This website requires JavaScript which is disabled in your browser!

News You Can't Use

News You Can Use

Check out the work in progress mobile version of WELLFLEETian.com.

To access this on your iPhone or android smartphone, type its URL address (outercape.info) into your Safari or Google browser.

To access this on your laptop/desktop click on the image on the right.


Wednesday, September 3, 2015

sep03 Wellfleet

Why September is the best month on Cape Cod

On today's CapeCast: The water is warm, the weather is fab and the crowds have gone--see why September is the best month on Cape Cod!



sep03 Wellfleet

Open University Announces Fall Courses

Have you signed up for Open University courses yet? Space is still available, although slots are going fast. This fall's selection includes a tour of five memoirs that were inspired by life in Wellfleet, led by OU organizer Rhoda Flaxman. John Cumbler, who published a great book about Cape Cod, mentioned here in a post this summer, will teach An Environmental History of Cape Cod. Become more knowledgeable about Wellfleet's history through stories and postcards with Jeff Tash, founder of The Wellfleetian web site. Are you interested in modern houses? Learn more about them thanks to Introducing Cape Cod Modernist Houses, taught by Betsy Bray, or opt for Two Architectural Geniuses: France Lloyd Wright and Charlie Zehnder. Maybe abstract art is the subject that has always fascinated you? Deborah Forman will cover the 45 artists mentioned in her new book Contemporary Cape Cod Artists: On Abstraction. Open University even plans a field trip to Frank Llyod Wright's Zimmerman House in Manchester, NH. For more information, go to the Open University Web site.


sep03 Wellfleet-Eastham-Orleans-Brewster

Nauset Regional School District prepped for new year

Starts Sept. 8. Nauset Regional High School will have new tennis courts, which should be ready for use in September, according to Nauset Schools Superintendent Thomas Conrad. Conrad, the longtime high school principal, began in July as the new superintendent. He said the five old tennis courts on the high school grounds have been unusable for years. The tennis team had to practice on courts in Orleans. But a $400,000 grant from the Eastham Community Preservation Fund paid for the construction of new courts, which will be available to residents of the town, as well as the high school students. "They are stunning," Conrad said. Nauset High will provide all students with iPad Airs this year, expanding the program that provided iPads just to the freshman previously, Conrad said. The students will be able to keep their own iPad for the year, and turn them in at the end of school, he added. Nauset Regional Middle School is expanding its foreign language program by offering Mandarin to seventh- and eighth-graders, Conrad said. Previously, the language was taught only in eighth grade. Eastham Elementary School has a new principal, Bill Crosby, a former elementary school teacher from Sandwich. Crosby has taught fourth grade at the Oak Ridge School for 19 years and served as the administrator in the absence of the principal, according to an announcement from Richard Hoffmann, the former Nauset superintendent. He replaces Joanne Scotti Finnegan, principal for the last four years, who retired in June. The five elementary schools in the Nauset district, which range from Wellfleet to Brewster, will be getting a new type of report card this year, Conrad said. The "standards-based" report cards will replace the more traditional grading method.


sep03 Wellfleet-Eastham-Truro-Orleans

Utility company to begin herbicide use in 8 Cape towns

Eversource Energy plans to start applying herbicides around power line rights of way in eight Cape towns by mid-month despite continued opposition to the practice among local residents. Touch-up applications also are tentatively scheduled for five additional towns, depending on the need to control plant growth, according to utility company spokesman Michael Durand. Spraying may begin the week of Sept. 14, depending on weather conditions, Durand said. The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources approved Eversource's yearly operational plan to control vegetation in June, but the practice of spraying herbicides around utility company rights of way has drawn the ire of environmental groups that say the chemicals being sprayed are harmful to the soil and water. Nontoxic remedies are preferable, said Laura Kelley, of Eastham, a horticulturalist who is director of a group called Protect Our Cape Cod Aquifer. "They can go back to mowing," she said. "It's cheap." The utility company, formerly known as NStar, voluntarily gave up spraying anywhere on the Cape for several years while company officials undertook a study of the practice and got community reaction, Durand said. They found residents don't like mowing because it produces a barren-looking landscape, he said. Part of the utility's approach is to mow and target invasive, tall species such as purple loosestrife and trees for herbicide application as the plants re-emerge, allowing low-lying plants such as bayberry and milkweed to spread and thrive, Durand said. Environmentalists have concerns about the types of chemicals being applied, such as glyphosate used in Roundup and Garlon 4, Kelley said. Garlon 4 kills oysters, and the United Nations International Agency for Research on Cancer says glyphosate is a probable carcinogen in humans, she said. Eversource will notify residents when it plans to begin spraying with a published announcement in the newspaper, as is required by law, Durand said. The spraying can take a week or so, he said. Residents can take steps to minimize the impact of the herbicide application by closing house and car windows and harvesting vegetables before spraying begins, Kelley said. She also suggested people mark private wells with a stake, since Eversource is not supposed to spray within 50 feet of a private well, and she suggested that people keep a separate pair of shoes outside the house for walking under the power lines. The eight towns where rights of way are scheduled for herbicide application this fall include Barnstable, Bourne, Eastham, Falmouth, Mashpee, Orleans, Truro and Wellfleet. Eversource may also apply herbicides in Chatham, Dennis, Harwich, Sandwich and Yarmouth if "touch ups" are necessary due to plant growth, Durand said. Touch ups may also be done at rights of way sprayed in the past in Bourne and Falmouth.


sep03 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Porchfest - VIDEO Mashup

The local music scene on Cape Cod continues to amaze us. On Saturday, while we were walking around Wellfleet, we saw a band playing acoustic music on the porch of a house. There was a audience of a couple dozen people standing along the street. Down the road, we saw another band on the porch of a quaint storefront. There was another audience. We saw people walking. We thought we might be onto something. We were - Wellfleet Porchfest 2015. With more than a dozen acts set up on a walking loop through beautiful Wellfleet, Porchfest lasted two hours. Here, in the most random way possible, is a mashup of 20 seconds of every band we could find, starting with the Ukeladies.



more

sep03 Wellfleet

Mayo Creek marsh restoration in Wellfleet hits snag

Plans to restore the Mayo Creek salt marshes have been put on hold because the conservation commission has changed its mind about the need to review the proposed strategy. John Riehl, chair of the Mayo Creek Restoration Committee, told the selectmen on Tuesday that his group had hoped to have a better idea of the feasibility of the project by now. But that determination will have to wait for rulings by the Conservation Commission and the state Dept. of Environmental Protection. The Mayo Creek marshes turned into a swamp after the creek was diked in 1909. Riehl said there are many reasons to restore the salt marshes, but the most important was to promote nitrogen mitigation in the harbor at low cost. The restoration committee planned to remove a duckbill check valve in a culvert under Commercial Street as a test of what would happen to the groundwater without flooding the area. The Conservation Commission approved the plan, as did the DEP, and told the committee that a notice of intent would not be required. But an abutting landowner's appeal led to a reversal of both the commission's decision and the DEP's position. As a result, Riehl told the selectmen, "instead of looking at a proposal for a trial, we are doing a full notice of intent." He predicted that the project might not be able to move forward for a year or more. Selectman Dennis Murphy, acting chair of the board, asked Riehl if his committee needed money for engineers to continue with the work. "We are not certain," said Riehl. "We do need some help for legal review, so the next time we go before the Conservation Commission or the DEP we have a solid case. I'm not concerned about getting the money to do the project, but to do the planning - that could be tight."


sep03 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Dines Out benefits Wellfleet Council on Aging

Between Labor Day and Columbus Day, food lovers can dine out at a Wellfleet restaurant and double their fun by giving to a good cause. Participating restaurants have chosen an evening when they will donate a percentage of their food sales to the Friends of the Wellfleet Council on Aging. The donation will support the senior center programs, services and other special needs of Wellfleet's seniors. Here are the scheduled days of participating restaurants:


sep03 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Conservation Trust 9th Annual Guided Walk

Each year in September the Wellfleet Conservation Trust hosts the Annual Guided Walk. This year's walk will take place Saturday September 12th at 9AM. They will explore points of interest around the Lecount Hollow area of South Wellfleet. The walk is free of charge and all are welcome to join. The WCT Annual Guided Walk is a tradition that began in 2007 for the public to experience the beauty of Wellfleet's open space and conservation lands while being guided by naturalists and local experts who share their knowledge of the history, geology and ecology of the areas being explored. Each year they explore a different area, and each year the feedback is overwhelming. It's their signature event! Highlights of this year's walk will include the Glider School, Cook's Camps, the Melman Modernist House, Surfside Cottages, the Clover Conservation Area, and Blackfish Creek. The Walk will begin at Lecount Hollow Beach parking lot at 9AM on Saturday September 12th. Walkers may choose between full distance of 3.0 miles or end at a convenient location about halfway through. Duration of the full-length walk is 2.5 to 3 hours. The walk is free and all are welcome. Rain date is the following day, same time and place. For more information, visit our website.


sep03 Wellfleet

Oscar Nominated Film in Wellfleet - Free film viewing and discussion

In 1994, a year after serving two terms as one of the most popular governors in modern Washington State history, Booth Gardner was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. In 2008, as his health continued to deteriorate, he returned to the political spotlight, this time as the driving force behind a ballot initiative that would legalize one's choice to die. Oscar-nominated in 2009 in the category of Best Documentary (Short Subject), THE LAST CAMPAIGN OF GOVERNOR BOOTH GARDNER chronicles Gardner's controversial crusade, looking at both sides of this hotly debated issue. The film tracks Gardner and his supporters in their efforts to pass Initiative 1000 (I-1000), also known as the Death with Dignity Act, in Washington State, following the debates the campaign provokes, as well as the toll it takes on Gardner's health. Along with Gardner and his supporters, Film Director Junge and his crew had extensive access to opponents of I-1000. The film runs about 40 minutes. Marie Manis and Betsy Van Dorn of Compassion & Choices will lead a discussion after the film and also talk about the campaign to pass a similar initiative here in Massachusetts.


sep03 Wellfleet

Conservation Trust to participate in annual CoastSweep

The Conservation Trust is planning to revive Wellfleet's participation in the annual CoastSweep. They are looking for partners in this effort to pick up trash along the Wellfleet shoreline from the Herring River dike to the Audubon wildlife sanctuary in South Wellfleet. The statewide project is sponsored by the Dept of Energy and Environmental Affairs and Coastal Zone Management. The target date is Saturday, September 26 from approximately 9:00 am until noon or thereabouts. Please contact Ned Hitchcock at 508-349-1229 by September 10 if you want to volunteer.


sep03 Wellfleet

Novelist performs monologue of self-discovery and trust in Wellfleet

In his new first novel, "The Blackfish Inheritance," author Thomas Wolfson takes protagonist Leon Perlman on a journey through many selves and through the gestalt of the 1960s in a way that speaks to many of that generation but also to anyone struggling for meaning in opposition to a difficult family. Leon is born into Manhattan privilege, yet fails in a society that defines ambition and achievement as de rigueur. He becomes a plumber, an insurance salesman, and finally a school teacher who comes to terms at last with his overwhelming father and with himself. This transformation includes the discovery of a mysterious spirit path and the support of his wife on a journey that takes them to Wellfleet. The story is often startlingly revelatory, with writing almost clairvoyant in describing people and places. The Banner talked with Wolfson, who is delivering a theatrical performance of his monologue, "The Finer Life," on Wednesday, Sept. 2, at Wellfleet Preservation Hall


more

sep03 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Historical Society & Museum September Talk

On Wednesday, September 9th, 7:30 PM, at the Wellfleet Public Library Meeting Room, Dan Sanders will present "History of the New England Fishery and the 1st Sharpshooter Schooner". The Etta G. Fogg, the first Sharpshooter Schooner was commissioned by the Wellfleet Captains Society and built in Essex, MA in 1857. It set the style of the fishing schooners for the New England fishing industry in the late 19th century. Dan will outline the history of the fishing industry, high ship models and a very strange ghost story. Dan Sanders was born on Cape Cod. One of the major influences in his life was his grandfather Daniel Worcester, who was a fisherman out of the fleet in Nova Scotia. Dan studied at Tufts, Trinity College and RPI in Hartford, CT as a graduate student. Dan worked for Pratt and Whitney which lead him to work at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and the Johnson Space Center in Texas for the Apollo flight. Dan is President of the Highland Light and he volunteers at the Truro Historical Museum. Dan is also a model boat builder of renown. His models can be found in the Smithsonian Institute and many Cape Cod locations. The Wellfleet Historical Society is proud to display two of his models.


sep03 Wellfleet

The Lowdown by Ira Wood: Comma Queen Mary Norris

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



sep03 Wellfleet

Purchase of hatchery will help secure future of Cape shellfishing

An estimated 200 local jobs related to shellfishing are more secure following the Aug. 14 purchase of Aquaculture Research Corp. in Dennis by a group of investors, said Rob Doane of Wellfleet, the new CEO of the company. The transfer of the shellfish hatchery and 39 acres of land on Cape Cod Bay - now protected by conservation restrictions - cost $6 million in all and was pulled off in less than a year by an unusual public-private partnership. Among the new owners of the hatchery is Wellfleet Shellfish Promotion and Tasting (SPAT), the nonprofit that produces the annual OysterFest. SPAT invested $125,000 in the purchase. Other investors include the Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen's Alliance, which took the lead in pulling the group together, and Jonathan Fleming, a Mashpee venture capitalist who is the chair of ARC's new board of directors. The ARC hatchery provides 80 percent of the seed for shellfish propagation on Cape Cod, said Doane. The company was run for decades by former president Richard Kraus, who, with his partners Gail Hart and Susan Machie, retains 8 percent ownership. Kraus is also a member of the new board. "Dick is totally committed to the hatchery," said Nancy Civetta of the Fishermen's Alliance, "and he has been looking for a long time for a way to turn it over to the next generation." The former owners tried for 10 years to find a strategy for continuing the business, without success. Doane said he became aware of the importance of ARC in his previous job as controller at the Wellfleet Shellfish Company. "Our suppliers were coming to us and saying, 'You've got to save ARC,'" he told the Banner. "They wanted to expand their shellfishing operations but were waiting to know they would have a secure source of reliable local seed." The ARC hatchery was built in the 1960s and in terrible condition. "They didn't have the money to fix the roof," said Doane. "The existing structure is falling down." He went to work to figure out what needed to be done to keep the business going and how much it would cost. The dilapidated structure will now be replaced with a state-of-the-art facility with twice the spat-producing capacity as the old building. Half the money involved in the transaction - $3 million - went to the purchase of conservation restrictions on the 39 acres, 29 of which have now been transferred to the town of Dennis. The restrictions themselves are owned by the town of Yarmouth, Barnstable County, and the Nature Conservancy. State Sen. Dan Wolf was instrumental in obtaining $1.6 million in state funding to make the land deal possible, said Doane.


more

sep03 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Preservation Hall present Billy Hardy and Beth Sweeney

This Sunday, 7:30pm, at Wellfleet Preservation Hall come enjoy a beautiful evening of mostly Celtic music performed by wonderful local artists, Billy Hardy and Beth Sweeney. Billy Hardy and Beth Sweeney have been a well-tuned duo performing traditional Celtic music together for over twenty years. Between the two of them, Billy and Beth play a multitude of instruments including fiddle, piano, banjo, and mandolin. Billy has even been known to play a tune on the saw. Their repertoire of songs and instrumentals draws from the traditions of Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Canada, and includes many of their own compositions. Beth performs selections of her Irish repertoire of songs in the original Gaelic.


more

sep03 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Community Oriented Policing Workshop 10/3/15

The men and women of the Wellfleet Police Department will be sponsoring a facilitator-led Community Oriented Policing Workshop on Saturday October 3, 2015 from 8:30 AM until 2:30 PM at the Wellfleet Senior Center, 715 Old King's Highway. The Workshop will be led by Dr. Stephen A. Morreale of Worcester State College and Denise Owens, MBA, of Roger Williams College. All Wellfleet residents are encouraged to attend and participate. The philosophy of Community Oriented Policing emphasizes the establishment of lasting police-community partnerships and adopts problem-solving approach that is responsive to the needs of the community. It is our hope that this opportunity will both reinforce the concept of community-oriented policing and participants can see that it progressively guides police management style and operational strategies. One of the major objectives of our community policing efforts is to establish an active partnership between the police and the community that can thoughtfully analyze problems and work to design, implement and assess solutions and services in partnership that are truly community-based. This requires the police to make a conscious effort to create an atmosphere in which community partners actively and willingly co-operate with the police. An important step in the ongoing consultation with the community, through a community police forum, is of critical importance. Community policing forums are not the only means of consultation; other channels need to be developed and should include the participation of all of our stakeholders.


sep03 Wellfleet

Parkington Sisters homecoming show at Beachcomber

Wellfleet's own is back home. On Saturday, Aug. 29, the Parkington Sisters performed in Wellfleet at the Beachcomber. "It feels great," Rose Parkington says of the homecoming show. Growing up in Wellfleet, the Parkington sisters, daughters of a classically-trained guitarist and progressive rock musician, found making music together a welcome diversion in the quiet off-season when the days grew short and the town grew quiet. "We grew up in large family, and come winter there wasn't much to do," Ariel Parkington says. The group, originally a quintet is now a trio, consisting of Sarah, Ariel and Rose Parkington. Rose plays piano, guitar and accordion, Ariel and Sarah play violin and viola. "We think of our band as our house. People come in and out," says Ariel of the departure of sisters Norah and Lydia Parkington from the group. The three remaining siblings have continued making a name for themselves nationwide thanks to their musicianship, beautiful harmonies and ability to go from the ethereal to the earthy with ease. "We try not to limit ourselves," Ariel says of their diversity. "We have a lot of influences." Their most recent album, "Me You Us," ranges from the explosive "Let Me Down" to the hypnotic "In the Garden." The songs were all written an arranged by the sisters, for whom writing, like performing, is a cooperative and intuitive process, born out of their close relationship. "We have a sixth sense," says Rose of their ability to meld ideas. "We usually write from personal experience," Ariel adds. "We can't help but write about what we are experiencing. Since we are all song-writers and sisters, sometimes what's happening personally in our lives is related, since we share family experiences. During the writing of this record, our grandfather passed, so certainly some of our dealings with grief and processing of life and death was coming through in our songwriting." Ariel credits the Lower Cape land and seascape for helping to shape their music. "Absolutely, she says. "A lot of our songs are open and spacious." The lyrics in "Me You Us," written in the first person, are positioned on the CD in a way that moves from helplessness to hope. "Seems we're spinning out/We're losing all control," they sing in the opening cut, "Pacific Islands."


more

sep03 Eastham-Orleans-Chatham

Cape's great white sharks head closer to shore

July and the first week of August are often thought of as the dog days of summer, but if last year and this year are any indication, August and September could become the shark days of summer. On Monday, researchers encountered 23 great white sharks from Chatham to Orleans, including three off Nauset Beach. The burgeoning population of sharks visiting the Cape has prompted local officials to rethink how they protect the swimming public from a potentially dangerous encounter. While video footage of each shark seen Monday will still have to be analyzed to make sure they are 23 unique sharks and not repeats, it continues a trend in recent weeks, with 17 new sharks identified in one day three weeks ago and 19 in one day a week and a half ago. More disturbing to beach managers is a pattern in recent weeks of great white sharks cruising in shallow water at swimming beaches along the coastline of the Outer Cape, prompting the temporary closing of some of the region's most popular beaches. "The last week and a half have been unbelievable," Orleans' Nauset Beach supervisor Bob Bates said, noting a string of eight days of shark sightings. These haven't always been a single shark. Last week, Nauset lifeguards saw three great whites 50 to 60 feet from shore swimming within the protected area where most people go into the water. Swimming just 2 to 3 feet below the surface, the three were also visible to beachgoers, Bates said.


more

sep03 Eastham

Gala cocktail party benefits Eastham Library building fund

The Eastham Library Building Fund invites all to extend summer with a Gala Cocktail Party at the PB Boulangerie Bistro Monday, Sept. 14, from 5 to 8 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres by the owner, innovative Chef Philippe Rispoli, and wine are included in the $75 per person cost. There will also be a cash bar available for mixed and soft drinks Rispoli discovered his appreciation for fine cuisine at a young age. He first learned to cook by watching his mother and grandmother cook in the Lyon region of France, where he later began his apprenticeship at the age of 14. He has worked with many respected chefs, including Charlie Palmer and Daniel Boulud. Chef Rispoli's experiences have brought years of a Michelin-starred fine dining background and French cuisine to his friendly Cape Cod bakery and bistro. RSVP by Sept 7. Checks, made out to ELBFI, can be mailed to Al Alfano, 2225 Herring Brook Road, Eastham 02642. For questions call 508-255-4448 or email al.alfano@comcast.net. PB Boulangerie Bistro is generously sponsoring the fundraiser to support the new Eastham Public Library building project. The restaurant is located at 15 Lecount Hollow Road at Route 6 in South Wellfleet. For general information about the Eastham Library Building Fund, please go to www.elbfi.org.


sep03 Truro

Truro School District prepped for new year

For the most part, nothing is new this year in the Truro School District, Truro School District Superintendent Michael Gradone said. "Thank goodness, because last year we had a new principal and a new superintendent, a new special education director, a new classroom teacher and two new special education teachers," Gradone said. "This year we're going to be consolidating all the things we did new and all the new people we met last year and concentrate on doing things even better than we did a year ago." In the upcoming school year, there will be 125 to 130 students in pre-kindergarten through sixth grade at Truro Central School, and another 85 students attending Nauset Regional Middle School in Orleans and Nauset Regional High School in North Eastham, Gradone said. One change occurring is the introduction of a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) laboratory in the school's annex for sixth graders under the direction of sixth grade teacher John Burns, Gradone said. Burns has been working with the school's media specialist Stacey Klimkosky on developing a program for sixth graders, with an ultimate goal of expanding the program throughout all the grades in coming years. The STEM laboratory will be a place where students undertake activities such as boat building that don't work well in a regular classroom, Gradone said.


sep03 Truro

Truro selectman wants town to explore 'creative' ways to shift tax burden

The selectmen on Tuesday declined to establish two different categories of property taxation for year-round versus part-time residents for fiscal year 2016. But Selectman Jay Coburn urged his colleagues to explore other strategies for shifting the tax burden from those at the lower end of the economic scale. "The property tax is very regressive," said Coburn. "We want this town to be open to all. But home values are being driven up by people who don't have to struggle to make a living here. We need to shift some of the burden away from people with lower house values, to recognize that we have a wide range of household incomes in town." Massachusetts towns have the option of granting a "residential exemption" of up to 20 percent of the average residential property value for all properties owned by those who live in town year-round. This policy has the result of shifting some of the tax burden to part-time residents. The board of assessors voted unanimously on Aug. 3 not to recommend the residential exemption policy. "As part-time residents already pay a personal property tax on the contents of their Truro homes which year-round residents do not pay," the assessors wrote in their recommendation, "the assessors feel it would be inequitable to create this separation within the residential class." The selectmen voted to accept the assessors' advice. But Coburn, calling for more "creative thinking" on the issue, had a different suggestion: a policy that would apply to all properties, granting an exemption of $100,000 or $200,000 - that is, deducting that amount from the assessed value of every residential property. Such a policy, he argued, would shift the tax burden away from those least able to pay without treating part-time residents differently. The board agreed that any such change in tax policy would require much more thought. But Selectman Jan Worthington thanked Coburn for bringing up the issue. "I would like to see us explore this," she said. In addition to rejecting the residential exemption on Tuesday, the selectmen declined to establish different tax rates for residential, open space, commercial, industrial or personal property. In this they again concurred with the assessors' unanimous recommendation. Coburn asked about the status of the pending exemption for affordable accessory dwellings. "We have the go-ahead from the state to implement this," said Town Administrator Rae Ann Palmer. Deputy Assessor Cathy Fryxell, who participated in the discussion of tax rates on Tuesday, reminded the selectmen that there are currently two open seats on the board of assessors.


sep03 Truro

Poetry in Truro

Poets Alan Feldman and Mary Ann Larkin will read from their new books at 6:30 p.m on Tuesday, Sept.8, at the Truro Library, 7 Standish Way, North Truro. Larkin will read from "On Gannon Street." Her work has appeared in previous volumes of poetry, in five chapter books, and in many anthologies and magazines, including "America in Poetry," "Ireland in Poetry" and "Loving." Feldman will read from "Immortality,"published by the University of Wisconsin Press last March and awarded the Four Lakes Prize. His work appears in two previous books of poetry, as well as in numerous magazines and anthologies. Both poets are seasonal residents of the Outer Cape. For more information, call the Truro Library at 508-487-1125.


sep03 Truro

Truro Agricultural Fair

Rev those veggie engines! On Sunday, the Truro Agricultural Fair will host the third annual Zucchini 500 at 20 Truro Center Road. Bring your own homemade Zucchini racecar or create one at the fair from 10 a.m. to noon. Judging begins at noon and the races commence at 12:30. There will be ribbons awarded in various categories such as the largest, smallest and best decorated and embellished zucchinis, as well as the "Fastest Zucchini on Cape Cod." In addition to the Z-500, the Truro Ag Fair, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4p m, will feature turnip bowling, harvest contests (tallest sunflower, longest cucumber on Cape Cod, strangest varietal, and more), barnyard beauty contests for farm animals, pie-baking contests and pie-eating contests. A central harvest market offers local delicacies including fresh fruits and veggies, honey, fresh baked goods, lobsters, oysters and more. Food trucks cook up delicious local fare. Not Your Average Joe's.


sep03 Truro

Great Truro pond for a September swim!

On today's CapeCast: There's nothing like a September swim in the velvety smooth water of a kettle pond--grab your towel and check out Great Pond in Truro!



sep03 Truro-Wellfleet

Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Walking the Truro Highlands, from History to Hidden Beach Plums

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. He has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday morning at 8:35am and Tuesday afternoon at 5:45pm. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.





I walked up Higgins Hollow in North Truro this morning, a fine old crease of a road tucked away in a glacial valley between two large hills. On my left I passed an old house with a large front porch where a piece of literary history took place in 1920. That summer the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay was vacationing there with her family. One day the eminent critic Edmund Wilson, then a young unknown writer, visited her and asked her to marry him. She said she "would think about it," but she eventually declined. A little further on the pavement turns to dirt, and eventually I turned right onto a paved driveway that climbed a quarter mile or so up to the site of the old Ball summer mansion. In the early 20th century, Sheldon W. Ball, a New York businessman, owned a thousand acres of oceanfront property, running from Higgins Hollow a mile south to Ballston Beach. In fact, the name "Balston Beach" derives from "Ball's Town" - a summer resort that once included several cottages, a bowling alley, a community center and a dining hall - all gone now. From this bluff there is a fine view. This area, known as the Truro Highlands, is intensely cratered with dozens of small but steep kettle holes. To the south and north the headlands are steeply tilted to the west; their shaggy, sandy crests rise up like gigantic swells about to crash down on the beach hundred 150 feet below. To the west one can see across the bay to the Manomet Hills in Plymouth. I worked my way down to the beach, then climbed back up to the crest at Long Nook and walked north. Most of the cliff face in this stretch is uniform and sandy. Along the top of the crest purple asters blazed through red and green mats of fruiting bearberry. Halfway between Long Nook and the North Truro Air Force Base I came upon a deep bowl filled almost entirely with a pure stand of the finest beach plums I have ever encountered. All the bushes were thickly hung with bright, ripe multicolored berries, just asking to be picked. They hung there, waiting for hands. I fell on them, picking over two quarts in less than twenty minutes. I grabbed them wantonly by the handfuls, ripping them off the twigs, crushing some in my haste. Now and then I would stuff an entire, ripe bunch into my mouth, the red juice spurting over my hands and my feet. My appetite sated, I noticed that the beach plums had what looked like a particularly thick dust or bloom on them. But looking more closely, I saw it was a coating of extremely fine sand, blown up off the beach in a recent easterly wind. The finest sands of all are at the top of these crests, covering leaf, berry, and plants - like mica dust on mountains. It is as fine as silt, yet it remains sand: clean, glistening, like gold dust. It jammed in the creases and veins of my palms even as I tried to blow it away. Like the berries, this land conforms to the contours of my imagination; it holds the lineaments of my desires.


sep03 Truro

Greener future in store at Truro's Highland Links

The grass underfoot is thick and smooth on the three acres surrounding the first hole of the Highland Links golf course, located at the top of an ocean-facing bluff in a historic district of the National Seashore. For the first time in its history, it is being cared for organically. As the result of a new partnership between the Seashore and Johnson Golf Management, which operates Highlands Links on a concession contract with the Park Service, turf management on the nine-hole links is undergoing a trial transition from synthetic and chemical fertilizers and treatments to more sustainable solutions. The golf course is one of six that Johnson Golf Management oversees in Massachusetts. At a press conference arranged by the Seashore at Highland Links on Monday, Jason Laramee, Johnson's business manager, said it's "a big step for us to get in on the ground floor" of the transition to more "green" greens maintenance. He said the decision to take part in the trial came after the Park chose Johnson as its new concessionaire last May. Seashore Supt. George Price, who said he worked at chemically-laden golf courses in his youth, described the project as coming together through discussions with Charles "Chip" Osborne, board member of Beyond Pesticides in Washington, D.C., and a leading expert on "scientific systems-based" organic turf management. Beyond Pesticides started collaborating with the National Park Service in 2009 on three pilot projects in the Midwest, later expanding to 12. But this first project in the East could be a model for eco-friendly practices for the nine golf courses located inside the National Park Service system. Osborne will guide it. At Monday's gathering, Osborne said he has been a horticulturalist for 40 years. Half of that time he used chemicals, the other half he learned organics "by trial and error." Like Osborne himself the links will transition from synthetics, chemical pesticides, fungicides and fertilizers - which he noted have not been heavily used here - to more environmentally sound solutions. A three-year experiment will determine the means and methods and whether Highland Links will be able to go all organic in five years or so. The purpose, Osborne said, is to be "more protective of human and public health and of the ecosystem," but the byproduct can mean a 30- percent reduction in costs as well. Other benefits include using less product and less water. And what is used stays at work in the ground longer than conventional synthetics - from eight to 12 weeks. Because golf courses are different from public parks or woodland soils, and from each other, "We want to see how to get from point A to point B," Osborne said, explaining the process. "We did a soil test, finding sand, silt and clay. Then we tested for soil chemistry and life in two cups of soil, which was cultured and looked at under a microscope to see exactly what organisms are there."


more

sep03 Provincetown

Provincetown Schools prepped for new year

Students attending school in Provincetown this year will be learning about making better, more mindful choices in their day-to-day lives as well as being more savvy on the Internet, according to school district Principal Kim Pike. The mindfulness training will include activities such as yoga, meditative thinking and breathing, and the "digital citizenship" coursework will teach students how to be both safe and responsible on the Internet, Pike said. The school will be introducing STEAM class work, which adds arts into the focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Also, all the students in the school, rather than a subset, will be participating Nov. 21 in a communitywide harvest feast at town hall. The school will also have a new sculpture park at the front of the building at 12 Winslow St., with donations from the Provincetown Art Association and Museum and the Fine Arts Work Center, Pike said. Last year, Provincetown Schools had 111 students at the Winslow Street building from pre-kindergarten through eighth grade, while older students attended out-of-town high schools such as Nauset Regional High School in North Eastham.


sep03 Provincetown

New Provincetown Town Manager Ready to Tackle Affordable Housing

Provincetown's new town manager, David Panagore, spent his first day on the job on Monday. Panagore, 50, who came to Cape Cod from Connecticut where he was the executive director of the New Haven Parking Authority, said he spent his day meeting with the staff and getting familiar with the town. He also got out of the office to talk with a couple of merchants and had over 150 emails to sift through. The town's search was a long process after the former town manager, Sharon Lynn, resigned in 2013. The job was first offered to another candidate who turned it down due to the lack of affordable housing. Panagore says that issue is front and center. "Housing is an issue across the Cape but in Provincetown it's clearly one of the most critical issues," Panagore said. "Year-round available housing being a critical one." Panagore said another major issue facing the town is finding its base in the local economy with the disappearance of fishing as a major industry along with environmental issues. Settling into the position is how Panagore expects to begin his tenure. "First on my agenda list is really to spend the next month or so really listening and going out and meeting everyone that I can in town who has an interest in town," he said. "So that I can help see the community move forward the way it wants to." Panagore and selectmen came to terms on a three-year contract in July with a salary that starts at $140,000 per year. Panagore previously worked for the city of Hartford as its chief operating officer and held positions in Springfield and Chelsea.


sep03 Provincetown

Provincetown housing council approves $20K in emergency assistance for homeless

The Provincetown Community Housing Council voted 3-0 on Monday to approve a request from the Homeless Prevention Council for $20,000 in emergency housing funds for the coming year. "These emergency funds are only used for direct assistance, and not for administrative costs," said HPC Program Director Maggi Flanagan. Last year's expenditures were listed by Flanagan, who reported that from March 2014 to June 2015 HPC provided $20,000 in assistance to 61 Provincetown families and individuals who were homeless or at risk of being homeless. Other agencies provided $16,747. All of those funds had been spent by June 10. No single payment exceeded $650. The financial assistance provided last year by the HPC helped pay for rent, utilities, car repairs, propane, firewood, oil, motel and inn rooms, and mortgage payments.


sep03 Provincetown

Ghost tours offer eerie and educational nighttime entertainment in Provincetown

You've probably seen the hearse advertising the Provincetown Ghost Tours, which run Thursdays through Mondays through the end of the month and Friday and Saturday of Labor Day Weekend. It's parked on Standish Street. Maybe you've even been frightened by the passenger in the back - a pirate long-deceased, with an eye patch draped across his rather exposed skull. After all, it's in its 10th season, though the ghosts have been around for much longer, and the tour guide, Angela Vital-Martowski, is a seasoned pro. Before she started the tours, she did "five years of research," she says, and it shows. What intrigues me is the historical backing and facts - who [the ghosts] might be and why. That makes it interesting," says Vital-Martowski. But the tour is not just historically accurate, it's also legitimate. She's had many a paranormal investigator on board, and they've gotten their money's worth. After all, "This is real stuff, hundreds of years coming back," she says. So if you're looking for haunted houses, masked figures popping out at you, or anything even close to a fog machine, look elsewhere. Vital-Martowski may be cloaked in a cape, donning a rhinestone-covered skeleton pin, and carrying a lamp from another century, but that's part of the fun. "I do my tour as a performance," she explains. All in all the Provincetown Ghost Tour is more historical walk than haunted house ride-and that's a good thing. The tour de departed forces begins at the Coffee Pot, but the only thing haunted about that location is perhaps an old trashed coffee grinder. After grabbing an electromagnetic field detector, or downloading the iemf app onto one's phone, the first stop is the Provincetown Library. Here Vital-Martowski explains that the librarians often find the clocks in the library fallen or face down upon their arrival in the morning. Who is the culprit? The ghost of Captain Marion Perry, whose ship the Rose Dorothea has been replicated on the second floor - the largest model of its size to be kept indoors. Just ask the Guinness Book. Vital-Martowski jokes about such "useless Provincetown trivia" throughout her highly entertaining and captivating spiel, but these aren't your average mind-numbing factoids - this is stuff that's actually interesting to whip out at dinner parties. Another reason his ghost is most likely among the paperbacks? Sometimes after the tour goes by, the fire alarm goes off. Plus, the emf meters flash like crazy upon arrival at the library's steps.


more

sep03 Provincetown

Labor Day Weekend reading, auction in Provincetown to benefit Alzheimer's support

"Memory Objects," a reading and silent auction of original books created by collaborations between artists and writers, is being held Friday and Saturday, Sept. 4-5, at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, 24 Pearl St. All proceeds support the Alzheimer's Family Support Center of Cape Cod. At 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4 there's an evening reading by Michael Cunningham, Greg O'Brien and Toby Olson, three of the writers who joined artists in creating the "memory objects" - one-of-a-kind handmade books - to be viewed and bid on during the silent auction. Bidding begins at the reading and then runs all through Saturday, Sept. 5, wrapping up with a closing night party from 5 to 7 p.m. The Support Center's direct assistance to caregivers begins with the premise that caring for those suffering from dementia can be an isolating struggle - a labor of love. For many of the artists and writers who created the one of a kind, handmade books, to be viewed and bid on during "Memory Objects," participation in this benefit is a way of giving back to the center, which provides its services free of charge. The center currently helps nearly 250 individuals and families in support groups, counseling and phone support from Falmouth to Provincetown. For more information, visit alzheimerscapecod@gmail.com or call (508) 896-5170 or (508) 737-9452.


sep03 Provincetown

Writer's Voice Cafe in Provincetown

Singer/songwriter Anne Stott will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 9, at the Provincetown Public Library, 356 Commercial St. The event is part of the library's Writers Voice Cafe, a series that aims to bring writers of all kinds of media together with the local community. Stott will be singing songs from her new album "Love Never Dies." There will be an open mic session following her performance, and coffee, tea and snacks will be served. This event is open to the public, and there will be a free-will offering. For more information, call 508-487-7094.


sep03 Provincetown

Former Provincetown portrait artist draws attention for the wrong reason

Jane Rosenberg is used to doing courtroom sketches of high-profile people, like Woody Allen, Mia Farrow, and Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. But Monday, as the former Provincetown portrait artist left the federal courthouse in Manhattan - where U.S. District Court Judge Richard M. Berman was hearing New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady's appeal of his four-game suspension - the television cameras were pointed at her. Rosenberg is the courtroom sketch artist who rendered Brady - believed beautiful by many of his fans - in a less than hunky light during an Aug. 12 court appearance related to Deflategate, allegations that the Patriots purposefully underinflated footballs to gain an advantage during play. Her poison pastel went viral. That and her heartfelt apology afterward have made her famous. It's not the kind of publicity she enjoys, however. "The first day I felt awful," she said. "I got 700 emails. The majority were supportive. But there are really nasty people sitting behind their computer screens." Back before all that fame, Rosenberg was an artist in the Cape's outermost town where she met Simie Maryles, then also a portrait artist. The two women worked together on the streets doing quick sketches of tourists in the 1970s. As they grew up, Maryles settled in Provincetown and started the Simie Maryles Gallery. Rosenberg sat in on court trials in New York City making practice sketches until a network television station bought the first sketch, she said. Rosenberg has gone on to work on major cases, depicting the gritty, like John Gotti, to the glittery, like Martha Stewart, with the quick hands of an artist used to getting down the elements of a face in a few precious strokes. For 35 years, she's comfortably enjoyed her background seat to history. Each summer, she comes to Provincetown for an opening of her plein air work at the Simie Maryles Gallery. This year's opening took place in July, she said. Not a sports fan herself, she had never heard of Brady, Rosenberg said. Then, when she saw him in court on Aug. 12, she had just minutes to make the sketch during the brief hearing, Maryles said. It's tough to sketch pretty people, she said. "The smooth faces of really good-looking people are harder to draw," Maryles said. Since Rosenberg's poor portrait went viral and she faced a media maelstrom, she has had lots of offers to buy the infamous sketch. She said she still doesn't know if she will sell it though. "I get more offers every day," she said. But she has had a chance to practice Brady's face. And it was a good thing too, because on Monday Brady appeared only briefly, she said. He sat in the back of the courtroom, mostly hidden behind his lawyer. "It was a courtroom artist's worst nightmare," Rosenberg said. "I was under so much stress. It was a good thing I did a practice sketch. I worked a lot from memory." Rosenberg said she was nearly alone in court finishing her drawing when Brady left a conference room and walked nearby with his lawyers. She says he waved, looked her way and said "thank you." Rosenberg's not reading too much into it, saying he might just be "a polite guy who waves to everybody."


sep03 Orleans

Better management for Nauset Beach?

Selectman John Hodgson, chairman of the parks commissioners, was on Nauset Beach recently and got to thinking about the lifeguard stands. There was nothing really wrong with them, they help protect the lifeguards and give them a better view, but they aren't designed with the big picture in mind. In a meeting with some department heads on the beach it was the consensus the stands should be higher to help with sighting sharks in the water. That kind of holistic thinking, from the small details, like lifeguard chairs, to how the south end of Nauset, which is shared with Chatham, should be managed as one beach - not two - is imperative moving forward, said Hodgson. "We have a major East Coast beach and we need to start managing it like one," he said. "I think that is what citizens and tourists expect from us." He has asked beach staff to come forward this fall with initiatives, and price tags, on how to better run and promote the beach. "Here is our vision for the beach how are we going to get there," Hodgson said. Some ideas include having Verizon improve cellular service so if there is an emergency it can get called in quickly, moving the boardwalk so it doesn't create an easy path for the sea to take a bite out of the parking lot, and the creation of a reserve fund to turn the money made at the beach back into protecting it. Patrolling the close to nine-miles of beach also needs to be looked at. "You can't just have a guy in a pickup truck bouncing up and down. We have a boat on Meetinghouse Pond, we need to discuss if that boat needs to be out patrolling," he said. "These are the conversations we are going to have." Hodgson said town officials need to be more proactive in working with the state on projects - such as dune building - to decrease erosion instead of just nodding when they say it would be difficult to permit. "We need to stop just accepting what is handed to us," he said. For the past several years, town officials and residents have spent a lot of time "fighting" to open up the beach, Hodgson said, referring to the recently successful effort to allow oversand vehicles on the beach earlier in the summer with a more stringent program to protect threatened piping plovers. Now, he said, energy should be spent on how to enjoy, protect and improve access. The visioning by the board and staff is being augmented by a study by the Woods Hole Group, funded by the Community Preservation Act, that covers everything from establishing a threshold for beach facilities relocation, to pedestrian access, to safety, to erosion rates.


more

sep03 Orleans

Public Health Advisory Issued at Orleans Pond

Harvey's Pond in Orleans was recently issued a Public Health Advisory from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Officials with the Orleans Health Department said the advisory is due to an excess of Cyanobacteria, or Blue Green Algae. People and pets should avoid contact with the waters until safe levels of the bacteria have been reached, according to health officials. Questions regarding the advisory can be directed to MA Dept. of Public Health, (617) 624-5757, or the Orleans Health Department, (508) 240, 3700 ext. 450.


sep03 Orleans

Blue-green algae prompts warning about Orleans pond

State public health officials are warning people to stay away from Uncle Harvey's Pond in East Orleans and Schoolhouse Pond in Hyannisport due to the presence of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae. The two freshwater ponds are among nine bodies of water in Massachusetts listed as having cyanobacteria advisories as of Friday by the state Department of Public Health. Uncle Harvey's Pond is off Pochet Road in East Orleans, and Schoolhouse Pond is off Scudder Avenue in Hyannisport. Algae are a natural component of aquatic ecosystems that can, in large quantities or blooms, pose a significant potential threat to human and ecological health, according to the federal Environmental Protection Agency. The blooms are often composed of microorganisms known as cyanobacteria, some of which have the potential to produce toxins that can cause adverse health effects in humans and animals through contamination of waterways used for recreational purposes and as drinking water. Anyone with questions can call the state Department of Public Health at 617-624-5757.


sep03 Orleans

Nauset Community Education

Nauset Community Education is accepting registration through Sept. 8 for its fall session of more than 70 enrichment courses. Subjects include arts and crafts, dance and music, fitness and health, home and garden, health and safety, writing and literature, languages, recreation, technology and more. New courses this session are: Folk Dance, Music Appreciation, Chair Caning, 101 Ways to Better Health, Small Business Management Software and Solving Sudoku. There are both day and evening classes scheduled from September to November, with most courses running four and eight weeks. Class locations and fees vary. Brochures containing course descriptions, meeting times and locations, and costs are available at Nauset area town halls and libraries; councils on aging in Brewster, Eastham, Orleans and Wellfleet; and at the Naust Community Education office, located at Nauset Regional Middle School, Route 28, Orleans. The brochure can also be accessed at www.nausetcommunityed.org. Early registration is advised, as many classes fill quickly. For course information or to register by phone (with a MasterCard or Visa), call 508-255-4300. Office hours are 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays and 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Fridays during registration.


sep03 Orleans

Safe Sidewalks Orleans gathers steam

Libby Callahan has lived on Beach Road for years and she loves to see people and families out walking and enjoying the beautiful area. But that feeling is always marred by worry - worry that a car may hit them. "There have been times I have had to jump off the road onto the grass," Callahan said. "It's just a matter of time. It's an accident waiting to happen." Callahan said more signage, and more police presence, as well as a zero tolerance policy for speeding, would help make the popular road to Nauset Beach safer. But what she would really like though is a sidewalk. "It is a definite sign there are pedestrians," said Callahan, whose five grandchildren often visit. Callahan is one of many residents who are working to get a sidewalk built on the south side of Beach Road. A new group, Safe Sidewalks Orleans, has formed to create a coalition around the idea and try and work with those who live along the winding road. One of the organizers of the group, Ronda Sigel, was before selectmen last week updating the board on their progress since they formed in May. She said they had a few informational meetings, as well as a public meeting with neighbors and Department of Public Works Director Tom Daley, and they hope to have a community forum in the coming weeks. The group hopes to have a town meeting article appropriating design funds next spring. Sigel said that the group wants abutters to feel part of the design process and they want the sidewalk that is in keeping with the character of the town. Selectmen seemed intrigued by the idea, which initially began several years ago, but was reborn after six pedestrians were struck by a car over Memorial Day weekend. "I think the project has a merit," said Selectman Jon Fuller.


more

sep03 Orleans

Lower Cape Outreach Council Champagne Gala

The Lower Cape Outreach Council will present its Champion's Award to state Sen. Dan Wolf at its benefit Champagne Gala from 6 to 9 p.m. Sept. 26 at the Orleans Yacht Club, located at 39 Cove Road. The council is honoring the senator for his support of the Cape's nonprofit community. The gala will feature music by Sarah Swain and the Oh Boys, a Taste of Cape Cod, with offerings from some of the finest restaurants in the area, and a live "Flings to Be Flung" auction, filled with adventures to bid on. There will be cocktails, a raw bar and classical music on the deck overlooking Town Cove. Tickets, $100, per person can be purchased by Sept. 22 at lcoutreach.org or by calling 508-240-0694. Proceeds will benefit the Outreach Council, a nonprofit agency serving Lower Cape residents in need with food, transportation, heat and utilities, and medical costs as well as other necessities. For more information, visit lcoutreach.org.


sep03 Orleans

Celebrate Our Waters Weekend is coming up in Orleans

The sixth annual Celebrate Our Waters weekend will be Friday, Sept. 18, through Sunday, Sept. 20. Fran McClennen of Orleans Pond Coalition said the weekend, which is a collaboration between the non-profit coalition and the town, is comprised of more than 50 water-related events, and they are all free. Along with events where folks can go out on paddleboards, kayaks and sailboats there are also walks, talks, tours, demonstrations, music and art events. "And, of course, there is the band concert and the town-sponsored bonfire at Nauset Beach on Friday night," McClennen told selectmen last week. Although all the events are free and open to the public, some require reservations, which can be done through the pond coalition's website beginning Sept. 11. "[The weekend] is an opportunity to for those of us who live here to join together in appreciating our special waterways and proudly sharing them with visitors," McClennen said.


sep03 Orleans

Orleans fire department secures grant

Orleans received an Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG), which help support equipment and training for fire departments across the country, Congressman Bill Keating announced late last month. Orleans's federal share of $42,858 will be used for the purchase of a cardiac compression device. "One of the most important impacts our government can have is providing our first responders with the most modern, efficient equipment available," said Keating in a statement. "The benefits of grants to firefighters are seen day in and day out in the lives saved and the communities protected. As always, I commend the chiefs and entire fire department of these towns for their great work and dedication to our communities." Orleans Fire Chief Anthony Pike said, "This is a tremendous resource to add to the medical arsenal available to our community. Several taxpayers had expressed their hopes that we would be able to bring this life-saving equipment to the town of Orleans. The AFG grant will allow our department to respond more efficiently and effectively to medical emergencies in town."


sep03 Brewster

Sunset tractor rides a Brewster tradition

Sparky's sign sums up his style: "Growing old is great when you remember to play." Sparky just turned 74 and he still plays with his toy, a 1948 John Deere Model A tractor, which he said his brother gave him as a combined birthday and wedding present more than 30 years ago. Sparky, also known as Parker Williams Jr., has been offering hayrides from Kate's Seafood, on Paines Creek Road, for at least 25 years. Aboard the green tractor with yellow cart neatly lined with hay bales, he charges $1 for kids and $2 for big kids to take them the short distance down to watch sunsets at Paines Creek Beach. With handlebar mustache, straw hat and barrel chest, Sparky goes back and forth most nights in the summer without any plans to retire. Country music plays on the radio that's neatly built into the wooden cart above another built-in shelf for sunscreen. "He's been here longer than I've been alive," said Liam Ohman, son of Kathy Ohman, who owns Kate's. "We love him. He's a great guy." And that sentiment was repeated often on a late summer night. "I like him a lot," said Luke Iorio, 4. "We visit here a lot and literally we cannot go a night without coming here," said Luke's mom, Melissa Iorio. "And if he's not here, we have to say he's on vacation." Another boy, about age 10, wrote a book about Sparky, in which he described how much he looked forward to the rides, and how he worried when Sparky didn't show up. He might be sick, or even dead, the boy wrote. His parents printed a hardcover copy of the book and gave it to Sparky. "It's just fun," said Sparky, a former Marine who still drives a cement truck for Cape Cod Ready Mix during the day. He said he loves meeting people from all over, and he has done at least 16 weddings as well as many birthday parties. People come to Kate's for ice cream and stay for a hayride, he said. Or they come for hayride and get lured by the delicious smell of fried food. It's a reciprocal relationship that has worked for decades. Sparky grew up on a farm in Weston, the oldest of seven children, he said. He moved to Brewster in 1977. The hayrides began when his brother gave him the tractor. He would drive it around his neighborhood picking up children and adults to go get ice cream and then see the sunset. "That's how it all started," he said. His children and now grandchildren enjoy the rides. And Sparky never tires of seeing sunsets. "Not one is ever the same," he said.


sep03 Brewster

Back to the future: Market emphasizes local roots

Stephan Brown of Great Cape Herbs believes Brewster could be a "transition town," as in transition to a sustainable, locally rooted future. To that end he's establishing a market, every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in front of his herb shop opposite Foster Square, next to True Value Hardware on Route 6A. The market is for all locally produced goods and services, from paintings to quilts to tomatoes, and it's doing quite well in its first summer. "Tomorrow we'll have twice as many vendors as ever (13)," Brown said on Wednesday. "Transition towns started in a little town in England in 2006. People are transitioning into what the future will be like: more sensible and sustainable than today. There are now thousands (of transition towns) around the world." On the surface the market doesn't appear futuristic. In some ways it's more backward looking. "In medieval times there was a market day. The king would appoint market towns, usually at a crossroads or river, and people would come and sell goods and go home," Brown said. "This is the same idea." Dave Scandura of Edible Landscape Garden Installations was selling home-grown herbs. "They're culinary and medicinal. Unique and hard to find," he said. "Last week (his first) I got enough (business) to want to come back and it's good enough today to come back next week. I make more here than at the Farmer's Market." Rebecca Dalmas was selling a service, Techno Tutor, to improve process of learning - essentially until it's a natural as breathing. "I've been here almost every week and it's gotten busier every week," she said. "I really enjoy the group here. I've gotten leads here from people who are interested for themselves or an employer." Brown would like to extend it into the evening hours, perhaps with live music. "That way it becomes a community event," he said. "We're going back to mom and pop businesses. It's basically downsizing. A transition town is more egalitarian. The reward is you fulfill your needs. It seems to be working well." Pam Stone, who sells jewelry at the market is helping manage it and handles most of the paperwork. "We started with five vendors and it has grown," she said. "We didn't put a lot of money into marketing. This is a test year for us. But it's been well received. Last week was my best week. And it's helped all our individual businesses so the community is interested in what we are doing." Karen North Wells was selling beautiful cards and pictures based on her paintings. Ellen Peterson of Crazy Home Fabrics displayed spectacular quilts.


more

sep03 Brewster

Cape Cod Bird Club

The Cape Cod Bird Club will kick off a new season with a presentation by John Kricheron on "Why Did I Go to Borneo?" at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History, Route 6A, Brewster. Borneo is the world's third largest island and historically has contained some of the planet's richest biodiversity. According to a press release, while increasingly under threat from extensive logging and palm oil production, some significantly large tracts of rain forest remain and are protected, including Sabah in northern Borneo. In his illustrated talk, Kricher will share some observations from his recent trip to Sabah and provide an overview of Bornean biodiversity. Kricher is a professor of biology at Wheaton College in Norton as well as an author and a Fellow of the American Ornithologists Union. He has served as president of the Association of Field Ornithologists and the Wilson Ornithological Society. The club meets at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month from September to May at the museum. All meetings are free and open to the public. The club hosts speaker presentations as well as a number of walks, including these coming up in September:

  • 8 to 10 a.m. Friday at Peterson Farm in Falmouth. Participants will walk around the farm's thickets looking for flycatchers, vireos, warblers and possibly a bobolink or dickcissel. Leader: Stefanie Paventy, 508-968-5125 or stefpav09@gmail.com.

  • 7:30 to 11 a.m. Sept. 26 at Sandy Neck, off Route 6A, West Barnstable (beach parking lot, past visitors shack). Participants will start on the beach looking for seabirds before heading out on Trail 1 to search for birds in the marsh. Highlights may include seabirds, waders, shorebirds, warblers and sparrows. Leader: Peter Crosson, 508-280-1678 or pcrosson@emeraldphysicians.com.

Walks are free, but participants are asked to call or email the above trip leader to register. For more information on the club, go to capecodbirdclub.org.


sep03 Brewster

Digging into the past at Cape Cod Museum of Natural History

Author and historian Theresa Mitchell Barbo will speak at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History as part of the on-going Digging into the Past speaker series. The event is free with admission to the museum at 869 Main St., Brewster. With an illustrated presentation, Barbo will touch on a wide variety of facts, including which wild creature went from the soup pot to the state's conserved species list and why Cape Codders call lunch "the noontime dinner." For information, call 508-896-3867, ext. 133.


sep03 Brewster

Garden Club of Brewster "The Romance Of Hats"

The Garden Club of Brewster will present its first program of the season, "The Romance Of Hats," at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Northside United Methodist Church, 701 Airline Road, Brewster. In this program, Donna and Ron Lasko, owners of Courtship Tea of Osterville, will present their personal collection of hats from 1800 to 2015. The meaning of the flowers used to adorn these hats will be explained in the presentation. Willing audience members will be encouraged to model the hats. The Laskos have been named "The Ultimate Tea Couple" by the Tea Association of America. Their Courtship Tea is their own blend of black teas and flavorings that create a smooth-tasting afternoon tea and will complement the club's usual light refreshments of tea sandwiches and sweets. Nonmembers and guests as well as potential new members are welcome to attend free of charge. For more information on the club, go to gardenclubofbrewster.com.


sep03 Brewster

Grief support at Lazarus Ministry of Our Lady in Brewster

The Lazarus Ministry of Our Lady of the Cape Parish of Brewster will offer the six-week bereavement support program, "Come Walk With Me," from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Thursdays Sept. 10 to Oct. 15 in the Parish Center, located at 456 Stony Brook Road. This program is designed for people who have experienced the loss of a loved one within the past year. Cost is $10 for materials. For required preregistration and more information, call Mary Morley at 508-385-8942 or Joan Merz at 508-385-9265.


sep03 Chatham

4-year-old girl injured in fall at Coast Guard lighthouse

A 4-year-old girl was flown to a Boston hospital Monday after falling inside a Coast Guard lighthouse, according to a Chatham fire official. Around 2:30 p.m., firefighters responded to the Chatham Coast Guard Station on Main Street after the girl fell about 15 feet inside the lighthouse located at the station, Chatham fire Capt. Matt Flynn said. The girl suffered a possible head injury and was flown from the Chatham Municipal Airport to Tufts Medical Center, Flynn said. The girl is the daughter of a Coast Guard member and was visiting her mother at the time of the fall, a Coast Guard official said.


sep03 Chatham

Shark Researchers Have a Record Tagging Day off Cape Cod

The shark-tagging season remains active off Cape Cod as researchers continue spotting great whites close to shore. State shark expert Dr. Greg Skomal says they tagged four sharks on Monday, a record for one day. Skomal is working with the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy again this year to tag and research the burgeoning white shark population that now spends much of the summer off Monomoy and the rest of the Outer Cape. On a typical day out on the water for the researchers, spotter pilot Wayne Davis heads out first and scans the area from the tip of Monomoy to the Nauset Inlet. Then the researchers head out, going up and down the coast from Monomoy to Orleans, looking for seal activity and recording what they see: how many seals are hauled out along the shore, for example. When Davis spots a great white shark, he direct the boat to the shark. The crew then works to get underwater footage of both sides of the shark using the Go-Pro cameras, recording the animal's markings. Once Skomal believes he has enough footage to be able to identify the shark, he brings out the tagging pole to try to tag the shark.


sep03 Chatham

Aerial footage captures shark tagging in Cape Cod

A drone captured footage of the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy conducting research on sharks off the coast of Chatham.



Dr. Greg Skomal, a biologist for the Division of Marine Fisheries, was working with the organization as a part of population and movement study. You can see in the footage a shark being tagged near the coast of Chatham. Later on in the video, the researchers come across another shark in the ocean and tag it as well.

sep03 Chatham

Bernard Cornwell at Eldredge Public Library

Bernard Cornwell, 7 p.m. Thursday, Eldredge Public Library, 564 Main St. in Chatham. The book being discussed is his recently published "Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles." It is a work of nonfiction and there will be copies available for purchase at the event.


sep03 Chatham-Harwich

Monomoy Regional School District prepped for new year

Starts Sept. 8. The Monomoy Regional School District saw a lot of changes over the summer with around 30 staff and teachers leaving the system, most of them retiring. That means a lot of new faces at all the schools this fall including Mary Oldach, a new assistant principal at Harwich Elementary School, who came to Monomoy from the Dennis-Yarmouth school system. Administration staffing was a bit of musical chairs as former Harwich Elementary assistant principal Robin Millen takes over as principal of Chatham Elementary School. Monomoy is also continuing a program they started last year in which students were dismissed early every other Wednesday so teachers could meet with one another and with other teachers in the district on regional educational issues. The district is also deploying a parent pickup program that allows parents to notify teachers and school administrators when a student requires an early dismissal or other change of schedule. Parents can communicate using smartphones, tablets or personal computers. Harwich elementary principal Sam Hein said his students would be focusing on close reading, which has an emphasis on how children interpret and comprehend text. Monomoy Regional High School Principal Bill Burkhead was happy to be starting his second year in the new high school. The construction workers are gone, the scheduling difficulties they encountered at the beginning of last year are hopefully behind them, and the staff and students will be settling into what is now a familiar setting. The high school did lose six or seven positions, but is welcoming 16 new staffers, from teachers to front office personnel and custodial staff, Burkhead said. Class sizes dropped from an average of 18 to 17. A restructuring of the rotating block schedule from eight days to seven resulted in students losing the opportunity of adding another elective, but Burkhead felt the consolidated elective offerings represented those that were consistently popular with students. Monomoy high school does include eighth-graders and Burkhead said those students would be grouped in teams as they would in a middle school setting. "It's a really strong model that works," he said.


sep03 Harwich

Annual Jailhouse Barbecue to be Held in Harwich

Harwich residents will have a chance to meet their local police officers Saturday at the annual Harwich Police Association Jailhouse Barbecue. The cookout will be held at the Harwich Police Department on Sisson Road from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Attendees will be able to sit in cruisers and on department motorcycles and have free "mugshots" taken. There will be a Dunk-a-Cop dunk tank and an inflatable obstacle course for kids. Refreshments include hot dogs, hamburgers, chowder and more. Extra parking for the event will be available at the Harwich Middle School on Sisson Road.


sep03 Harwich

Allen Harbor Yacht club helps Family Pantry

Congratulations to the Allen Harbor Yacht club, which just raised over $17,000 for the Family Pantry of Cape Cod at a recent cocktail party, auction and raffle. The members of the club also brought non-perishable items which filled the pantry's truck. The Family Pantry of Cape Cod is the largest Cape pantry that is open to anyone in need. This past year, they served approximately 9,000 people. For more information or to donate, contact the pantry at 508-432-6519 or visit the website at www.thefamilypantry.com. The pantry is located at 133 Queen Anne Road in Harwich.


sep03 Harwich

Device advice at Brooks Free Library

After a summer hiatus, Brooks Free Library will resume its weekly question-and-answer sessions on using electronic devices at a new day and time - 5 to 6:15 p.m. Thursdays Sept. 3 to Dec. 17 - at the library, 739 Main St., Harwich. In this program, open to all, attendees are asked to bring their devices and library staff will do their best to help you learn more about how to use your tablet, laptop, ereader, cellphone, etc. If you have multiple questions or think you need one-on-one tutoring, ask about the library's Book-a-Librarian program. For more information on this service, contact staff librarian Emily Milan at emilan@clamsnet.org or 508-430-7562, ext. 4.


sep03

Birding: Offshore journey yields an astounding bounty By E. Vernon Laux

For the past couple of weekends there have been some extraordinary sightings along the edge of and in the submarine canyons that are located slightly more than a 100 miles south of Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard. On Aug. 15 and 16, four dedicated underwater photographers left Nantucket on The Endurance. Aside from great weather, they photographed a white-tipped reef shark and a large hammerhead shark estimated at 500 pounds. As far as anyone in the know knows, this is the furthest north this species has been recorded in the North Atlantic. But the underwater marine aspect of what was happening was truly the tip of the iceberg when compared to what happened on another recent boat trip. A dedicated pelagic birding trip left Hyannis on Aug. 22 on the MV Helen H and returned on the evening of Aug. 23 with about 60 birders aboard. They saw and photographed so many unusual birds that it literally raised the bar for future expeditions. There had never been a trip even close to this, and to say it was beyond all expectations would still be a very large understatement. It was as if tropical birds left over from multiple, large hurricanes were flying about where the continental shelf reaches the Gulf Stream south, 100 plus miles south of Nantucket - for no apparent reason. It was as though every rare tropical species that participants wanted to see actually cooperated. In fact, sea trips out of Cape Hatteras or off Florida are rarely, if ever, as productive as this trip. Birds that a lone sighting of which would have made most observers happy were seen by the hundreds. It was almost an "Alice in Wonderland" setting except they obtaining excellent photographs of all species as proof they were clearly not hallucinating but enjoying an historic pelagic trip the likes of which may never be seen again. For those familiar with pelagic birds, the following list will sound like something you have been dreaming of. For those hearing these birds' names for the first time just be amazed at all the ornithological diversity occurring on the ocean off the northeast United States. Two black-capped petrels, in the genus Pterodroma, from the Caribbean were seen and photographed. They are found every few years, so to get good views of two on the same trip is outstanding. In addition, there were an astounding 202 Audubon's shearwaters, another tropical species that is always way south of here. An amazing 28 white-faced storm petrels, one of the highest counts ever anywhere in the world, 161 Leach's storm-petrels, 23 band-rumped storm petrels and five tropicbirds. They had four white-tailed tropicbirds and a red-billed tropicbird, both mega-rarities off the New England coast. These species are scarce off the coast of Hatteras in the summer and fall. Other birds seen included all three jaeger species, a South Polar skua and a bridled tern. This major commitment of time and money was well worth it as far as all aboard were concerned. In the annals of New England pelagic birding trips this one will live in infamy. It will be interesting to see if any of these species hang around to be seen again when people are able to venture out to this last frontier in New England. Back ashore the humidity finally cleared out when the wind came from the west. A lark sparrow on Tuckernuck Island and lots of landbirds, including the season's first migrant bobolinks, put in an appearance Aug. 27. A feeder in Madaket has five Baltimore orioles and two ruby-throated hummingbirds. Shorebirds and terns are on the move and things are about to bust loose in the bird world. The migration spigot is about to open up. The next couple of months offer outstanding birding on the Cape and Islands. Until next week-keep your eyes to the sky!


sep03

Pickleball: The Cape's fastest growing sport

It looks a little bit like tennis, a little bit like badminton, and even a little bit like table tennis, but pickleball is a sport unto itself. Maybe you've heard of it, or maybe you haven't, but either way, this sport has gained unprecedented momentum locally, and looks to be here to stay for a long time to come. "This sport is growing very fast," said USA Pickleball Association ambassador George Rice. "I was the one who started the sport on Cape Cod. When we started very few people had even heard of the sport, but now we have several hundred players across most of the Cape towns." Pickleball is a racket sport invented in 1965 in Washington. It is played on a badminton sized court with a net a little lower than a tennis court net. Despite being invented fifty years ago, no one on Cape Cod so much as knew about it ten years ago. Pickleball is very popular amongst retirement aged people making Cape Cod a natural fit. It isn't as strenuous as tennis, and is much less taxing on the knees and shoulders. But make no mistake; this is a fast moving and very challenging sport for all ages. Rice says anyone "from 8 to 88" can enjoy it, and several schools even have it as part of their gym curriculum. Rice took a trip to a large Florida retirement community, The Villages, in 2007 where he was introduced to the game. He took to it immediately and wanted to bring it back to the Cape. At the time, there were no ambassadors in New England, and nowhere to play. The closest place at the time was in Albany New York. Rice learned how to convert tennis courts for pickleball, and started playing. It was slow moving at first as Rice found it tough to get the towns on board, but eventually, the ball was rolling, and the sport took off. Today, there are over 50 ambassadors, and 58 places to play in Massachusetts alone. On Cape Cod, there are ten towns who have official pickleball locations. "It took a while, but I eventually was allowed by the tennis court people in my community to use two of the courts for pickleball as long as it wasn't on the weekend," said Rice. "Eventually, the pickleball people outnumbered the tennis people. At that point, I joined the USA pickleball association." On that application, there was a box labeled "do you want to promote the sport." Rice checked the box not really understanding what that meant. Soon after, a box arrived filled with USAPA business cards, and Rice was on his way to grow this sport on Cape Cod. Everyone stresses the camaraderie inherent in the sport. Pickleball players are very accommodating and willing to help new players along. Unlike tennis where it is mostly common for 2-4 friends to just go out and play whenever, pickleball players set up specific times for large groups to go out and play. On these sanctioned times and locations, it isn't uncommon for 15-30 players to show up. "There is a social aspect to the sport," said Rice. "And it is extremely addictive."


more

sep03 Wellfleet

Local Food Report by Elspeth Hay: Preserving Quince - and Portuguese Tradition - by Making Marmelada

Elspeth Hay is an avid locavore who lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30am on Morning Edition and Thursdays at 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30am.





Marmelada, if you've never had it, is nothing like marmalade. It is made of quince, not oranges, and although it is a kind of fruit preserve, it is much more firm than the citrus stuff. It's so hard that the Portuguese eat it in slices, alongside a piece of banana maybe or plain or with a hunk of cheese. On the Local Food Report this week, Elspeth talks with Louiza Azancot of Chatham about the Portuguese tradition of preserving quince. You can find more details, and Louiza's recipe for Marmelada, here at Elspeth's blog.






News Archive