series in Provincetown this summer -- features a cavalcade of Broadway and cabaret stars, kicking off its fifth year on Sunday with comedian/actress/talk show host Rosie O'Donnell making her first appearance with the series. Your host that night and for most of the season will be mega-hyphenate and series co-creator Seth Rudetsky, who can lay claim to being an actor-pianist-playwright-Sirius/XM host-novelist-web star. "The vibe you're getting is you're sitting with us at brunch and hearing celebs tell great theater stories," says Rudetsky, via an email interview. "I don't pre-plan much. Usually we have a bunch of songs to choose from and I put them in the order I think will work. Often, I'll surprise someone and make them sing something unplanned. Like when Sutton Foster revealed she played Annie as a kid, I immediately ran to the piano and had her haul out 'Tomorrow.' "I love P-town. So happy I get to see my vacation destination for a job every week!" Upcoming performers will include Matthew Broderick and Sarah Jessica Parker; Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka; Audra McDonald and Will Swenson; Norm Lewis, Kerry Butler, Jane Krakowski and Lea DeLaria. Rudetsky is no doubt happy to begin with old pal O'Donnell, for whom he wrote for five years. Here's what past experience has taught him to expect from O'Donnell: "I ask one question and she does an amazing stand-up routine for an answer."


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may23 Provincetown

Pop-up Provincetown

Paintings, prints and sculpture representing a cross section of styles and eras of Provincetown art opens at a pop-up show called "Camp Provincetown" at 7 p.m. Friday, May 22, in the Woodman Shimko Gallery, 398 Commercial St., Provincetown. The show, called "Searching for the Motherlode," runs for four days only, closing May 25, and features work by Vicky Tomayko, Joey Mars, Cassandra Complex, Bob Gasoi, Richard Pepitone, Karen Cappotto, Silas Finch, Andrew Jacob, Michael Koehler, Dominque Pecce, Matty Briggs, Jessica Teffer, Adam O'Day and Brooks Whelan Sr.


may23 Provincetown

Pop-up photo show in Provincetown focuses on LGBTQ youth coming out stories

Rachelle Lee Smith had a positive and supported coming out experience. But when she got to college, she met students who'd gone through terrible ones. So when Smith began studying photography at Philadelphia's University of the Arts, she decided to document the range of experiences with a photo essay. "I wanted to capture the right here, right now," she says. Fast forward 10 years and Smith's ongoing photographic essay "Speaking Out: Queer Youth in Focus" is now a book, published this year by PM Press and Reach & Teach with a foreword and afterword by Candace Gingrich and Graeme Taylor of the Human Rights Campaign. Over the course of the project, Smith, a Pennsylvania native who lives in Philadelphia, photographed a diverse group of 60 to 70 young people, ages 14 to 24, who identified as queer (i.e., lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning). The images incorporate both photojournalism, which was Smith's original field of study, and art photography, her eventual major. Smith is bringing mounted images from the project to Provincetown for a "pop up exhibition" over Memorial Day weekend, and will talk about the photographs and the process of bringing "Speaking Out" to fruition. She will appear at the Provincetown Public Library on May 24 and 25, and will also sign books at Womencrafts on May 25. "I didn't start out with the intent for it to be a book. But people kept asking," she says, adding that the book form is an affordable and accessible way to catalog the project. Smith shot all her photos on film with her subjects posed against a white background. She wanted the images to speak for themselves without distractions or outside influences. The youths in the photos also speak for themselves: each expresses his or her feelings by writing directly onto the image. "I like the tactile, tangible quality of film," says Smith. Having the youths write in their own style and by hand was part of that personal, direct approach, she says. Begun when Smith was the age of her subjects (she's now in her 30s), "Speaking Out" chronicles how the lives and concerns of LGBTQ youth have changed over 10 years. "A decade ago there was more fear and shame and anxiety, and now there's more pride and ownership and happiness," notes Smith. "There are more young people who don't fit into labels and who are creating their own labels." Since her project "crosses so many platforms" from education to art to LGBT issues, Smith says she's now working with teachers to create a lesson plan for using the book in the classroom. It's her hope that "Speaking Out" will speak to all kids, not just LGBTQ.


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may23 Provincetown

Provincetown Players turns 100

Provincetown, the oldest continuous arts colony in the country, is also heralded as the birthplace of the Provincetown Players, whose innovations helped to shape modern American drama. In July 1915, new ideas about politics, feminism, arts, psychology, and theater came to artistic fruition in Provincetown with the creation of a non-commercial, experimental theater led by Greenwich Village writers, painters and philosophers who traveled to the tip of Cape Cod to write, direct and act in short plays. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of this milestone, the Provincetown Theater will host the Provincetown Players Centennial Celebration in July. Mark the dates: Over three weekends, Thursdays through Saturdays, July 2 to 18, the Provincetown Theater will present "Then and Now," with four productions each evening, of short plays written during the Provincetown Players' formative years: Suppressed Desires by George Cram Cook and Susan Glaspell, produced by the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater; "Constancy," by Neith Boyce, produced by the Provincetown Theater; "Trifles," by Susan Glaspell, produced by the Payomet Performing Arts Center, and "The Sniper," by Eugene O'Neill, produced by CETK Arts. Tickets can be purchased at provincetowntheater.org or by calling 508-487-7487.


may23 Provincetown

WOMR: Arts Week with Jeannette de Beauvoir - Mark Cortale Presents @ The Art House



may23 Provincetown

End of an Era for Adams After 146 Years

After 146 years, as the oldest business operating in the same Provincetown location for all that time, the shop that will perhaps forever be known to Townies and frequent PTown visitors as Adams Pharmacy, finishes that legacy by moving across the street. Known at various times as 252 and as 254 Commercial Street, the house at the corner of Commercial and Gosnold streets was built about 1850, with the small front yard giving way at some point to the storefront that was built on sometime later. In 1869, Dr. John M. Crocker, who was the original publisher of The Provincetown Advocate, was living in the house when he started printing his weekly newspaper. It seems that the pharmacy business was started in the same year. Born and raised in Provincetown, Dr. Crocker had graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1866, and practiced medicine here for some 20 years. John D. Adams lent his name to the business when he bought it in 1875. Later, relatives in the Norman Cook Family got involved with the business, followed by Norman Jr., who ran the place for over 40 years, beginning in the 1930s. He was a volunteer on the Provincetown Fire Department, as well as a licensed pharmacist.
Adams' Pharmacy, at the right, about 1880. Gosnold Street sign is on the tree.

His wife Dorothy ran the store while her husband served briefly in the Pacific in WWII, having been drafted into the Navy. They eventually passed down the management of the shop to Joe Ward, whom they had more or less "adopted" when he had begun working at the store as a troubled teen, needing a home. Adams Pharmacy has always been a sort of gathering place for PTown folks. After the second enlargement of the storefront there was plenty of space for three tables in the center of the room, where people could have a cup of tea while they discussed the events of the day or swapped stories and rumors.
The town shovels out after a huge snowstorm in 1939.

When a long counter with twirling stools and an old fashioned soda fountain was installed, the place instantly became a hangout for high school kids sipping sodas after class and on weekends, and by then most of the town was starting each day with a hot cup of coffee at that counter, along with a couple of juicy tidbits from a neighbor or two. Vincent Duarte bought the property in 1989, and he continued to run the pharmacy. When he removed the beloved soda fountain and counter in 2003, the entire town seemed to go through a period of mourning.
This photo from Adams' Facebook page looks like it was probably taken in the 1950s. Notice the old ice cream chest.

Tables and a few chairs were once again employed, and folks could still stop in for an ice cream treat from the self-serve freezer, or share a little gossip over a newspaper and a cup of coffee, but it just was never quite the same. Although Duarte still owns the shop today, he sold the pharmacy interest in the business to Stop and Shop when they came to Provincetown in 2009. I'm afraid this week's move will really prove to be the end of an era as Adams moves across Gosnold Street, trading places with Big Vin's Liquors.


may23 Orleans

Scootin' Scallop Paddlesports Regatta in Orleans

The sixth annual Scootin' Scallop Paddlesports Regatta will be held the Monday of Memorial Day Weekend, May 25 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Meetinghouse Pond Landing off Barley Neck Road. The event is for kayakers, stand-up paddleboarders, and canoes. The parade of kayaks and SUPs traverses a three-mile loop that will take paddlers down The River into Little Pleasant Bay and out to Sampson's Island. If you want to race, there is an optional race, too. Participants paddle or row kayaks, stand-up paddleboards, canoes, dory, dingy, sculls, surf skis. The public can view the start of the Scootin' Scallop at Meetinghouse Pond Landing or as the regatta passes River Road Landing. The Paddlesports Regatta can also be viewed from Kent's Point off Monument Road in Orleans. Event is free, pre-registration is not required. Info: Dick Hilmer 508-255-2349 or on Facebook: Explore Cape Cod fan page/events, in photos, under album, Scootin Scallop.


may23 Orleans

Orleans art cottages extend season

The popularity of the art cottages downtown has convinced organizers to not only add more, but also extend the season. "They were very well received," said Todd Thayer, who owns the property where the cottages sit along a winding path graced by outdoor sculpture and vibrant plantings. "It's a really inexpensive way for artists to get exposure." Last year there were three small cottages with local artists showing and selling their work at Orleans Marketplace. This year there will be eight, and instead of just being open in the height of the summer they will open up beginning on Memorial Day weekend. Come July they will be open five days a week - Wednesday through Sunday. Those in the area in recent days may have seen some powerwashing and prepping happening on CVS's large brick wall that faces the Hot Chocolate Sparrow, which is just across the lot from Orleans Marketplace and the cottages. Thayer owns that property as well and has enlisted artists to paint a mural. He is working with others to create a pocket park in front. The mural, which will begin to take shape in June, will recognize a pivotal part of the town's history. "It's a celebration of the 100th anniversary of when the railroad came to Orleans," he said. "It is just another way to draw attention to the area that is fun." Thayer, a native, has been working on creating public places in the downtown that people are drawn to, not just happen by. That seems to be the case with the cottages, he said. Thayer said that in conversations with visitors it seems that people go see the cottages and then come back on different occasions with friends and family, which is unlike the artist shanties in Hyannis that get more ferry traffic. "These seem more ingrained in the community," he said. To find out more about the artists and the cottages, visit artcottages.com.


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may23 Orleans

In Tune with Denya LaVine of Orleans

You can count on Denya LeVine to hit the right note wherever she appears-whether it's at music festivals, concerts, parties, benefits or schools. That's because as a full-time performing musician, Denya's fiddle, ukulele and singing fascinates her listeners. " I like making people smile," she explains. "It's a thrill making music and watching people leave a performance happier than when they came. That makes me happy too." Denya illustrated that joy during a ukulele lesson she was giving to several adults at the Cape Abilities Center in Hyannis. "Here's how you hold it. Good! Now strum, strum," she tells the students who place their hands on their instruments, start playing and look pleased. Working at Cape Abilities in Hyannis and Eastham, at day care centers, senior centers, nursing homes and playing in bands are among the most important ways Denya has illustrated the joy of music to Cape Codders for the last 35 years. Denya's mane of salt and pepper hair and warm personality epitomize the free-spirited music she delivers to students-often as a volunteer-as well as to paying audiences. Music, she believes, can have a powerful and healthy effect upon others. "When people listen to something that pleases them, it raises their endorphins and offers them the opportunity to reflect in the midst of their lives," she said. One of the busiest of those lives is Denya's own. As a child growing up in Sharon, she initially studied violin with Sheldon Rotenberg of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. She also once heard Pete Seeger at a fundraiser in a Boston home. At age 15, while attending boarding school at Cushing Academy in Asburnham, she put away her violin and later became a theater major at Ithaca College. By then the Vietnam years were in full swing and like thousands of other young people, Denya embraced the counterculture and moved to New York City. There, she worked her way up from a menial job to become the box office treasurer at Filmore East, one of the coolest Lower East Side concert halls specializing in rock, jazz and folk music.


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may23 Orleans

Plant Sale at Nauset Regional Middle School

On May 23 and 24, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. there will be a plant sale at the brand spanking new greenhouse at Nauset Regional Middle School. The students have been working hard planting, watering and caring for these new little plants. You will be able to choose between Proven Winners in 10-inch peat baskets in a veritable rainbow of colors. The middle school is located at 70 Route 28, Orleans.


may23 Orleans

Knack in Orleans: Much anticipated eatery lives up to hype

Every so often you come across a business that is doing every single thing right. The Knack in Orleans is one such place. Brothers Van and Michael Haidas decided to perfect the Cape Cod roadside stand and the choices they have made say a lot about the type of people they are. Every single thing on the menu is handmade in house using the best local ingredients they can find. The sirloin burgers ($6 for a classic single and $8.50 for a double) are made with meat ground by butcher Rick Backus at Nauset Farms in East Orleans. The fresh seafood comes from Cape Fish and Lobster in Hyannis. For produce, they buy from Cape Abilities Farm in Dennis and Surrey Farms in Brewster. Ice cream sandwiches are made with homemade cookies, filled with The Knack's own soft serve ice cream and frozen. Dessert doesn't feel like a guilty pleasure because The Knack's owners donate 10 percent of dessert proceeds every day to local charities like Cape Abilities, Camp Amerikids and the Lower Cape Outreach Council's food pantries. The Haidas brothers come from a long line of restaurateurs. Their grandfather opened Kream n' Kone in 1953 and their father and uncle opened the first Cooke's Seafood in 1977. Both brothers worked at Cooke's, and in addition to creating their own recipes, they employ a few family secrets. All that sounds wonderful, but the best part is the quality of the food is as good as their story, and very reasonably priced. I recently visited with my mother and son and we were all blown away by our meals. In true roadside stand fashion, you order at a window and then go find a seat in the patio dining room. The patio has thick vinyl curtains and heaters in the ceiling so the weather is never an obstacle.


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may23 Orleans

July 4 events in Orleans

The 4th of July Parade will be held on Saturday, July 4, rain or shine. Fireworks will go off at Rock Harbor at dusk on Sunday, July 5, rain date Monday, July 6. Parade entry forms are available on the town's website. This year's theme is Surf's Up! Ride the Wave of Freedom.


may23 Brewster

Chamber music at the Brewster Ladies' Library

To open its 42nd season, the Meeting House Chamber Music Festival will present a "sampler" program at the Brewster Ladies' Library Saturday, May 23, 4 p.m. Highlights taken from the chamber music repertoire - music from Mozart to Astor Piazzolla - will be played by three principals of the Cape Symphony: violinist Heather Goodchild Wade, cellist Bo Ericsson, and pianist Donald Enos. The concert is co-sponsored by the Brewster Cultural Council. Admission is free, and all are welcome to attend.


may23 Brewster

Ellis takes the Helm of Brewster's Roadwork

Brewster has its "pot o'gold" for the roads, $10-million dollars worth that passed by a 527-270 vote Tuesday and now they have a man to hand it to. The town welcomed Patrick Ellis as Department of Public Works Superintendent at Monday night's selectman's meeting. Ellis was a candidate for state representative for Barnstable's 5th District in 2012 (running against Republican Randy Hunt) and was elected as a Sandwich selectman last year after a decade off the board. Prior to that he was Sandwich's DPW superintendent. His appointment at the DPW is only for six months as the 61-year-old is more or less retired and focusing on his work as selectman in Sandwich. But he will get things rolling on the roadwork with Underpass and Snow Roads first on the list. "This is work Brewster needs to take on," selectman Ben deRuyter said Tuesday night after the town vote. "The citizens have given us the capacity to repair and maintain the roads that we desperately need to do. Now the onus is on us. We've got a limited amount of time and we've got to make it happen." Ten million dollars will be borrowed, but not all at once as they can't do all the roads in one year. The work will take five to seven years. The estimated cost for Snow and Underpass roads is $2.2 million and that will be borrowed this summer. A project meeting is scheduled for June 3, and engineering and design is under way. Bids for the work will go out and work will start in the fall. The cost on the tax rate will rise as borrowing continues and average out to about $100 per $400,000 home annually over a 15-year period. Town Administrator Charles Sumner said Brewster has $800,000 in Chapter 90 funds from the state stockpiled and will do a lot of lesser repairs on roads over the summer. "Patrick Ellis is meeting with our consultant to figure where to apply the funds," Sumner said. "I'm looking forward to it," Ellis said on Monday. ""We still have to address standards and drainage work. There are a lot of roads. They're the fabric that holds the entire town together. To me it's the measure of the advancement of civilization. I'm impressed with the town staff and I'm looking forward to the next six months." Bob Bersin quit as the DPW Superintendent Dec. 18, after running it since 2005. Natural Resources Director Chris Miller filled in through the winter snow season as the acting director but with summer rolling in he needs to devote his attention to Natural Resources. Brewster's efforts to hire a new director were unsatisfactory. "It's our desire to let the new town administrator find is own DPW Superintendent," James Foley, Chairman of the selectmen said on Monday. "Six months gives us a chance to get work done."


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may23 Brewster

Captain Cobb of Brewster Sails Again

"And Brewster, before and after Thoreau's transitory visit, was 'the modern-built town of the Cape.' Its streets were shaded with fine old trees, its houses were large and substantial and the men who built and owned them were large and substantial, too. They made their fortunes-fortunes that were the beginnings of bigger ones for their descendants in Boston, New York and many another city-by sailing over pretty nearly all the wet places on the earth's surface and bargaining and risking and daring, with Yankee shrewdness and Yankee bravery." — Joseph C. Lincoln, 1905

History on Cape Cod is like the magma under Yellowstone, a huge, constant force that bubbles up in pockets here and there and occasionally shoots a geyser high into the sky. In Brewster these days, the geyser grabbing attention is Elijah Cobb (1768-1848), whose enduring legacy is evidenced by the current effort to transform his 215-year old house on Lower Road into the Brewster Historical Society's new office and museum. The house would replace a building the society leases on Main Street just east of the Cape Cod Sea Camps. The Brewster Historical Society is 51-years-old now, and it has mounted a million-dollar campaign to establish, for the first time in recent history, a captain's house that would be open to the public, as Brewster is the Sea Captains' town, and its history is its stock in trade. Even as this is being written, workers at the Cobb house (both a residence and an inn at various times since 1799) are peeling back the shrouds of time to reveal carpet-hidden floor boards, colorful decoupage tea boxes that doubled as insulation, massive beams that join in the middle of the attic and support both the house and the widow's walk above, as well as dentil molding everywhere, stenciled panels, a wrought-iron lock-box in the front door. "Mullions, quoins, parging, I'm learning all sorts of new words," Brewster Historical Society Vice President Sally Cabot Gunning said with a smile on a tour around the house, top-to-bottom, inside and out, an hour-long trip back in time. Gunning is spearheading the effort to transform the Captain Elijah Cobb House on Lower Road into the society's office and museum. The project is due to be completed next year and the new museum is scheduled to open in the summer of 2016.


may23 Harwich

'Trailer Park' at low-brow parody at Harwich Junior Theater

"Red-neck" and trailer park jokes are often good for a laugh, as politically incorrect as they are, and Harwich Junior Theater's comedy "The Great American Trailer Park Musical" takes these off-color jokes to a new level. The wacky and relatively thin storyline is told by Armadillo Acres Trailer Park's nosey threesome, played by Heidi Crawley, Anne Vohs, and Caroline Clancy. This talented trio also doubles as a spectacular girl-chorus group that sings about being down on their luck "on this side of the tracks." Caitlin Mills portrays Jeannie, a good-hearted agoraphobic and Lifetime-movie-loving housewife, who likens her spray-cheese-covered jalapeńo Pringles to a homemade treat. Her easy-going, toll-collector husband, Norbert, is played by Matthew Kohler. Tired of his wife not being able to leave their trailer, he falls victim to the charms of their new neighbor, Pippi, "a stripper on the run." Kym Edson is a force to be reckoned with in this sexy role. Brendan Cloney is outrageously funny as Duke, Pippi's scary ex. He is determined to have his girl back and sets out to find her, gun in hand. Not only does this ensemble have excellent comedic timing, it also has noteworthy voices. Luckily, the wonderful pleasure of listening to them is not diminished by the many screwball songs such as "Flushed down the Pipes," "Road Kill" and "It Doesn't Take a Genius," set to a mix of country, R & B and rockabilly. Director Robert Wilder did not miss a "white-trash" detail to exploit in this low-brow parody, which happily adds extra layers to the absurd plot. Wilder also directs the excellent band, consisting of Dick Stocks, Rose Blackwell and Thomas Petruso. Suzette Hutchinson's madcap choreography (one number includes toilet plungers) is perfectly paired with the short shorts and flashy, over-the-top outfits that she and Tristan Divincenzo designed. Guy Trudeau's set is an inviting mix of dated, yet cozy, mobile homes, complete with the prerequisite-flock of plastic pink flamingos. Even though it's HJT, this 2005 off-Broadway musical is rated PG-13, due to adult subjects and language.


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may23 Harwich

Driver injured after SUV hits tree in Harwich

Harwich Fire and Rescue transported a male driver of this Ford Escape to Cape Cod Hospital with unknown injuries after the vehicle hit a tree. The crash happened Friday around 7:30 p.m. on Depot Road between Queen Anne Road and Route 39. Harwich Police are handling the investigation.


may23

WCAI Weekly News Roundup: Cape Cod Bus Driver Charged With DWI; Wampanoag Get Say In Roadwork


WCAI News Director Sean Corcoran and local journalists review the top local and regional news stories of the week. Sean's guests this week include Geoff Spillane, a reporter at The Cape Cod Times; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Nelson Sigelman, editor of the Martha's Vineyard Times; and Jim DeArruda of the New Bedford Standard Times. Among the stories they discuss this week: A Sandwich fish market owner who pleaded guilty to receiving stolen oysters last year is back on the town Planning Board after a write-in campaign; a Cape Cod bus driver is arrested and charged with a second DWI, but bus company won't say if having a previous DWI conviction precludes someone from driving their school buses; a grand jury indicts a Hyannis physician; an election in the West Barnstable Fire District is challenged in court; and the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe signs an agreement with the state to consult on transportation projects that could impact traditional Wampanoag burial grounds or artifacts.




may23

Electricity Rates May Be Dropping for Eversource Customers On the Cape

With electricity rates dropping from historic highs, Eversource Energy has filed with the state Department of Public Utilities to pass the savings on to customers. If approved, the new supply price would take effect July 1, resulting in a $25 per month decrease in the average total monthly bill, or about 20 percent. Eversource spokesman Mike Durand says the timing couldn't have been better. "It's going to be right at the time when most people are putting their air conditioners in and start to use them on a more regular basis so that's really good news and great timing for customers," said Durand. Durand says it would affect a lot of customers on the Cape. "On the Cape, it's important to note that we as a delivery company serve about 200,000 customers, however of that 200,000, roughly 26,000 customers do get their supply from us. They are the ones who will benefit from the supply price cut that we're announcing," said Durand. If approved, the price cut would take effect July 1.


may23

Seacoast vacation homes hit by higher insurance

A vacation home on the seacoast used to be a retreat. Now, it can be more like a money pit. Owners of summer homes on the coast not only are getting hit with higher flood-insurance premiums, but also a $250 annual surcharge. The fee, which took effect last month, affects only owners of second homes in flood-prone areas. The surcharge is $25 for primary residences. Nationwide, more than a quarter of the 5 million homeowners who use the National Flood Insurance Program are insuring vacation homes, according to a 2013 federal government estimate. While its unclear how many of the 60,000 policyholders in Massachusetts are covering secondary homes, flood insurance experts say it could affect thousands, from those who have cottages on Scituate's Humarock Beach to owners of clapboard capes in Dennis. "It's exorbitant," Jack Gleason, a 72-year-old retired teacher from Andover, said of the surcharge. Gleason, who has owned a cottage in Plymouth for more than 40 years, was notified this week that he has to pay the $250 on top of the hundreds he spends annually for flood insurance. Gleason said he bought flood insurance a few years ago, after watching the extensive water damage caused by storms such as Hurricane Sandy. Flood insurance is a separate coverage from homeowners insurance. "After this, I might have secondary thoughts," he said about the costs. "It might force people out of flood insurance." Peter Ruffini, a managing broker for Coldwell Banker in Scituate and Cohasset, said coastal homeowners have to accept that flood insurance prices are going to increase substantially every year. The increases are cooling the real estate market in some coastal communities, Ruffini said. "A lot of folks are rethinking the value proposition" of living near the ocean, he said. "When the first question is 'Is it a flood zone or does it have flood insurance?' most people don't want to see it." The average annual premium for flood insurance - for both primary and secondary homes nationwide - is rising 19 percent in 2015 to $638, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The figure does not include the surcharges. Recent hurricanes and tropical storms have triggered a need for the premium increases and surcharges. Federal flood insurance covers homeowners that private insurers refuse to cover because the risk of loss is too high, too expensive, and too frequent. The program, which is subsidized by taxpayers, is more than $24 billion in debt, hobbled by payments on claims after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012.


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may23

Uber starting Cape service this weekend

Uber, the mobile app that connects riders with the closest available driver, begins service on the Cape Memorial Day Weekend. Uber users will be able to open up the Uber app on the Cape and request a safe, affordable ride at the touch of a button. The service, uberX, is Uber's low-cost, ride-sharing option, and costs about 29 percent cheaper than a local taxi. It's a seamless, cashless and convenient way to move around town. On the Cape, the cost of an uberX ride is $2.50 base fare plus $0.25 per minute and $1.90 per mile.May 22) at 5:00 PM, Uber users will be able to open up the Uber app on the Cape and request a safe, affordable ride at the touch of a button. If you are new to Uber, sign up with this link: get.uber.com/go/MABeachesNew riders will get their first ride for free up to $40 by signing up through this link..


may23 Wellfleet

Local Food Report by Elspeth Hay: Milk, Rennet, Salt, and Cultures: Transforming Four Basic Ingredients Into Fine Cheese

Elspeth Hay is an avid locavore who lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30am on Morning Edition and Thursdays at 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30am.





Jacqueline Foster is the cheesemaker at Grey Barn Farm, an organic dairy in Chilmark. To speak about how she uses variations in moisture and salt to create the farm's three very different cheeses, she brought me to the large sterile kitchen where the cheese is made. She described them for me, pointing out the differences. "Prufrock is our washed rind cheese - it's a nice little eight-ounce stinker. Then about a year ago we started Eidolon, which is our bloomy rind; it's sort of like a tall brie, or camembert. That one's a nice big, one-pound cylinder. And then we just pulled out of our cave our first batch of blue, called blue bird." I eat a lot of cheese, but as I stood there in a pair of sterile white clogs and a clean white jacket, I realized I know very little about how and why the varieties I like are different. Jacqueline told me the process started in the 250-gallon stainless steel vat in front of us, when she curdles the milk using a set of enzymes called rennet. "The amount of rennet and the time and the temperature allowed for the renneting process will determine how much moisture is locked in the coagulum, the gel of the cheese, and then from there the curd is cut," she said. "And the size of the curd is going to determine how much moisture is inside. So for example, the Prufrock has a little bit of a shorter time of coagulation and the curds are cut sort of smaller than compared to the Eidolon." In other words, to get a slightly firmer stinky cheese like the Prufrock, you want a little less moisture. To get a softer, more camembert-style cheese like Eidolon, you want somewhat more. From here the curds are stirred, drained, and put into molds, and it's up to the cheesemaker whether they lose or keep moisture along the way. "Moisture content will give you a different texture," Jacqueline continued. "It will also help determine what types of molds, yeasts, and bacteria want to grow on that cheese. For example, with the Prufrock we're trying to grow something called a brevibacterium linen - also known as b. linen - that orange bacteria that makes the cheese really stinky. That's a moisture loving bacteria, but only to a certain extent. If the moisture level is too high, it can go really crazy, and you end up with something pretty weird. Each type of mold or bacteria or spore that you're trying to grow has its certain happy place as far as moisture goes." The same is true for salt content. "Certain molds, such as the white mold on the outside of the Eidleon or a camembert, don't really like salt so much. That's why those cheeses are typically less salty than others. But a cheese like a blue, like our bluebird, really loves salt. And that's why you typically find really salty blue cheeses." It's fascinating that such small variations in essentially two factors-moisture content and salt-make such a huge difference when it comes to the flavors and textures of the cheese. And this is why it's so important that everything in the cheesemaking room is completely sterile and clean. Jacqueline explained, "Oh, everything can go wrong. It's a living organism, and our job is to try and control it - we want certain things to grow and certain things not to grow. We want to take something that changes constantly throughout the year and make it the same all year round. It's challenging." Jacqueline was a chef, before she became a cheesemaker. Explaining how she got started, she told me, "I was looking for a change, and I was always very attracted to the transformation of something like milk into something so complex. There's that magic that does happen in the vat all the time. But I think what really kept me here in cheese, was the technical side. I learn every day that I make cheese." Despite the fact that it's made with only four ingredients-milk, rennet, salt, and cultures-cheesemakers estimate there are around 2000 different kinds of cheese made across the world. In addition to moisture and salt levels, geography also plays a big role in what kind of cheese a given place will make, because everywhere has its own unique set of living cultures.


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may23

Perils of parenthood

Becoming a parent can be very stressful, not just for humans but for many other animals, and birds as well. One has only to be outdoors watching and listening to know that many furry and feathered parents are feeling a lot of stress these days. While human parents worry mostly about keeping newborn babies well fed, healthy and safe from accidents, parents out in nature worry about their babies simply surviving. There are so many perils out in the natural world that it is not surprising that many of the animals and birds we see at this time of year seem to be frantic when we see them. As humans we have done a lot to minimize the danger to our infants. Few of us worry these days about wild animals hunting our children for dinner, for example. Our shelters are well built, strong and secure. We have created many items to keep our babies safe in our homes, vehicles and outside and they are monitored closely. Humans can take their infants with them to gather food in a shop in most cases whereas birds and animals often have to leave the little ones behind while they hunt or gather the food personally. It is this latter fact that gives wild predators the edge. Recently I have been witness to many nest robberies. Bigger birds steal the eggs and young of smaller birds but even those birds may turn around and steal from even smaller birds. Parasitic nesters like cowbirds lay their eggs in the nests of other birds, where the larger nestling often nudges out the smaller nestlings, usually leading to their demise. Some parent birds recognize that their nest is being compromised and invaded and work desperately to fight off the egg laying intruder or push out the egg or newly hatched baby but many do not succeed. It's not just other birds that steal baby birds and eggs, of course. Black racers and other snakes shimmy up tree trunks for an easy protein rich meal and are often oblivious to the cries and pecks of distraught parents. Squirrels and even chipmunks will also steal from bird nests when the opportunity is right. It's tough raising bird babies out there and sometimes it is heartbreaking to be in the vicinity. Nest raiding is often accompanied by the sad, heart rending sounds of desperate parents trying to stop the inevitable. Just the other day I watched an interesting confrontation between a grackle and a crow. There is quite a size differential but the grackle was holding its own. There was a nest nearby, something both birds seemed well aware of. Perhaps the crow had already made a visit and this grackle was not going to allow another visit if it could help it. Every time the crow moved, the grackle did as well. For about half an hour they were at a standstill in their standoff. The crow eventually left, perhaps to find an easier meal. For the moment, the baby grackles nearby were safe.


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