News Archive

Friday, August 31, 2012

aug31 Wellfleet

'Heritage Fest' in Wellfleet

Wellfleet Preservation Hall celebrates the 100th birthday of the building it's located in (the former Our Lady of Lourdes church) at a "Heritage Fest" at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 1. The event will include stories about and a history of the building, a Kevin Rice skit, a barbecue dinner (bring a side dish to share) and a dance party with tunes from the last 100 years.


aug31 Wellfleet

Sound choice: Catbirds at Beachcomber

Eastham native Chandler Travis has been creating bands and original music for years. But he says his latest project - the Catbirds - is a band that allows him to play his rock 'n' roll "louder and rougher" than ever before. A CD release party for "Catbirds Say Yeah" will be held Friday at The Beachcomber in Wellfleet; Travis calls the venue the perfect place "to make a loud racket." "Its getting hard to find a place to blast on the Cape," Travis says in a phone interview. "There are so many bars that are really restaurants ... and our music just isn't designed to be played at low volume." The band, formed in 2010, is composed of Travis on bass, baritone guitar and vox; Rikki Bates, dubbed "the drummer in a dress"; Dinty Child on drums, guitar, mandocello, accordion and vox; and Steve Wood on guitar and vox. All of the band members have played in Travis' other bands - The Casuals, Chandler Travis Philharmonic and Chandler Three-O. But Travis says Catbird members wanted to use R&B and rock 'n' roll to "fight the war on boring" and get their fans "moving again." "We wanted to play real music and something different," Travis says. "We all have different bands that we are doing, but the Catbirds scratch the same itch for all of us - and that's noise - and I need that itch scratched every now and then." So with that goal in mind, the quartet converged and in 2011 released the EP "Viborate." Travis says the recording sessions for the EP amounted to enough material for their current album release. "We had all four guys in the studio blasting away. I think we recorded 20 songs in two days. We play with voracity (throughout the album) and people dig it, and we just love the music on that album."

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aug31 Eastham

State tackling harassment complaints against Eastham police chief

Three police dispatchers' complaints that they were sexually harassed by Police Chief Edward Kulhawik are moving forward after state mediation failed. Dispatchers Julie Austin, Kerianne Leidenfrost and Melanie Beaulieu filed sexual harassment complaints in June with the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination, the state agency that handles civil rights violations. They charge that Kulhawik made inappropriate sexual comments, gossiped about co-workers and behaved unprofessionally. The women filed with the state agency after complaining first to the chief's boss, Town Administrator Sheila Vanderhoef. In late June, Vanderhoef found some merit to their complaints, but the town didn't punish the chief or help improve the workplace atmosphere, the dispatchers' attorney, Howard Wilgoren, said. A mediation session held Aug. 23 failed to resolve the issues and so now MCAD will investigate further and ultimately decide if there is probable cause to move forward, Barbara Green, MCAD's media liaison, said. If MCAD finds probable cause and if the parties cannot work out an agreement, the case will proceed to a public hearing and a decision. "In my review of the case, the town has violated the law by failing to conduct a prompt investigation of my clients' complaints and although the town administrator found merit to some of the complaints, the town has failed in its legal obligation to take appropriate remedial action up to and including termination of Chief Kulhawik," Wilgoren said. "To our knowledge, there has been no consequences imposed on Chief Kulhawik at all, even for the conduct that the town administrator found to have occurred." The town's attorney for the MCAD suit, Leonard Kesten, said in response that the town will win. And, he added, the dispatchers' most recent complaints have been laughable. "The last complaint we had was that the chief was using the trash can in the dispatch room," Kesten said. The other complaint received in the last two months was that the chief used the shredder in the dispatch room, he said. "He is really running amok," Kesten joked. "I have no doubt the town did the right thing, and they will win." Kesten argued that the sexual harassment complaints are old news. "Whatever allegedly happened months ago has not been repeated, so now we're down to trash cans and shredders," Kesten said. "It's not a hostile working environment." Kulhawik, 55, earned $123,323 in base pay in 2011. He was hired three years ago from the town of Wilton, Conn. His contract is up for renewal this month. Vanderhoef has not responded to multiple requests for information about whether his contract has been renewed. Kulhawik was a police officer in Wilton starting in 1981. He was chief there for five years before being hired in Eastham. The three dispatchers' complaints differ slightly, but all level the same accusations that Kulhawik made comments about women's bodies, mostly women on TV. They say he also commented on a dispatcher's weight and allegedly said the female dispatchers needed to go to boot camp, according to their complaints filed with MCAD.

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aug31 Truro

Cornucopia of offerings at this year's Agricultural Fair in Truro

It's that time of the year again - time to celebrate farm animals, organic produce, flowers and honey bees, as well as the local residents who continue to keep Lower Cape farming a thriving business. The fourth annual Truro Agricultural Fair will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday on the village green, at 7 Truro Center Road. The Ag Fair attempts to promote a broader understanding and appreciation for agriculture, aquaculture, fishing and farming on the Cape. The goal of this fair also is to educate fair-goers on the importance of local foods, as well as steps one can take to help sustain our physical health, land and water resources. In addition to education, it also allows residents and visitors to get involved through voluntary service and help raise spirit in this small community. Central to the activities and events at this year's fair will be the well-known harvest market, where local farmers will sell their produce - everything from honey to eggs to heirloom fruits and vegetables. A total of 21 farms are participating this year, several based in Truro, including Gain's Greens, Truro Vineyards, Out There Organics, Long Meadow Farms, Honey Bee Farms, Nestwood Farms and Hillside Farms. Drew Locke of Hillside Farms in North Truro will be one of the locals participating in this year's fair. Being the seventh generation at this historic farm - previously known as Perry's Farm - Locke graduated from UMass.-Amherst with a master's in sustainable food and farming, as well as an associate's from the Stockbridge School of Agriculture in fruit and vegetable production. His family's farm will be selling a variety of vegetables, including tomatoes, eggplant, basil, cucumbers, squash and zucchini. Locke also will have his special blind chicken at the event.

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aug31 Provincetown

Artist and Activist Jay Critchley Discusses the 25th Anniversary of the Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life and Paddler Flotilla

I talked with activist and artist Jay Critchley about the Silver Anniversary of the Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life and Paddler Flotilla (A Benefit for AIDS, Women's Health & the Community), which happens Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012. Since 1987 thousands of swimmers, kayakers, volunteers, and spectators have been participating in this fabulous Provincetown fundraising tradition, presented by the Provincetown Community Compact. Swimmers from across the country will swim 1.4 miles across Provincetown Harbor to benefit Helping Our Women, AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod, Outer Cape Health Services, Provincetown Rescue Squad, Lower Cape Ambulance, Academy at Provincetown Schools, Soup Kitchen of Provincetown, and the Compact Community Fund. Last year swimmers raised $200,000.

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aug31 Provincetown

A new recipe for 'Love and Happiness' in Provincetown

Lora Brody shifted from one highly successful, creative career in the public spotlight to another. Put simply, Brody moved from food to photography. As part of a group show opening at 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, at Provincetown's Schoolhouse Gallery, 494 Commercial St., Brody will present a new series of cyanotypes, a process she says appeals to her the most. "Love and Happiness," her series of town images, is a mile marker in her journey to renew herself creatively. Starting as a caterer in 1972, Brody proceeded through a series of posts as chef, including at the Cape's own Chillingsworth Restaurant in the late '70s. Subsequently, working with Julia Child, Sara Moulton, Margaret Romagnoli, among others, Brody founded the Women's Culinary Guild, an organization for professional women in the food industry, and she become known as a popular cooking media figure on TV and radio. A series of bestselling cookbooks, including "The Kitchen Survival Guide" and "Basic Baking," assured her continuing prominence. However, following the events of September 11, 2001, Brody was faced with having to reclaim her artistic voice and redefine her professional purpose. "While I've always taken pictures," she says, "I began to take it as a serious vocation after 9/11, when I found myself totally crippled with writer's block. Since my books are as much about stories as recipes, not being able to produce text was pretty devastating. I needed an outlet for my creative impulses, and my camera provided the perfect tool. There was another factor in play as well. After 25 years I really was ready to give up writing cookbooks. The market has changed so much [that] without a 'platform,' a TV show, a restaurant or the like, now it is almost impossible to sell a cookbook. So the timing was perfect." Studying with Constantine Manos, Marion Roth, Alex Webb, Amy Arbus and Lana Caplan, Brody mastered a number of art-photography techniques including pinhole and cyanotype that enabled her to move from professional image-taking to more creative and personal expression. "When I gave up writing cookbooks to do photography full-time there wasn't much I missed about cooking - at first," she says. "Ultimately, what I did come to miss was the mucking around with ingredients to create new recipes. Digital technology didn't give me enough of a chance to engage physically with the making of a picture. While the one-of-a kind cyanotypes begin with digital capture, each final image is the result of many hours of hands-on effort and a lot of trial and error. [Classic cyanotype], invented before the first modern camera, yields a brilliant blue image. The sepia images have been bleached and then toned with strong tea solutions. The process is long and messy and rife with potential accidents, some good, some not so good. But it offers the artist countless opportunities to create something by hand that is truly unique, sort of like cooking."

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aug31 Provincetown

Provincetown's Bobby Miller: transforming reality one face at a time

Photographer Bobby Miller sees more than what's there; he sees the possibility of what could be there and makes it so. His latest book project, "Fairy Tale Folk and Other Imagined Creatures," is revealed in an opening at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, at Gallery 200. "I see light," he says, as if that explains everything. And in a way, it does. Painters have come to Provincetown for more than a century for the light, for the way it changes and shifts and makes magic from the mundane. But photographers see light differently. He points out the way the light coming through the window behind us outlines our shoulders and profiles and throws parts of us into shadow. It's simple, he says, seeing how light defines the image, and he has learned very well how to capture that subtlety and make it the driving force in an image. Born in Washington, D.C., Miller ran away from home at 14 and headed for San Francisco in 1967 during the Summer of Love. He stayed a few years, moved to London and then back to D.C. before heading off to New York. He arrived in Manhattan on April Fool's Day in 1973 - "How appropriate," he says - and started painting, but the fumes in his tiny apartment "nearly killed me," he says, and he made the switch to photography. He studied with Lisette Model in New York and now doles out stories about the iconic Model and her pal Berenice Abbott in New York and Paris that make one feel like part of the very inside crowd of artists who were changing the way the world saw things. He took thousands of images, some 90,000 in film alone before switching to digital, but mostly just put them away in filing cabinets.

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aug31 Provincetown

Cape Codder from Provincetown has Fenway photo at MFA

If you're at all familiar with the cookbook scene, particularly from the 1980s and '90s, you've probably heard of Lora Brody. She wrote her first in 1984, and more than 20 titles later - including "The Kitchen Survival Guide" and "Basic Baking" - she decided to give it up for another passion: photography. The switch paid off in a big way this summer when Brody's photograph of a food vendor won a competition at Fenway Park, was shown on the big screen during the July 18 game and was named part of a new exhibit, "Grandstand to Gallery" at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. "I had a heart attack," Brody, 66, says of learning she was named a finalist in the competition. "It was the most incredible thing to find out." In 2004 and 2005, the lifelong Red Sox fan, and part-time Provincetown resident, had a press pass to Fenway Park and focused on street art within the park, the people and staff, instead of the players on the field. This spring, the museum and Red Sox began soliciting contest images in three categories - portrait, landscape and "curveball," for more artistic images. From 700 submissions, MFA director Malcolm Rogers and Red Sox vice-president and historian Dick Bresciani selected one winner in each category. Brody's photo of a hot pretzel vendor pausing on the steps, with a sunset-tinged sky in the background, took the curveball category. Another three photos were selected through an online vote, bringing the exhibition to six. "Pretzels and baseball go hand in hand - vendors are part of what baseball stadiums are, walking through the crowds and peddling different refreshments," Bresciani says of the photograph. "We can see Fenway Park and the skyline with a beautiful sunset. All those factors had to do with our choice." Brody shares credit for the final product with Bob Korn, of Orleans, who helped edit the image. Brody, who divides her time between homes in Waltham and Provincetown, shows her photographs at the Schoolhouse Gallery on Commercial Street. Her newest exhibit there, "Feel the Love - Share the Happiness" opens tonight and runs through Sept. 19.

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aug31 Orleans

Nauset Beach closed to swimming due to shark

Nauset Beach was closed to swimming Thursday because of a shark sighting. The beach was closed at 11 a.m. This beach closure comes on the heels of Chatham closing all east-facing beaches because of the high number of great white sharks spotted recently. According to state shark expert Greg Skomal, 10 white sharks have been tagged this summer.

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aug31 Orleans

7 sharks spotted off Cape Cod coast


Seven more sharks were spotted off the coast of Cape Cod Thursday, scaring vacationers and causing beaches to close. This comes just ahead of the Labor Day weekend, when many people plan to spend their holiday at the beach. "We're not allowing swimming because of great white sharks that have been in the vicinity all day long. Some of these were within 15 feet of shore," said Supt. Paul Fulcher of Orleans Parks and Beaches. Three sharks lingered off shore. Sunbathers looked out at the ocean and quickly realized what was going on. "We knew it was out there. First we saw the seals, then we saw the helicopters, then we saw the tagging boat and the tagging boat was here for at least an hour and a half," said a witness, Michael Strouth. The scene caused tension for onlookers who were cooling off before the beach was closed by the town. This is the same area where a kayaker got up close and personal with a shark in early July. Further north in Truro, a man from Denver was bitten. There were at least seven spotted in all; four spotted by air near Chatham. The town closed east-facing ocean beaches and noted that state officials tracking tagged sharks are finding they are getting closer to the shore.

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aug31 Orleans

Sold out from under in Orleans

The best intentions and the vocal support of the local Occupy movement couldn't stop Sandy Schaefer-Ung's home from being auctioned on Wednesday - but the South Orleans woman still holds out hope that a lawsuit will let her keep her home. On Wednesday afternoon, Schaefer-Ung sat in her front yard with freshly made sandwiches for her crowd of supporters. A group of about 20 people marched in her driveway, opposing the scheduled auction of her foreclosed home. "Banks got bailed out, we got sold out," chanted the group, which included several Occupy Cape Cod and Occupy Falmouth members. "I'm so proud of them," Schaefer-Ung said, watching the group moments before the scheduled auction. This was the third time the auction was scheduled since June at the 38 Tar Kiln Road property, with both other events postponed. Schaefer-Ung's lawyer, Jamie Ranney of Nantucket, filed a lawsuit in Land Court earlier in the day, arguing that U.S. Bank couldn't prove it was the proper mortgagee. In the filing, Schaefer-Ung "denies that U.S. Bank or any other respondent possesses or can establish a lawful and valid chain of title to any mortgage, note, or any other interests in the premises that may have been originally granted" by her. Ranney said the promissory note he received was a photocopy which, he said, the line saying "pay to the order of" is blank. According to a recent decision by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, the lender trying to foreclose must hold both the mortgage and promissory note, which is proof of the debt. In this case, Homeward Residential manages the loan, which was assigned to U.S. Bank through Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. In public records, MERS is the nominal mortgage for this loan. In splitting and bundling loans as securities on the secondary market, MERS records and tracks the mortgage but allows the lender to retain or sell the note without recording the transfer in public records. MERS' authority to reassign mortgages, some of which were "robo-signed" without review, has been challenged in court.

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aug31 Brewster

In the red: Captains Course reports deficit for second year

Captains Golf Course will be handicapped for years. That's the verdict of the Brewster selectmen who don't expect the 36-hole course to resume contributing to town coffers until 2020. The course slipped to a $230,362 deficit last year and in the fiscal year ending this past July will lose $139,415 despite reforms in tee times and membership tiers. Course director Mark O'Brien had hoped Captains would show a small $6,953 profit. "Although we made some significant progress in revenue it did fall short of what we had projected in FY2012," O'Brien said. "In season passes it was $56,000 short and in greens fees it was $60,000 short. I guess I overestimated demand as far as greens fees goes." In efforts to boost revenues the course added guest tees times in the morning but fewer people took advantage of that than O'Brien predicted. Greens fees were up by $110,000 (after a drop of $120,000 the year before) so the changes helped. Season passes were pretty much flat (actually down by about $5,000). Overall revenues were up $127,303, after a drop of $220,071 in FY2011. "The increase in revenue was significant," O'Brien said. "I do believe without tiered membership we would have brought in less revenue." "You've really done a great job getting it this close [to break even]," Selectman James Foley said. "Once all this debt is paid off the total numbers we're looking at today would be a smashing success and a benefit to the tax rate." Captains shows a profit from operations of $475,585 for fiscal year 2012 (up from $409,477 last year). As Foley noted the problem is debt incurred when an additional 18-holes were added in 1999 at the height of the golf boom. The combined interest and principal on the debt was $774,200 this past year. The interest was included under operational costs but principal payments of $505,000 aren't and combined with $100,000 due annually on an irrigation bond and a $60,000 course renovation loan they drag Captains into the red. The irrigation bonds will be paid off in two years but the extra 18-holes won't be off the books until 2020. Captains is also suffering from a general malaise in the golf world. "There are 749 resident members of Captains, down from the heyday when we had over 1,100," Lewis said. "Four-hundred at $500 a pop, that's $200,000."

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aug31

Cyclist injured in hit and run in Brewster

A patrol officer, who stopped to investigate a damaged bicycle early this morning, found an unconscious man nearby with a head wound, police said. The cyclist was found at 1:45 a.m. on Route 6A with a head laceration near his badly damaged bike, said Brewster police Chief Richard Koch Jr. The man regained consciousness and only remembered he was riding home from Ocean Edge, where he worked, to his home in Orleans. Police found some Toyota Corolla car parts left near the bike, the chief said. The cyclist, a seasonal employee at Ocean Edge, was wearing dark clothing and only had a small reflector on the bike, Koch said. He was taken to Cape Cod Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. At 3 a.m, the Brewster police got a call from a person in Eastham. Alyssa Brown, 21, told her family that she thought she hit somebody in Brewster. She was frightened and continued to drive home without stopping, Koch said. Brown was given a criminal citation for leaving the scene of a personal injury accident, Koch added. Police are attempting to raise awareness about cycling safety, handing out "Same roads, same rights, same rules" bumper stickers to other police departments and interested cyclists. The bumper sticker was produced by the Pan Mass Challenge "at my request," Koch said. "We also put together a bicycle safety flyer and dropped them off at Ocean Edge to educate visiting seasonal employees about safety," he added.


aug31 Chatham

More shark reports shut down beaches in Orleans, Chatham

With the southern part of the same stretch of beach closed because of increased sightings of great white sharks, Thom Montanari strolled out of the water Thursday after an early morning swim at Lighthouse Beach. A television crew was on the overlook talking about officials shutting down many of the town's east-facing, ocean side beaches, Orleans would close Nauset Beach - just a short jaunt down the coast for the fast-swimming white sharks - a few hours later, and a spotter plane was in the air circling overhead, but it wasn't going to interfere with Montanari's early morning ritual. In fact, he would probably be back later that evening, right around dusk - supposed shark time. How worried was he? "Not much to be honest with you," he said, one just has to stay away from seals, the meal the sharks are interested in. "It's just common sense really." Montanari, who lives in New Jersey but has a family home in Chatham, has been coming to town for decades, and sharks have been too. Talk to any fisherman, he said, they have seen them for years. The only difference is the seal population has grown exponentially (Montanari doesn't remember seeing many 20 years ago) and the sharks are coming in closer to shore. "I was always wondering when they (would start closing beaches)," he said. "It's only been a matter of time." Since 2009, the town has been closing east-facing beaches from time to time because of sharks cruising close to shore. Besides selling some shark-themed T-shirts and bringing in curious crowds, the increased presence of the apex predator has been a boon for researchers. More than 10 sharks have been tagged over the years and outfitted with transmitters expected to give researchers and managers more information, not only about shark behavior, but when to close beaches. There have been some scares, however, and a Colorado man was bitten in the leg in the waters off Ballston Beach in Truro this month. This most recent closure in Chatham Wednesday was prompted by reports, from private individuals, commercial fishermen and the state Division of Marine Fisheries suggesting that white shark activity has increased in the vicinity of Chatham's east, ocean facing beaches. As long as the red flag proclaiming no swimming wasn't up at Lighthouse (and it wasn't) Montanari was going to continue to enjoy the water. "It's therapeutic," he said. "The water is so pristine here. I have a better chance of getting hit by lightning." East facing ocean beaches will be closed from the Orleans/Chatham line south along Nauset Beach to Monomoy - including North Beach Island and South Beach - until further notice. All other public beaches remain open to swimming, including Hardings Beach, Ridgevale Beach, Cockle Cove Beach, Forest Street Beach and Pleasant Street Beach along Nantucket Sound. Officials caution not swimming within 300 feet of seals. If you see a shark get out of the water and call the harbormaster's office, 508-945-5185


aug31 Chatham

Chatham man charged with burglarizing neighbors

Police caught a man allegedly breaking into his neighbors' homes this afternoon. Joshua N. Wordell, 35, who lives on Cockle Cove Road, is charged with two counts of breaking and entering in the daytime, larceny from a building and possession of burglary tools. Police were called at 12:20 p.m. to a home on Cockle Cove Road, after the homeowner discovered the residence had been broken into and property was missing. A witness told police a man was seen leaving the victim's property on a bicycle. Patrol Officers Joshua Wisniewski, Thomas Powers and Sgt. Andrew Goddard found a bicycle in another yard on Cockle Cove Road. Officers then noticed a broken rear window and a backpack on the ground. Officers heard items breaking inside the residence. When police entered the residence, they found Wordell. He had stolen property and burglary tools.

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aug31 Harwich

CapeCast: Homegrown goodies in Harwich center



aug31

The Cape Cod National Seashore A Photographic Adventure and Guide

One of my favorite pastimes is to photograph Cape Cod's ever-changing landscape. When a book of such images passes by me, I just have to stop and turn the pages, hoping for inspiration. As it turned out, I got my shot in the arm when I opened native Cape Codder Christopher Seufert 's The Cape Cod National Seashore: A Photographic Adventure and Guide. Do you ever wish you could take the day off when it's sunny and warm and go for a drive? This book makes me want to head right down Cape. The collection of color photos is a combination of aerials of the area covered by the National Seashore, with swirling patterns of green, blue and sand that you can only see from this vantage. Seufert also captures some hidden treasures of the National Seashore. He is giving you a sampling of the views the rangers have. Images of playful fox will humor you, and the special effects enhance the antiquity of an old barn. With his camera, Seufert takes these views and transforms the simplest things, like reeds poking up from vivid blue waters of Great Pond, into pieces of art. The book is also a guide to the not so traveled paths of the National Seashore, the ones you would have to have an inside scoop on to find. They're the ones that will bring sighs of amazement over what we are so lucky to have in our own backyard.

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Thursday, August 30, 2012

aug30

Study says National Seashore will suffer from climate change

In 100 years, the Cape Cod National Seashore's beach breezes will be warmer and its cherished lowlands will disappear, according to a new report on the effect of climate change on seven federal seashores on the Atlantic Ocean. The Seashore is likely to experience an average summer temperature increase of 3.4 degrees, to 79.6 degrees, by 2051 - weather comparable to summers now on Long Island, N.Y. The findings, estimates and projections were based on long-term weather trends at the seven locations and on different levels of emissions of heat-trapping gasest. The two nonprofit environmental advocacy groups called for more federal help to reduce the projected effects of climate change on all seven national seashores. The other six parks in the report are Assateague in Virginia and Maryland, Fire Island in New York, Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout in North Carolina, Cumberland Island in Georgia and Canaveral in Florida. By 2081, an average summer temperature within the Cape Cod National Seashore is expected to reach 82.3 degrees, nearly as hot as recent summers in Cape May, N.J. Between 1961 and 1990, the average temperature at the Cape Seashore rose 1.7 degrees. The Seashore is also among four of the federal seashores in the report where seas are rising at rates higher than the global average, a trend that is expected to continue. As a result, low-lying lands will erode during storms and eventually disappear, a fate that will have many repercussions, such as relocation of roads and buildings, limitations on visitors, and a loss of habitats, marshes, bays, inlets and beaches. Of the seven national seashores studied, Cape Cod had the least vulnerability to rising seas because of the miles of high cliffs and the limited number of buildings and roads along the shoreline. But there's certainly many places within the Cape Cod National Seashore that are vulnerable to sea level rise and storm activity. The boundaries of the Seashore cross six towns and include private and public lands stretching from Provincetown to Chatham. Most of the Seashore's lands are more than 3 feet above sea level, but low-lying areas of concern are in Provincetown, near Route 6, and in Orleans and Chatham. During the winter, an old sea wall and paved walkway at Herring Cove Beach in Provincetown caved in at several spots because of severe storms. Seashore officials made temporary repairs in time for the current summer season but plans are under way to relocate a bathhouse and one parking lot. The Cape Cod National Seashore had 4.7 million recreational visitors in 2010, the most of the seven seashores studied. Those visitors spent $171 million in that year, and out-of-town visitors spent money that supported 1,856 jobs. Environmental groups want mandatory limits on pollution from the burning of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil and natural gas. They also want to protect the authority of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the federal Clean Air Act, and they support investment in energy-efficiency technology and development of new technology to reduce emissions of pollutants.

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aug30

National Seashore beaches, including Cape Cod, endangered by climate change, report finds

Beachgoers headed to Cape Cod National Seashore over the coming decades may find themselves baking in hotter temperatures, and sections of beach and wetlands could be lost or altered as climate change fuels sea level rise, according to a new report by two environmental groups. The report, authored by the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization, found that a majority of the land in five national seashores along the East Coast are at risk of being lost. Overall, the elevation of the Cape makes it less vulnerable than other seashores, but key sections, in the southeast elbow and near Provincetown, are especially threatened, in part because the land in the area is sinking as ocean levels rise. "In a relative sense, Cape Cod is not as vulnerable as many of the other national seashores that were studied, but many places within Cape Cod National Seashore are vulnerable to sea level rise, as well as storm activity," said S. Jeffress Williams, an emeritus scientist with the US Geological Survey who reviewed the report. The report painted a picture of future beach-going that could be dramatically altered if nothing is done to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases. It found five national seashores have more than half their land a meter or less above sea level, making them vulnerable to rising oceans: Fire Island in New York, Assateague Island in Maryland and Virginia, Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout in North Carolina, and Canaveral in Florida. Sections of Cape Cod and Cumberland Island national seashores would also be affected. Cape Cod will experience higher sea level rise than is predicted globally because of the added fact that the land is sinking, due to natural shifting of the Earth's crust.

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aug30 Wellfleet

Wellfleet man faces cocaine trafficking charge

A Wellfleet man was arrested early this morning and charged with trafficking in cocaine. Aaron Gamsey, 42, of Wellfleet is scheduled to be arraigned today on three drug charges including trafficking in cocaine - 28 grams, possession with intent to distribute cocaine and possession with intent to distribute heroin. Gamsey had been the focus of an investigation initiated by Truro police Lt. Craig Danzinger and Sgt. David Perry and conducted by them with investigators from Eastham, Wellfleet, Provincetown, the Cape Cod Drug Task Force and Barnstable County Sheriff's Office. Police were tipped that Gamsey was headed off Cape, allegedly to pick up more drugs. He was later stopped and arrested.

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aug30 Wellfleet

Wellfleet professor unearths missing link fossil fishapod

If you haven't found your inner child yet maybe you ought to give up and seek your inner fish. Dr. Neil Shubin has. The Wellfeet resident and professor of anatomy at the University of Chicago conducted his search not with x-rays but in the frigid rock ridges of far Arctic Canada. It was there he became one of the few paleontologists to unearth a true missing link, Tiktaalik, an early fishapod that walked on land. "Inside each of us is a shared connection with fish that extends over 375 million years," Shubin told an audience at the Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. "In every person's DNA is the code for every organ of the body, which means we have a deep connection with other life." Through time our DNA was altered and added onto as organisms evolved from fish to mammals to humans. "You can compare the gene that makes a limb in a salamander and a fin in a fish. It's not a new gene but an old gene used in new ways," Shubin said. "We could call this talk your inner worm. We're talking about the shared history of all life on this planet." But Shubin is the author of "Your Inner Fish," a more saleable title for sure. "The transition of fish to land living creatures happened 375 million years ago. You look at the transition and it seems impossible, incredible," Shubin said. "Yet we can know this transition if we discover fossils and genes and know that it is possible. I want to show how that event is embedded in our own bodies." In addition to developing legs from fins, the first fishapod shifted from a torpedo shaped fish to a flat-headed creature with a neck (fish don't have necks) with eyes in the same plane (like us), rather than on opposite sides of the head. At the time Shubin became interested in all this he was working at the University of Pennsylvania. He needed to find that primordial fishapod. "I wanted three things; rocks of the right age to answer the question that interested us (so we wanted 375-million year old rocks), rocks of the right type to preserve fossils and it does no good if rocks of the right age and type are five miles underground, they have to be at the surface."

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aug30 Wellfleet

Wellfleet writer's 'Oblomov' brings Russian classic to U.S.

If you mention "Oblomov" in Russia, chances are people will know who and what you're talking about. The 19th-century novel (and political satire) about a man who rarely leaves his bed is a classic there, inspired a "sloth"-defined noun from its title character, and was even referenced once in a Lenin speech. If you say "Oblomov" to Americans? Eh? An American who knows the story and character backward and forward, though, is Wellfleet playwright Kevin Rice, and he's hoping to spread the word. So far, he says, Americans who have been introduced to the sympathetic, often comic character have "fallen in love" with "the prince of procrastination," but more just need to know his story. "Oblomov is an observer, an inert character, a philosopher "» who criticizes doing, doing, doing," Rice says, explaining why "oblomovism" in Russia means slothfulness or inertia. "In the play, he meets a woman and, for the first time in his life, he wants to respond and he can't. Many parts of (the story) are very, very funny, but there's a lot of depth to it, too." Rice, who has academic degrees in Russian language and literature, wrote a 12-actor stage adaptation of "Oblomov" that debuted to acclaim in 2002 at the Sakha Theater in Yakutsk, Russia, where it ran in repertory for two years. After long urging from friends, he's translated the script back to English and reworked it (the play now has three actors), and the show is having its American premiere at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater. Rice was one of six co-founders of WHAT back in the 1980s, and has had three plays previously produced there. He's now artistic director at Payomet Performing Arts Center in North Truro and says he's "ecstatic" that WHAT wanted to give his play a full production. (It had also had a successful reading as "Oblomov in Love" last winter at the Academy of Performing Arts in Orleans.) WHAT "is a great regional, professional company " and I want theater to remain a core of what they do. I'm happy to be part of it," he says. "It's to their credit that they're taking a chance with this." Longtime friend Daisy Walker (daughter of WHAT co-founder Dan Walker) is directing, and Rice has been rewriting during rehearsals based on feedback from what he considers a brilliant cast: professional actors Michael Pemberton as Oblomov, Valerie Stanford as his mother and potential love interest Olga, and Michael Samuel Kaplan in eight roles that Rice says "literally create a whirlwind around Oblomov, who's a static, stationary guy."

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aug31 Wellfleet

Sticks and Bones packs a wallop in Wellfleet

Relevance tends to turn up like the proverbial bad penny. David Rabe's 1972 Tony Award-winning Sticks and Bones, which is being revived by Wellfleet's Harbor Stage Company (through September 8), has one foot in the froth of mid-20th-century television, the other in the morass of Vietnam. Yet with legions of damaged Americans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, Rabe's black comedy proves as lacerating today as when he wrote it (as part of a Vietnam trilogy that also includes The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel and Streamers) in the wake of an 11-month tour "in country." The Simpsons has replaced The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet as the longest-running sitcom in history, proof that no one is coming home to as relentlessly sunny and insular a homeland as that of the play. But Sticks and Bones still wields the cliché-rattling power that caused many CBS affiliates to duck and cover rather than air the TV-movie version produced in 1973. The setting is chez Nelson circa 1968, when a convoy of trucks bearing the walking wounded arrives at the door delivering Ozzie and Harriet's embittered older son, David, blinded in Vietnam but determined to make his nuclear clan open their eyes to the ugliness beyond their happy-go-lucky, blinkered existence. For those not old enough to remember the Nelsons, who lived their lives on the small screen (somewhere between a sitcom and reality TV, it now seems) from 1952 to 1966, David's relatives include ice-cream-eating dad Ozzie, kitchen-bound mom Harriet, and guitar-strumming younger brother Rick, who in the late '50s became a teen rock star. Here he's a handsome lug who ambles in and out, primarily to masticate some of Mom's fine fudge and snap photos of family doings, however mucked up they are by the despairing and volatile David. Sticks and Bones must be a difficult work to pull off, because it is by no means tonally consistent. Harriet and Rick are broadly caricatured, though they ultimately surprise you. David is shadowed by the presence of the Vietnamese girl he left behind (a mute, somewhat puzzling device until the end), discovering too late that she was the one thing tethering him to his humanity. The returned vet's lashing out can be quite funny, as when he whacks Harriet's mainstay, the unctuous Father Donald, with his white cane every time the priest tries to bless him. But at other times he speaks a depressive, arguably banal poetry. Ozzie is perhaps the most interesting character, David's crisis seeming to trigger in him one of his own. Alternately rueful and manic, he reminisces à la Rabbit Angstrom of an athletic youth and compiles a large stack of curriculum vitae - lists of all his possessions and their monetary value - that he frenziedly orders family members to distribute to all and sundry on every occasion possible.

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aug30 Wellfleet

Recipe for grilled swordfish with avocado mousseline and summer salad

For a summer meal, Philippe Rispoli, chef and owner of PB Boulangerie Bistro in Wellfleet, grills local swordfish and prepares a lighter version of a French mousseline as a sauce; his is made with avocado instead of cream. The dish is served on a salad of cucumber, cherry tomatoes, and watermelon, seasoned with cilantro, which Rispoli says was inspired by dishes he prepared when he worked on the French Riviera.

SALAD

1 English cucumber, cutinto ½-inch dice
1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
3 triangles watermelon, cutinto 1-inch dice
4 shallots, finely chopped
1 bunch cilantro, finely chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
3 tablespoons sherryvinegar
¼ cup olive oil

1. In a large bowl, combine cucumber, tomatoes, watermelon, shallots, cilantro, salt, and pepper. Toss well.

2. In another bowl, whisk the vinegar, salt, and pepper. Gradually whisk in the oil. Add to the salad.


AVOCADOS AND SWORDFISH

2 ripe avocados, halved,pitted, and skinned
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons balsamicvinegar
pounds swordfish, cutinto 4 pieces
Olive oil (for sprinkling)

1. Light a charcoal grill or turn a gas grill to medium-high.

2. In a food processor, combine the avocados, salt, pepper, andolive oil. Pulse slowly until thetexture turns fluffy. Beat in the balsamic vinegar.

3. Sprinkle the swordfish with oil, salt, and pepper.

4. Grill the swordfish for 5 minutes on a side or until it is just cooked through.

5. On each of 4 deep plates, divide the salad. Add swordfish and mousseline to each one.

aug30 Provincetown

Energy-saving streetlight project OK'd in Provincetown

In an on-going effort to reduce the town's electricity costs as well as its energy footprint, selectmen agreed Monday to participate in a pilot program that could, if residents approve, replace each of the existing 427 streetlights at no cost to taxpayers. The pilot program is being offered by the Cape Light Compact, the non-profit energy aggregator that works to negotiate lower energy costs for its municipal members, which include 21 towns on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. Provincetown selectmen agreed Monday to initially replace eight streetlights with new LED lamps that use less energy while providing the same amount of brightness. Originally, the Cape Light Compact proposed that the pilot program replace eight lights in the municipal parking lot next to MacMillan Pier. However, Assistant Town Manager David Gardner said residents, who will give the final thumbs up or down to the program, could get a better idea of the differences in LED lighting if the demo streetlights were placed in both commercial and residential areas. He recommended replacing the four streetlamps along Commercial Street between Ryder and Standish streets, and another four lamps on Court Street between Cudworth and Winthrop streets. Selectmen approved the recommendation and the LED lights should be installed sometime in October or November. Cape Light Compact will pay for all the installation and equipment costs for the pilot program. "The LED technology has advanced significantly and continues to march forward. You'll be saving money because you're using less kilowatt hours and using less energy, which is what the Cape Light Compact is all about," said Compact executive director Maggie Downey, who met with selectmen Monday. "We have a three-year plan to replace all 14,542 streetlights on the Cape and Vineyard." There is some concern that residents may not like the light provided by the LED streetlights. While the new street lamps will be more downward focused than the current street lights, making night driving easier, they issue a bright, white light that is different from the amber light people are used to. "It's a different light, but a nice light. We want you to like them. They save energy. They save money," Downey said.

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aug31 Provincetown

VP Biden inspires Dems at Pilgrim Monument in Provincetown

Vice President Joe Biden gave a rousing speech to a crowd of 300-plus supporters up at the Pilgrim Monument & Provincetown Museum Sunday in Provincetown during a fundraiser and campaign stop. Host and event planner Bryan Rafanelli welcomed Biden, his wife Dr. Jill Biden and their granddaughter to Provincetown. The Vice President covered a host of topics in his nearly hour-long speech, but focused heavily on civil rights. "Many of you have advanced civil rights at great expense," he said. "If I had to use one adjective to describe this community it'd be courage. You have summoned the courage to speak out, to come out. We owe you." The LGBT community has not only advanced their own civil rights, but the "civil rights of every straight American. . You are freeing the soul of the American people," he added, inspiring loud applause from the crowd. Dr. Jill Biden, who spoke just prior to her husband, echoed his sentiments. "The road to equality is long." Biden got the most impassioned in his speech as he talked about working class Americans. "We know this country is not built from the top, down, but from the middle out." Too many "hard-working Americans" have been stripped of their dignity in the years since the housing market collapse, he said. Other political dignitaries included state Rep. Sarah Peake, state Sen. Dan Wolf, Congresswoman Niki Tsongas, Congressman Bill Keating and Pennsylvania Congresswoman Allyson Schwartz, who has a home in Truro.


aug30 Provincetown

With her big voice and big message, Lea DeLaria's back in Provincetown

Lea DeLaria isn't known for playing it safe. A renowned jazz vocalist, Broadway star and, oh yes, standup comedian who has the distinction of being the first openly gay comic to grace a late-night talk show with her no-holds-barred 1993 appearance on "The Arsenio Hall Show," is blunt about what her new show, "Last Butch Standing" is not. "I'm not going to talk about socks in the dryer. I'm not going to talk about the Olympics. I'm not even going to talk about the election. You can get that from anybody," says DeLaria, 54. "I am going to talk about the state of queerdom: what's happening in our lives, where we've come and how much farther we have to go." "Last Butch Standing" is subtitled "The Adventures of an Old-School Butch in a Post-Ellen Modern Queer World." Says DeLaria, " That lets people know exactly what I'm going to talk about. We've made some great progress. And in some respects we've really fucked ourselves in our ass. That's what I'm going to talk about." And there will also be music, including DeLaria's signature songs "I Can Cook, Too" from "On the Town" and her acclaimed jazz version of "The Ballad of Sweeney Todd." "There will be some Jerome Kern, some Thelonious Monk, a mix of Broadway and jazz," says DeLaria, who this fall will record her sixth CD, "House of David," her jazz covers of David Bowie songs. The Warner Jazz label will release the CD in the spring. "Last Butch Standing," which runs Aug. 31 to Sept. 2 at The Crown & Anchor's Paramount Nightclub, marks DeLaria's first return to perform in Provincetown in several years. From the mid-'80s to the early '90s, her standup show was a fixture on Commercial Street.

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aug30 Chatham

Growing problem: Sharks put bite on beaches

Officials have banned swimming at all the town's east-facing ocean beaches, saying there are too many great white sharks offshore to take any chances. The ban covers the town's barrier beaches from the Orleans town line down to the end of South Beach. Beaches along the inner portion of the harbor, including Lighthouse Beach in front of the stairway, Andrew Harding's Beach, Ridgevale, Cockle Cove, Forest Street and Pleasant Street beaches all remain open for swimming. Not only have more great whites been seen close to beaches, but researchers from the state Division of Marine Fisheries have had an increased number of hits from the acoustic tags they've placed on some of the predators, Daniel Tobin, parks and recreation director in Chatham, said Wednesday afternoon. The acoustic tags emit a signal picked up by listening buoys along the Chatham shore and into Wellfleet. Tobin said there also have been more reports of great whites from boaters, commercial fishermen and the scientists and contractors doing the tagging. The tagging researchers, led by state shark expert Greg Skomal, recently reported sharks close to shore near swimmers, according to a statement from the parks department. The statement also said some fishermen have reported great whites in their nets, and a research spotter plane saw a white shark leaving Chatham Harbor east of the Chatham Lighthouse through the 1987 inlet. Tobin said the swimming ban also took into account that there would be fewer eyes on the water as the boating season ends and town staffing drops.

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aug30 Harwich

Goddess Festival in Harwich focuses on personal exploration

Have you ever thought about wanting to discover your inner goddess? Yes? Maybe? Well, tomorrow and Sunday may be just the perfect time to do that at the first Cape Cod Goddess Festival being held on the grounds of the Harwich Junior Theater. And it's not just for women - there are going to be plenty of activities that men and children can enjoy too. The festival is the brainchild of Pandora Peoples, a Dennis psychic/medium who frequently lectures and offers workshops on the mind/body health connection, and also ancient folklore, which includes legends of goddesses throughout history. "There is a lot of folklore that celebrates women as life givers, and encourages women to connect with the goddess within," Peoples says. "It can help women be confident about who they are, and just how amazing they are." Over two days the Goddess Festival will feature seventeen classes, many performers, and artisans selling their wares. "The festival is going to be a celebration of the masculine and feminine coming together in harmony," she says. "Summer is ending, kids are headed back to school, and we're all getting back to normal schedule. This is a wonderful opportunity for people to try a little of this, a little of that, and see local artists, incredible craftspeople and great musicians." The event, sponsored by WOMR, is only $10 for adults each day. Attendees can see local musicians including Sarah Burrill, Boss Queens, Kathleen Healy and Jo & Co offering a potpourri of styles from folk to rock to soul. The free classes, all one half-hour each, will offer participants a chance to try their hand at everything from dance to juggling. You can hone your hip hop skills, or maybe flamenco is more your style, spend a half-hour with Jenny Wood discovering your elemental goddess, or relax with some yoga. Children can take a writing class, make a fairy house or try martial arts. "My idea was to create an event where people could try a lot of different activities on," says Peoples. "People are so critical of themselves, we want them to come and seize the day. To get rid of the blocks because of fear, or inherited ideas of what we like or dislike. You don't often know until you try something if you really might like it." The Cape Cod Goddess Festival runs Saturday & Sunday, Sept. 1 & 2, noon to 7 p.m., at Harwich Junior Theatre.

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aug30 Harwich

Meet Pandora Peoples: the visionary behind the Cape Cod Goddess Festival

Meeting Pandora Peoples is a multi-sensory experience. The meditation room is serene, almost like a tree house, looking out over woods and a lake. Sage is burning inside a big seashell, and the aroma of Jasmine tea wafts gently by. Pandora's smile, complete with dimples, is high-wattage and welcoming. We are drinking Pandora's Saraswati Mood Lifter tea, with organic St. John's Wort, Kava Kava, and jasmine flowers. It has a delicious, minty taste. I am not usually partial to tea, but this tea is out-of-this-world. Pandora's name means "All giving and all gifted" in Greek. Born and raised in Venice, California, her forward-thinking parents raised her celebrating Christmas, while focusing on Jesus as a healer, and Mary as a demi-Goddess. Pandora co-produced the upcoming Cape Cod Goddess Festival with her friend, Nadia Schuessler. The Festival arrives this Friday and Saturday, at HJT Arts Center, 265 Sisson Road in Harwich. An indoor/outdoor event, the Festival will feature face painting, Karate classes, Flamenco, Egyptian belly dancing, an art show, a kids' writing workshop, Cape Cod Henna, Tribal Fusion dance, Hip Hop/Soul from Boston, Trevor the Juggler, African dancing, a chanting class, intuitives, shamans, Higher Consciousness massage, piano music, blues, indie rock, bagpipes, yoga, organic and green clothing/accessories, food by Dancing Spoons, poetry, and so much more. "There are so many talented Cape people who have traveled the world who came back here to live, with many great artists who will be sharing their work at the Festival." Men are featured as well as artists and musicians. "I'm hoping the Festival will spark people's creativity and rekindle things they may have put aside," she says, of the kid-friendly event. Pandora tells stories about Kali, the demon slayer, who fights for justice; Athena, Greek Goddess of Wisdom, and Saint Bridget, the Goddess of Hearth and Healing, mother and keeper of the home. "We can all relate to these powerful women," she says. We talk about having balance in our lives. "It's important for us all to find that balance and connect to the Divine. When we have that balance and are aligned [with Spirit], things come easier," Pandora says, with a bewitching smile. She believes in everything, from Buddhism to Judaism to Catholicism to Goddesses and more. She just believes. "We all naturally do things that are ritualistic and meaningful. Even non-believers tend to believe in something and channel that energy into something positive." Pandora is a psychic medium, as well as an herbalist offering herbal consultations. The herbs are all adaptogenic, meaning tailored to your needs. Her clients from around the world have been assisted in their journeys on weight loss and pain management, in which Pandora specializes, as well as nutrition and diabetes. All her products are organic and she uses Aromatherapy to create a fragrant environment. Though raised in Southern California, she is effusive about her love for the Cape. We talk about Cape Cod being a place where manifestations are quicker. "It's like living on an island," says Pandora, referencing the salt all around us, which conducts energy, and citing detoxifying seaweed. As a medium, prior to a "magical reading," she likes to gather information in advance, steeping in the essence of the person, with all the facts informing her during her everyday life. She is a self-described Photo Shaman, whose work will be on display at the Festival this weekend, featuring her Living Goddess Series. If you go: The Cape Cod Goddess Festival is Saturday, September 1 and Sunday, September 2 from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tickets at the door: adults $10, children 5-12 are $3; kids 4 and under are free. Parking at venue and across street at Harwich Historical Society. Visit Pandora's Garden on Facebook and her website here.

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aug30 Harwich

Final music stroll of the season on Aug. 22 entertains in Harwich Port



aug30 Harwich

Clam camp: Internships teach environmental science

Cleaning the home for 700,000 clams can be tough work - but a great learning opportunity. That's why Heinz Proft, the town natural resources director, enlists the assistance of three local high school interns and a science teacher in a six-week program at the town shellfish lab on Wychmere Harbor. They also help monitor area water quality. "We're so lucky to have such an exceptional caliber of students this year. And it's a huge boost to the program to have so much help," said Proft. For Kira Archambault, Jennifer Witzgall, and Michael Steidel, the last six weeks were an incredible chance to learn about how the town receives nearly three-quarters of a million pinhead-sized clams in the spring and nurtures them over the summer into a big enough size so they are more likely to survive when they are dispersed, by hand, onto sand flats across town in the fall. The three interns all profess a love for the environment and science. They're intrigued by the workings of the shellfish lab, which relies on a series of pumps to feed oxygen- and nutrient-rich saltwater to the 15 or so buckets of clams held in racks. The interns also see the six-week experience as a launching pad for other academic goals. Witzgall, 16, has lived in town for 14 years and attends Harwich High School. She is a junior and is very interested in science, especially astronomy. She's got her eye on Williams College in Western Massachusetts as a possible next step. teidel is also a junior and 16 but attends Pope John Paul High School in Hyannis. He has enjoyed getting to understand the mechanics of the clam lab and wants to pursue a college degree in engineering, possibly in robotics. And Archambault, who is 14 and lives in South Yarmouth, hopes to be able to attend the new Monomoy Regional High School for her senior year. Her preference is to keep studying in the field of oceanography and marine biology. Because Proft is busy doing all of his regular work duties, he relies on internship program supervisor Jill Eastman to help oversee the day-to-day operations. Eastman has taught science at Harwich High School for the last 12 years. Three days a week, the interns spend the majority of their day doing the most laborious task at the lab: cleaning the tanks where the clams live. This requires careful hands to shift through the clams to pull out debris or dead ones and then a lot of elbow grease to hand scrub the large plastic buckets. They also have to clean the intake filters to make sure they don't get blocked. Sometimes they even find crabs caught in the filters, trying hard to gobble up baby clams.

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aug30

Clock ticking for Cape's trash plan

Time is running out for Cape Cod towns trying to decide what to do with their trash. "You might think you have 24 months," Robert Angell, superintendent of the regional transfer station in South Yarmouth, said during a meeting Wednesday of the Cape Cod Solid Waste Advisory Committee. "You don't. You have 12 months." The current contracts that Cape towns have to dump trash at the SEMASS Resource Recovery Facility in Rochester expire at the start of 2015, but Angell and other members of the advisory committee say they need to start planning budgets for that time frame sooner. Brewster is the only Cape town so far to sign a new contract with SEMASS owner-operator Covanta Energy. The other towns have been meeting off and on for several years through the advisory committee and the Cape Cod Commission to study other options and to discuss a possible renegotiation with Covanta. Current tipping fees of $37 per ton to dump trash at SEMASS, which burns trash to generate electricity, are expected to at least double under a new contract. Brewster agreed to pay $70 per ton under its new contract. A request for quotes from vendors interested in disposing of the Cape's trash prompted six responses with prices for transportation and disposal of the Cape's trash ranging from about $78 to $90 per ton.

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aug30

The Local Food Report: Fall Planting

Elspeth talks with Natalie Souza of Bayberry Gardens in Truro about planting vegetables for fall. An avid locavore, Elspeth lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her program airs on WCAI Thursdays at 7:30 on Morning Edition and 4:30pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30.





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Wednesday, August 29, 2012

aug29 Wellfleet

Wellfleet considering tax exemption for year-round homeowners

The selectmen, for years, have assessed the same property tax on the owners of residential and commercial properties. Now they are considering a change in the residential tax that could mean a savings of $500 or more to property owners who live in Wellfleet. A proposed residential exemption of up to 20 percent will be discussed at the property classification hearing, which will be held next month at a date to be announced. "We need to make it easier for year-round people to live in Wellfleet," said Selectman John Morrissey. He noted that 106 communities in the state take advantage of residential tax exemptions to reduce the tax burden on full-time residents. Nancy Vail, principal assessor, agreed that the selectmen could vote to exempt up to 20 percent of a year-round resident's tax bill. But if they were to enact such an exemption, the tax rate, which right now is $6.12 per $1,000 of assessed property value, would climb to $6.70 per thousand, she said. "Barnstable is the only town on the Cape that has this exemption," she said. She estimated 1,887 property owners in town would be eligible for this exemption. Properties valued at more than $1 million would not be eligible. At least 15 homes in town are assessed at more than $1 million, she said. "If you are domiciled in Wellfleet, and the value of your property is less than $1 million, what you would pay in taxes would be less," Pilcher said. "I've been pushing for this for the past year. People on the lower end would get a tax break of $500 and that could be a significant break for them. It might pay a mortgage bill." Vail said Brewster selectmen approved the residential tax exemption, but then reversed themselves when "non-resident taxpayers went berserk." The average home in Wellfleet is valued at $489,000. If the selectmen were to adopt the 20 percent residential exemption, the property owner would pay a tax of $2,620, while the non-resident taxpayer whose home is also assessed at $489,000, would pay at tax of $3,276. Vail said if the selectmen decide to go this route, she would need at least one year of lead time to deal with it. She and the tax collector's office would need changes to the software they now use. "This is too late for FY 2013," she said. "The first year this is in place, I'll be flooded with 1,187 people giving me their paperwork." Vail said it is not that easy to prove someone is domiciled in Wellfleet. "We've got people who are registered to vote for 20 years, and they get absentee ballots every year," she said. "Imagine what will happen if people think they will be able to get a $500 tax break? I've had 86-year old grandmothers look me in the eye and lie to me." Pilcher said he has warned non-resident taxpayers that the residential tax exemption would be discussed that night, but none of them showed up. Vail noted that while the selectmen were meeting, the non-resident taxpayers association was holding its annual meeting at another location. Vail said she contacted all the assessors on the Cape to ask them why they are not giving the residential tax exemption to their domiciled residents. "They basically all said because it is such a huge shift to the non-residents, who don't put their children in the schools, " she said.


aug29 Wellfleet

'Oblomov' to premiere at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater

What happens when you put the penultimate "horizontal man," a man of soft hands and softer ambition, on stage in a bed for 90 minutes? In the case of the play "Oblomov," adapted by Kevin Rice from the 1859 Russian novel by Ivan Goncharev, directed by Daisy Miller, two things: on the one hand, you have a hilarious high-energy social satire; on the other, a fiercely intellectual tour-de-force that unpacks the seething contradictions of bourgeois modernity and a mechanical march of progress that continue to irk stubborn romantics today. "All this swirls around Oblomov, like a whirlwind," says Miller, but Oblomov keeps falling asleep. "Oblomov" premieres at the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater, 2357 Route 6, on Aug. 30 and runs Wednesdays through Sundays through Sept. 22. When Goncharev wrote the novel in the mid-19th century, it smacked of modernity with its character who would accomplish nothing, not even a marriage, considered in the play to be the most prosaic of accomplishments. Says Rice, "Oblomov is the only literary character who spawned a lexicon. The novel was read by young people as a cautionary tale. Don't be Oblomov. Don't be Oblomovist." In Russian, "oblomovshchina" means laziness, the inability to adapt to rise to an occasion or even, as in the character Oblomov's case, rise at all. As Rice points out, Lenin borrowed Oblomov in a speech in 1922 to create an anti-revolutionary archetype, pointing out that the "Oblomovs" who remain, even after the Revolution, must be weeded out and flogged. Lenin wasn't talking about the nobility but the mental state that remained even after three revolutions in which the aristocracy was overthrown. The play blurs dream and reality, as well as brings utopianism to clash with the homogenizing and inescapable facts of modern life. As it turns out, we side with Oblomov and his dreams, accepting our fate of Oblomovism, which will probably kill us in the end, just not today. Rice points out that the word in Russian has an etymology that calls up the words "fragment," "cloud" and "orb." Rice, who learned Russian as a teenager and studied Russian literature in Leningrad during college, wrote the first adaptation of the play 15 years ago. Translating it into Russian, and then Mongolian, he staged it in Russia 10 years ago with a cast of 12. Upon return, Miller encouraged him to translate the play back into English and streamline the characters. This current production is a result, says Rice, of a close collaboration between him and Miller.

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aug29 Wellfleet

While You Were Sleeping...The American Premiere of Oblomov

Shakespeare's Hamlet pondered the question, "To Be or Not to Be?" Russian literature's Oblomov heard the same question and gave a resounding "No!" Written in 1859 by Ivan Goncharov, Oblomov is a classic Russian novel that has endured through time and become a cultural icon in Russia. The main character is a wealthy nobleman who is unable to make any important decisions or undertake anything important in life. In fact, he rarely ever leaves his bed. At the time it was written, it was largely perceived as a critical commentary on the Russian aristocracy, but over time it became a cautionary tale against sloth and laziness, so much so that the Russian word Oblomovshchina, or oblomovism, is used to describe someone with a personality prone to inertia. Even Lenin once said that the Soviet Union needed to "eliminate the Oblomovs" in society. Such an important work in Russia has been adapted for television and film throughout the world. And the latest interpretation of the work, written by Kevin Rice and directed by Daisy Walker, is making its American premiere at the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater this week. "There is an Oblomov in us all," says Rice, who is a Russian literature expert. "He lives in an imaginary world. He is a dreamer. But he's going to do all those things he dreams about tomorrow. There's a lot of comedy to it, but also a lot of depth." Rice makes a loose comparison to Don Quixote when talking about the character of Oblomov, and his servant Zakhar, who could be a Russian Sancho Panza. And just like Dulcinea inspired Don Quixote to go and fight the windmills, it is the mysterious and beautiful Olya that gets Oblomov out of bed and into the neon light world of today's Moscow, which he views through the lens of unrealized dreams. "It's never really been adapted for the stage successfully in the U.S., or the West for that matter," says Rice, who speaks fluent Russian and has lived in Russia for long periods of time. "It's a tough novel." Rice's adaptation made its world premiere in 2002 at the Sakha Theater in Yakutsk, Russia, a city of about 250,000 in Siberia. The play, which discusses "being versus doing," was met with great reviews, and the story still strikes a relevant chord with audiences in Russia, especially as the country continues to adapt to a new way of life since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The production in the 450-seat theater just south of the Arctic Circle is testament to the rich appreciation of theater in Russian society, says Rice. "I often joke that it shows you the lengths I'll go to for a production," says Rice, about the rather remote location of the first run of Oblomov.  "They have a great theater tradition in Russia. The government in Russia supports the arts and theater in ways we can only dream about in America." Rice has further adapted the play for American audiences to make it more culturally accessible, adding that there are certainly parallels between the current state of affairs in the United States and the themes within Oblomov.  

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aug29 Wellfleet

StageStruck: WHAT's Up at the Harbor

I've been away. On vacation. This is news only because it's the first time I've left Western Mass. during the summer theater season since, let's see, oh, yes, ever. I went to the Cape and did nothing but loll and laze, sun and swim. And, okay, I went to the theater. Twice. The shows were at theaters that until this year were venues for the same company. The Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater (WHAT) has been a Cape Cod institution for a quarter of a century, formerly housed in a funky little space by the water and now holding forth in the distinctly unfunky Julie Harris Theater out on Route 6 (what.org, 508-349-9428). The old location has been taken on by a brand-new organization, the Harbor Stage Company, which was formed early this year when WHAT's lease on the harbor property wasn't renewed, for reasons that haven't been made public. Harbor Stage, an actor-run ensemble of WHAT veterans, furthers WHAT's original mission of presenting new and/or edgy work. Meanwhile, WHAT's edge doesn't seem to have been dulled by its posh-and overhead-intensive-new digs. The shows I caught last week, both of them new to me, are surreal comedies that confront harsh questions of sanity, betrayal, self-deception and death. Adventurous (and major-award-winning) experiments with style and substance, both were imaginatively if unevenly staged. But I found them rather dreary, the substance drowned out by self-conscious style, despite impressive performances across the board. Hysteria, at WHAT, is a critique of Sigmund Freud's revision of his theory of incest, filtered through the psychoanalyst's acquaintance with Salvador Dalí. Terry Johnson's 1993 play bounces between blistering accusations from the angry daughter of a former patient and images from Dalí's surrealist dreamscapes, with an extended parody of the British naughty-knickers brand of farce thrown in. There's an aha moment at the end, when the reason for this ill-fitting montage is revealed. But by then it's more an a- without the -ha, and the bizarre clash of styles feels like a sly Freudian joke cooked up to make a didactic drama into a black comedy. David Rabe's Vietnam-era Sticks and Bones, at Harbor Stage through Sept. 8 (harborstage.org, 508-349-6800), is solidly in the black comedy mold. It's set in a satirically suburban household headed by parents Ozzie and Harriet (yes, the resemblance to that 1950s sitcom is intentional), whose squeaky-clean lifestyle is upended by the return of son David from the war, blinded and enraged by what he's seen and done. The play was a hit in 1972, when the war was roiling the country and Broadway was welcoming both protest plays and alternative styles. It won a best-play Tony for its cheeky sendup of all-American "values" that disintegrate in a nightmarish cascade that could make you think PTSD is contagious. I, and the people I was with, found the piece overwrought and hopelessly dated-political agitprop married to '60s avant garde. But here's a subjectivity alert. I was sitting two seats away from the Boston Globe's critic, who applauded it in his paper as a "fierce and unsettling" piece that "does not feel in the least bit dated." Which, once again, goes to show: art speaks to everyone, but we often hear different voices.


aug29 Wellfleet

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Canoe Journey

Bob takes us on a late summer canoe journey. Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing. Robert Finch has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. He is the author of six collections of essays, most recently "The Iambics of Newfoundland" (Counterpoint Press), and co-editor of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing." His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday at 8:30AM and every Wednesday at 5:45pm.



aug29 Eastham

Eastham wants to buy T-Time for $1.3m for affordable housing

The T-Time Family Sports Center at 4790 State Highway is for sale and the town is hoping to buy it, for $1.34 million, the 10.4 acre parcel's assessed value. Town Administrator Sheila Vanderhoef announced Monday that the selectmen had negotiated with the owners, the Tedeschi's. The owner has asked that the sale be settled by May, which prompted the board Monday to schedule a special town meeting on Oct. 1. "We are all pretty excited about this," said Aimee Eckman, chairman of the board. "Hopefully this can go through. The main thing we are looking at putting there is affordable apartments," she said. Vanderhoef said it would be crucial to get approval from the Community Preservation Act Committee to fund this purchase. That committee will meet at 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, to hear the town's request. "If the Community Preservation Act Committee does not vote positively for this, it cannot be approved by town meeting," Vanderhoef said. Tom Johnson, former chairman of the Community Preservation Act Committee, did not share the board's enthusiasm for the possible purchase. "How many parcels does the town already own?" he asked the board. "Several," Eckman said. Johnson rattled off the numbers. "One hundred sixty-five parcels and 892 acres the town already owns," he said. "Twenty-four are greater than the 10.4 acre one you want to buy. Before we start talking about taking Community Preservation Act funds to purchase land, you should go to the planning board and the finance committee." He pointed out there is a cost involved in holding a town meeting, and he said, Lillian Lamperti, town clerk, is worried bout the cost of a special town meeting. "The seller wants to sell before May. We have a lot of process to go through before that." He said the planning board should "weigh in" on whether this is a good purchase. He pointed out that the property would have to be rezoned if used for housing, which would also have to be approved by town meeting.

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aug29 Eastham

Eastham used car business stalled again

Once again, the plans of Kristin and Donald Carboni to sell five cars and provide detailing service at 186 Brackett Road are at a standstill. The couple was allowed to withdraw without prejudice their last application to the zoning board of appeals in April when it was clear the board was going to turn them down. They had sought permission to sell up to five vehicles on the property. Their attorney, Brian Wall of Sandwich, returned to the board on Aug. 9 with a different application, one that sought a special permit for the outdoor display of goods in conjunction with business or retail trade. At the Aug. 9 hearing, Wall pointed out they were not seeking the right to sell cars from the board, since they believed they have that right. What they were asking for now was simply a special permit for outdoor display and to sell detailing products. Nothing has been simple for the Carbonis. Building Inspector Frank DeFelice gave them a permit to sell cars at their location, in Zone D, in July 2011. The selectmen, also in 2011, issued them a license to sell one car at this location, however, the board told the couple they had to acquire permits from the zoning board of appeals. The sale of cars was not the issue here, Wall told the board. They wanted a special permit for outdoor display. Board member Richard Dill saw no problem with this request, nor did members John Zazzaro and Bob Sheldon. "I think the appearance of four shiny automobiles might improve the appearance of that spot in Eastham," Dill said. "I don't think it's the garden spot in Eastham and my position is that they indeed would approve the appearance of that place." Dill said he researched the bylaw and is convinced that the use proposed by the Carbonis is allowable in that district. "This is a retail area and I am absolutely convinced that this is an allowable use in the area." But member George Reinhart, who was prepared to vote down the application in April, disagreed. "It will open up another Willow Street," Reinhart said, referring to the many car dealers along that Hyannis strip. "If you get away with this, everyone else will get away with it." The Carbonis have maintained all along that they will not have flags or banners, as do the Willow Street auto dealers. Wall told Reinhart, "I understand your concern, but I think you are killing a gnat with a cannon." The board could "armor" its decision to prevent others from seeking permission to display used cars by saying, "if you want to do this in Eastham, you will have to do it under highly regulated circumstances," he said. Board chairman Stephen Wasby said, "Do we allow this because someone has made a sympathetic case? The answer is, if we allow it then everyone and his cousin will want it" When Dill moved to grant the special permit, he, Zazzaro and Sheldon voted in favor, but Reinhart and Wasby voted no. Since four affirmative votes were required for passage, the motion to approve failed.

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aug29 Truro

Coast Guard honors Truro police chief at retirement ceremony

The Coast Guard pulled out all the stops for Police Chief Kyle Takakjian at a July 28 retirement ceremony in honor of Takakjian's Coast Guard service. After 28 years, Takakjian retired as master chief in the Coast Guard Reserve. It was a memorable day at Air Station Cape Cod for the more than 190 friends, family coworkers and members of the Coast Guard with whom Takakjian had served. Presiding officer Rear Admiral Daniel Neptun presented Takakjian with his award citation. Takakjian served with Neptun for two of his last four years as reserve command master chief of the First District. Guest speaker was Capt. "Wes" Pulver, commanding officer of the Coast Guard Barque Eagle. Takakjian served with Pulver while stationed at the Coast Guard Academy.


aug29 Provincetown

Provincetown stalwart Earle Chaddock to be honored

Longtime town employee Earle Chaddock, who died last August at the age of 86, will be honored at a dedication ceremony next week. The ceremony will take place on Friday, Aug. 31, at 10 a.m. in the Judge Welsh Hearing Room at Town Hall. A plaque in Chaddock's memory noting his almost three-decade service to the town will be hung on the wall outside of the assistant town manager's office in the basement of Town Hall, where the original civil defense offices used to be located. Chaddock was the town's civil defense director for 23 years, from 1979 to 2002. He was also the town's veteran's agent from 1979 to 2006. His military service spanned two wars: during WW II he served in the Navy, and during the Korean War he served in the Air Force. He was also a founding member of the Pilgrim Amateur Radio Club and was selected as Provincetown's Senior of the Year in 2002. "Earle was a pleasure to work with and to know," said Chris Hottle, director of the council on aging. "He always had a smile on his face and a kind word. He loved Provincetown and was selfless in his service to the town and his country. He was especially involved in emergency preparedness and worked hard to keep residents safe." All town employees and the public are invited to the ceremony. Chaddock's family will also be in attendance.


aug29 Provincetown

Kenneth Hawkey paints Provincetown

Kenneth Hawkey, an accomplished representational artist, brings an interest in historic architecture and his training in art, art history and theater design to bear on his paintings, but he insists that his creative techniques were developed on his own, through intensely hard work and careful focus on the scene or object he is painting. Hawkey is acutely, visually attuned to his surroundings and believes that the art he creates is a manifestation of himself as a person and of the world in which he lives. "In my work I embrace a realistic, representational approach," he says. "My path through life and all my interactions with other people and with the physical world are based on my visual impressions, and I naturally approach painting from this perspective. I see scenes and compositions when I am seeking subjects. Shape, colors, layers and composition are how I view the world around me. My process has arisen from a natural [tendency] toward proportion, perspective and color theory." In his most recent show, "Provincetown Gables," currently on exhibit at Provincetown's Larkin Gallery, 405 Commercial St., Provincetown, through Sept. 6, Hawkey has taken a departure from what he described as the "educational format" he chose to display in a show last year, "Heritage Preserved," which received support from the Truro Cultural Council. Freed from such constraints this time he "painted places that simply suited only [my] visual and artistic temperament. After a few were completed," he says, "I realized I was developing a series, capturing Provincetown's lines and silhouettes. Architectural gables are dominant features in many of these paintings." The show also includes a few landscapes and some recent, previously shown Truro paintings. Hawkey's gifts as a draftsman, designer and landscape architect are clear in this show, but his paintings are distinguished more by their luminous thoughtfulness than by strict adherence to architectural precision. Hawkey lavishes attention on how light defines the angles of the houses and plays off their surfaces to shimmering effect. Each viewer is presented with a familiar scene redefined, one that is represented almost as if for the very first time. He hopes "people will look at my application of paint, the layers I use and my color theory practices, and then make that all disappear. They should see the painting for what it is; a whole with a focus." "I hope that the residents and visitors to Provincetown will appreciate my artistic interpretation of [this town]," he says. "I hope my style of painting, my use of color and my interpretation of the light in this part of the Cape will be shared. I always hope that my paintings will have a universal appeal, not just a local one. A universal sharing through what one creates is by far the most important part of being [an artist.] I think every creative person wants his work to be shared and appreciated."

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aug29 Provincetown

No ordinary Joe: Provincetown's Basine bent on continuing good works in Haiti

The earthquake that rocked much of Haiti and affected nearly three million people on Jan. 12, 2010, also affected local resident Joe Basine, known to most here as "Joe Bones." It affected him so much that he decided he needed to respond, personally. And he did. Since the earthquake two and a half years ago, Basine has spent nearly two years in Haiti, off and on, working for an NGO, or non-governmental organization, that was helping rebuild the small island country. Now Basine is planning a return trip to Haiti, either late September or early October, when he plans to sail his new 30-foot Iroquois catamaran, named "Dove," down the eastern seaboard and across the Gulf of Mexico. He's been busy getting familiar with the ins and outs of navigating Dove, since a catamaran sails substantially differently from single-hulled boats. He's also been doing some research. He would like to start his own NGO, he says, aiming for a more sustainable operation, perhaps teaching the locals how to cultivate a crop such as saffron or a craft like making sandals. If this project doesn't end up being feasible, however, he says, he may cargo goods back and forth from Florida to Haiti. He's also been doing some research. He would like to start his own NGO, he says, aiming for a more sustainable operation, perhaps teaching the locals how to cultivate a crop such as saffron or a craft like making sandals. If this project doesn't end up being feasible, however, he says, he may cargo goods back and forth from Florida to Haiti. When Basine first considered going, friends told him, "No, no, just donate money." But two things about Basine: one, he doesn't really listen when people say no, and, two, he really wanted to help. He arrived in Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, 25 days after the earthquake and was struck by the terrible devastation - he saw "nothing but rubble in some areas," from Port-au-Prince to Leogane, an area about the size of Provincetown to South Wellfleet. The infrastructure of much of Haiti's houses is cement roofs supported by cinderblocks with not enough steel in the mix. Basine knew he had his work cut out for him. He approached the United Nations first, which covered a large area that housed hundreds of NGOs in tents. He found an opportunity to help as a motorcycle consultant, checking out bikes that had been donated for transportation. From there, he went on odd jobs, every day, looking for ways to help out. He performed dangerous food drops and helped distribute critical water filters.

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aug29 Orleans

First ever bowhead whale spotted off Cape Cod

The Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies (PCCS) today announced a record setting sighting off Cape Cod. In March, an aerial team spotted a bowhead whale east of Orleans. Bowheads are an arctic species, never before seen this far south in the Atlantic. According to PCCS spokesperson Cathrine Macort, the bowhead, a 43-foot juvenile, was seen "engaged in social behavior" with a group of young North Atlantic right whales. The whales were photographed in what researchers call a surface active group or SAG. Not only is this the first bowhead seen near the Cape, it is also the first seen interacting with right whales, according to PCCS. Bowheads are related to right whales, but they are best adapted to live in a polar region. Their thick blubber provides insulation and energy storage and they are capable of swimming up to 35 minutes underwater, even under ice. They use their large skulls to break through the ice to create breathing holes, according to PCCS. Changes in climate and weather may explain the bowhead venturing this far south. "Understanding the movement patterns and behavior of Arctic species, such as the bowhead whale, is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change on the ice-associated ecosystem. Bowhead whales are considered vulnerable to impacts of climate change, due to the current and projected loss of sea ice associated with global warming," said Dr. Cynthia Tynan, PCCS researcher. Last week, according to PCCS, researchers from the New England Aquarium reported a bowhead in the Bay of Fundy. Images of the Cape Cod bowhead were compared to those of the Bay of Fundy bowhead, leading researchers to believe it is the same whale. Bowheads are an endangered species.


aug29 Orleans

Orleans skateboard competition

Families and skateboarders are invited to attend the 2012 Skateboard Competition Saturday, Sept. 1, at Finch Park, Orleans. All skill levels are welcome to enter. The entry fee is $10 and registration begins at 10 a.m. Prizes will be awarded and food will be available for purchase. All proceeds will benefit Finch Park and Nauset Together We Can, a non-profit organization that supports area youth. To access Finch Park, park at the Nauset Regional Middle School track and field area. The park is to the left of the track. For more information visit www.finchskatepark.tumblr.com.

aug29 Chatham

Flourishing Seals Frustrate Cape Cod Fishermen


At Chatham Harbor on Cape Cod, fishermen are unloading their trawlers with the catch of the day. The fishing pier is popular with tourists, but not just for ogling the grungy fishermen at work. Gray seals pop their heads out of the water. They dip and dive and swim around the docked boats, waiting, like dogs around a dinner table, for fish to fall off. "When I was a kid you'd be like, 'Oh! There's a seal.' And it was cool to see one," fisherman Sam Fuller says. "Now they're like, everywhere." Fuller now sees them as a nuisance. He says they've learned to follow his boat like a chuck wagon, waiting for crew members to pull up a net. "All the fish are in it," Fuller says. "The seals just sit there and eat the fish out of the net as it's coming up onto the boat." The seals' sharp teeth also tear the nets. Fuller says those cost hundreds of dollars each to replace. But federal law bars him and other fishermen from shooing the gray seals away, much less shooting them. Same goes for residents angry that their pricey beachfront property is now a favorite sunbathing spot for 300-pound pinnipeds. Chatham dock worker Ron Eppler thinks at least commercial fishermen should be able to do something. "You know, if you own a ranch in Montana, and you've got a coyote problem, you're allowed to protect your livestock," Eppler says. "But these guys aren't allowed to get near them because they're cute." Actually, the seals are protected because they were almost wiped out. Early New Englanders hunted seals for their furs, and to keep them from eating cod. Massachusetts paid bounties on seals, $5 per nose. But 40 years ago, the federal government outlawed killing and harassing seals. The Marine Mammal Protection Act helped gray seals and harbor seals recolonize New England waters.

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aug29 Chatham

Seals eat 6 percent of their weight in fish each day

During an aerial survey last year, researchers counted over 15,000 seals in local waters. Forty years ago there were but a handful. Seals are protected because they were almost wiped out by New Englanders hunting them for their furs. Massachusetts once paid a $5 a piece bounty on seals, but forty years ago, the federal government outlawed killing and even harassing seals. The area around Chatham Harbor and Monomoy Island is literally jammed with seals which are the reason for the recent wave of shark attacks since seal are a primary part of that predictor's diet. Adult harbor seals eat 5% to 6% of their body weight per day, about 4.5 to 8.2 kg (10-18 lb.).

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aug29 Chatham

Chatham's Red Nun hosts music event

The Red Nun is holding its fourth annual music festival Saturday, Sept. 1, from noon to 10 p.m. The event is part of the town's 300th celebration. Over the years the festival has raised $13,386 for local charities.


aug29 Harwich

Monomoy vote passes in Harwich

The signs were everywhere along the roadsides Tuesday, urging voters to support building a new regional high school. But, at a highly visible roundabout, someone had defaced a sign scrawling a loud but lone "No" in opposition to the $64.7 million project. And that was pretty much how Tuesday night's special town meeting went, with those against the school a small band of less than 60 and nearly 900 rising from their seats to vote for it. "Last night in Chatham, voters hit a triple," regional school committee member Terry Russell told the overflow crowd. "Tonight, with our yes vote, let's drive this project home." The actual vote count was 878 in favor and 58 against, and, after the meeting, regional school committee member Brian Widegren was amazed at the big victory margins in both towns. This was the second of four votes needed to qualify for nearly $30 million in state reimbursement money, nearly half the total project costs for a 168,000-square-foot school housing almost 700 students grades 8 through 12. The state aid, from the Massachusetts School Building Authority, reduced Harwich's share to $25.2 million and Chatham's to $9.8 million. On Monday night, Chatham town meeting voters also showed strong support for building the school, 522 to 166. The two remaining votes are a ballot question for the state primary election in each town asking for a Proposition 2½ debt exclusion. If the school is built, Harwich property taxes on a median home valued at $350,000 will increase by $157 in the first year, declining each following year to $97 by 2032. A 2003 building needs study in Harwich found the high school, which is nearly 50 years old, would require $25 million in repairs, or $42 million for a new school. In 2006, state school officials gave the building its lowest rating, and the town received a warning that the school was negatively effecting student health and learning and that it faced possible loss of accreditation. Regionalization, which Chatham and Harwich approved in 2010, along with building the new school, would save Harwich not only the additional $17 million they would have had to spend to construct a new facility on its own but also savings in operation and maintenance.

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aug29 Harwich

Overflow crowd in Harwich backs Monomoy Regional High School project

Looking out at a sea of faces in the community center gym, with an overflow crowd watching the action from two additional rooms, retired secondary school principal Terry Russell said residents have all to gain and nothing to lose with a new Monomoy Regional High School. "This is the right project, the right time and the right price," he said. "Last night in Chatham the voters hit a triple. Tonight, let's drive this home." And the voters did. The night after Chatham voters supported the project 552 to 166, Harwich residents voted 878 to 58 to build the regional high school on the site of the current Harwich High School. The project is estimated to cost $64.7 million. The state has agreed to pay $29.7 million, with Chatham - with a much smaller student population - paying $9.8 million, leaving Harwich's share at $25.2 million. The borrowing must also be approved at an election on Sept. 6. Speaker after speaker extolled the benefits - both economic and educational - of building a new regional high school. Regional school committee member Brian Widegren reminded the audience that in 2007 Harwich High School was placed in the "warning category" by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, and was in danger of losing accreditation. To build a new school on its own was then estimated to cost $42 million, he said. It was at this juncture that the Massachusetts School Building Authority recommended regionalization. Given the participation of Chatham and the commonwealth, Widegren described the project as a "golden opportunity." Alternatives, he said, were "neither timely or beneficial." He said tax increases will be offset by the retirement of debt from other capital projects.

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Tuesday, August 28, 2012

aug28 Wellfleet

Deane shares details of Wellfleet health center expansion

During the AIM Thrift Shop's annual luncheon and fashion show at Van Rensselaer's Restaurant last week, Sally Deane, CEO of Outer Cape Health Services, updated AIM volunteers on the plans for the new Wellfleet Health Center. It most likely will be sited on the grounds of the existing health center, a center that was built 47 years ago with funds raised by volunteers and called the AIM Medical Center. AIM volunteers presented her with a check for $10,000 to go towards the new health center, which has been in the planning stage since 2007. Deane said they would use the model set by Wellfleet Preservation Hall to raise the $2.5 million they need for the new health center. The existing center is the busiest of all. "It serves more than any other health center in a smaller space, with 27,000 visits last year, and we may do 30,000 visits this year," she said. She and the board originally thought they would not be able to bring water to the current site, but have found out now that they will be able to, at a cost of $50,000. "We have to find a way to raise that," she said. If they are able to build the new center on the existing site, Deane said they will ask the state to install a traffic signal on Route 6, to replace the existing yellow flashing light. "Right now, there are too many accidents, and we are not in the business of creating problems." Deane, when presented with the check for $10,000, said, "There is no one we receive more from than AIM. If we only had the teamwork and community mindedness of AIM [in all areas], we would be miles ahead." Outer Cape Health Services now employs 145 people. "In the past two years, we've gone from serving 10,500 people to 16,500, and we have 300 new patients every week," Deane said. By next June, she promised, they will be able to reveal the image of what the new Wellfleet Health Center will look like. The directors have hired Sibel Asantugrul, a Wellfleet architect, as a three-day-a-week employee to assure that they follow all the processes from final site selection, where they are now, to the schematics of the proposed new building, "so that we can start our capital campaign for the Wellfleet Health Center."


aug28 Wellfleet

Wellfleet shellfish board mulls plan to purchase county hatchery

Bill Clark, director of the Cape Cod Cooperative Extension Service, is making the rounds to all 15 towns on the Cape, trying to get them to buy into a plan for Barnstable County to borrow $4 million to purchase Aquacultural Research Corp. (ARC), the privately owned hatchery that supplies all of the Cape towns with the seed that goes into their flats. He and Dick Kraus, the 51 percent owner of ARC, appeared before the Wellfleet Shellfish Advisory Board on Aug. 13, and were told the board would make a decision at its Sept. 6 meeting on whether the members will recommend this purchase to the board of selectmen. Three towns have already registered their support of the project, Clark told them, which entails the county borrowing $4 million to purchase the 39 acres in Dennis on which the hatchery is located. Clark said if all 15 towns agree to this, then the county will own the land, but will lease the hatchery back to ARC to operate it for 20 years. Krause said ARC would pay the county $50,000 each year for 20 years. The county would borrow the $4 million over 20 years at 4 percent interest; it would be paid for by all the participating towns increasing the fees they charge for shellfish licenses. That ARC provides Wellfleet with a valuable service seemed to be broadly accepted at the meeting. On two occasions, when other hatcheries got the county bid to provide seed to the Cape towns, the hatcheries failed to produce at the last minute, and ARC stepped in, and provided the seed. Judy Taylor, a shellfisher who attended the meeting, said the seed they get from ARC is local and dependable. This is not always the case with other hatcheries, she said. "Seed coming from other places has problems, and has caused problems with what's in our water and in the harbor and has affected our local, native shellfish," she said. "We want to keep it local." Kraus said he would keep ownership of the hatchery if the proposal goes through. "I would continue to own the business and could sell it to whomever I want," if and when he decides to sell it, he said. "I'll be 65 soon, and it's awful hard work. I don't have to do this anymore. But I can't walk away from it. I would not be able to sleep at night. My intention is to continue it as it is going now, and then hopefully find someone who can pick it up."

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aug28 Wellfleet

Tiny turtles take first steps in Wellfleet Bay

It's Head Start without the language and literacy skills, a hotel stay with room service but no bill, transportation with no need for a ticket. With a boost from young day campers 15 newly born diamondback terrapins were set free into the Wellfleet Bay salt marshes Wednesday afternoon. The 1,200-acre Mass Audubon Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary monitors all the terrapin nests they find on their grounds, as well as nests at "turtle gardens" elsewhere in town. When turtle hatchlings are lagging or still hobbled by a yolk sack they'll bring them into the lab, treat to a few days of kindness and then set them free on their life's journey. "During nesting season patrols go out twice a day," explained Molly Shuman-Goodier, the sanctuary's terrapin field coordinator. "They mark the nests with protection. We have 64 on the sanctuary. During hatching season it's the same procedure; patrols twice a day. When they emerge we release them. If they have a big yolk sack we take them in. It seems to work pretty well." The terrapins reach their northern limit in Wellfleet Bay. Thanks, in part at least, to conservation efforts by the sanctuary staff and volunteers the population is a healthy one. "The [nest] cages are a must because of foxes," explained naturalist Jenette Kerr. "On Lieutenant Island predation is 90 percent because of fox and raccoon," added Shuman-Goodier. "Fox are the worst and in hatching you have crows, ants, roots, maggots. We don't save them from all of it but we give them a head start." The turtles prefer open sandy areas to nest so sanctuary volunteers have cleared "turtle gardens" on Lieutenant Island and Old Wharf Road.

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aug28 Wellfleet

Return of the Tides: The Herring River Restoration Project

Friends of Herring River has produced a short video about the value of a healthy salt marsh and the expected benefits of restoring the historic tidal range in the Herring River Estuary.



aug28 Eastham

Two taken to hospital after Eastham lightning strike

A grandmother and her 4-year-old granddaughter were taken to Cape Cod Hospital this morning for evaluation after lightning struck somewhere nearby as they were leaving the family car. Eastham Fire Capt. William Sprague said the grandmother was holding an open umbrella trying to shield her granddaughter from a driving rain when there was a bright flash and loud boom. Other family members who were still in the car at the time, dialed 911 at 10:16 a.m. and alerted police and fire officials of a possible lightning strike at 17 Marions Way. Sprague said the grandmother and granddaughter were examined at the scene and sent to Cape Cod Hospital for evaluation. Sprague said there were no immediately apparent signs to rescue personnel that the pair had actually been hit by the lightning or damage to the home, trees or soil indicating a direct hit there.


aug28 Truro

Aquaculture expert to speak at Truro's Highland House Museum

Scott Lindell, director of the Scientific Aquaculture Program at Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory, will give a talk at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, at the Highland House Museum. Lindell will report on the local development of mussel farming and the prospects of integrating sea vegetable culture around the Cape and Islands.


aug28 Orleans

Author Bill Sargent to speak in Orleans

Naturalist and writer Bill Sargent, whose family has a home on Barley Neck and deep roots in Orleans - his father (and former governor) Frank Sargent helped start Goose Hummock - will talk about his new book, "Beach Wars: Ten Thousand Years on a Barrier Beach," at the Old Firehouse at Parish Park on Main Street Thursday, Aug. 30, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. The talk will take audience members on a whirlwind tour of the last 10,000 years of history of Cape Cod's Nauset Beach. He will discuss glaciers, pirates, rum running, mooncussers, piping plovers, coastal geology, sea level rise, and more. Sargent plans to use photos and illustrations to explain what the 1626 wreck of the "Sparrowhawk" can tell us about the fate of coastal homes threatened by sea level rise today. He will explain how a lovelorn pirate suffering from bipolar symptoms ran aground off Wellfleet and became the basis for Johnny Depp's character in "Pirates of the Caribbean." Books will be available for purchase through Main Street Books, next door. Sargent's talk will serve as the inaugural event in the "It's All in Orleans Cultural Series," to be followed by many other presentations at the Old Firehouse, which the Orleans Community Partnership is renting from the town of Orleans. The partnership welcomes community organizations to consider using the Old Firehouse and encourages sign-up at its website, www.itsallinorleans.org, or by email at orleanscommunitypartnership@gmail.com.


aug28 Orleans

Orleans' "extraordinary history"

While poring over old newspaper articles about shipwrecks in the 1800s, historian William Quinn came upon a treasure trove he just couldn't walk away from. "I found a lot of interesting stories about my own hometown," said Quinn. Those hours spent at the library at Cape Cod Community College produced a pile of printed pages five-inches-thick and two books: "The Lifesavers of Historic Cape Cod" and Quinn's most recent work, "Orleans: A Small Cape Cod Town with an Extraordinary History." The book is close to 300 pages, filled with familiar stores, forgotten lore, and intimate details about the town Quinn has lived in for close to 85 years. It is also packed with photos, mostly taken by the author. "I have been shooting pictures for practically all my life and spent 30 years as a television news cameraman," Quinn said. The long history behind the lens provides opportunities to see how the town changed over the years, from the shot of the two gas pumps in front of the old Snow's in the early 1900s to the recently renovated Snow's Home and Garden. "Everything is connected," he said. The book also touches on personal themes that resonate with many throughout town, including the reality that many residents are the descendants of those who shipwrecked on the dangerous shoals offshore. Quinn is one of those descendants as his grandfather came to stay after the Canadian lumber schooner he was on foundered off Eastham in 1878. But the trend started long before that when a number of British sailors deserted after being told to go offshore and revenge the loss of the frigate Newcastle during the War of 1812. Quinn is well versed in the patchwork of happenings that shaped the town, but even he was surprised at some of the historical nuggets he stumbled upon, including a visit from President Ulysses S. Grant. "That never happened anywhere else, just Orleans," said Quinn. "He got off the train and started shaking hands with people." Other fun facts that pepper the book include:

  • The town, incorporated in 1797, was named after the French Duke of Orleans, Louis Philippe, who had visited the town earlier. He later became king.
  • Captain Kidd supposedly buried his treasure on Hog Island's Money Head.
  • In 1863 one could buy a pig for $2.50.
  • In the 1800s people who swam in the ocean in the summer were considered daft.
  • In 1837 the town produced 21,000 bushels of salt; the industry tanked after the salt mines in Onondaga were found.
  • Defiance Lane, near Rock Harbor, was named for an old woman who when she saw the British land in the war of 1812 immediately put up the American flag.
  • The first fire engine was purchased in 1893 and firefighters, who were volunteers, were paid $2 a year.
  • In 1928 the tax rate was $17.50 per thousand dollars of valuation.
  • In 1950 there were 1,759 people living in town.
  • "That Quail Robert" about a hometown bird was a best seller in 1965.
aug28 Brewster

CapeCast: Down in the mud with crawly critters



aug28 Brewster

Mills & Gills celebrates Stony Brook Gristmill

The Mills &Gills Festival in the Stony Brook Valley was held Saturday, Aug. 26, at the Gristmill on Stony Brook Road where people watched the giant mill wheel drive the grindstone and grind corn into meal. There was a weaving demonstration and corn bread sampling. At Drummer Boy Park on Route 6A, tours were offered of the windmill, Harris-Black House and blacksmith shop. The Yarmouth Minute Men camped on the grounds all day. Mills & Gills was presented by the town of Brewster Mill Site Committee and the Brewster Historical Society. All Brewster Historical Society buildings are open from 1 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday till Sept. 1. More info: brewsterhistoricalsociety.org.


aug28 Brewster

Magic at Brewster VFW

Magician Michael Trixx will appear at the Brewster VFW Pavillion Sunday Sept. 2, at 6 p.m. to benefit the VFW scholarship fund. He combines rock music and magic. The VFW will serve hot dogs, chowder and hamburgers from 4:30 to 6 p.m. prior to the show. Donate at the gate.


aug28 Chatham

Chatham says 'aye' to school plan

They almost didn't need to take a vote. The majority was evident in the resounding applause that followed each argument in favor of building a new $64.7 million regional high school compared with the response to positions taken against it. The final tally was as lopsided as the decibel levels, with Chatham voters at Monday night's special town meeting approving borrowing nearly $10 million for their share of the construction costs by a 522-166 margin. Harwich voters get their chance to vote tonight at a special town meeting that again requests authorization to borrow $64.7 million. But that town's share is really $25.2 million because the state is providing a reimbursement of $29.7 million. Both towns will vote on a Proposition 2½ debt exclusion ballot question on Sept. 6. The degree of support shown by Chatham voters was encouraging to Harwich school officials present at Monday night's meeting. Monomoy Regional School Committee member Brian Widegren of Harwich marveled that the vote could be so strongly in favor of the proposal when the vote to regionalize barely passed in Chatham two years ago, by 61 votes. The actual cost to Chatham taxpayers for the new high school is estimated at $83 per year for a $600,000 median assessed value home, declining over 20 years to $51 a year. Harwich property owners would pay $157 more per year declining to $97 by 2032 on a home valued at $350,000.

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aug28 Chatham

Chatham approves new Monomoy Regional High School

The only ones who could think having a hodgepodge of buildings in two towns would make educational sense for a regional school district are "bean counters," local attorney Bill Riley told Chatham special town meeting Monday night. Ignore them, he suggested, and support construction of the new Monomoy High School. "I urge a "yes" vote and lets get this thing moving," he said. Chatham voters took his advice and overwhelming supported constructing a $64.7 million high school by a vote of 552 to 166. The Chatham vote, which still needs approval at the ballot box on Sept. 6, ends weeks of debate over whether existing buildings could serve the steadily dwindling student population in the two towns and whether the new school was too expensive. As hundreds sat in the sweltering gymnasium - and an overflow crowd sat in the auditorium - several speakers pointed out that since the state was picking up slightly more than half the tab, and Harwich - which has a much larger student population - was responsible for 72 percent of the remainder, the bill for Chatham taxpayers was only $9.8 million. And, said Selectman David Whitcomb, regionalizing the town's schools with Harwich, which the town voted to do in 2010 by a much smaller margin, has already garnered savings.

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aug28 Chatham

Deadline looms on Chatham bridge construction

A new Mitchell River Bridge should be completed before federal funding runs out, but timing is tight. Very tight. Those words from Joseph Pavao, of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, had Florence Seldin, chairman of the board of selectmen, saying her board would do "everything" in its power to make sure the town retained the $11 million in federal and state funding to replace the deteriorating bridge which spans the river between Stage Harbor and Mill Pond. Over the last few years, a number of consulting parties, including the town, have spent many hours trying to hammer out the best way to protect the iconic wooden bridge, which is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and is considered the last remaining wooden drawbridge in the country. Not everyone is pleased with the half timber, half concrete and steel replacement, but the selectmen believe it protects the authenticity of the scene - which hasn't changed much over the last 150 years - and makes sense for taxpayers. Now that a design has been agreed to the bridge needs to be permitted and built by 2016, or the town will have to pick up the tab. There are a few issues to navigate, however. One is how to address the loss of public access to shellfishing areas on either side of the 1858 bridge. Working with the state, and federal highway, the town will likely have to relocate the path, which has existed since 1908, on the south side during construction. "It is really the only pathway in that area," said Ted Keon, the town's director of Coastal Resources. "So preserving the access is very important," What was left unanswered was how to protect access on the north side, which is private property, but an area that townspeople have used for close to 100 years. How best to do that will be taken up by the shellfish advisory committee and the selectmen plan to write a letter to federal highway by early September with their recommendation.

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aug28 Chatham

Chatham hires new community development director

Deanna Ruffer, who currently works in a similar capacity in Pittsfield, has been named the town's community development director and is expected to start Sept. 17. According to a memo from Town Manager Jill Goldsmith, Ruffer's background is well matched to the town's needs. Ruffer has a Civil Engineering degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with courses in architecture, and, along with various planning and project management positions, she was also an independent consultant in both Massachusetts and Georgia providing services in economic development, community planning and smart growth. The projects Ruffer was involved in include renewable energy, transportation, community development block grants, public-private development partnerships, solid waste technical assistance and trust funding, and sustainable growth, the memo reads. Goldsmith said that Pittsfield, where Ruffer was the director for close to a decade, has fostered a more diverse economy, attracting many differing types of business and cultural development including tourism. Ruffer's bio notes she has worked to consolidate development permitting activities and has implemented streamlined permitting procedures as well as developed and oversaw a coordinated comprehensive code enforcement program involving building, fire and health related inspectional services. While in Pittsfield, she guided the town in multiple public-private partnerships, including the development of a $22 million state of the art six- theater cinema complex in a historic downtown building, developing more than 70 market rate housing units in the downtown with another 40 in planning, and development of more than 80 units of new affordable housing.


aug28

Cape Bus Schedules 2012

Nauset Regional School District
   · Nauset Regional High School and Middle School
   · Nauset Elementary Schools (Stony Brook, Eddy, Orleans)

Truro Central School
   · Truro Central School

Monomoy Regional School District
   · Chatham Elementary School
   · Chatham High School and Middle School
   · Harwich Elementary School
   · Harwich Middle School and High School


Cape Cod Regional Technical High School
   · Bus schedule

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Monday, August 27, 2012

aug27 Wellfleet

Tiny turtles protected from predators

Early Friday morning, a quarter-size diamondback terrapin wiggled out of its eggshell and into Tempe Regan's hand. The tiny turtle was one of several found that day, and what brought a small group of volunteers to Massachusetts Audubon Society's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, including Regan, who was last year's turtle research assistant. Daily patrols are made at the sanctuary in August and September in search of the terrapin hatchlings. The turtles are considered a threatened species in the state and are the only salt marsh turtles in North America, said Kelly Sattman of Harwich, one of the volunteers. Wellfleet is the farthest north the turtles are found, she said. In June and July, researchers and volunteers look for nests. They mark the nests and use "predator excluders" to protect the eggs from foxes and other wildlife. But these small wire enclosures can't keep away other pests such as ants and maggots, which can wreak havoc on a nest and destroy the eggs. The discovery of new hatchlings prompts a flurry of activity. Turtles are sprayed with water to clear them of any ants or maggots. They are weighed and measured. Any terrapin that has a yolk sac that hasn't been absorbed yet is taken back to the sanctuary until the sac is absorbed. Others are cleared immediately for release and handed to a volunteer, who clears a spot and covers it from the light and the heat of the summer sun. Then it's off to the next nest.



aug27 Wellfleet

Wellfleet ZBA postpones cottage colony decision to Sept. 20

Will Suzannah Pabot have to remove the two-story structure she has partially built overlooking Mayo Beach, as she was ordered to do by the zoning board of appeals in its July 31 decision? Or will she be allowed to scale back the size of the building at the same location - a building and location several neighbors claim has blocked their view? The board will make a decision on the matter when they meet again on Sept. 20, since the members agreed at their last meeting on Aug. 16 to allow Ben Zehnder, Pabot's lawyer, to come back with revisions that might change their mind about this project. Last Thursday the board heard a new application filed by Zehnder seeking a special permit to allow Pabot's new, partially completed structure, to remain at the site. By meeting's end, however, Zehnder failed to convince the board that they were dealing with a single-family residence, not a cottage colony that the colony's bylaw specifies cannot be more than 750 square feet. Pabot's structure is 1,841 square feet, 37 percent larger than her existing cottage, which she proposes to demolish if allowed to live in the new, and much larger structure. David Reid, the lawyer hired by two abutters, Carol Ridker and Alice Carter, who successfully appealed the building inspector's issuance of a permit to Pabot to build the new house, urged the board to vote that night, rather than allow a continuance. David Paul, an abutter, said, "If this application is approved, it would set a precedent that could significantly impact the quality of this neighborhood. It would represent the urbanization of the harbor." Board member Roger Putnam said nothing had changed in his mind since they made their last decision to deny. "The size issue bothers me. This is much bigger than it was supposed to be." Member Sharon Inger agreed with Putnam. Board member William Nickerson said, "It's tough situation. We don't want to cause financial harm, but it is a pretty massive structure for a cottage colony."

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aug27 Truro

Chepus lectures on painting at Truro library

Artist Peter Chepus will give a lecture on how to create a good painting using a photograph as a reference at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 28, at the Truro Public Library. Born in Cuba, Chepus is a graduate of New York University and studied at the Cape Cod School of Art and the Armory School of the Arts in Palm Beach, Fla. An accomplished teacher, he has been a faculty member of the Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill for the past four years. He is represented by Cortile Gallery in Provincetown and divides his time between Truro and Jupiter, Fla.


aug27 Provincetown

Vice president makes P'town pitch

Describing Provincetown as a place of "courage," Vice President Joe Biden wound up a two-day fundraising trip to Cape Cod with a stop at the place the Pilgrims first landed. Accompanied by his wife, Jill, Biden spent Saturday night at the Wayside Inn in Chatham, attending a fundraiser. On Sunday, he was at the Pilgrim Monument and Museum to raise more money and the spirits of a crowd of nearly 300 people. Bryan Rafanelli - CEO of Rafanelli Events, who planned Chelsea Clinton's 2010 wedding - welcomed Biden to the Cape tip by joking, "welcome to the end of the Earth." Biden answered back, "I don't think this is the end of the Earth, but the beginning." The cost of tickets to Sunday's invitation-only fundraiser ranged from $250 for general admission to $25,000, which bought a photo opportunity with the vice president. In his nearly hourlong speech, Biden touched on a multiplicity of topics but focused mainly on civil rights. "Many of you have advanced civil rights at great expense," he said during his visit to a town long recognized for its lesbian, gay and transgender residents and visitors. "If I had to use one adjective to describe this community it'd be courage. You have summoned the courage to speak out, to come out. We owe you." Biden's wife echoed his sentiments. "The road to equality is long," she said. The vice president said the efforts of the LGBT community have not only advanced their own civil rights, but the "civil rights of every straight American." "You are freeing the soul of the American people," Biden said, earning loud applause from the crowd.

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aug27 Provincetown

Songs for stargazing on a summer evening in Provincetown

A starry sky on a warm August night is the theme of tenor Christopher Sidoli and pianist John Thomas's concert this Monday evening. The "constellation of music for a warm August evening" includes classical, art, novelty and show tunes by Puccini, Cole Porter, Johnny Mercer, Richard Rodgers and more. "Look to the Stars: An Evening of Celestial Music" begins at 8:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 27, at the Unitarian Universalist Meeting House, 236 Commercial St., Provincetown. Admission is $15 at the door.

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aug27 Orleans

Orleans Pops in the Park




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aug27 Orleans

Free healthy eating course at Orleans senior center

The senior center is hosting a new program this fall to help older adults make healthy eating choices. The goal is to help participants make choices to prevent the development and progression of chronic disease such as heart disease and osteoporosis. Attendees will have the opportunity to evaluate their own individual needs, set goals for improved food choices and physical activity, and make changes. Every session includes information about exercise and delicious, easy to prepare food. The series will be facilitated by Mary Ellen Lavenberg and Catherine Wentworth and begins Wednesday, Sept. 12, and continuing on Wednesdays Sept. 19, Sept. 26, Oct. 3, Oct. 10, and Thursday, Oct. 18. Session 5 will be a field trip to the supermarket. Session 6 will feature a cooking demonstration. An optional Session 7 (Nov. 14) is a luncheon at a local restaurant to see how easy healthy eating can be. This program is offered free to Orleans seniors and is funded in part by the Tufts Health Plan Foundation and the Executive Office of Elder Affairs. Advance registration is required as the series is limited to 12 participants. Call the senior center at 508-255-6333 to sign up.


aug27 Chatham

Meeting tonight to decide fate of new Chatham/Harwich regional school

The first of three votes on the proposed Monomoy Regional High School happens tonight. Chatham holds its special town meeting on Monday, August 27 at 6:30 p.m. in the high school gym, and Harwich holds its session on Tuesday, August 28 at 7 p.m. at the community center. Voters in both towns will then consider the $64.7 million project in the September 6 special election. The Harwich finance committee held a session last week on committee member comportment generated by the contentious high school funding article in the special town meeting. The idea was to mend fences, but the language contained in the recommendation in the warrant article, included a minority report not seen by some members, further inflamed passions. Kenneth Sommer, Chatham Finance Committee Chairman, said this past week, "The idea of building a new high school in Harwich is premature. Not all options available to the community for the highest and wisest use of existing resources have been explored. MSBA and the Monomoy Regional School District have not yet analyzed the utilization of existing facilities either as is, or with a variety of modifications to meet the requirements for the students in Harwich and Chatham. The allure of a big new high school is understandable, but most would agree that the time for building oversized public facilities is past, especially when they become cost prohibitive. If the project as proposed is defeated, the school district will have 90 additional days to re-evaluate its options."

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aug27 Chatham

Chatham Special Town Meeting tonight

Town meeting will vote on 11 articles at the special town meeting Monday at 6:30 p.m. at the high school on Crowell Road. The heart of the warrant is the article asking voters to approve $64.7 million to build a new regional high school, in Harwich, that will serve Chatham and Harwich students. Since the state is picking up half, and Harwich is picking up about 70 percent of the remainder, the new Monomoy Regional High School will cost Chatham about $9.8 million. The tax impact, averaged over 20 years, is $70 a year for a median home: valued at $600,000. Other items on the warrant include, spending $150,000 to fund conceptual design and cost estimate for a new Chatham fire headquarters; moving money from one account to another to fund the relocation of the town's skateboard park, and two Community Preservation Act funding requests for historic preservation, one involving the Orpheum Theater and the other the Bassett House.


aug27 Chatham

Chatham police union contract breaks new ground

Winning praise for being "ingenious," a new three-year contract with the police union was approved by selectmen Tuesday. "This is out-of-the-box thinking. I like the avenues that we are headed," said Selectman Sean Summers. "I think all the contracts have to start going this way because we can't afford the constant three, four and five percent increases over the private sector." Town Manager Jill Goldsmith, who helped negotiate the contract, said it took into consideration the "excellent services" the department provides as well as economic realities. Unlike many other contracts, it ties step raises to performance - opposed to periodic increases - and connects raises to Chatham's fiscal health, not the health of the country. So if Chatham does better than the rest of the nation and its revenues increase three percent from one year to the next, salaries do as well. In the past, the cost of living increases were connected to the consumer price index. The raises can't exceed 3 percent a year, however. New employees will also receive fewer benefits, such as existing employees can accrue 170 sick days whereas new one only 150, health insurance premiums for new employees is split 65 percent to 35 with the town (instead of the town picking up 70 percent, and new employees won't receive Quinn bill payments. (The state has stopped paying its share of the legislation, which encourages professional development.) The contract began on July 1 of this year and at Monday's special town meeting voters will be asked to approve $10,000 to cover salary increases and other contractual obligations.


aug27

New data recast whale studies

When the whale known as Touche is hungry for a school of fatty fish, he circles below them, fashioning a net of air by streaming bubbles from his blowhole. Then he corkscrews toward the surface of the Gulf of Maine, herding the fish into an ever tighter packet with the bubbles and his 30-ton body. Finally he opens his jaw wide, takes a monstrous gulp and relaxes, breathing deeply at the water's surface. Then he dives again. Over and over. Touche's feeding strategy, captured in June by an electronic tag attached to his back, is of keen interest to scientists tracking North Atlantic humpback whales off Cape Cod. "Every time we go out and put another tag on, we learn something else," said Dave Wiley, research director of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. For Wiley - who returned to shore recently after plying Stellwagen's waters for two weeks with researchers from several institutions - the most striking insight is that each humpback has its own set of behaviors. "We've got examples sometimes of hundreds of feeding events that are almost all identical for that particular whale but are different than the hundred feeding events that we have for a different whale," he said. For decades, humpback behavior was poorly understood because of the difficulty of shadowing the whales as they roamed the North Atlantic. The breakthrough was the D-tag, engineered in 1999 at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Unlike satellite tags, which transmit location, typically over a long period of time, D-tags stay attached for 36 hours at most and record information like speed, depth and audio. They also carry a three-axis accelerometer that measures the front-to-back, side-to-side orientation of the whale. Heading out for two weeks each summer since 2002, Wiley and a handful of colleagues have successfully tagged humpbacks 90 times, in some cases the same individuals over multiple years. The tag data are overlaid with acoustical studies of prey biomass and, for the past two summers, images from National Geographic's so-called Crittercams, which bring back video showing how whales use different parts of their bodies while feeding and coordinate their movements while traveling in groups. The data have revolutionized humpback research and conservation in the sanctuary, showing scientists where the whales spend their time in the water column while on a dive, what they do at different depths, how they move around and when they vocalize. The D-tag, about the size of a pack of Twinkies, has four suction cups and is attached to a whale by extending a pole. The tag is programmed to pop off after a predetermined time, although some get bumped off or shaken off early. Then it floats to the surface, where the researchers retrieve it and download its data.

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aug27

Charter schools tip balance on Cape

When Sturgis Charter Public School's second Hyannis campus opens next month, students will come from towns as far away as Truro and Brewster. They're the lucky ones: More than 300 are on the school's long waiting list. More and more parents are choosing to send their children to the Cape's only two independent charter schools, Sturgis and Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School in Harwich. Sturgis and Lighthouse charter and two other Cape public schools are the only ones seeing increases in student enrollment. As a result, town schools are not only losing students but also the funding that goes with them. Enrollment at traditional public Cape schools dropped an average of 19 percent from 2004 to 2011, with the exception of Truro and Upper Cape Cod Regional Technical School. Meanwhile, Lighthouse charter had a 26 percent increase in enrollment, and Sturgis had a 76 percent jump in the same time period. Clearly, the Cape's traditional school enrollment is dropping: About 7,000 school-age children left the Cape between 2000 and 2010. This demographic decline makes the loss of students to charter schools even more acute. The loss of children to other schools costs money. The first year, sending school districts receive 100 percent reimbursement from the state for the loss of a student. After the first year, reimbursement drops to 25 percent for the next five years. The regional Nauset district has for years lost about 71 students annually to the Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School, which educates sixth- to eighth-graders. "I think that Nauset Middle School has many more course offerings than Lighthouse - advanced classes in grades seventh and eighth grades, robotics, two foreign languages, interscholastic sports teams, adventure education, outstanding art, music and drama programs," Nauset Superintendent Richard Hoffmann said. But these assets don't stop parents from applying to Lighthouse. Hoffmann said the smaller class sizes at Lighthouse are the real appeal, and it's something he cannot replicate because of his budget.

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aug27

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 8/21
WAHLSTROM, Seth, 36, 125 Oakwood Road, Eastham; three counts of violating a protective order, Oct. 18, Nov. 18 and Aug. 20 in Eastham, dismissed.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 8/21
DESCHAINE, Darian, 51, 810 Massasoit Road, Eastham; assault and battery, Aug. 21 in Eastham. Pretrial hearing Sept. 17.

YEATES, Keith, 22, 80 Fletcher Lane, Brewster; operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), negligent driving and two other traffic violations, Aug. 21 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Aug. 22.

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Sunday, August 26, 2012

aug26 Wellfleet

A summer tradition of family, friends and great music comes to Wellfleet

Like so many families who call Cape Cod their second home, the Lighthouse Chamber Players is a tightly knit group that summers here together each year, then scatters off to their separate lives until another season calls them back. That their core ensemble consists of virtuosic musicians and their other homes happen to include the world's renowned symphony halls is a happy coincidence. Their artistic director and violinist Elizabeth Chang insists that despite long hours of rehearsal and performances on the Cape, the group really is on a vacation of sorts. "I think we're doing what most musicians enjoy doing most - playing with friends," she says. "We usually find a cheap house to rent, and as times have progressed people have children, bring their families," she says. "The Cape was part of my life growing up. My son took his first steps here. Now he's 13 and has been playing violin at the Wellfleet Public Library for the last couple of years" in a program for youth. And this year, the son of the Players' featured guest artist, pianist Anne-Marie McDermott, has joined Chang's child in the youth program. The Lighthouse Chamber Players formed on the Cape 18 years ago at a dinner party. "We were just friends," says Chang. "We came out here to spend time together." At the party, she recalls, the idea emerged from a chat she had with a college friend whose mother was involved with the Nauset Light Preservation Society. Chang and her fellow musicians decided to help out by playing a benefit concert. They raised funds to help save the lighthouse from beach erosion, which threatened to tumble the 15-foot-tall brick tower built in 1892 into the sea. The lighthouse rescued, the group's mission has expanded over the years to introduce classical music to new audiences on the Cape through their summer series of workshops, talks and concerts, two of which are coming to Wellfleet next week. Both concerts are free with donations appreciated. Suggested donations are $25 and $10 for students. On Monday, Aug. 27, at 7:30 p.m., Chang will perform a solo concert at the library, 55 West Main St. The program includes J.S. Bach's "Sonata No. 2 in A Minor," Stefan Wolpe's "Pieces in Two Parts for Violin Alone" and Bach's "Partita No. 2 in D Minor." On Thursday, Aug. 30, at 7:30 p.m., violist Nardo Poy, cellist Maureen McDermott and pianist Anne-Marie McDermott join Chang at the Congregational Church, 200 Main St. Thursday's program includes Mozart's "Prelude and Fugue in F Minor," Shostakovich's "Piano Trio No. 2 in E Minor, Op. 67" and Brahms' "Piano Quartet in G Minor."

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aug26 Truro

2012 Science in the Seashore Research Conference on Tuesday in Truro

In an effort to communicate natural resource science taking place at Cape Cod National Seashore, the Atlantic Research Center (ARC) will be hosting the second annual "Science in the Seashore Research Conference." The conference will take place at the ARC Classroom building located at the Highlands Center in North Truro, Massachusetts on Tuesday, August 28th. The afternoon event will feature 8-10 oral presentations by individuals conducting scientific research at Cape Cod National Seashore. Topics will span the disciplines engaged in management-driven natural resource science including plant ecology, wildlife ecology, geology, and the marine sciences. The parallel goals of the Atlantic Research Center are to expand upon the magnitude of research taking place within Cape Cod National Seashore and to communicate this research to students, educators, administrators, other scientists, and members of the public. The conference will provide a brisk, half-day of talks with the intent to generate an environment engaging for researchers and members of the public alike. Snacks and refreshments will be provided by the Friends of Cape Cod National Seashore.

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aug26 Provincetown

Change of plan for historic Hawthorne barn in Provincetown

Josh Prager bought the historic Hawthorne barn in 2009 with the intention of renovating it himself. Five building permits, one 501c3 application and a few dozen mortgage payments later, his plans have changed. Prager, a journalist who has summered in North Truro since he was a kid, still intends to make the barn available to artists and others through a mixture of public programming, to be administered by a non-profit called 20 Summers. And he still wants the barn to be fixed up in a way that's true to its original character. But after three years spent laying the groundwork for the project - obtaining everything from site plan approval to a working septic system, all the while shouldering a mortgage - his resources are stretched thin, he said last week. "It's been expensive for me personally because it's taken me so long to get everything in order," Prager said. In addition, "It's been difficult for our non-profit to raise money for the barn, and we can't move ahead with the program until the barn is renovated." Revising his approach, Prager has agreed to sell the barn to its next-door neighbors, Adam Moss and Daniel Kaizer. Moss and Kaizer own the house that was once used as a summer residence for students of the artist Charles Hawthorne, and they took pains to restore that property to "its original splendor," Prager said. They are keen on preserving the authenticity of the Hawthorne barn as well. In a contract that is being hammered out this week, Moss and Kaizer will purchase and renovate the barn, then rent it at a fixed rate for a fixed period each year to 20 Summers, the non-profit founded by Prager and his business partner, Ricky Opaterny (www.20summers.org. Twenty Summers will open up the space to artists who wish to paint there and to lectures and other events. The month-long program will run annually from May 15 to June 14 and is expected to begin in 2014. "A month may not seem like a lot, but it is to us and we are taking steps to fill those 30 days with wonderful programs," Prager said. Plans to hold artist or writer-in-residence programs at the barn have been dropped. In general, Prager said he is "thrilled" about the new arrangement. "I didn't seek [Moss and Kaizer] out. I was simply talking to Adam earlier this month and telling him it was expensive for me and that it was a burden for the non-profit to raise money for the renovation," he said. A little while later, "They e-mailed me and said, look, it'll be a nightmare if the barn fell into the wrong hands. . Our big fear was that the barn would fall into the hands of someone who wouldn't care about its history." Built by Hawthorne in 1907, the barn on Miller Hill Road served as quarters for the Cape Cod School of Art, center of the Cape Tip's budding art colony at the turn of the 20th century. After Hawthorne died in 1930, the famed abstract expressionist and esteemed art teacher Hans Hofmann used it as a classroom. In 1979 the barn was listed on the National Register of Historic Places; that same year, artist Peter Gee purchased the Hawthorne property and began using the barn as a workspace for his silkscreening and poster projects. He taught classes on pop art there in the 1990s. Residents voted at Town Meeting last year to give Prager $75,000 in Community Preservation Act funds to help with the renovation. It was the first time the town had agreed to award CPA money to an individual for a historic preservation project. Now that he is selling the barn, Prager said, he will not accept the grant money from the town. Nor will he benefit financially from the sale, he added.

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aug26

"Trainee" skipper grounds Provincetown-Boston ferry

The Provincetown to Boston Ferry, the Provincetown III, was run aground on a trip yesterday morning to the Cape tip by a skipper in training who missed navigational marks and rammed the boat with 149 passengers onto a sandbar between Deer Island and Long Island in Boston Harbor. The skipper was fired. A Bay State Cruise Co. spokesman said, "there is no excuse for having missed the navigational marks and being as far out of position as they were." The spokesman also said that fast ferry service on the Provincetown III could be restored by today if it turns out only the propellers are damaged. The ferry trip takes a hour and a half and costs $83.

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aug26

Megan Mullally: puzzling, yet entertaining

Many of the performers that Seth Rudetsky invites to sing on the Broadway at The Art House series are Broadway vets. His guest this past weekend, Megan Mullally, has some important Broadway credits - "Grease" and "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" - but to most audiences she is known as the wisecracking friend Karen Walker in the eight-season hit TV series, "Will and Grace." The Art House program opened with Mullally singing the Barbra Streisand standard "Happy Days are Here Again" with all the standard Streisand mannerisms. It was an odd way to introduce yourself to the sold-out Provincetown audience. As fine a singer as Mullally is, and she has an outstanding Broadway belt, she is not up to out-singing Streisand, so why try? The usually thoughtful and engaging Rudetsky seemed distracted and was not as successful as in past performances engaging his guests. While the program was, as usual, unscripted and casual, it occasionally crossed the dangerous line between unscripted and seemingly unprepared. Both he and Mullally fiddled distractingly through her sheet music while trying to maintain a conversation, making me wonder why such polished performers needed to use sheet music. Mullally was kept in the dark about what song came next and at times seemed to need a minute to get focused on her next task. Highlights in the 70 minute set included Mullally singing the 1927 Kern and Hammerstein classic "Bill" from "Show Boat" with a soulful and sincere quality that was arresting. We learned Mullally has developed a musical based on her "Will and Grace" character and sang a hilarious song from the show that reminded us how much we loved Karen Walker.

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aug26 Orleans

Legacy lifeguards: It's all in the family at Nauset Beach

The tide comes in, the tide goes out. Visitors come and then they go. Even the onion rings at Liam's are deliciously predictable. In fact, there may be only one thing more predictable than the tides at Nauset Beach - and that's finding a lifeguard on duty with the surname Wolff, Parmenter, Van Cott or Sloan. And not just this summer, but over a span of decades and generations. You must go back before the late 1970s for there to be a time when you couldn't find a lifeguard at Nauset Beach that had one of those family names. It's something special and everyone involved has an appreciation for how unique it is to have so many brothers, sons and daughters continue the lifeguard tradition at Nauset Beach. Current head lifeguard Greg Johnson, who has been guarding here for 34 years (head guard for the past 10) has been a part of it all. "At one point in time there were four Wolff brothers, me and my two brothers, and two Herders on the beach," he says. "In 1980, I was with Tighe Parmenter, Joe Wolff, Josh Sloan and Jon Van Cott. This summer I have their sons on my staff. It's very rare. There is not another beach on Cape Cod or anywhere I can think of that has a lifeguard legacy like this." Joe Wolff agrees. "There were 17 guards, all the same age, and we all hung out together. Ten of us went to college together at UMass. It was pretty awesome," he says. "There was me, four of my brothers, and then my sister. There was a Wolff on the beach from 1977-1989. My daughter, Karen, was the first legacy guard (2006-2011) and my son, Brian, has been on the beach since 2010." Tighe Parmenter, who was an All America swimmer at Southern Illinois and went on to become a Top Gun instructor, remembers that the pay for head lifeguard was pretty good in 1980 at $5.25/hr. "For me, it was very important in my formative years to be leading other people. I was 21 and had to be good," he says. "I had no idea how meaningful it would be later in life. I'm really proud to this day of being a lifeguard at Nauset. I've done a lot of cool things in my life and I put that right up there. These kids, including my son, will be better for having this experience."

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aug26 Chatham

Biden brings a bit of a buzz to Chatham

Vice President Joe Biden was greeted by hundreds of curious onlookers Friday night at the Wayside Inn. The Main Street inn hosted a fundraiser for the Barack Obama reelection campaign, where Biden and his wife were special guests. Tickets started at $5,000 per person. Main Street shoppers lined both sides of the street starting at about 5:30 p.m., hoping to catch a glimpse of the vice president. State police were present to direct traffic and control the crowds, while a security contingent patrolled the area surrounding the inn. Biden arrived in a motorcade just after 6 p.m. to a smattering of cheers and waves, as well as the snapping of smart phone cameras from the crowd. By the time he arrived, there were about 100 people on each side of Main Street. "I think it's cool no matter which way you lean," said Donna Mavmomates of Quincy, who had her camera and caught a glimpse of Biden as he pulled up. Dave Erwin, of Connecticut, stood on the sidewalk as Biden made his appearance. "It's pretty exciting," he said. The Wayside Inn reported no noticeable increase in business because of Biden's appearance. A front desk spokeswoman said the inn is booked this time of year, anyway. The event was hosted by Chatham resident and Obama campaign fundraiser Michael Schell and his wife, Kathy. Biden visited the Cape in 2008, taking a trip to Nantucket for Thanksgiving. The Biden family has spent more than 30 Thanksgivings on the island.

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aug26 Monomoy

New Monomoy school in voters' hands

Chatham Selectman David Whitcomb knows the price students paid as his town's high school population shrank and fewer courses were offered, sports programs were eliminated, and music and other performing arts participation dwindled to just a few members. "A majority of my daughter's classmates went to Nauset (Regional High School) for sports, dramatic arts and for socialization. They wanted a bigger pool of children," Whitcomb told the Chatham Finance Committee at a recent meeting. Harwich's student population had also dropped over the years, but the town urgently needed to replace an aging high school that was 50 years old and riddled with structural and functional problems. Both Chatham and Harwich school systems are hemorrhaging students who choose greater opportunities or better facilities elsewhere. Half of Chatham's freshman class, for instance, has chosen to go elsewhere this year. Whitcomb sees the vote at a special town meeting Monday night and in Harwich on Tuesday to authorize borrowing of $64.7 million to build a new regional high school as the fulfillment of promise made to voters when the two towns voted to regionalize into the Monomoy school district two years ago. "The pledge we made at town meeting was that we would save taxpayers money and provide for increased educational opportunities for our students to get back the ones we lost, retain students in the future, and this building will do that," he said. Monomoy interim Superintendent Carolyn Cragin sees a new high school, combined with the relatively new Chatham High School/Middle School, which will be converted solely to a middle school, as critical to retaining students and even attracting children from other towns. "This would provide the type of facilities that would be unrivaled in the area and allow us to operate as a strong and sustainable regional school system," Cragin said. But critics say the two towns did not have enough input into the process, that the building is too large and costly and that they want more time to examine other options. Chatham would be borrowing $9.8 million, which would cost taxpayers who own a median-priced $600,000 home an average of $70 per year added onto their annual property tax over the 20-year loan period. Harwich, whose students make up 72 percent of the Monomoy Regional School system population, would pay a larger share at $25.2 million or $157 per year in the opening years of the loan period for the owner of a median-priced home of $350,000, decreasing to $97 per year in the final years of the loan. Proponents of building the new school argue that, for Harwich, the $25.2 million is much less than they would spend to build a new school on their own to replace the current high school. Harwich faces state sanctions including the possible loss of accreditation if the existing high school is not replaced. Chatham is heading down the road that Provincetown already traveled with a declining enrollment that hampers education and could ultimately threaten its accreditation as well.

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aug26

Harwich police bag teen bathroom tagger

A spate of tagging will likely come to an end now that Harwich police have a confession and a suspect in custody. The bathroom facility at Red River Beach has been the target of multiple taggings this summer. Early Wednesday morning, just before 2 a.m., Officer Keith Lincoln encountered three suspicious males while patrolling the beach parking lot. Officer Lincoln also found fresh spray-paint on one of the bathroom walls. Officer Lincoln, assisted by Officer Robert Hadfield, interviewed the three males at the scene and soon discovered a backpack full of spray-paint cans in the car of one of the suspects. The teen, identified as 18-year-old Joseph Tagliaferri of Harwich, told the officers he was responsible for the tagging. Tagliaferri was placed under arrest and charged with tagging property.

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Saturday, August 25, 2012

aug25 Wellfleet

Back from the road

After a run of road gigs, writing, and recording in the studio, Wellfleet's Parkington Sisters are playing two shows back home on the Cape as part of community radio station WOMR's 30th anniversary celebration. The Parkingtons - both in descending chronology and the way they line up on stage - are Ariel, Sarah, Nora and Rose. While each is a multi-instrumentalist, for performances Ariel and Sarah play violin, Nora some violin but mostly percussion, with Rose on guitar, piano or accordion. Their journey has taken them to some real heights. The last year-plus has seen the Parkingtons share a stage with Bruce Springsteen, play Fenway Park with the Dropkick Murphys, open for soul legend Mavis Staples at Boston Symphony Hall on New Year's Eve, and play the Bonnaroo festival in Tennessee. With their stringed instruments and vocal harmonies, they occupy something of a dual existence, musically. On their own, they can fill most any room on the Cape - when they play someplace like the Marion Craine Room at the Snow Library in Orleans, the crowd is squeezed out into the hallways and wings like Play-Doh through a fist. The room is full of plaid-clad hipsters in trucker hats and throngs of senior citizens. Both groups adore them. But then they go on the road with the likes of raucous Celtic punkers Dropkick Murphys - for whom they both open and later join on stage - and suddenly they're in front of thousands in Canadian and West Coast theaters, or playing to tens-of-thousands at outdoor European festivals. They toured with State Radio last year and are heading back out this fall with roots rockers Dispatch, including a show at fabled Radio City Music Hall. Last summer they headlined, and packed, the Wellfleet Beachcomber. Most recently they played the after party for folk darlings Mumford & Sons at the State Theater in Portland, Maine. This summer had them riding on a tour bus through Europe with the Dropkicks. They joke about never unpacking their suitcases. Asked the worst part of touring, they all cite a lack of personal space. Nora describes the repetition of show-bus-hotel-soundcheck as a constant challenge to carve "your own space within no space."

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aug25 Truro

'Sesame Street' says goodbye to the Count

Sesame Street got a little lonelier Thursday, as longtime puppeteer Jerry Nelson, the alter ego of Count von Count, died after suffering from emphysema for years. He was 78 and had lived in Truro since the 1970s, where he was known for playing his music at the Payomet Performing Arts Center or slipping into some of his famous voices. For more than four decades, Nelson lent his voice and puppetry skills to the PBS children's show "Sesame Street." He brought to life the popular vampire with a penchant for numbers, educating and entertaining children across the globe. With their stringed instruments and vocal harmonies, they occupy something of a dual existence, musically. He worked creatively on a number of Jim Henson projects over the years, including Muppet films, television shows and spin-off series such as "Fraggle Rock." Carol-Lynn Parente, executive producer at "Sesame Street," said Nelson's passing has left "such a hole." "I was fortunate enough to know the man of so many characters," she said. "They were all funny, silly, passionate and musical - because Jerry had such a great voice - and I realized those words could all describe Jerry." Nelson, who was born in Tulsa, Okla., started working with Jim Henson in the late 1960s, filling in for legendary puppeteer Frank Oz. "Sesame Street" premiered in 1969, and Nelson was there from nearly the beginning. Parente said Nelson's improvisation skills played a huge part in animating characters such as the Count, Herry Monster, Sherlock Hemlock, Snuffleupagus and many others. "It's profoundly sad to lose a talent like that," she said. Bill Evaul, a neighbor and close friend of Nelson in Truro, said Cape Cod was "very important" to him. "He came down with (fellow Henson puppeteer) Richard Hunt in the early '70s and never left," he said. Nelson actually dreamed of being an actor and broke into puppeteering simply to get a job in the entertainment business, Evaul said. "He would say, 'I got my first job because I lied and wore cowboy boots,'" Evaul said. He said Nelson landed the job with puppeteer Bill Baird by lying about his puppet skills and bonding with Baird over a shared love of cowboy boots. "For the first 20 years, he wouldn't say he was a puppeteer. He would say he was an actor waiting for his big break," Evaul said. Nelson also had a passion for music and would often perform the musical portions on "Sesame," singing in-voice as dozens of characters, Evaul said. He released a CD of original songs in 2009 titled "Truro Daydreams." Nelson retired from puppeteering in 2004 but continued working with the characters he had a hand in creating, doing voice-over work remotely and visiting the "Sesame Street" set to give input. Right up until his death, he did voice-over work at a studio in North Eastham run by Brian Morris of Morris Creative Services.

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aug25 Truro

Truro painter Gail Fields: paintings as reflections

Gail Fields' lyric oil paintings mirror her conversational style - soft, muted tones punctuated by exuberant bursts of color. Not one to talk about herself at great length, she prefers to have her artwork speak instead. Her eloquent landscapes reveal a vivid visual imagination clarified by a perfectionist's eye for minute, telling detail. While Fields is a "studio painter," one who seldom if ever paints outdoors, her views of the marshes, dunes and beaches are as true to place as a plein air painting. To her sense of the real, however, she adds distinctive touches, her own extension of the scene's story. She might include unexpected beachside flowers, a suggestion of an impending storm despite surface tranquility or even the wriggle of some small creature hidden in the dune grass. Fields loves seasonal passage. Her landscapes - on exhibit through Aug. 31 at the Truro Public Library, 7 Standish St., in North Truro - offer a full calendar year of images. Fourteen recent landscapes, all oil on canvas, take viewers on a seasonal tour of the Outer Cape. An opening reception will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24. Painting in her carefully organized Truro studio provides Fields balance, a change of pace from her graphic design work in partnership with her husband, photographer Charles Fields. Together they are Fields Publishing Company, designers, creators, producers of classic, award-winning "coffee table books," some of which chart their travels to Vietnam, explore the story and artistry of artists like Anne Packard and John Grillo or document the natural glories of Cape Cod. With degrees in psychology and art therapy, she brings an interesting background to bear on her artwork: the psychology enhances the inner depths of her scenes; the training as an art therapist parallels her move away from precise, tightly controlled art into more expressive and abstract impressions. Fields once painted with Anne Packard, who encouraged her to loosen up, to use her largest brushes and "say as little as possible, invite viewers in and let them complete the paintings." Now, some five years later, Fields' palette is energized, her approach to painting more expansive. As she stated on her website, "Working with big canvas, big brushes have transformed my paintings into free explosions of expression, with color, light and texture."

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aug25 Truro

Truro Ag Fair a'comin'

The Truro Agricultural Fair will take place on Sunday, Sept. 2 (rain date, Sept. 11), and volunteers and sponsors are still welcome, as are contributions of baked treats for the Community Bake Sale table and entries for the Pie-Baking Contest and Harvest & Barnyard Beauty contests. Go to truroagfair.com to pre-register, or fill out an Ag Fair form at the library.


aug25 Provincetown

Provincetown ferry runs aground in Boston Harbor

A Provincetown-bound ferry ran aground in Boston Harbor Saturday morning, the Coast Guard said. The company that runs the ferry blamed the mishap on "operator error." The ferry, which was carrying 149 passengers, ran aground off Nixes Mate. "[There was] a bang. We had hot coffee spilled all over us. And we got really scared and a little girl right next to us sobbed and cried. Then they said get your life jackets. We started to get scared. But they kept assuring us, assuring us. But that never should have happened," said Dr. Irma Zarinsky of Swampscott. Rescuers spent more than an hour and a half transferring passengers, crews and one dog from the Provincetown III ferry to Provincetown II. The ferry is operated by Bay State Cruise Company. Quincy police rescued 52 passengers with their vessel "The Guardian." "It never should have happened. It was operator error pure and simple, as unattractive as that truth is," said Michael Glasfeld, president of BayState Cruise Company. "We were going along at a decent speed and all you heard was a slow crunch and crunch and crunch. Right away you knew you had hit bottom," said passenger David Conti, who was going to Provincetown to celebrate his birthday. One passenger said the fog was like "pea soup" and could have been a contributing factor, but other passengers said the boat was outside of the buoys marking the shipping lane. Nixes Mate is one of the smaller islands in the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. "A rocky mass that was once a 12-acre island, Nixes Mate is now nothing more than a 200-square-foot mini-island marked by a black-and-white "day beacon" to aid in ship navigation," according to an article on the Freedom Trail Foundation website.

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aug25 Provincetown

Provincetown-bound ferry stuck between Boston Harbor islands

A Provincetown-bound ferry ran aground in the Boston Harbor Saturday morning. No injuries were reported, and all 149 passengers were transferred onto another ferry. "There was not enough water underneath the boat," said Ross Ruddell, a Coast Guard public affairs specialist. "They're waiting for the next high tide to refloat." The ferry, the Provincetown III run by the Bay State Cruise Company, was not damaged, Ruddell said. Fast ferry service on the Provincetown III will not be running for the rest of the weekend, according to a statement on the Bay State Cruise Company's website. The company will offer a "motorcoach service" between Boston and Provincetown. The ferry got stuck near Nixes Mate, a small patch of land between Deer Island and Long Island. It ran aground around 9:49 a.m. Quincy Police, the Coast Guard, and Boston Police Harbor Patrol transferred passengers from the Provincetown III to the Provincetown II, another Bay State Cruise Company vessel, to continue their journey. The ferry got stuck in rocks between the islands.

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aug25 Provincetown

Grounded ferry to Ptown operated by trainee

Passengers on board a fast ferry from Boston to Provincetown this morning were evacuated from the boat after it apparently ran aground, according to Bay State Cruise Lines. Witnesses said the boat was stopped about 10 minutes into their trip, which left Boston at 8:30 a.m. Michael Glasfeld, who owns Bay State Cruise Lines, said at about 12:30 p.m. that no passengers were injured and the evacuation was complete. The ship's operator was training when it ran aground and had only made the trip about 10 times before, Glasfeld said. The senior captain supervising her has worked for the company for about six years. No fast ferries will be running this weekend "due to unforseen circumstances," according to an announcement posted on the Bay State Cruise Lines website.

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aug25 Provincetown

Provincetown's 'ambassadors of traffic' keep order on Commercial Street

Navigating the thoroughfare in town this summer has proven a far more manageable task thanks to the tireless efforts of Provincetown's community service officers, or CSOs, a trio of men whose dedication to your safety is steadfast and assured. The grinding work of CSOs, who guide foot, bike and vehicular traffic through a vortex of unrelenting congestion, was initially the province of licensed police officers, hired by the police department to keep Commercial Street flowing smoothly during high season. But, last year, this detail was relegated to the newly formed position of CSO, department personnel who do not carry firearms or make arrests, but who serve, nonetheless, as the ambassadors of the police department. "It's an incredibly hard job," says Lt. Jim Golden, "and takes a particular set of skills. They're bombarded with questions all day long and can have more interaction with the public in one day than other officers can have in a week. They are the summer face of the department." Orientation for CSOs begins in May for two weeks and covers everything from tourism and licensing to parking and permits. The officers are stationed at the key intersections of Standish and Lopes Square and Ryder Street and Commercial for eight-hour shifts with periodic breaks, and their posts are covered by department staff on days off. Chosen from a dozen or so applicants (a fourth CSO was forced to abandon the position earlier in the season when his summer housing fell through), each officer is given a royal blue polo shirt, cap and whistle, as well as a bright neon green vest to distinguish him in the fray. And, clearly, their professional demeanor is a testament to the field they have chosen. At 56, Doug Allen is the eldest of the trio and, although his voice is perhaps familiar to many as a 12-year veteran dispatcher, Allen is, like his colleagues, new to the role. Jarrod Koskey, 40, from Provincetown, will be entering the Plymouth Police Academy in September. And Westfield State University grad, Tyler Dow, 22, hopes to be admitted to the state training facility in New Braintree. Dow has found the time on the street this summer both intense and invaluable as training for his career. "Bicyclists are the toughest challenge," he says. "They'll come tearing down the road thinking they have a different set of rules." Of course, the undisputed grandfather of community service officers is surely Donald Thomas, who joined the police department in 1947, first as an auxiliary officer then a summer cop. In the '70s, Thomas found his form at Lopes Square, delighting crowds week in and week out with the fleet of foot moves that earned him the title "The Dancing Cop," until his run ended in 2010 at the age of 83. And while the class of 2012 have pretty much kept their pads to the pavement, perhaps with a little prodding, this tradition might continue to thrive. Says Dow with a grin, "Maybe by Labor Day I'll bust out some moves."


aug25 Provincetown

Cat woman comes to Provincetown to share comedy and not-so-single life

A little over 10 years ago comedian Paula Poundstone was in the media spotlight, and not a rosy one. Let's get the elephant out of the room - she had been charged with child endangerment and a misdemeanor charge of inflicting injury on a child while intoxicated. The frenzy that followed was a painful one that has a happy ending. While critics and a leery public projected that her career would fall by the wayside, her family of three adopted children and a number of foster children taken from her permanently, she struggled to get her act together, both on stage and personally. Apparently, her efforts paid off, because today Poundstone lives in Santa Monica with her three kids and her career is once again on track. That in mind, she will perform at 7:30 and 9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 26, at The Crown & Anchor, 247 Commercial St., Provincetown. Though not born here, Poundstone, now 52, was brought up in Massachusetts, in Sudbury, where she attended Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School. Alas, her formal education was cut short when her desire to pursue the world of comedy called, and she dropped out of school to pursue her dreams of being on stage. In 1979 she started hitting the open mike nightclub scene and even went on to perform in a play, but found the theater was not her calling. She wanted to be a comedian, and that was that. Taking on such jobs as bussing tables and bicycle messenger to support her endeavors, Poundstone has done voice-overs on animated films and appeared on late-night programs and daytime talk shows as well as playing along on game shows such as "Hollywood Squares" and "To Tell the Truth." Over the years Poundstone has garnered several awards and distinctions and has clearly earned her mark in the world of comedy. She even has a memoir out titled "There Is Nothing in This Book That I Meant to Say." Currently, she says, she is logging 90 live dates a year as well as being a panelist on NPR's "Wait Wait. Don't Tell Me." She is also a regular on "A Prairie Home Companion." But it is not her fame or comedy that is dearest to the single mother's heart; it is her family - the three children she fought to keep, and the 16 cats and two German shepherd mix dogs, all adopted - that consumes her life and love these days.

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aug25 Provincetown

Old chestnut brings laughter and tears to Provincetown radio station benefit

In "Love Letters," playwright A.R. Gurney instructs the actors not to rehearse. Through simply reading the script, letters written over the course of a lifelong relationship, all the actors have to do is read the script aloud to the audience. Gurney wants them to be in the moment, reading with fresh eyes and putting their talents right on the spot. In the two characters, Melissa Ladd and Andrew Makepeace Gardner III, Gurney writes, "there is something of all of us." Since its first performance in 1988, the play has attracted big-name actors with busy careers, including Vanessa Redgrave, William Hurt, Kathleen Turner, George Segal, Stockard Channing, Christopher Walken and many more. Beginning at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25, Beverly Bentley and Guy Strauss bring back the immensely popular play in a benefit performance for and held at WOMR 92.1 radio station, 494 Commercial St. The two are performing the 75-minute play for the eighth time and Jeff Zinn directs them in it for the second time. Strauss founded the Payomet Theater in North Truro, which he ran as artistic director for 10 years and where he produced dozens of plays and concerts and readings. Previously, he had a 30-year career in theater as an actor and director. On television, Bentley appeared as early as 1951. Summering in Provincetown from New York, Bentley founded Act IV in the Gifford House in 1966; she starred in countless roles and worked with celebrated dramatists, including Sam Shepherd and Joe Chaikin. She has appeared more recently at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater in "The Road to Mecca" and at Payomet, with Strauss in Edward Albee's "The Marriage Play."

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aug25 Orleans

Actor going the distance for Academy of Performing Arts' 'Biloxi Blues'

For the Academy of Performing Arts production of "Biloxi Blues," Beau Jackett is stepping outside his comfort zone - both in acting and in distance. In the dozen or so productions he's done since returning to the Cape in 2004, native Jackett has usually played a good, or at least sympathetic, guy (the Stage Manager in "Our Town," for example). But Sgt. Toomey - his role in "Biloxi Blues" - is tough and antagonistic through most of the Neil Simon play; he's the officer charged with shaping up the enlisted men when young Eugene (a Simon stand-in for this second play in the writer's semi-autobiographical trilogy) goes to basic training in Mississippi during World War II. "It's been a challenge ... and kind of fun easing my way into it," he says. "This guy plays mind games with the kids. There's an innate meanness to him, how he disciplines these young guys who aren't used to being yelled at. He has some lessons to instill." Jackett is excited, though, to also try to get the audience to feel compassion for Toomey and for the fact that this kind of life is all Toomey knows. "There's a complexity and a lot of texture to the character," he says. "The challenge is to be believable, but, on the flip side, to gain some compassion from audiences when he breaks down. ... (The play) makes you think, at the end of it all, how war can really take its toll not only on the kids, but on people training the kids." Within all that, Jackett also has to be funny. Both he and Earle note that Toomey, especially in exchanges with the character of Pvt. Arnold Epstein, has some of the wittiest, sharpest lines in the play. "Biloxi Blues" is also a different experience for Jackett because of distance. This is the first play he's done outside of Provincetown and he has to make a 30-mile commute to Orleans - he lives in Truro and works two jobs in Provincetown - for rehearsals and 22 performances. Jackett first talked to artistic director Peter Earle about acting in Orleans when Earle was looking for actors for "Fiddler on the Roof" last winter; Jackett had performed in the musical when it was done in a Provincetown community-school show. That role didn't work out, but the timing of "Biloxi Blues" did - even with the complexity of working around "South Pacific" performances that involve some "Biloxi Blues" cast members. The chance to work at the academy, its arena stage and with director Peter Earle were the big draws, he says. Then when he was reminded of the power of the role via the 1988 movie (Christopher Walken played Toomey), Jackett says he knew "I'd be stupid not to do this." "Biloxi Blues" will be performed Tuesdays through Sundays through Sept. 22 at the Academy of Performing Arts in Orleans.

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aug25 Brewster

Brewster to repair herring run and dam

Herring got a hearing in Brewster Wednesday morning. The town will be repairing the dam at the popular Stony Brook Mill site and coincident with that they've invited the state Division of Marine Fisheries' fishway team to redo the herring run on the mill side of Stony Brook Road. Wednesday was the site visit by the DMF, their fish-way contractors, the Brewster Conservation Trust, Association to Preserve Cape Cod and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, among others. The Mill Pond dam project should go out to bid Sept. 21, and hopefully work will start in mid-October. Ideally the fishway work could be completed before that so construction won't be cramped into a compact site. "We'll start advertising the bid this weekend for the restoration of the dam and (first few feet of the) fish passage," Chris Miller, the Brewster Director of Natural Resources said. "The dam is leaking and it is poorly designed." The dam work is a sub-project of the Stony Brook restoration project that included the new culvert under Rte. 6A which has received Federal funding. The town meeting funded the engineering work on the dam. "Part of the challenge is that construction is in the fall when the juvenile herring are migrating out to sea," noted senior scientist and herring guru Jo Ann Muramoto of the APCC. Because of that construction will be done in two parts. The stream will be blocked and water will drain through the sluice under the mill's water wheel while the dam's left side is built. Then the right side will be done and water will drain through the stream. It should take 90 days, which will bring it to conclusion in mid-January. One concern is balancing the historic and bucolic aspects of the Stony Brook Mill site with the DMF's desire for a more modern and efficient fish passage. "The dam will be made of concrete and faced with stone," Miller said. "So it will look like it does now. It will be similar to what the pad for the wheel looks like. Over time it will pick up a patina. In the 1960s the stream was moved and the dam was raised two feet so not all the work is historic." However, the site is on the National Register of Historic Places. Not only is it visited by tourists but Muramoto estimates 41,000 herring traveled upstream weirs and beneath the beaks of gulls.

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aug25 Chatham

Folks may see the Vice President in Chatham today

The country-pop star Taylor Swift may be hanging out in Hyannis, but the Bidens are expected to be in Chatham today. Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill, are in town for a fundraising dinner that will be held at the Wayside Inn tonight, those who were told of the plans say. Biden is then scheduled to make an appearance at the Pilgrim Monument, again to raise funds for the Obama Victory Fund on Sunday morning.






Friday, August 24, 2012

aug24 Wellfleet

CapeCast: Wee terrapins get a helping hand



aug24

Critics' picks: STICKS AND BONES


STICKS AND BONES In a mesmerizing production by Lewis D. Wheeler, David Rabe's play does not feel the least bit dated, its roots in Vietnam War-era disillusion notwithstanding. This unsettling work, which won the 1972 Tony Award for best play, resonates at a time when soldiers are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, trying to explain things to their loved ones that might be hard to put into words. Pictured: Alex Pollock as David. Through Sept. 8. At Harbor Stage Company, Wellfleet. 508-349-6800, www.harborstage.org.


aug24 Wellfleet

'Oblomov' beds down in Wellfleet

Oblomovism is in the eye of the beholder. In the classic Russian novel "Oblomov," by Ivan Goncharov, the title character is a vestige of a fading aristocracy. He doesn't even get out of bed for the first 150 pages, instead letting life simply pass him by. "He's the ultimate horizontal man," says playwright Kevin Rice, whose "Oblomov," adapted from the novel, has its American premiere Thursday through Sept. 22 at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater. In Russian culture, the character's name became a term for a sort of do-nothing, a parasite. "Lenin, and I think Stalin, too, referred to him as a type we must protect ourselves from: 'We must eliminate this type of person.'" But what appeared lazy, privileged, and indulgent in 1859, when the novel was first published, can look like a Zen protest against our go-go, always-connected, 24/7/365 world. "We are sympathetic to him, and we're led to question: What is 'doing'?" says Rice. "Oblomov is about being. Oblomov has stepped away from the parade of life; he hasn't taken his turn in line; he hasn't taken the ticket to life." Oblomov's friends and family are baffled and frustrated by his intransigence, says Michael Pemberton, the actor who plays him. "He doesn't bother to explain himself to them, and they can't understand why he doesn't want to participate in all of this great stuff that's going on," says Pemberton. "But he doesn't want to. He finds it boring and meaningless." There is, Pemberton notes, "one shining moment" when it seems like Oblomov might reengage with life for the love of a woman. "A contemporary audience, you go, 'Oh, the love story, that's going to rescue him.' Because we all believe he needs rescuing," the actor says. "Because certainly in our society, we wouldn't condone anyone just spending their lives in bed." Rice got interested in Russia as a boy, thanks to a family friend, and studied the language at Milford High School. "Other kids were reading 'To Kill a Mockingbird,' and I was reading the history of the Russian Revolution." He studied Russian literature in college and has traveled to Russia several times for extended periods of study and work. He directed a version of his "Siberian Summer" there after staging it at WHAT in 1994. He also wrote and directed the first version of "Oblomov" for a Russian repertory company, using a cast of a dozen. This is the third play by Rice that director Daisy Walker has directed. "I've known her since she was 10 years old," says the playwright, who is also the artistic director of Payomet Performing Arts Center in Truro. Rice and Walker's late father, Dan, were among the six collaborators who founded WHAT in 1985.

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aug24 Eastham

Arnold's in Eastham plans to honor former employee

rnold's Lobster & Clam Bar will hold an all-day benefit Saturday, Sept. 8, in honor of Christopher Donato, 30, a former eight-year employee of the restaurant, who was stabbed to death on June 16 in his apartment in Hartford, Conn. "Chris was one of the best employees I have ever had the privilege to work with," said Nate Nickerson, owner of Arnold's. Donato last worked for the restaurant in 2008. A guitarist, who loved the Grateful Dead, Donato was "an incredible young man, a giver a man who never judged others," Nickerson said. Arnold's plans to make this an annual event to raise funds to offer a memorial scholarship, in Donato's name, to a high school student who goes on to major in music in college. Within a week of Donato's murder, police identified a suspect Carl Small, 31, a man whom Donato was trying to befriend. Hartford detectives tracked Small to Philadelphia, where he was arrested and transported back to Connecticut on Aug. 1. Small was arraigned for the murder in Connecticut Superior Court Thursday, Aug. 16, before 30 family members and friends. Nickerson and his daughter Hayley Nickerson, who dated Donato for many years, attended the arraignment, along with Donato's parents, Dan and Robin Donato of Eastham, his brothers and sisters, and other relatives. Small is being held on $1 million bail. He is due back in court on Sept. 24. Once again, the court will be filled with Donato's relatives and many friends, including Nickerson and his daughter. "It was a very tough day in court," Nickerson said, after he returned. Nickerson hopes to have a band playing outside during the benefit, "We have known the family forever. All of the kids worked for Arnold's at one time or another. We have a great relationship with the family." Every cent raised during the benefit will go into the scholarship fund. Nickerson said his suppliers are contributing to, and his employees will add all their tips into the fund. "Every one who comes in, not matter what they buy, every penny will go into the scholarship fund." His plan, he said, is to hold this fundraiser every year. "This way we will memorialize Chris forever."

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aug24

Gala to benefit Truro's Highland House Museum set for Saturday

Truro and the World," a gala event at the Highland House Museum, celebrating the town's contributions to art, literature and industry, is set for Saturday, Aug. 25, at the museum. Hosted by the Truro Historical Society, it will include a champagne reception, a catered dinner and a talk by esteemed author and journalist Stephen Kinzer. Accompanying the event will be an exhibition highlighting some of the museum's most valuable objects, including paintings by Jerry Farnsworth, Helen Sawyer, Josephine Hopper, William Bicknell, William L'Engle, Lucy L'Engle, Marston Hodgin and Milton Wright, as well as manuscripts by writers Eugene O'Neill, Susan Glaspell, Robert Nathan, Catherine Wooley, Thoreau and others. Tickets, $100, are available at the museum. Bidding in a silent auction of cranberry boxes designed by local artists is open to the public and continues through Saturday. Proceeds from the gala benefit the museum.


aug24 Provincetown

State, P'town grapple over squid

Squid fishing has been good - almost too good - in Provincetown this summer. The boon has led to a disagreement between state and local officials over new local rules intended to regulate the amount of squid landed from MacMillan Pier, a public commercial wharf in the center of town. Throughout the summer, fishermen catch squid off the pier with poles, lines and jigs at night, using a bright light to attract them. Anywhere from a dozen to 50 fishermen and their families might show up in one evening. With squid so plentiful, though, word has reached fishermen from out of town, and possibly out of state, who are landing what appear to be commercial quantities, pier officials said. There also have been complaints that fishermen leave a mess of squid ink and trespass on commercial fishing vessels tied to the pier in order to drop lines. "If they're making money on the deal, the town needs to be making money on the deal," Harbormaster Rex McKinsey said about the fishermen. On June 28, the town Public Pier Corp. board endorsed a limit on recreational squid fishing of up to five gallons per day, per car at MacMillan Pier. Beyond that amount, fishermen must show a commercial saltwater fishing license and other business credentials, and purchase a dealer's $500 offloading permit from the town, the new rule stated. State officials say the five-gallon limit is not a state rule, and possibly not legal. Also, regulators say the local law is not enforceable by the state environmental police and that overall, it's a bad idea because it encourages town-by-town rules rather than consistency statewide. A state marine fishing commission that approves regulatory changes will hear about the issue at its regular meeting Sept. 13, Dan McKiernan, deputy director of the state Department of Fish and Game, said Thursday. "The state environmental police is working with the Divison of Marine Fisheries, and with the town, to develop some sort of regulation," Reginald Zimmerman, spokesman for the state Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs said Thursday afternoon. "We're in the process of expressing those concerns to the town," McKiernan said. "Our attorneys want to talk to town counsel on some of the authority issues and whether these rules are necessary." Pier officials say, though, they have the right to make rules and manage the property. Currently, there are no size or possession limits in place on squid fishing under the state's commercial finfish regulations, nor is there any mention of squid in the state's recreational finfish regulations. Close to all commercial squid fishing is offshore in Massachusetts, McKiernan said. The federal government sets an annual harvest limit for squid.

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aug24 Provincetown

'Taste of Provincetown' fundraiser set for Aug. 25

Want to sample almost 30 of the town's restaurants and food suppliers but only have one night? Then circle Aug. 25 on your calendar for "Taste of Provincetown," a rollicking food banquet that doubles as a fundraiser for MassEquality, a non-profit organization that focuses on protecting the rights of LGBT persons in Massachusetts. About 30 local chefs and food and beverage suppliers will set up shop in Provincetown Town Hall auditorium at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, for the third annual "Taste." The number of participants is almost double last year's event and they'll be serving gourmet hors d'oeuvres, les amuse-bouches, wines and cocktails all contributed by the town's highly rated restaurants and food suppliers. Playing host for the event for the second year will be Tiffani Faison, one of two finalists on the first season of Bravo's "Top Chef" and winner of Bravo's 2007 "Top Chef Holiday Special." Faison also opened her own restaurant, Sweet Cheeks, in Boston this year. "I'm thrilled to be participating again in MassEquality's Taste of Provincetown," she said. "Provincetown has such a great foodie culture. I can't think of a better place to combine my passion for good food and fun, with my commitment to equality." The $125 ticket will get you unlimited tastes from places such as Victor's, Central House at The Crown, Saki, Bayside Betsy's, The Waterford Café & Tavern, Jimmy's Hideaway, Patio American Grill & Cocktail Bar, Relish, P'town Scoop, P'town Parties, Ten Tables, Far Land Provisions, The Lobster Pot, Sage Inn & Lounge, Bistro at Crowne Pointe, ScottCakes, Dalla Cucina, Castaways, Angel Foods, Batata, Waydowntown, Karoo Kafé, The Nut House, Frappo66, Chach, Devon's, Lucky Dog P'town, Napi's, Fanizzi's by the Sea, and 141 Market.


aug24

Affordable rental development in Provincetown provides welcome shelter to first tenants

The last thing Cathe Powers expected to hear last March was her name being called as the very first winner in a lottery for one of the 50 apartments in the new Province Landing affordable housing development on Shank Painter Road. But there it was, solving a very real problem for her. Though she has lived happily on Standish Street for the past five years, Powers' landlord had died and his wife was thinking of selling the house or turning it into condominiums. That not only would have forced Powers out of the house, it might have resulted in her having to leave Provincetown, where affordable rental properties are few and far between. So moving into Province Landing three weeks ago, into an apartment with wide doorways that easily accommodate her walker, was a dream come true. "This is a miracle that came to fruition," she said on Tuesday. "I'm very, very, very grateful." Powers was part of the first group to move in to 28 units in the three completed buildings on the property at 90 Shank Painter Road. Tenants for the remaining 22 units in the last three buildings have been identified and are undergoing financial eligibility checks before leases are drawn up. Project manager Michael Lozano said that full occupancy should take place sometime next month. "We're about 60 percent occupied now. We're very close to being done," he said. The affordable rental project was eight years in the making and is helping meet what is believed to be a huge demand for affordable housing in Provincetown. Under state law, at least 70 percent of the units in Province Landing had to be awarded to people already living in town. The lottery more than met that goal. According to Lozano, 48 of the 50 apartments initially were awarded to local residents. Some people have since dropped out, he said, but over 80 percent of the 89 expected tenants will be current town residents. Rents in the one-, two- and three-bedroom units range from $114 to $1,100 a month. Over the eight years it has taken to complete the project, the need for affordable rental and home ownership apartments in Provincetown has risen further. One report estimated that 500 people had been forced to move out of Provincetown between 2000 and 2006. The town conducted its own housing needs assessment in 2006 - a report prepared by a consultant estimated that Provincetown would need 125 to 150 affordable ownership units by 2011, in addition to a need for 200 to 250 year-round rentals for workers and 24 units for seniors.

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aug24

Julie Levesque: the power of white in Provincetown

When Julie Levesque's "Table for Seven" won an international competition in Provincetown, famed for restaurants, the table was set not at an eatery but in a group show at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum. Levesque's prize for the eye-catching "Table," its inlaid sugar-cube top worked like mosaic tiles and set with dishes, glasses and utensils covered with coarse salt, everything glowing crystalline white, was a gallery show of her own. This became her invitation to dig even more deeply into the well of memory - she is part of a family with seven siblings - and let her imagination run free over a much larger space. Levesque, a multi-media sculptor and installation artist working in two and three dimensions, used one of PAAM's gallery rooms in 2002 to install the more complex "What Remains." The piece, also entirely in white, was a classroom filled with chairs and desks tilted at different angles, or weighed down under salt-encrusted books reflecting the personalities (or nightmares) of grade-schoolers attending a Catholic school in Maine, the sort Levesque herself attended. The literal absence of children renders their physical presence all the more palpable, as does the use of white. "As a small child, you have to face your demons - and get through it," she says of the personal yet universal resonance this installation holds. Levesque shows at the Rice-Polak Gallery in Provincetown; she has developed a large following in the Boston area and on the Cape. "You're Going to Have to Save Yourself" is a collection of her newest work, using religious iconography to lead artist and viewer on a modern pilgrim's progress, a quest encouraging personal reflection. The show opens at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, and runs through Sept. 6. Work by Elli Crocker and Edward del Rosario also will be featured. Levesque's newest sculptures and two-dimensional pieces continue her exclusive use of white. This absence of color trains the eye to look for the small differences which suggest larger meanings. White itself is at the center of a cluster of shifting symbolic references: there is Melville's white whale, feared and hunted, the source of obsessive quest and profound nightmare; there is also the use of white to suggest purity - the christening or wedding gown, a nun's habit, the burial shroud. Levesque's art mixes all these things: she thinks and works in a realm closer to mythology, using religious iconography to lead to self-awareness. Any truths suggested are shifting and personal, far removed from doctrinaire teachings.

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aug24 Chatham

Great white shark eats gray seal

Call it a close encounter of the great white kind. A vacationing family filmed a great white shark feasting on a gray seal Wednesday morning in the water off Monomoy Island in Chatham. And their rare footage and photos may be a useful tool for scientists who've been studying the sharks. Peter Mottur said he was out on his 35-foot fishing boat Pelagic with family just 50-feet from the shore off the southern tip of the island when an awe-inspiring scene unfolded right in front of their eyes. "There was a great white shark gnawing on a seal. We were right on top of it," said Mottur, 43, of Portsmouth, R.I. "The shark wasn't scared and circled the boat for a few minutes. And it just kept coming back and nibbling on the seal." State shark expert Greg Skomal confirmed that it was a great white shark after viewing photos and video that was shot by Mottur and his family around 8:30 a.m. "This is great video evidence that these sharks are here for the seals," Skomal said. "What makes this such a great opportunity is that we don't get a lot of direct evidence of their behavior when they eat seals," Skomal said. "To actually have video footage of a shark eating is very rare for us."

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aug24

CapeCast: Giant beach chair dwarfs Harwich



aug24

The Local Food Report: County Garden

This week, Elspeth talks with Russ Norton, horticultural educator for Barnstable County, about two unusual crops he is growing at the demonstration garden at the County fairgrounds in East Falmouth. An avid locavore, Elspeth lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her program airs on WCAI Thursdays at 7:30 on Morning Edition and 4:30pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30.





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aug24

Shark v. Seal: Who Wins?


There's been a rise in shark sightings on the Cape this summer - drawn not by humans in the water (pace "Jaws") but by an abundant population of seals. As WGBH science editor Heather Goldstone told Bob Seay, it's not the first time marine experts have proposed this strategy.







Thursday, August 23, 2012

aug23 Wellfleet

The Parkington Sisters to perform in Wellfleet

Their days of playing Cape Cod street corners are over, the Parkington sisters recently played two sold-out shows before 30,000-plus fans at Fenway Park with the Dropkick Murphy's. They've also toured Europe, Canada and the U.S. twice with the Murphys and been so many places and done so many things it's hard to recall when they were just a local sister band from Wellfleet playing for free at the library. "It's been great," Ariel Parkington reflected. "We opened for Mavis Staples at Symphony Hall. It was pretty amazing to play at Symphony Hall. We played Bonaroo (a huge festival in Tennessee) last year and we were just at Mumford and Sons Gentleman of the Road show (in Portland). We're in the middle of recording a new album now." They've also been on television and radio, they headed Radio City Music Hall, not with the Rockettes but with Dispatch and they've lent their voices and talent to new recordings by Meika Pauley, State Radio and Brian Fallon of Gaslight Anthem's side project; the Horrible Crows. And most importantly, this weekend they have their only Cape Cod dates of 2012. The Dropkick Murphys are a lot more raucous and noisy than the Parkington's quiet violin/viola/guitar/piano milieu. How did these two opposites attract? "It's not really (a mismatch)," Ariel said. "The Dropkick Murphy's have elements of punk, folk and rock. Their new album has folk elements. We put some strings down for it and pretty Parkington Sisters' sister harmonies on some songs. It became a collaboration so when we went on tour we'd already recorded with them." "Both folk and punk are music of the people and music for people written by people," her sister Nora added. The Parkington's play what could be styled as chamber folk, with ethereal harmonies from all four sisters. Rose plays guitar, piano, accordion among other things, Ariel is on violin and viola, Nora on violin and percussion and Sarah plays violin, viola and guitar. All those strings give some songs a baroque vibe. But the music is unquestionably modern. The Parkington's play what could be styled as chamber folk, with ethereal harmonies from all four sisters. Rose plays guitar, piano, accordion among other things, Ariel is on violin and viola, Nora on violin and percussion and Sarah plays violin, viola and guitar. All those strings give some songs a baroque vibe. But the music is unquestionably modern. The second full CD is in progress. "Till Voices Wake Us."

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aug23 Wellfleet

'Apocalypse Now' in Ozzie and Harriet's living room

It must have been a tough play to watch in 1972. It's a tough play to watch 40 years later. In David Rabe's "Sticks and Bones" a Vietnam veteran - blind, haunted and volatile after his tour of duty - returns home. His name is David Nelson, his parents are Ozzie and Harriett, his kid brother is Ricky, and home is the living room straight out of the sitcom "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet." "Ozzie and Harriet," which began as a radio show in 1944, premiered on television in 1952 and aired for a time on both radio and television before shooting its final episode in 1966. It came to stand for the squeaky clean ideal of the American lifestyle of its times, an easy target for the counter culture. It was also an extremely well-produced program with talented actors, tight writing and a beloved following. (And say what you will about their bromide message, but the Nelson brothers were hotties.) In 1972, when "Sticks and Bones" won the Tony Award for best play, the U.S. was drawing down its troops in Vietnam. Nixon went to China. The play hit a lot of nerves. Rabe knew what he was doing lobbing this dramatic hand grenade into middle-class America's living room. A football player for his Catholic High School team in Dubuque, Iowa, Rabe grew up in the middle of the "Ozzie and Harriet" culture before going off to Vietnam himself and returning to write a trilogy of plays about the war, "Sticks and Bones" being the first. The premise of the play may sound like a send up of the good, old American dream. But just as the audience starts to laugh the play turns and slaps them in the face, gets them laughing again, then twists around for another swat. On opening night of Wellfleet's Harbor Stage Company's production of the play, which runs through Sept. 8, it seemed to take a while - maybe most of the first act - for the audience to tune its ear to the playwright; it kept them guessing. The script bobs and weaves between poking fun and violent or otherwise tough imagery and action, with heavy doses of the kind of spoken-word poetry bordering on the drug-addled drivel that Dennis Hopper delivers in "Apocalypse Now." 'Sticks and Bones,' by David Rabe will be performed at Harbor Stage Company, Wellfleet, through Sept. 8 (Wed.-Sat.).

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aug23 Wellfleet

Wellfleet professor says Cape must prep for Climate change

When you ask what time is it Nicholas Robinson won't say it's 4 o'clock, he'll tell you it's half past the Holocene and well into the Anthropocene - too late to stop climate change but time to start adapting. "It takes a long time to develop infrastructure. Climate change can't wait for us to catch up," Robinson said. "The warmer coastal waters that use to stop at Chatham are going to start pushing up the Atlantic so we'll see different patterns and currents. A nuclear power plant in Connecticut had to shut down because the ocean water was too warm for the cooling system. There are lots of disparate phenomena linked to warmer oceans. There will be shifts in rainfall and temperature, not every year, but consistently over time the temperature will get warmer." Robinson, a professor at Pace University in New York has worked on international environmental law since the 1970's. He travels the world speaking to governments and helping set up environmental legal systems. He spoke in his summer hometown of Wellfleet last Sunday. "For 20 years I was the environmental law negotiator and delegate to the Soviet Union working to build up an exchange of information on environmental law and I continued in the post-Soviet period," he recalled. He grew up New York's wetlands and bird laws and edited the proceedings of the U.N.'s 1992 conference on environment and development in Rio de Janeiro. It was at that conference that the U.N. first produced treaties on climate change and biodiversity. "You can't save biodiversity if you can't stabilize the climate," Robinson explained. "We can already detect a pattern of flora and fauna change as climate changes." Southern species are migrating into Massachusetts, northern species are becoming more rare. Highbush blueberries in Concord now flower three-weeks earlier than they did in the 1840's. "People don't see this in their daily lives because they're focused on what's in front of them," Robinson said. "Eugene Stoermer and Paul Crutzen take the position is we've left the Holocene period and entered the Anthropocene, a period in which manmade changes are dominant on the planet." The Geological Society of London is contemplating accepting that recommendation and designating a new official geological period. The Holocene dates from 12,000 years ago (the last ice age) to the present. "If we look back to the period from the late 1800s till now it's a period where we altered the Earth through human changes," Robinson said. "What I've been doing is to help governments figure out how to deal with the consequences of being in a new era of geologic time."

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aug23 Eastham

Eastham's Moll's Pond OK for swimming

Dogs and people can swim again at a small Eastham pond that had been plagued by blue-green algae. A water sample collected Aug. 14 at Moll's Pond found cyanobacteria were not detected at a harmful level. This is the second week a test came back showing the level is below the required state guidelines. The town has lifted the advisory warning against drinking and swimming. The warning was put in place July 16, after a dog who drank from Moll's Pond became ill. The animal recovered. Possible health effects for exposure to blue-green algae range from rashes, hives or skin blisters to runny eyes and nose, sore throat, diarrhea and vomiting. In rare cases, exposure can lead to neurological symptoms, including drooling, weakness, staggering, convulsions and death in dogs. Humans might experience dizziness, numb lips or tingling fingers. Anyone who notices the algae bloom has reappeared should contact the Eastham Health Department at 508-240-5900, ext. 230, or Natural Resources Department at 508-240-5972 for additional evaluations.

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aug23 Provincetown

Provincetown Special Town Meeting set for Oct. 29

Money requests are likely to be predominant on the warrant for this fall's Special Town Meeting, set for Monday, Oct. 29. Selectmen voted Monday to set the timetable for a fall STM. The warrant will open on Tuesday, Sept. 11, to any resident wishing to submit an article, and will close at 11 a.m. Friday, Sept. 28. All article requests must include a petition signed by at least 100 registered Provincetown voters and be submitted to the town clerk's office at Town Hall. While selectmen are still discussing the issues they would like to bring before voters this fall, there are several maintenance and capital improvement projects that need funding in order to proceed. The most immediate is likely to be emergency repairs to the high school. Another difficult issue coming before taxpayers is the town's solid waste contract. Provincetown and 18 other towns on Cape Cod and off-Cape were the first customers of Covanta Energy's Southeastern Massachusetts Resource Recovery Facility (SEMASS), the state's garbage and solid waste disposal plant, and all have long-term contracts with low rates that will expire on Jan. 1, 2015. In Provincetown's case, its contract calls for it to pay SEMASS $30 per ton for all the trash it hauls to the plant. The current market rate is between $70 and $90 per ton, depending on locations. No matter what price Provincetown is eventually able to negotiate with SEMASS - or if the town decides to look at other options for disposing of its trash - it is likely that residents will face a significant price hike. That has caused Town Manager Sharon Lynn and the department of public works to look at various options, including charging residents for curbside trash pick-up. Currently, the cost of curbside pickup is included in local property taxes. Provincetown and Falmouth are the only Cape Cod towns that still offer curbside trash pickup. An effort to impose a pay-per-throw system in Provincetown in 2008 was abandoned after residents vetoed the plan. But with SEMASS costs likely to double, if not triple, the town is running out of options.

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aug23 Provincetown

Dolphins released at Herring Cove in Provincetown

From Friday through Sunday, staff and volunteers with the International Fund for Animal Welflare scrambled to save 14 dolphins that stranded along the shores of Wellfleet and Eastham. Of the six that stranded in Wellfleet, four were released at Herring Cove in Provincetown on Sunday afternoon.


aug23 Orleans

Orleans' Pops in the Park

A summertime staple sponsored by the Orleans Chamber of Commerce, will take place on Saturday, Aug. 25 at Eldredge Field in Orleans as the Pops in the Park celebrates its 27th year. Gates open at 5 p.m. and the concert begins at 7 p.m. Attendees are free to bring a picnic supper and listen to the Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Artistic Director Maestro Jung-Ho Pak, as it presents an evening of music from Broadway to Hollywood, from familiar folk favorites to patriotic standards. "We hope to make Orleans absolutely hum in tribute to a musical program that pleases every musical interest," Stephen Polowczyk, chairman of the Pops in the Park committee said in a statement. Featured guest artists this year include the acoustic folk pop quartet Tripping Lily, the Chatham Chorale, vocalist Liz Saunders and violinist, Ilana Zaks. In keeping with August being Orleans' Heritage Month, and in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, in which the Town of Orleans was directly involved, attendees will hear a rendition of the 1812 Overture, complete with the firing of muskets by the Yarmouth Militia. Table seats are available for $75 per person and include light refreshments. General admission tickets are $25 advance sales and $30 the day of the concert. Youth tickets for ages 6-17 are $10. For tickets or information, please contact the Orleans Chamber of Commerce at 508-255-1386, or info@orleanscapecod.org, or visit the website www.PopsinthePark.com. Tickets are non-refundable.


aug23 Orleans/Brewster/Chatham

William Martin to sign books in Chatham, Brewster, Orleans

William Martin knows history well and has proven it in nine bestselling novels. His particular genius is connecting American history to the present in a way that shows readers just how important the past still is to modern day readers. He has done it again with his tenth novel, "The Lincoln Letter," which was released August 21, just in time for the Sept. 22 sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, an event that plays an important role in the story. "The Lincoln Letter" is Martin's fifth book in the Peter Fallon/Evangeline Carrington series. The novel opens with a fictional last letter President Lincoln wrote before he went to Ford's Theatre. The letter, to Lieutenant Halsey Hutchinson, requests the return of a very important item that could be detrimental to the nation's healing if it fell into the wrong hands. The item is Lincoln's private diary, where he recorded his true feelings about the war and freeing the slaves. When Peter Fallon is sent a copy of the letter, he can't resist trying to track down the diary with Evangeline as his reluctant side-kick. The novel alternates between the modern treasure hunt and the past, which focuses on Halsey's story. In 1862, Halsey inadvertently comes into possession of Lincoln's diary. He intends to hand it over to Lincoln himself, but the diary is stolen before he can do so, setting him on a four year adventure to retrieve it and clear his name. "What I try to do in all of these novels about lost artifacts is have some intrinsic value to the artifact itself," Martin says. "In 'Harvard Yard' it is a Shakespeare manuscript. What a wonderful thing that would be to get your hands on. In this book it's Lincoln's diary. These things have some intrinsic value and then some greater significance, whether cultural or political, in the way we live today because the idea that I'm always trying to get at is that we aren't simply products of our moment in time. We are products of the whole span of American history." William Martin book signings: Saturday, Aug. 25, 3 to 5 p.m. @ Booksmith/Musicsmith, 9 West Rd., Orleans, 508-255-4590; Sunday, Aug. 26, 1 - 3 p.m. @ Yellow Umbrella Books, 501 Main St., Chatham, 508-945-0144; Tuesday, Aug. 28, 1- a.m. - noon @ Brewster Book Store, 2648 Main St., 508-896-2305.

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aug23 Chatham

Monomoy Theatre tickles the funny bone with ...'Washington Slept Here'

Monomoy Theatre is leaving audiences laughing with its season finale: "George Washington Slept Here," the zany 1940 comedy by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Director Terry Layman lets his cast cut loose with their all-out performances as a bunch of quirky characters caught up in an absurd situation comedy. Hart and Kaufman's last work isn't their best. It lacks the wit and charm of their comedic classics "You Can't Take It With You" and "The Man Who Came to Dinner." The play is quite different from the 1942 film, which was created for the late, great Jack Benny. Yet "GW" has a lot of very funny moments filled with farcical complications, silly sight gags and good old-fashioned slapstick. This rarely produced, three-act play is a challenge to mount. It takes good acting and creative staging to pull it off and the Monomoy production comes through with flying colors. The show has wonderful sound and visual effects that add to the humor. The most impressive feat is an onstage rainfall during the thunderstorm scene. The set is a crucial piece of the action that sets-up the comedy. Layman cleverly uses musical interludes featuring Appalachian-style folk music by Aaron Copeland, to ease the scene changes and there's a major one. Andrew Sierszyn's rustic set of a ramshackle Colonial-era farmhouse is wonderfully detailed with beams and a realistic-looking stone fireplace. The tech crew deserves kudos for transforming the disheveled scene into the charming drawing room of a country estate. The fun begins when city dweller Newton Fuller buys a rundown, 200-year old farmhouse in Bucks County, Pa., and tries to convince his disgruntled wife Annabelle into adapting to country life. The house has no running water or bathrooms and turns into a money pit. But Newton's so excited about the prospect of living in the midst of American history and the legend that George Washington once slept in the house this his enthusiasm isn't dampened. The situation comes to a crisis point when the Fullers are faced with foreclosure and their daughter Madge runs off with a local theatrical Lothario. It's pretty convoluted stuff but all in good fun. "George Washington Slept Here" runs through Saturday, Aug. 25, at Monomoy Theatre, 776 Main St., Chatham.

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aug23 Harwich

Fundraisers, events, scale model support Crowell Barn project in Harwich

The project to reconstruct the historic barn owned by world renowned wooden bird carver Anthony Elmer Crowell may break ground late in 2012, with reassembly occurring adjacent to the Brooks Academy Museum on Parallel Street. Before that happens, a number of supporters are orchestrating events surrounding the project, including fundraisers, educational events, and even an unveiling of a hand-made scale model of the barn. The project to reconstruct the historic barn owned by world renowned wooden bird carver Anthony Elmer Crowell may break ground late in 2012, with reassembly occurring adjacent to the Brooks Academy Museum on Parallel Street. Before that happens, a number of supporters are orchestrating events surrounding the project, including fundraisers, educational events, and even an unveiling of a hand-made scale model of the barn. Crowell's primitive barn in East Harwich off Orleans Road was disassembled by its former owners a few years ago and placed in storage. While originally planned to be reassembled at a museum in Sandwich, town of Harwich stepped in to take ownership when the first plan failed. $140,000 in Community Preservation Funds has been approved to pay for the re-building project. While the timeline is for the project to break ground possibly late in 2012, it needs to clear a hurdle in front of special town meeting on Aug. 28. A 1989 act of town meeting declared that the land around the Brooks Museum was supposed to be kept in a natural state. Article 7 of the special town meeting amends the article to permit placement of the Crowell workshop on the property. If the special town meeting vote is successful, the town is planning to release a request for proposals for a set of architectural plans to be produced and then a second request for proposals will be released in the late fall to get bids for the actual re-construction of the barn. A private fundraiser is scheduled for Aug. 25 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the home of Robert and Noel Rebello at 34 Parallel Street, just down the block from the proposed site. For tickets, which are $25, call the Harwich Historical Society at 508-432-8089 or go to the Harwich Chamber of Commerce on Route 28 in Harwich Port.

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aug23 Harwich

Harwich man faces felony charges

Harwich police arrested a Harwich man, Sean Knight, Tuesday following a struggle in the parking lot of Brooks Free Library. The incident occurred after police observed Knight driving on Main Street in a car that was missing its right rear tire. Police said Knight had been told, several days earlier, that his vehicle wasn't safe to drive. Detective Paul Ulrich and Patrol Officer Aram Goshgarian approached Knight in the library parking lot, where police say Knight threatened to ram their cruisers. Police say Knight was very agitated and causing a disturbance. According to police, Knight started the car and drove away as the officers tried to stop him. Police say Detective Ulrich jumped free of the car, and was almost dragged down the road. Knight then attempted to elude police as he drove fast through Harwich Center, passing cars. Officers followed gouge marks in the asphalt all the way to Knight's home. Police said Knight ran into his house and barricaded himself in his bedroom. Patrol Lieutenant Barry Mitchell, Patrol Sergeant Kevin Considine, and Patrol Officers Thomas Clarke, John Warren, Eric Geake, and James Connery converged on the scene. The door to Knight's bedroom was forced open and he was taken into custody without further incident. Knight was transported to the Harwich Police Station and then held overnight at the County Correctional Facility on $5,000 cash bail. Knight is being charged with Felony Assault with a Dangerous Weapon, Resisting Arrest, Disorderly Conduct, Operating a Motor Vehicle Recklessly, and several other motor vehicle infractions.


aug23

CapeCast: Good year to pick beach plums







Wednesday, August 22, 2012

aug22 Eastham/Truro

2 Seashore beaches closed due to bacteria

Nauset Light Beach in Eastham and Head of the Meadow Beach in Truro were closed today because of high bacteria levels, according to an employee at the Cape Cod National Seashore.

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aug22 Truro

Truro Police join Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over mobilization

The Truro Police Department wil join 128 other law enforcement agencies statewide in support of an intensive crackdown on impaired driving from August 24th to September 3rd as part of the national Drive Sober Or Get Pulled Over mobilization, funded by a federal grant administered through the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security's Highway Safety Division. On average, there is one alcohol impaired driving-related fatality every 51 minutes across America. The number of drivers operating under the influence increases during holiday weekends, especially during the summer. The Truro Police Department is committed to keeping our residents and visitors safe. Officers will be aggressivly looking for impaired drivers. Since twice as many alcohol-related crashes over the weekend and four times as many occur at night, we will be especially vigilant during these high-risk times when drivers are most like to to be on our roads.


aug22 Provincetown

CapeCast: The bog that (almost) ate P'town



aug22 Provincetown

Provincetown ribbon exhibition set to begin Friday

An exhibition of prayer ribbons from the annual Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life & Paddler Flotilla will be held Friday through Monday on the front lawn of the library at 356 Commercial St. A ceremony in which volunteers will read the names and messages on the ribbons will be from 2 to 5:30 p.m. Sunday. Participants from past swims have inscribed ribbons with names and messages of loved ones they wish to honor. Volunteers are needed to read and help out with the event. For information, email organizer Jay Critchley at reroot@comcast.net or visit www.swim4life.org. he 1.4-mile swim from Long Point across the harbor to the West End will be held Sept. 8. Money raised from the swim is donated to AIDS, women's health and community agencies.


aug22 Provincetown

Swimmers conquer 20 miles from Plymouth to Provincetown

Hours before dawn Tuesday, five people waded into the waters off White Horse Beach in Plymouth and began swimming toward Provincetown, a 20-mile swim they hope will become the prototype for a new marathon swim event.

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aug22 Orleans

Conservation walk in Orleans

At 10 a.m., Thursday Aug. 23, Alan McClennen, chairman of the town's open space committee will be leading a trail walk through town-owned Kenrick Woods for the Orleans Conservation Trust. This walk is part of the town's Heritage Month celebration with the theme of "History Brought to Life" and is billed as a free, educational walk appropriate for all ages. Directions: From Orleans center, head north on Main Street/Route 28 towards Chatham for 2 miles. Take a left onto Namequoit Road. The town parking lot will be .2 miles ahead on right. Donations accepted and people are asked to call and register in advance at 508-255-6333.


aug22 Brewster

Two injured in 1-car accident in Brewster

Two people were taken to Cape Cod Hospital after an accident Tuesday morning on Route 6. The accident occurred in the westbound lane of Route 6 a half-mile before Exit 11. Harwich emergency crews transported the driver, Ralph Dubis, 38, of Dennisport, to the hospital. He was admitted in stable condition. The Brewster Fire Department transported a 21-year-old male passenger from Brewster. The westbound lane of the highway was shut down at about 7:45 a.m. to allow emergency crews to respond to the scene. Troopers created an alternating pattern in the eastbound lane to keep traffic moving.

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aug22 Brewster

Latham Centers elect three new members

Latham Centers Inc., a Cape-based not-for-profit company serving people with complex special needs, has elected three new members to three-year terms on its board of directors. Jeni A. Landers is an associate with the Hyannis law firm of Wynn & Wynn. She is a graduate of Smith College and the Northeastern University School of Law. Landers is a member of the Barnstable County Bar Association and serves on the boards of Cape Cod Young Professionals and the Smith College Club of Cape Cod, as well as volunteering with several other local nonprofits. David J. Lofstrom, a Brewster native, is vice president of U.S. commercial sales and product development for TD Insurance in Boston. He is a graduate of Westfield State University and has an MBA degree from Suffolk University. Lofstrom serves on the Kingston finance committee and volunteers as a youth baseball and basketball coach. Octavia Ossola retired in 2004 from her role as program director of the Latham School. She was a licensed social worker with more than 40 years of experience working with children in residential settings. Ossola holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from Boston University. She is active in Brewster organizations, most recently serving as chairwoman of the capital campaign committee for the renovation of the Brewster Unitarian Meeting House.


aug22 Harwich

Harwich selectmen split on school

Harwich selectmen split their vote 3-1-1 supporting the Monomoy regional school building project after a lengthy and detailed discussion over the construction budget. The vote tally had Peter Hughes voting against, Linda Cebula abstaining, with Ed McManus, Larry Ballantine and Angelo La Mantia voting in favor. Hughes expressed concern over the final cost and the budgeting process, saying the project could have been substantially trimmed back. He worried about certain contingency funds adding to the overall cost. La Mantia explained that the state has a very conservative practice of estimating costs, and has overestimated project costs by 14 percent. "Even if you cut that in half, we would still have three million left in contingency funds. We are looking at the absolute top level of costs," said La Mantia. McManus added that the Massachusetts School Building Authority is very conservative because there is a history ripe with school projects running out of money and that the estimated $6.7 million in contingency funds cover the potential increase in costs between the design and construction phases. If the contingency funds are not used then the final project cost would be reduced by that amount. Geoffrey Wiegman, president of the Harwich Taxpayers Association, said that documents from the Massachuestts School Building Authority stated that they were approving funds for only a 149,000 sq. ft. building where the new school building is designed for 168,000 sq. ft. He questioned who was paying for the extra space. McManus said that none of the school building costs have been excluded from state reimbursement. Wiegman said that statement is in direct contradiction to the state documents he obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. McManus replied, " I don't know where your notes came from or who wrote them. All I know is what the directors approved."






Tuesday, August 21, 2012

aug21 Wellfleet

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Summer Getaway Part I

Bob goes off-cape for a Summer Getaway. Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing. Robert Finch has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. He is the author of six collections of essays, most recently "The Iambics of Newfoundland" (Counterpoint Press), and co-editor of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing." His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday at 8:30AM and every Wednesday at 5:45pm.



aug21 Wellfleet

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Summer Getaway Part II

Last week in a Cape Cod Notebook, writer Robert Finch told of his summer getaway off-cape at Williard Brook State Park in Ashby, Massachusetts. Today, Part Two. Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing. Robert Finch has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. He is the author of six collections of essays, most recently "The Iambics of Newfoundland" (Counterpoint Press), and co-editor of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing." His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday at 8:30AM and every Wednesday at 5:45pm.



aug21 Wellfleet

Wellfleet wastewater agenda turns to oysters and newfangled toilets

Residents took their first formal look Monday at the town's plan to manage its wastewater in the future. The town's wastewater planners want to skirt a traditional pipes-in-the-street sewer as much as possible and use natural alternatives instead, said Curt Felix, vice chairman of the town's comprehensive wastewater management planning committee. The first year and a half of planning has yielded an interim needs analysis report, published in July. Comments about the analysis will be taken through Sept. 4. "We're learning as we go," Felix told about 35 people who attended the meeting at the senior center. "It's complex." Four estuaries are at greatest risk of contamination from on-site septic systems, according to the needs analysis. It found the most worrisome are at Mayo Beach and Duck Creek, in the densest part of town. Chipman's Cove and Indian Neck Beach are also worrisome. The town has 3,200 year-round residents, and about 17,000 in the summer. Of the more than 3,000 on-site septic systems, 500 require variances from state Title 5 code, and 312 of those - many around Duck Creek - are within 100 feet of a drinking water supply. There are also nearly 3,000 drinking water wells, and only 179 customers connected to the public water system. Town records show that more and more private drinking wells have elevated nitrate levels, which could be principally linked to on-site septic systems, the analysis stated. Nitrates are chemical combinations of nitrogen and oxygen. State environmental regulators believe estuaries suffer substantially with high concentrations of nutrients, especially phosphorus and nitrogen, which contributed to the loss of available oxygen in the water and the death of fish and other organisms. The Massachusetts Estuaries Project is developing nitrogen limits for estuaries, including Wellfleet Harbor, which would then become regulatory limits enforced by the state. The Interim Needs Assessment & Alternatives Analysis Report is available at www.wellfleetma.org/Public_Documents/WellfleetMA_BComm/wastewater.

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aug22 Truro

'Hear Cape Cod' at Truro library

Berklee College of Music professor and former Blue Man Group drummer Steve Wilkes has spent the past year and a half recording the indigenous sounds of the Cape for a project called Hear Cape Cod, which will provide a way to listen to the Cape, as it exists now, in the future. Wilkes will provide an update on the project and news about what lies ahead in a talk at the Truro Library at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 22


aug21 Provincetown

Interested in P'town lore? There's an app for that

According to Eric Dray, chair of the town's historical commission, Provincetown is the first Cape community to create a smart phone app for its historic walking tour. Thus the ultra-modern age with its tech revolution has settled firmly on the shores of this centuries-old town. With its 50-site history tour map already in a distribution of more than 10,000 copies, and assisted by a visitor services board grant, last year the commission hired Audissey Tours to devise a mobile phone app of that tour, usable for both Androids and iPhones. "The app, called 'Provincetown,' includes images, text and audio recordings for all 50 sites, using a GPS-based map and locator," Dray said. Local vocal talents Char Priolo and Richard Olson recorded most of the audio entries, and Dray sought out town luminaries to record commentary for 15 key sites with which they were connected. For example, state Rep. Sarah Peake read for Congressman Gerry Studds' house; Michael Lennon, Norman Mailer's official biographer, taped the entry for Mailer's house; executive directors Chris McCarthy and Margaret Murphy read for the Provincetown Art Association and Museum and the Fine Arts Work Center, respectively. Loath to take credit for the project's inspiration, Dray admitted rather shyly that this walking tour app was in fact his idea. It took about a year to create and produce, start to finish. "Our role in building the app was to supply the raw images, the map and the audio," he said. "We used a town map drawn by Ewa Nogiec. In terms of audio, my original thought was to have 50 different people for the 50 entries. I quickly realized that was going to be too much to get done, so I honed in on 15 or so sites that lent themselves to specific people, and then asked Char and Richard to read the rest." When asked about the historic commission's goals in making this app available, Dray replied, "There is a saying in historic preservation, 'the more people know, the more they care.' One of the purposes of a town's historical commission is to educate home and business owners and the general public about the architectural and historical significance of their town. In Provincetown there is so much history, so many layers, that we look for every means possible to make those stories known. The Walking Tour Map has been a big success, and creating an app seemed like the logical next step. In a tourist town like ours, I think the demand for a fun and informative app should be high." Projecting into the future, Dray added that as the use of the app grows and Provincetown's reputation as an international destination spreads, the historical commission hopes to make the audio available in other languages.

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aug21 Provincetown

Provincetown Police begin bike safety checks

The police department, in conjunction with the town's bike committee, will conduct bicycle checks with an eye toward education and safety awareness. This is another piece in the overall effort to improve bicycle safety on the town's roads. Some of the concerns are: Do motorists understand cyclists' rights and respect them? Are both bicyclists and motorists respecting all road users, including pedestrians? Do bicyclists know how to drive on the road and respect other road users? Are traffic laws regularly enforced for bicyclists? The outreach began during peak riding times on Friday, Aug. 17, and will continue through Labor Day weekend.


aug21 Provincetown

On this day in 1909: Pilgrim Monument is finished

On this day in 1909, two young girls, using ropes and a pulley, helped haul the last stone into place to complete the Pilgrim Monument in Provincetown. The town's Yankee residents had long been seeking funds to erect a monument to the Pilgrims, who landed on the tip of Cape Cod weeks before they ever laid eyes on Plymouth. It took until 1906 to raise enough money. The following year, President Theodore Roosevelt sailed to Provincetown in a yacht appropriately named the Mayflower to lay the cornerstone of the monument. Three years later, President William Howard Taft spoke at the dedication. 116 steps and 60 ramps lead to the top of the 252-foot tower, which is still the tallest all-granite structure in the United States.

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aug21

Great whites subject of talk at Snow Library

"Jaws: New England's Great White Shark Revisited" will be the subject of Snow Library's final installment in its Fred J. Brotherton Foundation summer series on Wednesday, Aug. 22, at 7 p.m. The presentation, by Dr. Greg Skomal of the Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries, will talk about his trips around the world studying sharks as well as his recent research with the headline-garnering fish now frequently seen off the Lower Cape's shores. Skomal is considered an accomplished marine biologist, underwater explorer, photographer, aquarist, and author and has been a senior fisheries biologist with Massachusetts Marine Fisheries since 1987.


aug21 Brewster

Home care provider charged with bilking state

A caretaker pleaded guilty Monday to defrauding the state of more than $10,000 after filing claims he took care of his sick and disabled roommate in Brewster while she was hospitalized and for three weeks after she died. Ralph Gasbarro, of Franklin, was charged with Medicaid false claims and larceny by false pretenses after he filed false time sheets with the state's Medicaid program, MassHealth. A judge in Orleans District Court ordered him on Monday to serve two years of probation and to pay more than $10,000 of restitution to MassHealth. MassHealth's Personal Care Attendant program allows Medicaid recipients with permanent or chronic disabilities to hire care attendants to help them with daily activities such as eating, dressing, bathing and using the bathroom. Between Jan. 1, 2004, and June 17, 2006, Gasbarro was paid $167,000 to provide care to Kathleen Davis, with whom he lived in Brewster, the criminal complaint said. Gasbarro's time sheets showed that he usually worked 140 hours and 15 minutes a week between late 2005 and mid-2006, the criminal complaint said, based on information provided by the intermediary for Davis and the state, Cerebral Palsy of Massachusetts. Gasbarro claimed to have worked seven days a week, every day from 6 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. and then for two hours every night from 2 to 4 a.m. State law says that registered care providers cannot claim hours while their person is hospitalized, but according to a criminal complaint, Gasbarro did just that. He collected $6,070.40 while Davis was hospitalized three separate times between Dec. 23, 2005, and her death on May 27, 2006.

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aug21 Chatham

Chatham poetess reads

I've bowled at the old alley, Leaned on the shingles at the Godfrey Mill, Shared a milk shake after a movie at the old drug store, Bought Twinkies at Bearse's Market, Sat on a picnic table outside Ho-Jo's, Where a guy named Todd told me I had root beer eyes. (excerpt from "Chatham" by Heather MacKenzie)
Fond memories that rhyme. All but one of those places in Heather MacKenzie's poem about her hometown are gone, but they live on in her reminiscing and struck a nostalgic chord in others. "My peers said 'Heather, you said it, you have taken me back.' I cried," said MacKenzie describing the response to her work. "It touched everything that they remember about Chatham and that made me feel really good that I brought back memories that they share." MacKenzie, who wrote the poem for Chatham's 300th celebration, will read the stanza here as well as others from "Chatham" at Local Color Sunday, Aug. 19, that not only showcases her poem, but her photographs and the work of several others in town. She is also more than willing to travel back and time and talk about those bus trips with her gym class to the old bowling alley - now a storage building - by Kate Gould Park and other places around town that, although lost, still resonate (only the recently restored Godfrey Gristmill remains). And, of course, she will wax poetic about the town she loves and, after 30 years as a television journalist in Los Angeles, was finally able to return to. "Chatham is more than just a place, a destination it is a place of the heart," she said. "This is a love letter to Chatham." MacKenzie said she wrote the poem looking out of her window onto Lovers' Lake and 50 years from now those who open up the time capsule, which contains a copy of her poem, will be able to look back in time and get a sense of the town. A poster of the poem, accented with photos by Shareen Davis, co-owner of Nickerson Gallery, will also be available for purchase as will the 300th commemorative book that contains work by both MacKenzie and Davis. MacKenzie will sign copies of both at the reception, which will be held from 3 to 5 p.m.


aug21 Harwich

State offers reward for lost turtle tag

State turtle researchers are offering a cash reward and other incentives for the return of a specialized tag that was attached to a leatherback turtle but has since been lost. The University of Massachusetts Large Pelagics Research Center is conducting research on leatherbacks in the eastern portion of Nantucket Sound. These tags record information on the turtle for three hours after they are attached with a suction cup device. They then separate and broadcast a signal that a recovery team uses to retrieve them and download the information. They are encased in orange foam with reflector tape and will likely be floating on the surface of the water with an antenna on top. This particular tag did not separate from its host within the three-hour period and researchers lost contact. They believe that with prevailing southwest winds the tag should wash up on a beach somewhere between South Dennis and Monomoy in Chatham. Each tag is worth about $5,000. The amount of the cash award has not yet been determined, but local lobsterman Mark Leach, whose boat is being used in the research, has sweetened the pot by adding four 2-pound lobsters. Researchers also will give research center T-shirts to whoever returns the tag. If you find the tag, contact Kara Dodge at 978-420-6096 or return it to the Harwich harbormaster's office at Saquatucket Harbor, 715 Main St. (Route 28), Harwich Port.

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aug21 Dennis

Arts museum faces mountain of debt

Money - or actually the lack of it - has the Cape Cod Museum of Art in turmoil, posing the question of who should be responsible for raising the funds to keep the doors open. Supporters say the Dennis museum's current financial crisis could be an opportunity for growth. The July 31 retirement of Executive Director Elizabeth Ives Hunter and the subsequent layoffs and program postponements will be a fresh start for the 31-year-old organization, they say. On Monday, Kevin Howard, executive director of the Arts Foundation of Cape Cod, the Cape's umbrella arts organization, launched a show of solidarity among the local arts, cultural and historical communities. He asked supporters to sign a letter seeking public support for "this jewel of the Cape Cod art scene" because of how vital its regional art collection and programs have become. But how the money will be raised for any type of fresh start - including the payoff of a reported $300,000 deficit - isn't clear because there has been such disagreement in the past over how to raise money for the museum. But Hunter, some key donors and other trustees argue that the board should have taken the lead on fundraising so Hunter could keep the museum operating. Federal 990 forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service show that in 2007, expenses exceeded revenue by $93,000. The gap in 2008 was less - $34,283 - but it rose sharply in 2009, to almost $160,000. By 2010, the deficit was about $173,000.

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aug21

Outer & Lower Cape Arraignments at Orleans District Court

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 8/20
BERRIO, Steven, 26, 144 Queen Anne Road, Harwich; three counts of malicious damage to a motor vehicle, Aug. 18 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing Sept. 4.

HENSHAW, Siobhan, 24, 104 Chatham Road, Harwich; OUI, negligent driving and another traffic violation Aug. 20 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing Aug. 30.

KEANE, Ryan, 29, 25F Bradford St., Provincetown; assault and battery, Aug. 18 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing Sept. 20.

MATHIS, Teresa, 52, 1878 Route 6, Wellfleet; OUI-second offense and two other traffic violations, Aug. 18 in Wellfleet. Pretrial hearing Aug. 27.

McCORKLE, Bryan, 28, 96 Court Way, Brewster; assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (baby bottle), Aug. 18 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Sept. 20.

MONTEJO, Ricardo, 18, 10 Oakwood Crossing, Eastham; OUI and another traffic violation, Aug. 19 in Dennis. Pretrial hearing Sept. 20.

RABIN, Patricia, 65, 10 Crosby Lane, Brewster; OUI, negligent driving and two other traffic violations, Aug. 19 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Sept. 19.

RICO, James C., 29, 34 Huckleberry Lane, Brewster; three counts of malicious damage to a motor vehicle, Aug. 18 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing Sept. 4.

YOUNG, Derrick, 26, 30 Angus Ave., Yarmouth; assault with a dangerous weapon, Aug. 20 in Chatham. Pretrial hearing Sept. 21.

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Monday, August 20, 2012

aug20 Wellfleet

Six dolphins strand in Wellfleet, four released

Four of six dolphins that stranded Sunday morning in Wellfleet Harbor were released at 2 this afternoon from Herring Cove in Provincetown, said Misty Niemeyer of the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Mammal Rescue and Research Program. The dolphins were beached in the area where Wellfleet Harbor meets the Herring River, known locally as The Gut. Two of the six dolphins died, she said. Friday evening, IFAW rescuers battled to save eight common dolphins that stranded along the Eastham coast of Cape Cod Bay between Campground and Kingsbury beaches. One was found dead, and the others were released Friday evening at West Dennis Beach. One of those dolphins was found dead in Eastham Saturday morning, bringing the death toll to four since Friday, Niemeyer said. The dolphins that stranded today, were not the same dolphins that stranded on Friday, she said. When the dolphins are released they are tagged so researchers can determine whether they have previously stranded, she said. It has been a long weekend for the IFAW Cape Cod Stranding network members. Early Friday morning, about 14 common dolphins were spotted swimming in Wellfleet Harbor. The harbormaster, IFAW staff, kayakers and boaters herded the mammals out to deeper water by late afternoon. Apparently the group of dolphins split, Niemeyer said, with some stranding in Eastham. The dolphins that stranded today were determined to be part of the original 14 dolphins seen in Wellfleet Harbor because one of them had a very distinctive dorsal fin that stranding network members recognized, Niemeyer said.


aug20

CapeCast: Dolphin rescue video from Wellfleet



aug20 Wellfleet

Surfers compete in Cape Cod Oldtimers Longboard Classic

Sun? Check. Cold beer? Check. Good eats and friends? Check. Waves? Not so much. But that small detail didn't mar the 38th annual Cape Cod Old­timers Longboard Clas­sic, where the supply of surfable waves was, at best, paltry. Organizer Mike Houghton said it's probably the first time in the competition's 38 years that the waves were so, well, unsurfable. But this wasn't the sort of competition that is easily deterred. Instead, for the hundred or so who participated in age-organized heats with names like "Social Security" (men's 62 and up), "Team Fat," "Biddies" (women 21 and up) and "Corporate Office Types" (men 40-49), they just paddle-boarded. Surfers sporting vintage longboards laid on their bellies and booked it out to a buoy about 50 yards off the coast of White Crest Beach in Wellfleet, then paddled back in. And even then, the instinct to catch a wave kicked in - with people just saying the heck with it and floating about in the water - waiting for a wave, any wave. Carl Breivogel, of Wellfleet, waited, and caught a decent-size wave, which he rode back to shore, cheered on by hundreds of people standing on the beach and on the ridge. Breivogel, who said he's surfed off and on since he was 16, was competing in the Social Security heat, which he won last year. Proceeds from the T-shirt sales and donations go toward Big Brothers Big Sisters of Cape Cod. Money also goes to two scholarships. Last year the competition raised about $5,000, Houghton said.

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aug20 Wellfleet

Signage snafu raises question of free speech on Wellfleet town property

Harriet Korim followed the rules to hold a "Hands Across The Bridge" event on Saturday, Aug. 3. The event was one of hundreds held across the world that demanded protection for marine life and coastal economies and supported renewable energy in lieu of offshore drilling and other toxic and dangerous energy sources. Korim applied for a sign permit, as required on Thursday, Aug. 2, and noted on the application it was for "Hands Across the Bridge." She offered to show Amy Voll, administrative assistant, the poster to be placed on the lawn in front of Town Hall. Voll told her that was not necessary. Once her poster went up, however, someone ripped it down, possibly finding the message offensive. It said, "No Offshore Drilling." According to Voll, Korim "never mentioned anywhere in her permit application that this was a movement to protest offshore drilling. So we politely told her since this was town property, we could not support one view over another." Before Voll had the opportunity to ask Korim to remove her sign, however, someone had already taken it down. Korim thought the town had removed her sign. Not so, said Voll. "We never saw the sign," Voll said. "Harriet came in and said 'Who tore my sign off?' and from there we ascertained that she had said something about offshore drilling. We know it was nobody in Town Hall who tore it off. Probably someone walking by who did not agree with that." But then the issue got cloudier. At some point on Friday, Aug. 3, Jeanne MacLauchlan, licensing agent, called the DPW to ask them to remove some signs that were on the first floor of Town Hall. They had been left there after the event was over, MacLauchlan said. On Saturday, the DPW sent someone over who mistakenly removed all of the permitted signs on display on the Town Hall lawn. Korim had been allowed to write out in longhand on a chalkboard the details of her event, minus the sentiment against offshore drilling, but that sign was removed too. As soon as the mistake was discovered, the signs were returned to the lawn on Monday, but by then Korim's event was over. "This impounding of private property and multiple expressions of free speech, with no notification, explanation or formal apology was referred to as a 'misunderstanding' and a 'snafu,'" Korim said. "I love our town, but I believe it is crucial to defend our right to free speech." Who, she wonders, decided that her sign was too political for Town Hall lawn.

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aug20 Wellfleet

The Wellfleet Drive-In lives on

The New York Times extols the future of an industry pronounced dead decades ago, but the Cape's now-famous drive-in theatre in Wellfleet lives on. Built in 1957, the Wellfleet Drive-In boasts a 100' x 44' screen, and a state-of-the-art FM stereo sound system that decodes modern sound tracks. In many (but not all) spots mono original speakers are available for your nostalgic listening pleasure. There's a playground and snack bar too. The Wellfleet Drive-In Theatre is open from late May through the weekend beyond Labor Day. Today the theater's flea market is an equal draw. It sits just off of winding Route 6, past the motels, clam shacks, and myriad beach shops that line the highway in the drive-in's massive asphalt parking lot which often fills up by 10 a.m. during the summer. But the cars and trucks here are not packed with movie buffs out for an early matinee. Instead, they are loaded with clothing, antiques, and knickknacks for sale. Four mornings each week, are many as 200 vendors line up to sell homemade jewelry, baseball cards, music, and other wares.

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aug20 Wellfleet

2nd workshop set on bike-pedestrian plan

A second public workshop on a master bicycle and pedestrian plan for the outermost towns of Cape Cod is scheduled for Tuesday. County and local planners, along with staff of Cape Cod National Seashore, are trying to create a safe passage for bicyclists and pedestrians from Wellfleet northward to Provincetown. Ultimately, the planners want to encourage more use of bicycles as a way to get around the Outer Cape, Cape Cod Commission planner Martha Hevenor said in a printed announcement of the meeting. Full-time and summer residents, visitors to the Cape, property owners and others are invited to the meeting to share their ideas about the plan. The first public meeting was held in October 2011. An online survey for people who would like to share their experiences and ideas is available at www.surveymonkey.com/s/SummerBike-Ped. The workshop is from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Wellfleet Senior Center at 715 Old King's Highway. For more information, contact Hevenor or Clay Schofield at the commission at 508-362-3828 or visit www.capecodcommission.org/initiatives/bikeped.


aug20 Wellfleet

Outer Cape plays host to the music of Bulgaria in Wellfleet and Provincetown

The union of world music between Provincetown's John Thomas and native-born Bulgarian Elena Mancheva first began when a roommate of Mancheva's introduced the two in 2010. "I heard John was interested in Bulgarian music and I said to myself, 'I want to see that,'" says Mancheva, a singer and pianist. "My music is so different - the timing, the tempo, 7/8, is a rhythm that is unusual but typical for Bulgarian music. He invited me to do a song with him. He said he always wanted to play Bulgarian music. We sang together and it was really surprising to me; Bulgarian rhythms are all, like, really hard to understand, but he got it." "As a musician, this music is a step up in challenge. It is very intense," says Thomas. "When I first started playing it I had to count in my head. Now I'm OK." After months of collaboration, the two will present "Bulgarian Tales in 7/8" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21, at the United Methodist Church, 246 Main St., in Wellfleet. Thomas and Mancheva have performed a few abbreviated gigs around town and are now prepared to wow the audience this week with their first hour-long concert. As for their past performances in Provincetown, Mancheva says, "I think we have been well accepted, it makes me feel good because I am surprised to meet so many people who enjoy the music I grew up with." For this concert, Mancheva will explain the lyrics before she sings them. But, she adds, "The translation is not the same. However, it proves languages and countries and borders don't matter as long as we have music. This will be entertainment, a lecture and education all at once." "We want to present music of Bulgaria and the music of neighboring countries," Mancheva says. "We want to show the kids who come here to work that we can share the art and culture in our hearts. We can sing and perform; it is very personal, a different thing that can exist here on the Cape." "There are so many Bulgarians here," Thomas says. "I knew there had to be some musicians. I have listened to Bulgarian music for years. The harmonies are so different from what I'm used to. I could not replicate the music. It was like a treasure hunt to find Elena and then I hit gold. These are smart people, highly trained. This is my emerging passion in music."

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aug20 Eastham

Eastham family awaits closure from fatal fire

The charred exposed beams, the pile of melted wet suits, the curled, burned edges of an American flag still flapping off the back deck. That's what Dianne and Dennis O'Neill stare at every day. Not only did the O'Neills lose their home in a March 18 fire, they lost their 33-year-old daughter, Shannon. And five months later, with no insurance payment from the Massachusetts Property Insurance Underwriting Association (FAIR Plan), they are forced to live in a donated trailer next to their burned-out house. "That's her bedroom right there," said Dianne, 60, pointing out the trailer's back window toward blackened rafters. "We're not allowed to touch anything," said Dennis, 63, a retired Nauset Regional Middle School teacher. "It's still an ongoing investigation." It's this investigation that is holding up the insurance payment. State Fire Marshal Stephen D. Coan ruled the cause arson and issued a carefully worded public statement shortly after the fire. His office has nothing new to add to that early statement, spokeswoman Jennifer Mieth said. "Investigators believe they know who set the fire and that the public is not at risk," Coan said in a March press release. The O'Neills don't believe their daughter set the fire. In fact, they think she was murdered, Dianne O'Neill said. But in terms of receiving payment from their insurance company, it's not what they think that matters. The question is what Shannon was thinking on the day of the blaze. If a household member intentionally sets a fire to destroy a home, the terms of an insurance policy may be violated and the policyholder may not be entitled to a settlement. The O'Neills lived at their 4 Gimlet Way home for 35 years. They have been married since 1976. They raised Shannon and her two younger brothers, Tim and Terry, in Eastham. "I lost everything," Dennis said. "But most important, I lost my daughter, my firstborn, my only girl."

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aug20 Eastham

12th Annual Eastham Golf Tournament and Awards Banquet

The 12th Annual Eastham Golf Tournament and Awards Banquet will be held Sept. 20 at the at Captains Course in Brewster. A shotgun scramble starts at 1 p.m. Participants can choose between a lobster or prime rib dinner at the Tournament Awards Banquet at 6 p.m. at the Elks Lodge in Eastham as the contest winners, awards, the grand prize and raffles are announced. This event, sponsored by the Eastham Chamber of Commerce, is open to the public. It will fund the chamber's Betty Fleming Nursing Scholarship, college scholarships, a toolship and several philanthropic endeavors to benefit the Eastham community. Cost is $500 for a foursome, $125 for an individual, and $35 for dinner only. Advance reservations are required by contacting the chamber office at 508-240-7211 or info@easthamchamber.com.


aug20 Eastham

Live animal show at the Eastham Senior Center

The last Tuesday evening program will be held on Aug. 21 at 6:30 p.m. at the Eastham Senior Center, 1405 Nauset Road will be a live animal show presented by Richard Roth of The Creature Teachers. This family program is free.


aug20 Truro

Driver with learner's permit charged in Truro crash

A 38-year-old Truro man was taken to Cape Cod Hospital on Saturday night after he was rear-ended by a car driven by a Provincetown man who had only a learner's permit. Truro police and fire personnel responded at 9:34 p.m. to the crash on Route 6 near the intersection with Cabral Farm Road. Police said they believe Omar Smellie, 39, of Provincetown was tailgating when he crashed into the rear end of a pickup driven by John A. Demasi III of Truro. Demasi was taken to the hospital and treated for unknown injuries. He was later released. Police arrested Smellie when they found was driving in violation of his learner's permit by not having a licensed driver in the car. Police charged Smellie with operating a motor vehicle without a license and following too close to a motor vehicle.


aug20 Truro

Charity bike rides raise traffic concerns in Truro

With the traffic slowdowns during the Aug. 5 Pan-Mass. Challenge bike ride still fresh in their minds, selectmen and police discussed concerns over another large bike riding event slated to roll through town within several weeks. Organizers of the Harbor to Bay Bike Ride - an event that raises money for AIDS organizations, including the AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod and Fenway Community Health - were seeking approval for help in navigating Truro's byways on Sept. 15. Although the Harbor to Bay already has garnered overall permission to cycle out Route 6 as part of its ninth annual ride, Police Chief Kyle Takakjian and the selectmen noted their concerns. Selectmen expressed worries about traffic delays as well as public safety. As approved, the route through Truro will follow Route 6 to South Highland Road, right on South Highland Road, left on Highland Road, and right on Route 6A. This route brings bikers directly past the Truro Central School during the weekend of the well-known Truro Treasures festival. Last year, said Takakjian, some bikers were "extremely rude" and inconsiderate of public safety, even acting unfriendly to on-duty officers. To combat that problem, said Takakjian, he will be taking extra safety precautions, including providing signs warning riders and drivers to be prepared to stop. "This is not a race, just a ride," he noted. Selectmen discussed the possibility of changing the route and having riders take Truro back roads, Castle Hill Road, for example. Takakjian told them he believes that would be a more dangerous route, with curves and blind-spots on the road.

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aug20 Truro

Poet Brendan Galvin reads at Castle Hill

Poet Brendan Galvin, finalist for the National Book Award in 2005, will read from his work on the deck at Truro's Center for the Arts at Castle Hill at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21. The reading is co-sponsored by Castle Hill and the Truro Public Library.


aug20 Truro

'Burgers & Bordeaux' tonight in Truro

Does a picnic at sunset sound like just the thing? Then you may want to head over to Truro Vineyards this evening, Monday, Aug. 20. Guest are invited to spread out picnic blankets to watch the sunset and enjoy some "Burgers and Bordeaux," all the while listening to the sounds of Frank & Chev. The vineyard is teaming up with the restaurant Local 186 of Provincetown to serve grass-fed burgers and Truro Vineyards' wine, from 5 to 8 p.m. Parking and admission are free, and there's a cash bar for wine and burgers. Reservations are not required.


aug20 Provincetown

Prayer Ribbons Exhibition to be held in P'town

An exhibition of prayer ribbons from the annual Provincetown Harbor Swim For Life & Paddler Flotilla will be held Friday (Aug. 24) through Monday (Aug. 27) on the public library front lawn at 356 Commercial St. A ceremony where volunteers will read the names and messages on the ribbons will be held from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday (Aug. 26). From past swims, participants have inscribed ribbons with names and messages of loved ones they wish to honor. Volunteers are needed to read and help out with the event. For information, email organizer Jay Critchley at reroot@comcast.net or visit www.swim4life.org. The 1.4 mile swim from Long Point across the harbor to the West End will be held Sept. 8. Money raised from the swim is donated to AIDS, women's health and community agencies.


aug20 Provincetown

Surfwomen man drill at Old Harbor Life-Saving Station in Provincetown

Every Thursday in July and August, while the town is abuzz with dinner preparations or jockeying for prime real estate at tea dance, out at Race Point - at a time-tested outpost of the National Seashore - the letter-perfect reenactment of a 115-year-old tradition in coastal lifesaving is being presented by a crack team of 10 men and women in a testament to manly valor of an age long-gone but not forgotten. The year is 1902 and the Keeper of the Station, portrayed on this balmy August afternoon by 32-year veteran of the drill, Richard Ryder, assembles his surfmen for duty promptly at 5:15 p.m. They are eight strong, clad in white cotton sailor dress of the day, and each introduces his or her real-life counterpart including name, age, birthplace and short descriptive duty on the drill. (The 10th member is the narrator, portrayed by female Park Ranger Brooke MacDonald.) It might be hard for those of a younger generation who have grown up with women in the Coast Guard operating cutters and helos to understand that it is only in the past 10 years or so that women aspired to portray surfmen on the drill - such as Supervisor Jody Anastasio, the park's North District interpreter. (Interpretive rangers engage the public in educational programs, walks, talks, etc.) In fact, on this day, Anastasio, portraying Surfman #2, will fire the 160 lb. bronze cannon - a procedure usually orchestrated by station vet David Spang. Other surf-women in the line-up include Anne-Brooke "Brooksie" Murray and her daughter, Lauren, very much pregnant, but still going strong on the drill some 10 years out of college. More likely, women of the day looking to aid in these rescue efforts would have been steered toward the Women's National Relief Association, an organization that provided support, spare clothing and blankets to shipwreck survivors. The association is a dear one for Ryder, whose grandmother was one of those hearty volunteers back in 1905, assisting her husband at this very station in its original setting during "cook week." Adding greater relativity, Surfman #8 is a representation of Ryder's grandfather, Richard E. Ryder. Settling into bleachers and onto a make-shift blanket outside the station, a crowd of more than 100 assembles to watch the demonstration which begins at 6 p.m. when the dory wagon stuffed with supplies is rolled out onto the dunes. Introductions are made and orders barked out: "Block and tackle!" "Man the lee whip!" And, from Anastasio's No. 2: "Loading the gun! No one to be in the gun from now on!"

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aug20 Provincetown

Stripping down to bare art at Provincetown's Herring Cove bathhouse

Changing rooms. Places we take off the trappings of one world and prepare to move into another. It's transition, vulnerability and joy. But what happens when the changing room changes, when it goes away forever? At the end of October the iconic bathhouse at Herring Cove will be torn down, ending its six decades hunkered down at the edge of the ocean while generations of beachgoers showered and changed and ate hot dogs and hung out in front of it. But before it goes, conceptual artist Jay Critchley of Swim for Life and Community Compact fame will have his way with it. From Sept. 28 to Oct. 7, we all get to enjoy what he is calling "10 Days That Shook the World: The Centennial Decade." In Critchley's creative resume, he has had a sand-covered car in the municipal parking lot for an entire summer, and he took over the Meadows Motel before it was torn down and turned it into an amazing transient art project that existed in the old motel rooms briefly and then evaporated like the thousands of late-night dreams of those who slept there over the years. "You could say I have a penchant for pre-demolition buildings," he says. This is my third." In addition to the Meadows Motel, he took over the office at the old motel that was replaced by Tradesmen's Park in Truro and did an ethereal installation called "Beige Motel." He's done performance art in abandoned septic systems and is currently collecting old outhouses for another upcoming project. But right now, his gaze is firmly on the bathhouse. What makes this especially complex is that when he first heard about the tear-down, Seashore Supt. George Price said that it wouldn't happen until 2014 because of funding. Then suddenly the money was available to the park, and what was a two-year planning process has accelerated into less than two months.

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aug20 Orleans

Orleans to begin work on water storage tank

The Orleans Water Department will empty its largest storage tank for painting and rehabilitation beginning Thursday. This maintenance will take approximately 90 days to complete. The tank was last painted in 1991. The water superintendent requests that there be no unnecessary water use, as the town's storage capacity for emergencies will be reduced temporarily by 67 percent. In addition, because of the change in direction of the usual flow of water through the water mains from one storage tank to another, some water customers may experience discolored water, which is strictly an aesthetics issue and should clear up within 24 hours. Besides painting the inside and the outside of the tank, the town plans to install a mixing system to eliminate the potential for stagnant water within the storage tank and provide a more consistent water quality. Additional information is available from the water department at 508-255-1200.


aug20 Orleans

When is a house too big for Cape Cod?

When Allison Jackson was growing up in Orleans there were farms, quaint cottages and fishermen's homes. Fifty years later much of that scenery has been replaced with big houses, except, until recently, in one Nauset Heights neighborhood where she used to take her guests to show them the old Orleans. She won't take them there anymore. "That was the one area that used to be similar to how Orleans used to be when I was a kid," Jackson said. "Now there is this monstrosity. It makes me a little sick actually." Jackson isn't alone in her frustration with the new, large home located on a bluff overlooking the Atlantic. Several folks in the community by Nauset Beach have approached the planning board about ways to prevent homes they think are out of character from being built and changing the landscape. Several homeowners in Chatham are in a parallel situation. They say a new home in the historic Old Village is jarringly out of place and dwarfs other homes in the old town center, some of which date back to 1800s. Sense of place matters, as does size, said Nancy Koerner, president of the Old Village Association. Most of the lots in the Old Village are small, the one with the new home is a third of an acre, and huge houses don't fit like they may in other parts of town, she said. "If you have a great, big house on Shore Road and you want to add a wing, wonderful," she said. Both homes fall within the boundaries of zoning regulations, but they have prompted those around them to petition the planning board, in Orleans' case, or call emergency neighborhood meetings to plot next steps in Chatham. One of those neighbors in Orleans' Nauset Heights is Rigney Cunningham, who along with her husband, John, has been to a few planning board meetings to try and protect the character of the hillside community that is made up mostly of old beach cottages from the 1920s. "It is very, very, very large," Cunningham said of the new home at 47 Nauset Road. "It is two, three and in some cases four times as large as anything on this street." Cunningham is in favor of a fix similar to a bylaw in Provincetown: the smallest home in the neighborhood is removed from consideration, as is the largest, and the average of the remainder is calculated. The new home can then be 15 percent larger than the average in a historic district and 25 percent larger in a newer development.

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aug20 Nauset

Nauset elementary schools spend $4.59 million for 171 special needs students

T hirty-percent of the FY13 elementary school budgets for Brewster, Eastham, Orleans and Wellfleet is to be spent on the education of 171 special needs students. $4.59 million out of a combined budget of $15.4 million is allocated for special education according to budget worksheets available in the public documents section of the Nauset region's website. While researching Orleans Elementary School's alarmingly high administrative costs and overall second highest cost per student on Cape Cod, CapeCodToday examined the budget worksheets for the five elementary schools in the Nauset region, hoping to find an explanation for Orleans' reporting per student administrative costs that rank seventh-highest in Massachusetts. Apologists for Orleans Elementary School often point to the high cost of special education at OES. Indeed, 25% of OES students were classified as special needs in Fiscal 2012. However, the special needs cost percentages in Brewster and Eastham are similar to Orleans. Orleans Elementary budgeted 28.9% of its funds to educate what was reported in FY12 as 52 of its 208 students. In Brewster the Eddy School budgeted 30.9% of its funds for special needs and the Stony Brook School needed 32.6% of its money to educate 29 special needs students. Eastham allocated 33.6% for special needs and Wellfleet 19.5%. All five of the Nauset region's elementary schools budgeted $4,593,285.

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aug20 Chatham

Team frees whale from Chatham Harbor

A disentanglement team from the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies freed a young humpback whale Saturday afternoon that was wrapped in lobster line and anchored in place at the mouth of Chatham Harbor by lobster pots. Ironically, the rescue team freed the same whale, identified as Hiatus, on July 5. It was in roughly the same spot and was also tangled in lobster gear and pots. Working from a small inflatable boat, the Marine Animal Entanglement Response team was able to use a 20-foot-long pole tipped with a sharp hook-shaped knife to free the whale from the ropes and the lobster pots. The Coastal Studies disentanglement work is supported by a grant from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries. The Massachusetts Environmental Trust also helps fund their work as do contributions from individuals and Coastal Studies members. Boaters are urged to report sightings of entangled whales, sea turtles and other marine animals to a hotline at 800-900-3622, or to the Coast Guard. They are urged to stay by the animal at a safe distance until help arrives.

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aug20 Harwich

East Harwich planning debate dispute

The East Harwich planning debate dispute Cape Cod Chronicle reports that the chairman of the East Harwich Collaborative, Ted Nelson, is questioning the town planning department's use of approximately $1,200 in grant funds provided through the Cape Cod Economic Development Council to assist with planning expenses for the East Harwich Village Center Initiative. Town Planner David Spitz used those funds to hire the same planning consultant the collaborative employed in shaping its zoning package a year ago. Nelson states a coordinating committee was charged to review all scopes of work and work product and to make recommendations to town bodies. But the group was not asked to review or make recommendations on the use of funds for the planning board's zoning efforts. The East Harwich Mixed-Use District seeks to create a mix of residential and smaller-scale commercial uses at the edge of the commercial village district, similar to what the collaborative proposed for its Village Mixed-Use District. In this plan development may occur with or without the village street development pattern. Connections are encouraged within the district and to the commercial village. Pedestrian friendly development and connections to public green space are important features of the district. Meanwhile, the Harwich planning board received a presentation last week from Town Planner David Spitz on that board's draft zoning vision for East Harwich, and there were several discussions relative to the two different plans created to shape the future of the four corners area. But planning board member Joe McParland made it clear that state statute gives the keys to the planning board when driving the bus on zoning changes.

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Sunday, August 19, 2012

aug19 Wellfleet

Two pedestrians struck by car in Wellfleet

Two people were injured after being hit by a car Saturday morning around 11 a.m. Officers who responded to an area near the Dunkin' Donuts found two people lying in the road near the entrance to Cove Corners. Wellfleet police said their initial investigation has found that John Clark, 26, of Truro, was driving a red Toyota Tundra west on Cove Road when he allegedly struck the two pedestrians. Both patients were taken to Cape Cod Hospital.

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aug19 Wellfleet

'Shellshocked' screens in Wellfleet

The documentary "Shellshocked: Saving Oysters to Save Ourselves," which tracks an effort to prevent the extinction of wild oyster reefs, will be shown at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 19, at WHAT's Julie Harris Stage. Sponsored by Shellfish Promotion and Tasting (SPAT) in collaboration with WHAT and the town of Wellfleet, the free screening will be followed by a panel discussion led by film producer Emily Driscoll and panelists Anamarija Frankic and Andy Koch. Curt Felix, vice-chair of the Wellfleet Wastewater Committee will moderate.


aug19 Provincetown

Valuable bikes stolen in Provincetown

Police are looking for two stolen bicycles used in the Pan-Mass Challenge with a combined value of $10,000. The owners finished the ride on Aug. 5, stored their bikes in the alcove at the Provincetown Inn, and last saw them the morning of Aug. 6. One of the bikes is described as a 20-speed red and white women's bike valued $4,000. The second is a 20-speed silver men's bike, with a water bottle, valued $6,000. The bicycles also have unique serial numbers. This is the first reported theft of bicycles from participants in the 32 years of the Pan Mass Challenge. Anyone with information regarding the missing bicycles is asked to call 508-487-2828.

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aug19 Provincetown

Woman hit by car in Provincetown

A 73-year-old woman was struck by a car as she was walking through a crosswalk Saturday afternoon. Judith Edsal, 73, of Florida, was struck near 133 Bradford St. and Alden Street around noon. She suffered from a possible broken hip and was taken to Cape Cod Hospital. The driver, Garfield Smith, 45, of Truro, was cited for failure to yield to a pedestrian in a crosswalk, but was not arrested.

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aug19 Provincetown

Rare book dealer Kenneth Gloss comes to Provincetown

As a child, the first word Boston native Kenneth Gloss uttered was "book." The son of the owners of the historic Brattle Book Shop, Gloss has devoted his life to paper tomes, becoming an expert in all things book-related. On Thursday, he'll bring that knowledge to the Provincetown Public Library to give a lecture, show off some of his finds and appraise books the public brings in. "I love doing the talks and lectures because it's my way to get out and talk to the general public," he says. The Brattle Book Shop, which the Gloss family has owned since 1949, is a massive used bookstore on West Street with an outside sale section and three floors of used books, ranging from general titles to the very rare. Gloss and his team purchase these used books from people who bring them into the shop. They also travel to people's homes to appraise and purchase collections. Gloss recently purchased 1,000 books from a home in New Hampshire, 15,000 books from an estate in Springfield and had recently bought out an entire bookstore and its 50,000 titles. All of those will grace the shelves of Brattle Book Shop. When he's not on bookstore business or doing lectures like the one in Provincetown, Gloss has also appeared as an appraiser on the PBS program "Antiques Roadshow." Gloss says no matter where he's doing appraisals, he never knows what he's going to find when people bring in their old or used books. "Most are not valuable, but (the owners) want to know," he says. But he has he had some very valuable finds, including a Declaration of Independence penned two weeks after the original in 1776 that was worth half a million dollars. Another time, a person brought in a beaten-up copy of "Catcher in the Rye." Even if it was a first edition, Gloss says it probably wouldn't have been worth much, but, upon closer examination, he found a lengthy inscription by author J.D. Salinger in the book's pages. He had been a neighbor of the book's original owner. "You really do never know and you can't just presume," Gloss says. "You have to look." During his appearance in Provincetown, Gloss says he will discuss what a first edition of a book actually is, among other topics. He'll be bringing with him a 1912 World Series brochure, a pamphlet for the RMS Titanic, a page from a book from the late 1400s and a cookbook from the 1700s. He'll also stick around to do a question-and-answer session and to appraise any and all items people bring in.

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aug19 Provincetown

Provincetown High School needs $1.3 million in repairs

Water damage caused by improper repairs 13 years ago has left the exterior of the high school building so damaged that bricks and masonry are in danger of falling to the ground, posing a danger to adults and students walking below. The dire report was given to selectmen Monday by Dr. Beth Singer, school superintendent, and architect Mark Almeda. Almeda, a principal of Mark Almeda Architects, was hired by the school committee to assess the exterior envelop of the 81-year-old building. He also was the architect in charge of the restoration of Provincetown Town Hall. Numerous water leaks inside the building caused by visible cracks and crumbling joint sealants on the exterior walls and roof of the building were the initial cause for alarm by Singer and the school committee. Almeda's report cites numerous incidences of water infiltration, building deterioration and safety issues, and prioritized a list of repairs. The worst of the problems were caused by "improper prior repairs and past deferred maintenance," Almeda said. "The building deterioration has progressed to the point where there are safety hazards due to falling limestone spalls, permanent loss of historic fabric and expensive repairs will be needed in order to restore the integrity of the façade," his report read. "Continued deferment of repairs will result in permanent loss of character defining stone elements, destruction of structural components and ultimate use of the building." Almeda estimated the cost to do all the recommended repairs would top $1.3 million. However, that figure does not cover design consultancy fees - usually about 10 percent of the construction costs - a project manager hired by the town, a clerk of the works also hired by the town, and a contingency fee, which can add another 10 percent to the project. The largest problems on the building are with the limestone. All the joints are filled with sealant. On the northwest corner there are all these pieces about the size of your hand ready to fall. Over 40 of these stones are ready to fall down. The high school building, built in 1931, underwent extensive repairs 13 years ago. At that time, Almeda said, the mortar between bricks was repointed incorrectly and joints on the roof were filled with a caulk-like sealant that is now crumbling, allowing water to leak inside the building.

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aug19 Orleans

Annual catboat gathering draws fans

The winds seemed to barely fill the sails Saturday afternoon on Little Pleasant Bay, and skies foretold doom. Still, 90 catboats slowly gathered in and around a big orange buoy that marked the start of the Arey's Pond Boat Yard Cat Gathering. The boats seemed disorganized at first, floating here and there, without much order. At 1:30 p.m., though, a shot across the water brought the sailors to attention. Ten minutes later, the first race began. The race course took the boats southward, pretty quickly, and then back north, much more slowly, for a total of 3½ miles. It was the boat yard's 20th race. An airplane with a photographer flew overhead as the boatyard attempted to capture documentation of all the boats to submit as a possible entry in the Guinness World Records: the most gaff-rigged catboats in one place. "It's amazing that we pulled it off with the weather forecast," said boatyard owner Tony Davis. "We had just enough wind." A catboat traditionally has a four-sided sail attached to a single mast, which is set near the front of the boat. A gaff is a type of bar that the top of the sail is attached to. The boats are often 16 to 26 feet, and designed to be stable, have a lot of capacity and be easy to handle in strong and light winds. Commercial fishermen and recreational sailors both have used the catboat in its more than 200-year history. Fran McClennen of Orleans was the overall winner of the race with "Old Ghost," finishing in one hour, 40 minutes and two seconds, Davis said. The last boat crossed the finish more than three hours after the start. Especially on the return leg, the sailors were focused and intent as they kept an eye on competitors.

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aug19 Orleans

Orleans Partnership focuses on arts

The Orleans Community Partnership is inviting folks to "coffee and carbs" a tour of the partnership's new gallery space - at the old community center - and brainstorming session Monday, Aug. 20, at 8:30 a.m. Kevin Howard, Executive Director of the Arts Foundation of Cape Cod, will update attendees on the Capewide celebration of the arts in October, Fall for the Arts, and members of the planning board will talk about a state cultural district designation for the village center. Partnership board members also hope people offer ideas about "self-guided Orleans Gallery Tours." The Orleans Community Partnership, Inc., is a non-profit organization dedicated to championing "cultural, environmental, and economic vitality in Orleans and its surrounding region." For more information: www.itsallinorleans.org RSVPs aren't required, but people are asked to respond by email at: info@orleanscommunitypartnership.org or by phone 508-737-4669 if they plan on attending.


aug19

Seal numbers, tensions growing

Crocker Snow Jr. is at the epicenter of a seal invasion. His family has owned a good portion of Muskeget, a small island of about 320 acres just west of Tuckernuck off Nantucket, since 1948. In 1994, Snow said, there were 19 adult seals on the island. Last year, an aerial census estimated there were between 3,500 and 3,800 seals. "It's a complete explosion," said Snow, the director of the Edward R. Murrow Center for Public Diplomacy at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. In 1980, Muskeget was listed as a National Natural Landmark by the National Park Service and is the only home to the rare Muskeget vole. Sometimes, it's very exciting, like being on the Galapagos Islands, but Snow said the fragile environment is being trampled by these lumbering visitors who weigh up to 800 pounds and have been moving inland as the beaches become too crowded. "It's quite a scene. The smell, the sound, the numbers, the overall commotion," Snow said of the winter mating season. At least two small freshwater ponds on the island have been polluted with their feces, and fishing is non-existent, Snow said. About the only good news is that he believes the island's extensive sandbars have kept the great whites from coming close to shore. By the 1960s, the gray seal population had been virtually wiped out in the region. Thanks to the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, which forbids harassing or harming all marine mammals, gray seals - the most numerous of the seal species in this area - returned in relatively large numbers. The Muskeget population spike mirrors the growth of gray seals on the Cape and Islands, whose estimated numbers went from 5,611 in 1999 to 15,756 in 2011. That has created problems for Snow and others who believe water quality, public safety and fish populations have all suffered. They are now questioning whether these seals still need that protection. "We'll become a stop on some eco-tour. There'll be no fishermen here," predicted Peter Krogh, spokesman for the Seal Abatement Coalition, a Nantucket group that has about 60 core members and has collected more than 1,200 signatures on a petition asking the federal government for an amendment to the law that would allow for the dispersion of gray seals. That's not an unprecedented request. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is in the process of developing guidelines for nonlethal, non-injurious methods for deterring California sea lions and harbor seals that damage property, fishing gear or catches in California, where there has also been explosive growth in those populations. Last year, NOAA also allowed the killing of California sea lions that were eating an endangered species of salmon on Oregon's Columbia River. The bottom line is that no one knows with any certainty what the Cape could be looking at in terms of the numbers of sharks and seals in our waters and their effects. It's a very complex ecosystem with complicated interactions. It's hard to know what the natural equilibrium will be.

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aug19

A Cape Cod retirement home is now more affordable

Massachusetts native Judy Watkins left the state more than 30 years ago, moving to Florida to escape the harsh New England winters. Over the past few years, however, her thoughts have again turned northward. Approaching retirement, Watkins, now 67, started thinking about buying property on Cape Cod, where she could spend half the year enjoying the beaches, natural beauty, and people of her home state. So she kept an eye on the market, watching as prices fell and options multiplied. Then, last month, she made her move, buying a two-bedroom, three-bath ranch home on a tree-ringed lot in East Falmouth for $185,000. The moment, she said, was right. "This is absolutely, definitely the time to buy, for sure," Watkins said. Cape Cod, with its relatively mild weather, low property taxes, and laid-back lifestyle, has long been a desirable destination for retirees. During the real estate boom, however, even the coziest of cottages soared in price, effectively shutting many middle-income would-be buyers out of the market. Then, the economy crashed, leaving many people worried about their jobs and their investments, and disinclined to make a major real estate purchase. Now however, seven down years in the real estate market have lowered prices to the point where owning a retirement home on Cape Cod is again an achievable dream for some baby boomers, according to financial planners and real estate agents. High-end communities remain expensive. The median home price in Truro, for example, is $638,000, and in Chatham is $550,000. A surge in homes for sale has helped bring prices down considerably. During the recession, many second-home owners concerned about their finances decided to sell their vacation properties. At the same time, rising foreclosure numbers meant more distressed and bank-owned homes were up for sale at depressed prices. Furthermore, low interest rates have made it much easier for boomers to buy real estate. As recently as 2006, mortgage rates hovered near 6 percent; now a 30-year fixed rate is down to 3.55 percent. On a 30-year $300,000 mortgage, that's a savings of about $450 a month.

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aug19

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 8/15
KELLEHER, Daniel, 43, 1005 Millstone Road, Brewster; not guilty of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI) and negligent driving, June 9 in Brewster; responsible for another traffic violation, $100 costs.

O'NEILL, Joshua, 21, 735 Harwich Road, Brewster; admitted sufficient facts to possession of heroin, May 30 in Brewster, continued without a finding for two years, $1,560 costs.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 8/15
AIZLEY, Jeffrey, 39, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (glass), Aug. 15 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing Aug. 31.

CAREY, Shaun, 28, New Bedford; four counts of breaking and entering in the daytime to commit a felony, four counts of larceny of more than $250, receiving stolen property valued at more than $250 and malicious destruction of property valued at more than $250, July 27 and Aug. 1 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Aug. 30.

NEVIUS, Jesse, 33, 35 North Forty Road, Eastham; violating a harassment protection order, Aug. 13 in Orleans. Pretrial hearing Aug. 24.

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Saturday, August 18, 2012

aug18 Wellfleet/Eastham

Eight dolphins strand along Cape Cod coast in Eastham

Eight common dolphins were stranded early Friday evening along the coast of Cape Cod Bay, a frustrating turn of events after a long day for rescuers. One animal was found dead in the early evening at Thumpertown Beach. Another healthy dolphin was stranded on First Encounter Beach at about 5 p.m. and was expected to be released, said Brian Sharp, stranding coordinator for the Yarmouthport-based International Fund for Animal Welfare. The other six were found alive along the coast between Kingsbury and Campground beaches, Sharp said at about 6 p.m. Friday. The stranded dolphins drew a crowd of as many as 50 people at Kingsbury Beach, watching as the stranding team attempted to help them. Rescued animals were evaluated by stranding team members in the beach parking lots. Low tide was at 6 p.m., and stranding officials hoped the dolphins still in the water off Kingsbury would swim out to deeper water as the tide came in. Earlier in the day, a flotilla of boats, kayaks and paddleboards, some manned by IFAW staff and Wellfleet Harbormaster Michael Flanagan, tried to convince about 14 wayward common dolphins to leave the shallow waters of Wellfleet Harbor. Some herders whooped and yelled or slapped their paddles or gunned their engines - anything to coax the animals out to deep water. The going was slow, particularly through the harbor's boat-studded mooring field. Dolphins kept turning back toward shallow water, sneaking around anchored pleasure boats, flummoxing their wranglers. The pod of dolphins had been spotted at about 6 a.m. by a fisherman just off of the east end of the Wellfleet pier. IFAW officials raced up to Wellfleet Harbor to try to prevent a stranding. "We immediately started herding the animals farther out because it is a very dangerous area for dolphins to be in," Sharp said. "We needed to be careful that the group didn't fracture or split up." They had to race against time because low tide would have put the dolphins in peril of stranding, Sharp said.

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aug18 Truro

Truro Historical Society gala begins with silent auction Saturday

A silent auction of cranberry boxes decorated by local artists kicks off "Truro in the World," a gala event celebrating the town's contributions to art, literature and industry, presented by the Truro Historical Society. Bidding on the cranberry boxes, which have been refashioned in a wide range of media, begins on Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Highland House Museum. Artists who have contributed boxes include Breon Dunigan, Jane Bunker, Del Filardi, Al Davis, Paul Wisotzky, Kenneth Hawkey, Ed Christie, Tina Tarantal, Tracy Harmon-Hay, Jody Johnson, Donna Mahan, Rebecca Bruyn and Susan Kurtzman. The gala will be held on Saturday, Aug. 25, at the museum and will include a champagne reception, a catered dinner and a talk by esteemed author and journalist Stephen Kinzer. An exhibition highlighting some of the museum's most valuable objects will accompany the event. Work on display will include paintings by Jerry Farnsworth, Helen Sawyer, Josephine Hopper, William Bicknell, William L'Engle, Lucy L'Engle, Marston Hodgin, and Milton Wright, and illustrators Courtney Allen and Edward A. Wilson, as well as artifacts and manuscripts by writers Eugene O'Neill, Susan Glaspell, Robert Nathan, Catherine Wooley, Thoreau and others. Tickets, $100, are available at the museum. Proceeds from the event benefit the Truro Historical Society.


aug18 Truro

Celtic Harpers play at Truro's First Congregational Parish

Truro's First Congregational Parish, located at the top of Town Hall Hill next to the Truro Town Hall, plays host to a concert featuring Celtic Harpers Thom Dutton and Chris LaFond on Saturday, Aug. 18. Performing as part of the Pilgrim Celtic Harp trio, and as solo performers, the two musicians have brought the grace and beauty of traditional folk harp music to thousands of listeners. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with music starting at 7 p.m.; admission is a free-will offering to benefit preservation of the historic Truro Meeting House, home to the First Congregational Parish. For a map to the concert, visit www.firstparishtruro.org.


aug18 Provincetown

CapeCast: The legendary Carnival parade in Provincetown



aug18 Provincetown

Provincetown rescue team frees two entangled leatherback turtles

The Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies' Marine Animal Entanglement Response team freed two entangled leatherback sea turtles in the last two days. Both turtles were anchored in fishing gear in Cape Cod Bay, with wraps of line around their neck and foreflippers. In both cases the turtles were found by recreational boaters, who quickly reported the sightings to the PCCS MAER hotline and stood by the animal until responders arrived. On Tuesday, a large female leatherback, approximately 4.5 feet long, was discovered outside Sesuit Harbor. Personnel from PCCS and the Dennis Harbormaster Department responded and released the turtle. On Wednesday a five-foot-long male leatherback was found just offshore of South Truro; PCCS and entanglement response trainees from Brazil and Argentina worked to free the turtle. After release both turtles swam off vigorously. Leatherback turtles are protected under the US Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are one of the largest living reptiles in the world. Typically, those sighted in Southeastern Massachusetts range in size from four to six feet in length and can weigh from 400 to more 1,200 pounds. In the last five years the PCCS MAER team has rescued more than thirty entangled leatherbacks in the waters off Cape Cod. Mariners are urged to keep watch for entangled marine animals and to immediately report sightings to the Marine Animal Entanglement Response Hotline (1-800-900-3622) or the US Coast Guard, then stand by the animal at a safe distance until trained responders arrive.


aug18 Provincetown

A renaissance man in heels in Provincetown

Drag star, writer and all-around impresario Charles Busch makes his highly anticipated return to Provincetown this weekend with special guest Varla Jean Merman and Seth Rudetsky at the piano. Among his many triumphs, Busch inked the longest running off-Broadway play, "Vampire Lesbians of Sodom," as well as "The Tale of the Allergist's Wife," which received a Tony nod for Best Play on Broadway, and "The Divine Sister," currently playing at The Provincetown Theater through Sept. 8. His films include "Psycho Beach Party" and "Die Mommy Die." Show time for Busch's two Art House performances is 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 18 and 19, at the Art House, 214 Commercial St. For tickets and information, go to www.ptownarthouse.com or visit the box office.

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aug18 Brewster

New multi-use park welcomes Brewster dogs

The dogs that were summarily booted from Drummer Boy Park may soon be frolicking freely in the "Jewel of Brewster." Where is this jewel? Just where it's always been, behind the police station on approximately nine acres of wooded land that the town recreation commission hopes to convert into a multi-use park for dogs, skateboarders, walkers, basketball players, picnickers, volleyballers, horseshoe players, bikers and bocce-ball enthusiasts, to mention just a few. "A multi-use park would make it more of a destination, a jewel for the town, something to be proud of," declared Selectman John Dickson. "Whatever the next steep is to push the ball down the road I'll take it." "This could be a beautiful park for the town if it's properly done so that's why we'd like to take the reins and try to do it," added Roland Bassett, chairman of the recreation commission. He'll get his chance as the selectmen voted 3-2 to transfer control of an unspecified amount of land behind the police station to the commission, pending approval of the town attorney. It turns out while the selectmen and board of health have been wrestling with the issue of dogs at Drummer Boy Park and a possible dog park for Brewster the recreation was conceiving a plan for the land - which was also under consideration for a possible dog park. "We've spent about a year on this," Bassett said. "We could get everybody involved and I think we could get a lot of funding donated. I ran it by the Community Preservation Committee and they are very into a multi-use park. A dog park would serve some people but not a lot. A multi-use park would serve a lot of people." Originally the selectmen were presented with two dog park alternatives: a fenced in area at Drummer Boy or a two-acre parcel behind the police station. In the end neither concept moved forward and the board of health voted to ban dogs from Drummer Boy on March 20. A summer resident, Jordan Sprechman, filed a lawsuit against the town April 13, seeking to overturn the ban. In recent weeks Dan Rabold, chairman of the board of selectmen, has been working on a plan, targeting the same parcel, as a potential multi-use park - with a self-sustaining dog park.

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aug18 Chatham

Chatham Band celebrates 80 years with new uniforms

The Chatham Band has taken the stage at 8 p.m. Fridays at Kate Gould Park from late June to late August every summer for 80 years. At roughly 10 concerts a season, that's nearly 800 times the all-volunteer band has performed to crowds that number in the high hundreds. Band concerts have become as much a part of Chatham as Lighthouse Beach, The Squire, The Candy Manor and traffic on Main Street. The band celebrated its anniversary Friday night by unveiling new uniforms in its traditional style: red jacket, blue pants and brass buttons. "It feels great," said Kenneth Eldredge, 89, of Chatham. Eldredge has been the conductor of the band since 1995 and a member since nearly the beginning. He said the new uniforms will keep band members much cooler in the summer and more comfortable on stage. "It's a great reward - to be relaxed, to look good for the audience," he said. Ken Davol of Chatham hasn't seen quite as many performances as Eldredge - at 21, he's one of the youngest members of the band - but he is proud to be a part of it. "It's one of the coolest feelings," Davol said. The band added a rendition of "Happy Birthday" to its repertoire, as concert attendees - young and old alike - sang, danced and clapped along with balloons floating and glow sticks waving. "It's fantastic," Eldredge said of the band he has grown up with. "I'm so proud and humbled." And he's sure the band will take the stage at 8 p.m. Fridays at Kate Gould Park from late June to late August for a long time. "We're turning 80, and we'll probably be around for 80 more," he said.


aug18 Chatham

Local wildlife beckons world travelers

In among the series of arresting images of humpback whales, white-rumped sandpipers, and seal startled pogies shimmering in the air there is a close-up photo of a rare yellow-breasted chat with a red bittersweet berry perfectly positioned in its open bill. John King, a retired biopharmaceutical entrepreneur, who just published his first photography book, "Wild Cape Cod: Free by Nature" with his wife Pam, doesn't divulge trade secrets when he is asked the story of the shot. "Dead luck," he said matter-of-factly. The chat, which doesn't have a tail, was in the Kings' backyard. All the creatures and scenes in the book were taken in the couple's figurative backyard, the Lower Cape, and the coffee table book is meant to both draw attention and funds to the enviable array of species on the peninsula and foster ways to celebrate it through eco-tourism. "This wild environment is all around us, but you often miss it," John said. "It's a spot where so many creatures migrate through: whales, tuna, birds, monarch butterflies." Although amateurs, the pair does have talent and have shot all over the world, on all seven continents, and met in their 20s one of the richest ecosystems in the world Alaska - where they were commercial fishing in the King Crab fishery. Their lives have come full circle in their retirement, said Pam, and they have immersed themselves in the natural world once again. "We have always been outdoor people," she said. When they decided to buy a home in Chatham - where John confessed he grew up as a summer brat - Pam noticed the diversity of species in the wild pockets among the crowds. Pam has the better eye of the duo - she usually takes the up-close images, he the land and seascapes. "Cape Cod has sort of been a pleasant surprise," he said. "We realized what an incredible resource the Cape is for wildlife." And the two believe it is untapped. They are hoping their images provide a clear picture of how an eco-tourism industry could flourish in the shoulder seasons. The two see naturalists attached to chambers of commerce and other institutions and plan to give the proceeds of the book to local charities that foster awareness about conservation and education. "We are quite interested in ecotourism as an additional economic generator for the region .to provide people who are interested in unique wildlife experiences," he said. The Kings' website, Commonflat, named for the shellfishing grounds off Monomoy, is part of that dream. The website, where folks can purchase photos, is meant to show the wild Cape can co-exist with man in a sustainable way, as has happened on the Common Flat for more than a 1,000 years. The couple has already donated some ocean safari experiences raising thousands of dollars for groups like Mass Audubon's Wellfleet Bay Sanctuary and the Chatham Historical Society, where King is the president of the board of trustees.

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aug18 Harwich

Local artist had connection to Red Sox legend

As Red Sox Nation mourns the passing of former player, manager and all-around legend Johnny Pesky, a local artist is recalling her brief but memorable friendship with the iconic Boston figure who died Monday at the age of 92. Although they only had a few encounters together, Harwich resident Elaine Ostrander can easily recall every moment of her time with the legend. It started in 1999, when Katherine Nixon (wife of then Sox player Trot Nixon) strolled into Ostrander's Stoughton art gallery to inquire about some art lessons. "We struck up a friendship and because of her, I started doing some work with the Red Sox wives," said Ostrander. It started with illustrations for some of the books produced by the wives, evolved into consignment projects for some of the players, and culminated in 2006 when the Red Sox approached her about a very special project. "They wanted me to do a collage for Johnny in honor of his 86th birthday, which was quite an honor for me." Ostrander had met Pesky only through passing during some of her visits to the Red Sox clubhouse, but now she was tasked with putting his life on canvas. Using a series of photographs from throughout his life, Ostrander painted a detailed montage of Pesky's life in-and-out of baseball. "I think I was able to capture a real part of his life, I really think that's what he loved about it. Everything from his time in the service, his wife, and his playing career was in it." In September 2006, during an on-field ceremony honoring Pesky's birthday and his contributions to the Red Sox throughout the years, Ostrander was able to present the painting to the man whose face was a clubhouse regular for generations. After the ceremony, Pesky invited Ostrander to join him for lunch. "What struck me was his personality. He was such a role model for those players and they absolutely adored him. I think it was because he was such an ordinary guy who truly loved his wife and just loved being around people. He was a part of the environment of that clubhouse and was always willing to help out in any way he could."

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aug18 Harwich

Vandals poison plants in Harwich yard for second year in a row

Vicki Goldsmith has lived on sleepy Paddock Drive, lined with modest ranch and Cape houses in the central part of town, for four years. For the last two of those her property has been mysteriously vandalized with white powdery poison resulting in the death of nearly $2,000 in bushes and plants. The most recent poisoning occurred in the overnight hours of Aug. 10 and 11. Goldsmith and her partner, Dave Akin, were shocked when they woke up Saturday morning to discover another dumping of what they think is a powerful herbicide. "It is a very evil deed to come and poison the soil around someone's home," said Goldsmith. She is the executive director of Cape Cod Habitat for Humanity, which builds affordable housing. Goldsmith said she gets along well with her neighbors and has no grudges, and is "just baffled as to who would do something like this." "The poison was white and extruded through some sort of die. It's the thickness of a pencil lead and is odorless and has a slightly silky feel," Akin said. The two estimate that they have lost more than a dozen bushes in two years, including rose, hydrangea, rhododendron, butterfly and other species. "We walked around the neighborhood to see if anyone else got hit and didn't see anything. I think it's a creepy thing. If we are fortunate enough to find out what happened, I expect it won't be connected to anything but be more of a random act," said Goldsmith. William Clark is the director of the Cape Cod Cooperative Extension, an educational division of Barnstable County that deals with a range of environmental issues including agriculture, hazardous materials, water quality, recycling, and marine resources. Clark has never heard of such a pointed act of vandalism in his 34 years with the extension. "I'm shocked and surprised. There are several products on the market that are strong herbicides that could be used for this and have a capacity to kill," he said. Clark said that it would be a very expensive process to chemically find out exactly what herbicide was used, costing thousands of dollars. He speculated that it could be a concentrated version of Roundup, a common weed killer.

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aug18

Vernon Laux: The time for rare birds is now

While summer has a few weeks left on the calendar, as far as birds are concerned, it is autumn. The length of day is rapidly shrinking and sunsets are noticeably earlier. Migration is under way. On nights with northwest winds, land birds are moving and each dawn brings a new cast of characters to woods and fields. For the many bird species that engage in migration, the changes are most intense. Since this encompasses a majority of birds that one is likely to encounter, whether in the yard or at the beach, migrants are already here, preparing to depart, or are passing through. The tidal flats are at their most productive right now, and a slew of birds are using these important feeding and resting areas. The most productive time of year for rare and unusual species is during the upcoming few weeks. An American avocet, a large, colorful shorebird that is rare this far north, has been delighting birders at the south end of Pilgrim Lake in North Truro for the past week. Good numbers of shorebirds keep being reported from Monomoy Island/South Beach in Chatham, and this is the most reliable spot on the Cape and Islands to see lots of the rarer shorebirds, such as Hudsonian godwits, Wilson's phalarope and many different vagrant species. Recently, there was a little stint and a bar-tailed godwit seen - species that winter in Africa and breed across the top of Europe and Asia. Seemingly any bird from anywhere can show up on the Outer Cape. Think for a moment of the difference between a day in August and a day in February in the life of a non-migratory black-capped chickadee on Cape Cod. It really is two different worlds, and surviving requires being able to effectively deal with both situations. For this species, the Massachusetts state bird, and all others that do not migrate from our region, the differences in hours of daylight, available food, ambient temperatures and availability of freshwater to drink are incredible. These birds are very tough indeed. For resident species of birds, year-rounders, they are growing new feathers and eating as much as possible to put away fuel in the form of fat reserves to get them through the long cold slog of the coming winter. Food resources - insects and an especially abundant berry crop this summer - are aiding this process. For migrant land birds, they are also eating like crazy in preparation for their upcoming migration south.

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aug18

12-Foot Great White Filmed in Cape Cod Bay

Shark week continues on Discovery Channel and in the waters of Cape Cod. Just five days after a 12 foot shark was sighted prowling the shoreline of Wellfleet, MA, a second 12 foot shark, identified as a great white, was seen and videoed by a fisherman near Sandy Neck beach in Cape Cod Bay - a highly uncommon area to see a shark. Take a look at the Cape Cod Bay shark in the video below.







Friday, August 17, 2012

aug17 Wellfleet

Rescuers race to move dolphins out of Wellfleet Harbor

Officials from the International Fund for Animal Welfare are trying to herd as many as 14 dolphins out of Wellfleet Harbor this afternoon. Rescuers and volunteers from IFAW's marine mammal rescue team are currently using boats, kayaks and loud noises in an effort to move the dolphins out to deeper water. Officials are concerned that the dolphins may strand if they get caught in too shallow water. High tide is around noon, which may work in favor of the rescuers. As of 12:30 p.m., the crews are herding the pod of dolphins toward the Indian Neck breakwater. They are making noise and staying behind them and just trying to coax them out to deeper water.



aug17 Wellfleet

Public meeting on wastewater planning at Wellfleet senior center

The town's Comprehensive Wastewater Management Planning Committee will hold the first of a series of public meetings with the Wellfleet community at 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 20, at the Wellfleet Senior Center to discuss and gather public comments on the comprehensive wastewater management planning process currently underway. Topics for the meeting include the plan's emphasis on low-cost natural system solutions, and how individuals and organizations can participate. There will also be presentations and discussion of the Draft Interim Needs Assessment and Alternatives Analysis Report developed by Environmental Partners Group (EPG) for the committee. The report is available on the Wellfleet Wastewater Planning Committee web page: www.wellfleetma.org/Public_Documents/WellfleetMA_BComm/wastewater. For more information or to submit written comments before the meeting, contact Liz Carver at lcarver@clf.org or (617) 850-1789. Written comments on the draft report will be accepted through Sept. 4, 2012.


aug17 Wellfleet

Hot summer soul in Wellfleet

With her four-octave range, diva Julia Nixon has been a fixture on the Washington, D.C., music scene for more than 20 years when she's not on the road. "Julia & Company" was the resident group at the popular Mr. Henry's nightclub. Nixon's depth of study includes seven years of opera training before she switched to Southern soul and Motown. Her vocal power has inspired comparisons to Aretha Franklin and Tina Turner and earned her the lead role of "Dreamgirls" on Broadway. At 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, she plays Wellfleet Preservation Hall, 335 Main St., Wellfleet. Tickets, $15-$25, are available at (508) 349-1800 and http://julianixon.eventbrite.com.


aug17 Truro

CapeCast: Chris Myers returns back to the scene of the bite



aug17 Truro

Kline scores victory in court

A Land Court ruling Monday allows property owner Andrea Kline to live in her house on Stephens Way until Tuesday, part of a secondary squabble in an ongoing legal case. But the town can challenge Kline in court if she tries to stay in the house longer. Kline, who lives primarily in Boca Raton, Fla., has filed three lawsuits this year in Land Court appealing different aspects of the town's order from Jan. 20 to tear down the 8,333-square-foot house. The house, at 27 Stephens Way, was built on a landscape overlooking Cape Cod Bay that some believe inspired American painter Edward Hopper, who owned a house next door in the mid-1900s. The town issued an occupancy permit in early 2011 but Kline had not stayed in the house overnight until early July. She found the property needed repairs and planned to return at the end of July to deal with them. On July 11, though, neighbors asked Truro Building Commissioner Thomas Wingard to ask any occupants to leave the house. Their attorney, Robert Shapiro of Boston, said the town's Jan. 20 tear-down order meant no one could live there. Shapiro said there was a dark SUV parked in the Kline carport in early July and two adults were seen at the house. Neighbors also heard music and voices at night. When Wingard inspected the property July 12, based on Shapiro's claims, he found the entry chained off and the house apparently unoccupied. Town Counsel E. James Veara then warned Kline, in a letter to her attorney on July 26, that she could not live in the house because the occupancy permit had been revoked. On Aug. 7, the town also filed an emergency motion in Land Court to stop Kline from occupying the property while she dealt with the repairs. The town's emergency motion was what Judge Harry Grossman denied Monday. "As the judge observed, there was really no public interest or harm or immediacy to support the town's 'emergency' motion to prevent my client from occupying the home on a temporary basis," attorney Diane Tillotson said. Kline and her late husband, developer Donald Kline, bought the 9 acres for $6.75 million. They began construction after receiving building permits in May 2008 from the town. In September 2008, however, four neighbors - not the same ones who hired Shapiro - sued the Kline family, saying the building permits were invalid. In 2009, Donald Kline died but his wife continued with construction even though the lawsuit was pending. That lawsuit ended at the state Appeals Court when a judge essentially told the town on May 26, 2011, that the two building permits were invalid.

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aug17 Truro

Truro Police Department hit by lightning

Lightning struck the police station at about midnight Wednesday on Route 6, temporarily knocking out power and leaving the department without computers and radios for several hours. The interior of the station filled with smoke shortly after the big boom, but no injuries were reported, dispatcher Heidi Dyer said. Technicians managed to get radios working on one channel, and computers could be turned on but were not communicating with one another, she said. In the meantime, the department used an electric typewriter to type documents, she said.


aug17 Truro

Truro accident sends two to hospital

Two men were taken late Wednesday to Cape Cod Hospital after a two-car crash on Route 6. The accident was reported at 11:15 p.m. near the intersection with Whitmanville Road. A Buick Legacy, driven by Colton Smith, 21, of Truro collided with a Toyota RAV4 driven by Edmund Winder, 47, of Kirkland, Wash.

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aug17 Provincetown

34th Annual Provincetown Carnival Parade

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aug17 Provincetown

Two entangled leatherbacks freed by Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies

Two entangled leatherback sea turtles have been freed from fishing line this week in Cape Cod Bay, rescuers from the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies said Thursday. A large female about 4½ feet long was found Tuesday outside Sesuit Harbor in Dennis, and a large male about 5 feet long was found Wednesday just offshore in South Truro. The turtles had line wrapped around their necks and fore flippers, and both were found by recreational boaters who called the center's hotline and then waited for rescuers to arrive, according to a statement from the center. The federal Endangered Species Act protects leatherback turtles, which are one of the largest reptiles in the world. In waters in Southeastern Massachusetts, the turtles can weigh from 400 to 1,200 pounds. In the past five years, the center's rescue team has untangled more than 30 leatherbacks in waters off Cape Cod. The hotline number to report an entanglement is 800-900-3622.


aug17

Elizabeth Warren works Cape Tip's thoroughfare

Walking through town alongside Elizabeth Warren and the entourage that accompanied her on a trek up Commercial Street Sunday in Provincetown, including state Sen. Dan Wolf and state Rep. Sarah Peake, provided a telling glimpse into the candidate's vigor and intellect - and, certainly, the energetic drive it requires to camp Walking through town alongside Elizabeth Warren and the entourage that accompanied her on a trek up Commercial Street Sunday in Provincetown, including state Sen. Dan Wolf and state Rep. Sarah Peake, provided a telling glimpse into the candidate's vigor and intellect - and, certainly, the energetic drive it requires to campaign for a hotly contested U.S. Senate seat. Listening to her speak, and meet and greet and chat with visitors and locals on the street, also offered a peek into the almost startling passion she has about the economic problems facing American families, and her desire to help them get back on their feet. The throngs on Commercial Street - on foot, on bikes and in cars - would stop when they realized it was her. Interestingly, the most frequent exclamation heard from admirers along the way was: "You're my hero!" And, indeed, Warren has become a hero to many because of her work and advocacy in the realm of consumer law. The Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, Warren has specialized in bankruptcy. She has written eight books and more than a hundred academic articles dealing with credit and economic stress. In 2003 she wrote the book "The Two-Income Trap: Why Middle-Class Parents Are Going Broke" with her daughter Amelia Warren Tyagi. (Tyagi, who works as a business management consultant, has an MBA from the prestigious Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania.) It was based on research Warren conducted with the Consumer Bankruptcy Project, starting in 1999 and continuing through 2001 and later. The book posited that families were going bankrupt at a higher rate today because housing, insurance and education are considerably more expensive than they were in the 1970s. They found startling trends in the research: In 20 years, says the book, the number of women filing petitions for bankruptcy increased by 662 percent. "The people who consistently rank in the worst financial trouble are united by one surprising characteristic," they wrote. "They are parents with children at home. Having a child is now the single best predictor that a woman will end up in financial collapse."

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aug17 Provincetown

Provincetown artist's inspiration comes in neon lights

Barbara Cohen's artwork took a decidedly different turn during her recent five-week stay in Venice, Italy. Under the auspices of the Emily Harvey Foundation, in September 2011, Cohen was provided with an apartment, a large studio and the opportunity to explore the ancient, water-defined city at will. This experience ultimately led to the newest of her new work in neon, now on view at Gallery Ehva. Cohen's exhibit, "New Neon," overlaps two group shows at the gallery. "Persistent Abstraction," running Aug. 10-22, features 10 artists who share an admiration of formal visual language while blurring its boundaries. "Make," which opens with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, and runs through Sept. 5, blurs the boundaries of artist and artisan. During a recent studio interview, Cohen radiated excitement about her unencumbered sojourn and the creative inspiration that led her to this point in her creative journey. "My residency gave me a completely new approach to my work in that I had total freedom to do exactly what I wanted to do, in a European setting [where] walking and using the vaporetta [Venetian boats] were the main means of transportation." Without an automobile, Cohen was able to explore in the elements, to see and experience more of non-tourist life first-hand. She was immersed in the everyday habits of Venetian city folk, "right up against their daily work and part of their culture, for five weeks, with no agenda." Cohen took virtually no art supplies with her for this trip, due partly to in-flight shipping costs and partly to the watery layout of Venice. "Because of the nature of the canals you can't carry heavy loads of paint and paper," she says. "I depended on found material, mostly scraps and cardboard from trash. Every part of what I was doing was about the hard life of working people who create a romantic Hollywood setting for tourists who briefly visit Venice. [Their] small chores of picking up trash daily from outside each house or apartment intrigued me. Their carts were big dollies designed to go up and down canal bridges." Cohen watched it all intently, taking particular note of the small cranes used to hoist mounds of trash onto huge waiting boats. Amid swarms of pigeons, she was out and about in the cooler early morning hours attempting to escape the heat and the tourists.

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aug17 Orleans

Orleans man accused of peeping in N.H.

Salem, N.H., police have arrested an Orleans man they believe spied on a woman in her trailer. Christian Hobbs, 44, of Orleans was arraigned Thursday and is being held on $25,000 cash bail. Hobbs allegedly rigged the trailer he sold to a New Hampshire woman with baby monitors and would spend days at a time camped underneath it. Police photographed a number of holes that Hobbs allegedly cut in floors and ducts to give him full view of the woman's bathroom. Hobbs had 16 short video clips of the victim in various states of undress on his cellphone and would bring "power bars, drinks and tissues" when he would camp under the trailer. He is being charged with a number of crimes, including child pornography, as the victim has a 4-year-old child who was videotaped during a bath. New Hampshire and Orleans police departments are working together to see if similar cases have happened in Orleans.

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aug17 Brewster

Brewster officials seek voters' OK on $1.8M land buy

Officials will ask town meeting voters to buy two developable parcels of land to preserve as open space. The $1.8 million price for the land, totalling about 82 acres, will be raised through a combination of Community Preservation Act funds, town water fees and grants, said Town Administrator Charles Sumner. The undeveloped properties occupy two different spots: 26.5 acres off Freemans Way and 55.2 acres off Slough Road. Both parcels, which are owned by Peter Copelas of Salem, have been approved for subdivisions. The smaller parcel was approved for nine lots. Recently the larger parcel received approval for a 20-lot subdivision. The property off Freemans Way lies near the town's wellfields for the public drinking water supply. The properties are the largest chunks of land in Brewster still owned by a single private property owner, said Mark Robinson, executive director of the Compact of Cape Cod Conservation Trusts. Brewster has spent millions to protect open space over the years, Robinson said. But if the town had not done something to stop development, taxpayers would be looking at many more millions for sewers and septic treatment systems, he added. The assessed value of both parcels comes to $1.94 million. The total purchase price of $1.8 million comes out to $22,000 per acre.

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aug17

The Local Food Report: Blueberries and Fowl

Elspeth talks with Stan Ingram of Coonamessett Farm in East Falmouth about an innovative way of combining blueberry production and pastured meat birds. An avid locavore, Elspeth lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her program airs on WCAI Thursdays at 7:30 on Morning Edition and 4:30pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30.





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Thursday, August 16, 2012

aug16 Wellfleet

12-foot shark spotted close to shore in Wellfleet

Just when Cape Cod beachgoers might have thought it was safe to go back in the water, a 12-foot shark was spotted dangerously close to shore. Suzanne Grout Thomas, Wellfleet beach administrator, said the shark was seen only five feet off Newcomb Hollow Beach among a group of seals early Sunday morning. "As the seal population grows, there's more and more sharks," she said. This is the first confirmed shark sighting in Wellfleet this summer, but it comes not too long after Chris Myers fell victim to the state's first great white shark attack since 1936. Myers was attacked July 30 off the coast of Truro, a town that borders Wellfleet. Thomas said this sighting will likely not be the last. "We'll probably see a few more this summer," she said. "We saw a handful last summer, but nothing that was that close to shore." The town operates four ocean beaches, all of which have lifeguards. Thomas said the lifeguards know what to do if a shark shows up and that local emergency personnel have been notified of the risk of an attack in the area. She said the monster fish was seen by Wellfleet Police Officer Jerre Austin, whom she described as an experienced deep-sea fisherman. A beachgoer also alerted lifeguards recently about a fin far off the shore between White Crest and Cahoon Hollow beaches, but Thomas said that sighting was unconfirmed. She said staff have posted signs on the town's beaches notifying swimmers of recent shark activity, but that there aren't any fewer umbrellas on the sand. "They want to see a fin," Thomas said. "They're very excited."


aug16 Wellfleet

12-foot shark cruises Wellfleet beach shore

A 12-foot great white shark was spotted cruising within six feet of a Wellfleet beach over the weekend, town officials reported. The frightening predator was seen around 6:30 a.m. Sunday by Wellfleet police Officer Jerre Austin, an experienced deep-sea fisherman, according to Wellfleet Beach Administrator Suzanne Grout Thomas. Austin spotted the fin just feet offshore, where the shark, which he estimated to be 12 feet long, was swimming near a group of seals, Thomas said. Thomas called it the town's first confirmed shark sighting of the summer.

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aug16 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Ponds Are Secret Cape Cod Treasures

Though recent great white shark sightings on Cape Cod shouldn't have you avoiding the ocean altogether, there is a saltwater alternative that makes for a perfect, bucolic escape from the crowded shoreline: the freshwater Wellfleet kettle ponds, nearly 20 of them, strewn like shimmering jewels throughout the sandy beech forests of Wellfleet and Truro. Though a good many of them are inaccessible due to parking limitations, or just extremely hard to find (and don't expect protective locals to help guide you there!), several are simple to get to, and all are delightful. Even the names are seductive: Gull, Spectacle, Duck, Turtle, Herring, Round, Sough, Snow, Higgins, Dyer, Great, many of which were admired by Henry David Thoreau, who wrote of them in Cape Cod. The kettle ponds were formed more than 15,000 years ago, when blocks of glacier ice melted, leaving massive holes, called kettles, that filled with fresh water. There are two Great Ponds-one each in neighboring Wellfleet and Truro. The latter is a wonderful pick, visible through the trees as you make the short hike over a pine-needle-carpeted trail, edged by a tiny sandy beach (many of the ponds have no beach to speak of), and home to a bevy of quick-footed green frogs and one remarkably tame snapping turtle. Its entryway is home to only four legal parking spots, though, so it takes some good luck and patience (or a willingness to bike or walk rather than drive) to get in. But it's worth the wait. Another great option with many more parking spots is Long Pond, at the end of a bumpy, winding road in Wellfleet. It's beloved among families with kids thanks to a shady picnic area, a small sandy beach and easy access from Route 6. Even easier and beachier still is Gull Pond-though only if you have a town parking sticker or are interested in renting a canoe from adjacent Jack's Boat Rental, which gets you a permit for the duration of your rental.

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aug16 Wellfleet

Visitor input sought on Lower Cape bike path plan

Officials from the Cape Cod Commission are seeking extensive input from Lower Cape residents and visitors to guide a master planning initiative on bike and pedestrian safety. To further this initiative, representatives from the three Lower Cape towns and the National Seashore have scheduled a second community planning workshop from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21, at the Wellfleet Senior Center, 715 Old Kings Highway. The first workshop, held in October 2011, captured input from year-round residents. The purpose of this second workshop is to provide an opportunity for visitors and summer residents to weigh in with year-rounders. In addition, the commission developed an online survey, which remains available for those who'd like to share their experiences and ideas that way: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SummerBike-Ped. "This planning effort will focus on making safe connections for bicyclists and pedestrians between Wellfleet, Truro and Provincetown," said Martha Hevenor, a commission planner. "Improving bike route connectivity in particular between the three towns will enable and encourage more people to choose the bicycle as a way to get around on the Outer Cape." Participants in the Aug. 21 session will help develop study goals and objectives and preliminary route concepts and destinations. In addition, they will discuss concepts for connecting the Cape Cod Rail Trail to Provincetown. For more information on the initiative Cape wide, go to www.capecodcommission.org/initiatives/bikeped.

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aug16 Wellfleet

David Krakauer Klezmer Trio to perform in Chamber Festival

"The whole thrust of my career has been to keep the music out of the museum," says Cape Cod Chamber Music Festival's next performer, David Krakauer. Friday night at First Congregational Church in Wellfleet, David Krakauer Klezmer Trio will up-end any belief that klezmer, and chamber music, is bound for the archives. Klezmer may not be what you think of when you hear the term "chamber music," but Krakauer is a major voice in classical music, as well as performing internationally with his group Klezmer Madness! He has appeared as soloist with the Dresden, Seattle, and Detroit symphony orchestras, among many others. The trio is a space-specific version of Krakauer's full formation, which usually includes electric guitar and drums. The trio, completed by Will Holshouser on accordian and Nicki Parrott on bass, has played together for over ten years. "We have a telepathic connection," Krakauer says of Holshouser and Parrott. "We've played this repertoire - which ranges from traditional tunes to my own originals - for many years. It truly is Klezmer chamber music." Friday's program will be a mix of traditional, Jewish klezmer tunes learned from recordings made in the 1920s by eastern European Jewish immigrants - but it's not just the replication of old tunes. Krakauer has a reputation for dosing his tunes with jazz, rock, funk and hip-hop. It's been described as "not your gramma's klezmer." "Any material I approach, I put my own spin on," Krakauer says. "One foot in the past and one foot in the future is how I like to think about how I deal with the music."

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aug16 Truro

Shark-bite victim returns to scene of attack

The last time Christopher Myers visited Ballston Beach, a great white shark chomped his legs, sending him into a world of pain and sudden fame. It was the bite heard 'round the world. But the toothy trauma didn't keep Myers away. On Wednesday, he limped back to Ballston for the first time since the July 30 shark attack that left him with 47 stitches and surgically repaired tendons. It was as if a gladiator had returned to the arena. Myers was recognized as he walked through the parking lot and asked to pose for photos. "He's kind of a local hero," said Jennifer Beke of Westfield, N.J., who snapped a pic of Myers with her kids. A small crowd followed him up the sandy path and onto the beach, enthralled as Myers retold his ripping yarn. "I'm excited to be back here," said Myers as he gazed out at the dull gray sea. "I felt a little pit in my stomach." Despite the cast on his left leg, Myers was in good spirits. "I still feel like I want to jump in that water," he said. "And then jump out really quick." Several beach bystanders told Myers they had witnessed the aftermath of the shark attack. "I walked down, and I saw you bandaged up with blood seeping through," said Cian Ryan, a youngster from Hurley, N.Y. Myers spent time chatting with people on the beach, answering their questions and reflecting on the sharky bump in the road that changed his life. He is writing an account of the attack, and one of the reasons he returned to Ballston was to help reset his memory about the place and the attack. So far, he reports no shark nightmares. But that shark is still lurking in his mind. "It was terrifying seeing it surface," Myers said. "It was just surreal."

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aug16 Provincetown

Ocean noise hindering right whales

Three years of study at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary has shown underwater noise, mainly from ships, has significantly reduced the ability of right whales to communicate with each other. But more study is needed to say how the endangered marine mammal's survival is affected. Each year, North Atlantic right whales, with their distinctive head markings, migrate along the western Atlantic coast from calving grounds off Florida to feeding areas in Nova Scotia. The federal government has named Massachusetts Bay and Cape Cod Bay as critical habitats for the whales, part of the protections required by federal law. Up to 550 whales exist today worldwide, a federal report stated this week. A paper published Wednesday in the journal Conservation Biology compared the current levels of underwater sound with those of almost 50 years ago, when waters were quieter. The results showed that, on average, 63 to 67 percent of right whales' "communication space" in the sanctuary and surrounding waters has been lost. Communication space is the area over which an animal can be heard. The loudest sound to drown out whale calls are bubbles from ship propellers, said Leila Hatch, a marine ecologist with the sanctuary and the paper's lead author. The research was led by the NOAA and the sanctuary, in cooperation with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Marine Acoustics Inc. in Rhode Island. Eighty-nine whales were documented in the study. "We still need to know what that loss of communication means," Hatch said Wednesday, both for individual whales and the whole population. "Those are big additional leaps we need to make. We're looking for the links." Right whales make several calls, but researchers documented the "up-call" in the study because it's the most prevalent used in and around the sanctuary, especially in the spring when the animals are feeding, Hatch said. The up-call is a distinct, rising "whoop" that lasts about a second, according to the Right Whale Listening Network, part of the Cornell lab. Researchers believe the up-call is a whale's way of making small talk and letting others know what's going on with activities such as finding food, mating, navigating, avoiding predators and taking care of their young. The loss of up-call information might mean, for example, a drop in the number of calories a right whale consumes, and that could possibly affect a whale's ability to have a calf, Hatch said.

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aug16 Orleans

Orleans Conservation Trust annual meeting looks to past

The Orleans Conservation Trust annual meeting at the Orleans Yacht Club will be held at 5 p.m., Aug. 29. Since 1970, the trust has preserved more than 630 acres in Orleans through deeded gifts, conservation restrictions and purchases. Naturalist and historian Todd Kelley on Portanimicut area in South Orleans will be speaking about how land around Portanimicut, with access to Pleasant Bay, has been largely protected by Orleans Conservation Trust. In 1623, three Native American leaders, including Aspinet, the sachem of the Nausets, were thought to be plotting against the white man at Wessagusset, in present day Weymouth. The intrigue was foiled, and one of the sachems was killed, his head placed on a post in front of the town. The other leaders faded into the mist, but as the power of their sachem faded so too did the culture and very existence of the Nausets who were almost synonymous with Eastham which included present day Orleans. Mattaquason, the Sachem of the Monomicks in Chatham set aside Portanimicut for the declining Nausets. Portanimicut was listed on maps as an Indian reservation at least until 1850. Those who lived there included Michael Rafe, the last Indian pastor to Portanimicut Meetinghouse. Kelley will also draw the connection between the splintering Native American culture of the time to the loss of the Cape Cod of way of life that is happening today and the role the trust has had in stemming the tide of influences from away.

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aug16 Chatham

Chatham shellfisherman's license suspension upheld

Following the advice of the shellfish constable, selectmen upheld a 28-day suspension for Keith Vecchione because Vecchione allegedly had more than 5 percent seed in his clam catch, which is not permitted. Vecchione disputed the claim and his lawyer asked for leniency because the punishment would be "financially crippling." But the selectmen agreed with audience members who said the resource needs to be protected because it was just beginning to rebound and more than Vecchione would be financially harmed if regulations were not enforced. Shellfish constable Renee Gagne said the suspension was lenient considering this was Vecchione's fourth.


aug16 Monomoy

Monomoy officials reach out

There's less than two weeks to go until a pair of critical town meetings in Chatham and Harwich that will decide the fate of the proposed $64.7 million high school, and school officials have undertaken a multipronged effort to reach out to the community to explain the details of the project. The regional school committee, high school building committee, and communications subcommittee are relying on a grassroots effort such as speaking at public events, e-mail blasts to the school community, and lots of casual conversations to stoke up support for the project. "It would be nice to be able to hire a (communications) firm to help get the word out but that's costly and we have been conscious to save money so we're doing it ourselves," said Dr. Carolyn Cragin, the interim superintendent for the Monomoy Regional School District. Cragin explained that officials plan to finish combining three websites into one, release a high tech fly-through animated video of the proposed 168,000 square foot school, distribute hundreds of fact sheets across the community, and encourage anyone from Harwich and Chatham to contact all their friends and neighbors to let them know of the benefits of the project. "The first hurdle in getting to voters is the fact that it's summer," noted Ed McManus, Harwich selectman and co-chair of the Monomoy Regional High School Building Committee that has designed the 700-student facility over the last year. "Because so many community groups aren't meeting during these months, we've had to adapt." David Whitcomb, Chatham selectman and co-chair of the building committee, said that he is living, breathing, sleeping, and eating the project and thinks that a diversified effort to build support is essential. "For Chatham, there were two initial goals for the Monomoy system: saving money by regionalizing and developing a state-of-the-art new high school. We've realized almost $2 million a year savings by regionalizing and now have a $65 million project that will only cost Chatham taxpayers less than $10 million to build. That's an incredible opportunity," he said.

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aug16 Monomoy

A taxing situation: projected Monomoy tax numbers challenged

Numbers don't lie but they often differ. Geoffrey Wiegman, president of the Harwich Taxpayer's Association, projected a 23.6% tax increase over the 2013 to 2016 four-year-span at the July 23 selectmen's meeting. David Ryan, Harwich's financial director, challenged that projection at the Aug. 6 selectmen's meeting, saying the actual tax increase over that period would be only 13.9%. Ryan explained that Wiegman's numbers do not reflect the expected debt retirement, the cost sharing of the Allen Harbor dredging project, nor the $2 million savings expected in 2016 from the reduction in the number of schools from 6 to 4 in the Monomoy Regional School system. Wiegman disagrees with the debt retirement decreasing the taxes and his calculations include a $1.2 million school override for 2014 that is being predicted by Finance Committee chairman Skip Patterson. Ryan countered saying an override is determined by the selectmen and that they haven't indicated any override is planned. These conflicting issues result in a 9.7% tax gap in the differing calculations. "It is mainly the debt retirement and the $1.2 million predicted override that are the differences in the budgets," said Wiegman, "one of our executive committee members will be working with Ryan to reconcile the differences."


aug16 Harwich

Sea chanteys and storytelling at Brooks Academy Museum

The New Bedford Harbor Sea Chantey Chorus will perform an afternoon of sea chanteys and storytelling at Brooks Academy Museum, 80 Parallel Street, Harwich, on Saturday, Aug. 25, from 1 - 4 p.m. The performance will include traditional and contemporary songs of Yankee seafarers, along with the ballads and ditties of mariners and coastwise fishermen in North America, the Cape Verde Islands and the British Isles. Under the direction of Tom Goux of Cape Cod, the chorus started as a volunteer activity of the Schooner Ernestina in 2000 and continues to promote the Ernestina through performances around New England. Captain Norman Gomes, captain of the rescue crew that brought Schooner Ernestina from Cape Verde to the United States in the 1980s, will relate adventures from the 41-day voyage. The Schooner Ernestina is the last ship to bring immigrants to this country under sail from the Cape Verde Islands. Designated as a National Historic Landmark, it is now part of the New Bedford Whaling National Historic Park and was named the official vessel of the State of Massachusetts. The storied schooner was built for the Gloucester fishing fleet, helped explore the North Pole, and later served as a trans-Atlantic packet ship carrying goods and passengers between Cape Verde and the United States. It was gifted to the United States by the Republic of Cape Verde in 1982. The program is being held in conjunction with the exhibit "So Sabi: Celebrating Cape Verdean Culture" on display at Brooks Academy Museum, sponsored by the Cape Verdean Historical Trust and the Harwich Historical Society. Admission is $3 for adults; free for kids and includes tours of museum exhibits. For more information, please call 508-432-8089.

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aug16 Harwich

'Alice' is creatively topsy turvy at Harwich Jr. Theatre

In "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," the young Alice goes through many extreme physical changes: from being as tall as the treetops to as small as a caterpillar. This is no easy feat to convey on stage, but through a number of creative approaches, Harwich Junior Theatre allows one's imagination to soar, as it brings Lewis Carroll's 1865 children's novel to life. Thinking outside the box, like Carroll did while writing in his literary nonsense style, HJT imaginatively uses two Alices, since, for their dramatic purposes, two are better than one. The story, narrated by Jasmine Ullman, begins with the much younger and smaller Alice (played by a confident Raquel Wallace). When she chases after the elusive White Rabbit (Julia Adams) and falls down the very long and strange hole, Wallace is replaced by a teenaged Erin Mahoney, who skillfully handles the majority of the role. Under the cover of darkness and creatively using spotlights, the two continue to switch roles, like when Alice swallows a shrinking drink or when she becomes as tall as a pigeon's (Calliope Pina Parker) tree-top nest. (Here, to produce a nearly 18-foot-tall Alice, Mahoney, with only her torso and head showing, is set high in the multi-tiered and windowed set, with a grounded and partially hidden Wallace, placed directly below her, with only showing her legs.) As Alice journeys through Wonderland, she encounters many strange, talking animals and humans alike. With the unusually large and impressive cast of 38 multi-aged actors, here are just some of the characters she meets along the way: the long-winded Dodo (Emma Brimdyr); a slinking caterpillar (acted-out in unison by Karen Stewart, Olivia Graceffa and Zelda Mayer); the sneezing Duchess (Stephanie DeFerie); a smiling Chesire Cat (Keelia Skye O'Donnell); the Mad Hatter (Ian Morris), March Hare (Audrey Erickson) and a doormouse (Fionn Pina Parker) all having a never-ending tea party; a singing Mock Turtle (Samantha Minshall); a gentrified Gryphon (Brendan Cloney); and a delightfully demanding Queen of Hearts (Kajsa Brimdyr) playing croquet with her powerless King of Hearts (Zane Bender). The comically out-of-control and nonsensical courtroom scene, filled with all of these characters and more, plus the flamingos and playing cards, brings the show to an entertaining climax. The multi-talented James P. Byrne not only directs the non-stop play with music, but he also designed the multi-functioning set and lighting. Lisa Canto choreographed the fun dance numbers. The bright and unique costumes were designed by Bobbie-Jean Powell and their varied colors and textures brilliantly fill the stage, adding to the zaniness of the show.

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aug16

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 8/13, 8/14
CROSSEN, Andrew, 24, 32 Gibson Road, Orleans; admitted sufficient facts to violating a protective order, July 13 in Orleans, continued without a finding for six months, $50 fee.

FIX, Matthew, 34, Albany, N.Y.; assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and assault and battery, Aug. 12 in Provincetown, dismissed.

STARKWEATHER, Daniel, 41, 2008 Main St., Chatham; breaking and entering in the daytime to commit a felony, breaking and entering and wanton destruction of property valued at more than $250, Aug. 9 in Chatham. Pretrial hearing Sept. 18.

YOUNG, Brahms, 36, 790 Main St., Chatham; guilty of violating a protective order, July 2 in Yarmouth, one-year probation, $600 costs.

CANAVAN, Peter, 50, 779 Millstone Road, Brewster; guilty of assault and battery, May 4 in Brewster, one-year probation, $780 costs and $50 fee.

MARTIN, Robert J., 45, 9 Pond Village Heights Road, Truro; violating a protective order, Jan. 25 in Provincetown, dismissed.

ROBERTS, Albert III, 52, Springfield; admitted sufficient facts to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), July 26 in Truro, continued without a finding for one year, 45-day license loss, $1,597.22 costs and $50 fee; not responsible for another traffic violation.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 8/13, 8/14
BURNIE, Nathaniel, 22, 80 Pheasant Run, Wellfleet; OUI and negligent driving, Aug. 5 in Wellfleet. Pretrial hearing Sept. 13.

GRANVILLE, Ann, 39, 21A Conwell St., Provincetown; assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (cellphone), assault and battery, mayhem and disorderly conduct, Aug. 10 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing Aug. 20.

McLAUGHLIN, James C., 55, 2074 Main St., Brewster; OUI-second offense, negligent driving and another traffic violation, Aug. 11 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Sept. 11.

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Wednesday, August 15, 2012

aug15 Wellfleet

Wellfleet has first shark sighting this year

A police officer making a dawn check Sunday morning at Newcomb Hollow Beach saw what is believed to be the first confirmed shark sighting this year in ocean waters off Wellfleet. It is among a handful of sightings reported in the outermost towns of Cape Cod since a great white shark bit Chris Myers' legs July 30 at Ballston Beach in Truro. Myers left Massachusetts General Hospital Aug. 3 with 47 stitches and repaired tendons. Prior to Myers, it had been nearly 80 years since a great white had injured a human in Massachusetts. At about 6 a.m. Sunday, Wellfleet Patrolman Jerre Austin, who was working an overnight shift, noticed seals hugging the shore. He owns a charter boat and has fished for 40 years, so he said he's seen "plenty" of great white sharks. He thought a shark might be in the waters. "I sat there for a while, and sure enough, one came up behind a pod of seals," Austin said Tuesday. "It was high tide. He was no more than 5 feet off the beach. I've never seen them quite that close." Austin reported the shark to be about 12 feet in length. At about 6:15 a.m. Saturday, two people reported seeing a shark off White Crest Beach.

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aug15 Wellfleet

Wellfleet to hold wastewater planning meeting

An inaugural wastewater planning meeting will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday at the Wellfleet Senior Center at 715 Old King's Highway. The meeting is the first in a series planned for the community to discuss a comprehensive wastewater management plan that is under way. The plan emphasizes low-cost, natural solutions. The talk will include information on how individuals and organizations can participate. Those attending will have the chance to learn about the draft interim needs assessment and alternatives analysis report, developed by Environmental Partners Group for the town's comprehensive wastewater management planning committee. The meeting will be led by CLF Ventures of Boston. For information, contact Liz Carver at lcarver@clf.org or call 617-850-1789.

aug15 Wellfleet

Wellfleet residents asked to weigh in on wastewater planning process

The Comprehensive Wastewater Planning Committee, chaired by Curt Felix, wants your input on the draft needs assessment and alternatives analysis report they have placed online. The report was prepared by Environmental Partners Group and can be found on the town's web page, www.wellfleetma.org, under bulletins and public notices. The committee plans to hold several public meetings to get public reaction to the wastewater planning process that is now underway. The first meeting will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Aug. 20, at the senior center, 715 Old Kings Highway. The current planning process emphasizes low-cost natural system solutions, as opposed to sewers. A cutting-edge approach to preserving the town's harbor water quality, using oysters, is already underway. Liz Carver of CLF Ventures, the company that is working with Environmental Partners Group on the environmental aspects of this project, is coordinating the meeting. Written comments on the draft plan can be sent to her at lcarver@clf.org in advance of the meeting. Or, you can call her with comments at (617) 850-1789.


aug15 Truro

Truro's real natives subject of talk at Highland House Museum

Dr. Robin Robertson, archaeologist, will talk about the Payomet Indians, who once inhabited the Truro area, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 15, at the Highland House Museum. Robertson will discuss their lifestyle, survival practices and the archaeological sites that have shed light on their history on their Cape. Admission to the program is free.


aug15 Truro

Red Sox biographer discusses his latest book in Truro

Glenn Stout, author, editor and sometimes ghostwriter, who wrote "Red Sox Century: The Definitive History of Baseball's Most Storied Franchise" and other baseball biographies, comes to the Truro Public Library at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 15, to discuss his latest book, "Fenway 1912: The Birth of a Ballpark, a Championship Season, and Fenway's Remarkable First Year." The book earned Stout the 2012 Seymour Medal from the Society for American Baseball Research, which honors the best book of baseball history or biography published during the preceding calendar year.


aug15 Provincetown

Provincetown hosts needed for wounded vets

Individuals and businesses are needed to host about 20 servicemen and women Sept. 21 in Provincetown as part of a two-day Wounded Warrior Project adaptive cycling event planned for Cape Cod. The Wounded Warrior Project serves troops who have military-related wounds, injuries or illnesses that occurred on or after Sept. 11, 2001. In Provincetown, the group will have lunch, do an activity on the water, have dinner and see a show, according to Kim Hurd, an organizer in Provincetown. Many of the troops have injuries from conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, serious enough to require them to retire from military service, Hurd said. The outing is meant to help restore the service members' physical and mental well-being. For more information, contact Hurd at 774-994-2098 or at ptownliving@hotmail.com.


aug15 Provincetown

Provincetown Police Department seeks pet food donations

The Provincetown Police Department would like the public's help to stuff a cruiser full of donated pet food to help stock the Lower Cape Outreach Council's food pantry. Donations of dry or canned pet food can be dropped off at the Stop & Shop Supermarket at 56 Shank Painter Road or in the lobby of the police station at 26 Shank Painter Road. Volunteers will collect the donations from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The council has food pantries in eight towns from Harwich to Provincetown, including supplies for pets. For information about the stuff-a-cruiser effort, call the police at 508-487-1212. For information about the food pantries, call the council at 508-240-0694.


aug15 Provincetown

Provincetown Tennis Club serves up programs for youth

Tucked into the East End, connected to the DNA Gallery on Bradford Street, is the off-the-beaten-track Provincetown Tennis Club, a not-for-profit club that has been in existence for more than 80 years. To promote health and fitness in local youth, and to connect more with the broader community, the club, at 288 Bradford St., is offering two weekly workshops for kids all summer long. These workshops are run by club manager and pro Ken Horgan. The Junior Jamboree, Thursdays from 3 to 5 p.m., is free and invites all ages, from 2 to 17, to come and participate in activities that focus on developing basic tennis fundamentals involved, but the kids also participate in running, jumping, and generally staying active and engaged for two hours. This workshop ends on Labor Day. The Children's Clinic, on Saturday afternoons from 3 to 4, is more formal and costs $20. Kids of all ages work with Horgan to develop basic tennis skills, including footwork, the basic stroke, keeping your eye on the ball, and generally working to develop effective tennis skills. Again, the focus is to be active and have fun. This workshop will continue as long as kids can come, into October. This is the first year the tennis club has offered these activities. Doug Gavel, a member of the club's board of governors, says the club is happy to be open to the community and to kids. Both he and Horgan believe in the importance of fun when young people are learning, understanding that they "will want to come back and improve their skills along the way," so there is always a focus on enjoying the activities. Horgan, who teaches in Pompano Beach, Fla., in the winter, says the kids aren't the only people having fun. He loves being "Coach Ken" and describes the special moment when a child "hits their first good ball," a moment of achievement that is exciting for everyone. Sometimes families are also inspired to get involved, says Horgan, citing a recent experience when one nine-year-old boy took a lesson and later taught his dad some moves he had learned that day. In addition to loving the sport and wanting to share it with kids, Horgan also believes it's important to offer kids a healthy activity. This town does well in arts and entertainment opportunities for kids, he says, but offers fewer opportunities in organized physical sports. He believes that tennis provides "physical, mental and emotional gains to all those who play" and he's excited to pass that on to the younger generations. The club maintains five Har Tru clay courts and two hard courts. For more information, stop by the club or visit www.provincetowntennis.com.

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aug15 Provincetown

Stand-up Judy Gold stages the human comedy in Provincetown

Stand-up comic Judy Gold has a large wingspan. Always tall for her age (a theme with endless riffs - there's a quick sight gag about showering with the short girls at summer camp), her body and especially her long arms are her best props. Opening night at the Art House, Gold enters the stage blinking at the bright lights, exhausted after a bumper-to-bumper drive from New York. "And what about that Good Samaritan suicide sign on the Sagamore Bridge," she shrieks. Gold is visibly limping, the result of recent knee surgery which has left a scar. Is there any better lead-in to a shtick on the indignities of life after 45? As if conducting her solo symphony, she waves her arms and launches into laugh-out-loud scenarios: weight, exercise, sexuality, ethnicity and aging. Her persona is highly accessible, especially if you grew up in New Jersey as Gold did, or in any upwardly mobile suburb, the daughter, "or son," she adds, getting the laughter from the men, of a conventional family - preferably ethnic, but WASP will do as well - before the L word started to speak its name. We imagine a gawky, self-conscious Gold until she grew into her body, and being 6' 3" became a way to attract attention. Today she's forthright and funny, with the sharp ear, tilted toward irony, of a therapist, hairdresser, best friend or stand-up comic. Gold is a Provincetown regular, performing in town since the early 1990s, with a devoted following. Her comic style ranges from the lazy-daisy of a Johnny Carson and the bite of a Borscht-belt stylist to the contemporary goofiness of a Tina Fey and the bawdy hilarity of Lea Delaria. Gold whines, coos and, when a punch line falls flat, shrugs and grits her teeth; staring into the audience, she fluffs her curls and widens her eyes, as if asking, "Who me?" In her hour and a half on stage we meet several of Gold's personae: as the hovering yet sympathetic mom bringing up kids with her partner, her ex and her ex's partner too ("now my kids have four Jewish mothers - wouldn't you just kill yourself?"); as the frustrated, space-deprived apartment dweller; as the long-term girlfriend - she's never quite sure, she confides, of the right word for their relationship; and as the attentive daughter to a mother in her 90s. "You can't make this stuff up" Gold snaps as she channels her mother's voice with a Julia Child nasal whine; and as "lezzie." She lobs the term from the stage, and waits for a reaction. Judy Gold's comedy show runs at The Art House, 214 Commercial St., Provincetown, through Sept. 1.

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aug15 Provincetown

Danner show at Julie Heller Gallery East, Provincetown

Artist Carole Ann Danner will exhibit her recent work at Julie Heller Gallery East, 465 Commercial Street, Provincetown, Aug. 17 - 30. There will be an opening reception Friday, Aug. 17, at 7:30 p.m.


aug15 Provincetown

An atelier on the water in Provincetown is open to all

Unlike many artists who crave or demand total quiet and isolation in order to be productive, A. Paul "Tony" Filiberto thrives amid the comings and goings of people and revels in the often noisy atmosphere of his self-designed space. Open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. during the summer season, this nexus of creative activity at 193 Commercial St., Provincetown, extends the definition of "artist's studio" well beyond the norm. It currently combines separate working space and exhibition areas for three local painters - its founder and owner Filiberto, Rob Longley and Brenda Silva, - provides free instruction and art materials to visitors of all ages, and maintains a constant open-door policy for "walk-ins" who wish to observe artists at their work and view their paintings. Filiberto is a man of prodigious energy and great optimism who sees his life in terms of infinite possibilities. He believes firmly in the concept of giving back to his community and puts that belief into concrete action every single day. He loves to paint, loves to discuss art and loves to share his passion with others. Have you ever wanted to try your hand seriously at acrylics or oils but didn't quite know where to start? Ask Filiberto. He will set you up and put you on a painterly way to your heart's content. During a recent studio visit, he shared how this all came about - including the Cortile Gallery at 230 Commercial St., which he owns with his wife, Kerry Filiberto. "We were approached about running a gallery and were kind of excited about it," he says. "'Cortile' means courtyard in Italian. We were looking for words that were associated with the space. 'Cortile' has a nice ring to it." His first on-site studio at the original Cortile location in the old Union Square gave him the idea and a sense of the value of being right in the public eye. "It made me realize the benefits of being in the flow," he says. "I saw it as not a distraction but a contribution. The flow of people is actually the source of a lot of what I do. For me to paint in isolation, I would be lost." Filiberto emphasizes that his interplay with studio visitors is integral to his creative process. Sometimes a particular canvas he is working on can be directly affected by an outsider's comment. "I get to spend time with them while they are here and see the work through their eyes and I can incorporate this information into decisions about what I am going to do about my work or I can disregard those opinions."

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aug15 Orleans

Organizers hope catboats make history in Orleans

When sailors gather at the 20th annual catboat race in Pleasant Bay they won't be only trying to beat their personal best, they will be aiming to make history. When Tony Davis of Arey's Pond Boatyard first began the gathering there were eight of the long-boomed, often brightly-hued boats bobbing at the starting line. Over the years it has hit 94 and this year, on Aug. 17 and 18, Davis is hoping to draw at least 120 to earn a space in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest gathering of gaffe-rigged catbirds in the world. "We thought we'd just try and add a little more jazz to [the gathering]," he said. "There is no record of a catboat gathering, whether they accept it or not no one knows." The setting is quintessential for the boats that were originally designed in the 1800s for fishing and transport in east coast waters and have developed a following among traditionalists. "For every harbor there is a particular design that fits the waters and ever since the beginning of sailing (on Pleasant Bay) it fits the waters," said Davis. "The catboat is the perfect fit for the waters we have." The event is also meant to draw attention to Pleasant Bay and the money raised in entrance fees will go to a number of watery advocates, including the friends of Pleasant Bay. "It is a parade of sail in support of the beauty of Pleasant Bay and protecting the waters we have here," said Davis, whose shop builds the boat that "come about as quick as a cat." The gathering is being dedicated to Dan Gould, Davis's business partner and close friend, who died July 10.


aug15 Orleans

Street light demonstration project in Orleans

Several streetlights on Main Street near Snow's Home and Garden and Mahoney's, and four more by residences on Monument Road will be outfitted with new LED (light-emitting diode) lights this fall. If the demonstration project is successful, all streetlights in town will be converted, likely beginning in May. Town Administrator John Kelly said the project was being brokered through Cape Light Compact and was funded through the energy efficiency program, so there is no cost to the town. The program is funded through a small surcharge - which adds up to millions of dollars - on electric bills. Selectman Sims McGrath, who has attended a presentation, said the damage to night vision - from going from black to glare - was reduced because the lights threw a wider pool so there was less contrast. There was some concern that the lights took awhile to get bright, but Kelly said, with a grin, that the transition from dusk to dark would give them time enough.


aug15 Orleans

Upcoming playground build in Orleans

Volunteers are being asked to turn out in droves to help build the new community playground at the elementary school. The popular old playground was beginning to deteriorate so a group of folks worked with the school, students and Leathers Associates to design a new playground that has a number of uniquely Orleans aspects - including a model of the Coast Guard 36500 boat (which was involved in the rescue of the crew of the Pendleton). To save money, the playground, designed and supplied by Leathers Associates, is being built by volunteers. The build week is Tuesday, Sept. 26 to Saturday, Sept. 30. "Hopefully they get addicted to it and want to stay for the rest of the week," volunteer Wendy Farrell said. Workdays are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and lunch and dinner will be provided. People are still needed in myriad capacities, from lunch to fund-raising. For more information, visit www.orleansplayground.com.


aug15 Brewster

Swim against the breast cancer tide at Nickerson State Park

In 1993 Cape Cod was reported as having the highest breast cancer incidence rate in the state. Although devastating, the news was not entirely baffling to the women of the Massachusetts Breast Cancer Coalition, which had been founded two years earlier in 1991. In response to the report, the coalition did what it does best: It took action. The coalition founded the Silent Spring Institute - not only to respond to these astounding statistics, but to discover the causes and to seek ways to reduce this elevated rate through scientific research. For 20 years the coalition has been educating and advocating while Silent Spring conducts scientific research as they work together toward breast cancer prevention. These local sister organizations have become national leaders in investigating environmental factors associated with breast cancer, as well as educating the public about and advocating for breast cancer prevention. Despite all their progress over the years, the coalition is continually overshadowed by national organizations. local organization, the Massachusetts Breast Cancer Coalition relies heavily upon its dedicated volunteers and supporters. With hard work, it has won significant victories without the expensive ad campaigns and corporate partnerships that empower national organizations. Many of these organizations carry out the important work of stressing early detection and finding a cure for the disease post-diagnosis. While this work is significant, the coalition believes prevention is the cure. For two decades, the coalition has continued to challenge the breast cancer epidemic by holding Against the Tide, an annual fundraiser that has expanded into a swim, walk, run and kayak event. Participants choose one or more of the event's competitive or recreational activities in any combination. This family-friendly and inspirational morning event is open to a wide range of athletic abilities, and brings in supporters from across the commonwealth with one common goal: breast cancer prevention. Against the Tide will take place on Cape Cod Aug. 18 at Nickerson State Park in Brewster. It is an experience like no other to see the dedication of our supporters at Against the Tide. Courageous breast cancer survivors participate to ensure that their daughters and granddaughters won't receive the same diagnosis. All too often we see mothers who have lost their daughter to breast cancer and children who have lost their mother to breast cancer, and they come to swim, walk, run, or kayak in memory of their lost loved one.

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aug15 Brewster

Mills and Gills Festival coming up in Brewster

The Mills and Gills Festival in the Stony Brook Valley will be held Aug. 26, at the Gristmill on Stony Brook road you can watch the giant mill wheel drive the grindstone, meet the miller and see how corn is ground to meal. There will be weaving demonstrations and child friendly activities. Sample fresh corn bread and visit the Gristmill Museum. At Windmill Village, Drummer Boy Park Route 6A: Tour the windmill, Harris-Black House and blacksmith shop. Enjoy the exciting Yarmouth Minute Men Encampment. All activities are free. Mills & Gills is Presented by the Town of Brewster Mill Site Committee and the Brewster Historical Society.


aug15 Chatham

Chatham board will debate privacy issues

Selectmen agreed to place $110,000 on the town meeting warrant so a ground-truthing could be done on the new software the assessor's are using. But, in response to a resident's question, they also agreed to discuss how much information about people's properties should be available on-line. Resident Elaine Gibbs, joking that she may watch too much Lifetime television, said that the photos, entrances and dimensions of homes are online and she isn't sure that is a good idea. "We ought to discuss it," said Selectman Chairman Florence Seldin. The review, which requires a company to go to properties in town and check the data, is required by the state. Chatham now has the same software as the 11 other towns on the Cape.


aug15 Harwich

CapeCast: Rocky remains in remote state park



aug15

Lower Cape house sales up significantly in 2012

After nearly a four-year slump in the real estate market, a number of towns are reporting encouraging signs of a turn-around, including a substantial increase in the number of homes sold. "I am totally encouraged by the numbers. We are seeing strong activity from the early spring market until now," said Jorie Fleming, a realtor at William Raveis Real Estate in Eastham and president of the Cape and Islands Association of Realtors. A total of 314 homes were sold in 2012 (through May) in Harwich, Eastham, Orleans, Brewster, and Chatham. That compares to 239 for the same period a year ago, a 31 percent increase. Realtor Jim Trainor of oldCape Sotheby's in Orleans said that the turnaround could be tied to the confluence of several factors: very good home prices, excellent diversity of homes on the market, and historically low bank interest rates. "Orleans saw a jump from 35 home sales in 2011 to 48 in 2012, a 37 percent increase. That's quite respectable," Trainor said. Realtor Jim Van Ness from Brewster Kinlin Grover has been in the business for 12 years. "I am very excited and have been very busy. No sooner do I have for sale signs in the ground that I am getting calls and more offers than I have in years. I think we are in for a slow, steady rise. Not meteoric but very healthy," he said. Van Ness said his office has seen a 60 percent increase over last year. 104 homes were on the market as of last week and with a stronger market in place, he hopes that number will grow. "The big uptick in home sales has been fantastic," said Chris Rhinesmith of Pine Acres Realty in Chatham. Rhinesmith noted that the Chatham market is dominated by high-end homes. "With 211 homes for sale, the average asking price is $1.3 million." Many buyers are more comfortable putting their money in a home than in the recently volatile stock market, theorized Rhinesmith. "If you look at real estate as an asset class, some people see it as more worthwhile than stocks." Richard Waystack of Team Waystack Realty in Harwich said that his seven realtors have been very busy this year, seeing a 49.2 percent gain in sales between 2011 and 2012. While sales have improved, Waystack agreed that prices are still down and coming back slowly. Sales in Harwich for the first five months of 2012 totaled 106 homes, compared to 71 for the same period last year. The median price dropped 10.4 percent, from $375,000 to $335,750. Prices in Orleans, Chatham, Eastham were also down during the same period and Brewster is the only area town that has shown an increase, from $351,000 to $385,000.

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aug15

Infection attacking striped bass

Warming water temperatures might be causing an increase in the number of striped bass that have lesions from a viral or bacterial infection, according to the state Division of Marine Fisheries. While the number of infected fish is estimated at less than 5 percent of those landed along the entire Massachusetts coastline, the infection rate is higher in fish caught in the Cape Cod Canal and in Buzzards Bay, according to a state advisory issued last month. So far, there is no evidence of the disease mycobacteriosis that has become prolific among striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay, according to the fisheries division, but the agency urged caution in handling fish because the disease can be transferred to humans through contact. Mycobacteria are widespread in the marine environment. The M. shottsii bacteria is the type most commonly associated with the outbreak of lesions in Chesapeake Bay fish. Up to 98 percent of fish in certain areas and 76 percent in the Chesapeake Bay area are believed to be infected with the disease, surveys show. Researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, located in Gloucester Point, Va., say it isn't clear whether shottsii can infect humans. It is distantly related to the bacteria that cause tuberculosis and leprosy but does not cause either in humans. Its closest relative is M. marinum, also known as fish handler's disease, which afflicts aquarium and aquaculture workers and can cause small nodules to form on the hands, elbows, knees and feet, joint pain and swelling and swelling in the lymph nodes. However, human bodies are too warm for the shottsii bacteria to flourish, and an infection usually can be treated with antibiotics, according to the Virginia institute, a research and education nonprofit. Those reporting issues in Massachusetts have described small red spots on the white underbelly of fish. Any fish with large open lesions or darkened patches of meat should be discarded. How to protect yourself: wear heavy gloves, especially if you have open sores or cuts; wash hands thoroughly with antibacterial soap after handling fish; wash cutting boards, surfaces knives and utensils with warm soapy water; discard fish with large open lesions and darkened patches on meat; and contact physician immediately if you show signs of infection after handling fish.

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aug15

DANA'S VIEW: Learning along the shore

What a great time of year to walk our lovely and inviting beaches, those white sand beaches that stretch for many miles all along our eastern flank, always looking about the same (but always retreating) and always hosting a fisherman or two along its length not to mention a plethora of sunbathers and swimmers. It was not always thus. When we roamed Monomoy's 10-mile east side in our old cars we usually saw not a soul except near the hot spots for fishing and then only fishermen. As fledgling fishermen ourselves, we kids knew which side of the bars to fish with the tide informing us in no uncertain terms. Those tides had taught us to fish the downstream side where the lurking bass waited for the turbulence induced by the shallow water to tumble the baitfish, making them easy prey. The learning was a slow process though, as the fish were not all that plentiful, that is until the bluefish arrived on the scene (1949). Surf fishing is the best fishing and here is why. The results are spotty at best. The physical labor is often difficult unless you happen to be a masochist. The angler is dealing with hair fine transparent line, often at night in a windstorm. The waves that crash in at your feet can dump you in the suds at any unwary moment. Or maybe the eel you are trying to thread on your hook will wind its way up your arm tail first, leaving a smear of slime to mark its travels. So then, why is surf fishing the best fishing? Because once you realize the fish are not the actual goal you can relax and enjoy the view, the place and your surroundings. You would never stand in the surf facing east and call it fun. But doing the exact same thing with a fish pole in your hand and you are a member of a select though loosely knit fraternity. And with proper application and effort, you just might bring home a fish, an ample bonus for the hours spent just reveling in this place you have chosen to be. This place where the crashing surf dares you to be complacent. A place where in season, gannets fish in earnest just a short distance away. Something I have seen a very few times but always have reveled in the majesty of the sight.

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Tuesday, August 14, 2012

aug14 Wellfleet

Cape Cod Modern House Trust offers new life for old houses

Two old and dilapidated houses with serious architectural credentials have found a savior. The Cape Cod Modern House Trust, a nonprofit group in Wellfleet, will rehab what are known as the Hatch and Weidlinger houses, both owned by the Cape Cod National Seashore. The trust signed a 10-year lease for each house in early July at $8,868 apiece annually. In 2010, Wellfleet town meeting gave $100,000 in Community Preservation Act money to help restore the Hatch house. The trust plans to raise money for the Weidlinger home as well, trust Executive Director Peter McMahon said Monday. The Seashore has identified 12 midcentury modernist houses within its boundaries, all but one in Wellfleet. All 12 are eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, but some are in good shape, some fair and two - the Hatch and Weidlinger houses - are in poor shape. Because the houses are eligible for the national register, they're protected as if they were actually listed - that is, no public money can be spent in a way that causes harm to them. Still, limitations on the Seashore's finances have prevented maintenance to some of the more than 300 structures the agency owns. "Here's a wonderful opportunity to work with this nonprofit," Seashore Superintendent George Price said. "This would be a great way to keep them preserved." The trust already leases another of the Seashore's modernist houses, called the Kugel/Gips house, and also used another $100,000 in Community Preservation Act money to upgrade it to good condition. The Seashore signed the 20-year lease for the Kugel/Gips house in 2009, at the same annual rental rate. The Hatch cottage, off Bound Brook Island Road, looks like modular, wooden cubes with hinged, floor-to-ceiling panels that open rooms up to sunshine, ocean breezes and views of Provincetown. Designer and local builder Jack Hall, who lived just down the road, built the summer house in 1961 for Robert Hatch, a book editor of The Nation magazine, and his wife, Ruth. The Seashore acquired the property in 2008. The Weidlinger house, which of the two is in the worst shape, sits deep in the woods on Higgins Pond, square and on stilts, with a wraparound porch. Engineer Paul Weidlinger built the house in 1954 after visiting modernist architect Marcel Breuer's home across the pond. Weidlinger, whose international firm still exists, made a name for himself with structures built to withstand earthquakes and explosions. The house was donated to the Seashore in 1980 and has been empty since the 1990s, McMahon said. "The thing I liked about the house as a small child was on two whole walls were 8-by-8-foot glass-pane windows," said Tom Weidlinger, speaking of his parents' summer house. "It was sort of like living in a treehouse in the forest. That was pretty cool for a kid." The Weidlinger house needs a new septic system and a new drinking-water well, replacements for the glass sliders, a new roof and road repairs, at a minimum, McMahon said. The Hatch house needs a new deck, footings, a septic system and a roof, to start. The houses are among more than 100 modernist houses built in the outermost towns of Cape Cod, from the 1930s to the 1960s, when artists, intellectuals and architecture enthusiasts were attracted to cheap land and the ability to experiment with construction and design. The crowd eventually expanded to include the founders of European modernism, such as Breuer.

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aug14 Wellfleet

Cape Cod Modern House Trust



The Hatch Cottage is located off of Bound Brook Island Road and overlooks Cape Cod Bay. The structure is one of the two new leases that Cape Cod Modern House Trust was granted from the National Seashore to begin renovations.




A potbelly wood stove in the living room of the Hatch Cottage. The structure is one of the two new leases that Cape Cod Modern House Trust was granted from the National Seashore to begin renovations.




Peter McMahon, the founding director of the Cape Cod Modern House Trust, talks about how the original cement pilings on the Hatch Cottage foundation were made with a beach sand so the footings cracked. The CCMHT is fabricating stainless steel replacements to "improve the structural performance of the building in ways that are not visible."




The Hatch Cottage is located off of Bound Brook Island Road and overlooks Cape Cod Bay.




The outdoor shower at the Hatch Cottage, which is located off of Bound Brook Island Road and overlooks Cape Cod Bay.




A model of the Weidlinger House, which is is being renovated by the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.




The Weidlinger House, built in 1953, is being restored by the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.




The Weidlinger House overlooks Higgins Pond.




The living room in the Weidlinger House overlooks Higgins Pond.




The covered balcony wraps around the Weidlinger House and offers many views of Higgins Pond.




The Weidlinger House, built in 1953, is being restored by the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.


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aug14

Fire Chief - Wellfleet, Massachusetts

The Town of Wellfleet, Mass., seeks qualified candidates for the position of full time Fire Chief. The Town of Wellfleet is a Cape Cod community in Massachusetts (pop. 3,200; seasonal 18,000). Current Fire Chief is retiring and has served as Chief since 2007. Fire Department is staffed with a Chief, Admin Asst, 8 FT firefighters/ALS and 12 call firefighters. Fire Chief is appointed by a five member Board of Selectmen and reports to the Board and Town Administrator. Qualifications: minimum ten years progressively responsible related experience including EMT field experience with five years supervisory fire command. Bachelor's degree preferred. Current EMT-Basic in MA required or able to obtain MA EMT certification within a reasonable time period. Paramedic certification is a plus. Wellfleet offers an excellent benefit package. Salary to be negotiated. Applicants should send cover letter and resume in PDF format via e-mail to Badgequest, Inc. at wellfleetfiresearch@comcast.net by Monday, September 17, 2012.

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aug14 Provincetown

Home town boy in one-man show back in

Local kid Brandon Cordeiro, back from New York City, brings his new one-man show, "I Love You, You're Hairy, Now Change!" to The Provincetown Theater, 238 Bradford St. Show time is 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesday, through Aug. 29. Through songs, personal stories and humor, Cordeiro explores things about people that people try to change. After intermission, he sings standards by Cole Porter, Gershwin and Rodgers & Hart cabaret style. For tickets call the box office at (508) 487-7487, or go to www.provincetowntheater.org.

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aug14 Orleans

Cape Cod Baseball Is the Greatest Form of America's Pastime

I just came back from a week in Cape Cod; a week away from the Internet; a week away from watching my beloved Mets; a week away from reading about the latest business endeavors, including Time Warner's acquisition of Bleacher Report. Let's just say that it was all worth it. It was a relaxing week. I spent two days tanning, not that I need it, added clam-digging to my repertoire of acquired skills, biked from Orleans to Harwich, MA and back (and felt the burn too), and devoured enough clam chowda to serve a soup kitchen for a day. But all of that couldn't compare to my first ever Cape Cod Baseball League game. It was a battle between rivals on the penultimate day of the season: the Orleans Firebirds (formerly the Orleans Cardinals) vs. the Chatham Anglers (formerly the Chatham A's). There was nothing to battle for except playoff position. The winner of the home split would face the second-seeded Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox, while the loser would face the top-seeded Harwich Mariners. In a game that was rife with good catches, occasional misplays and solid pitching, the Anglers won the game 4-0, allowing the Firebirds only one hit. You heard me right, one hit. My first ever Cape Cod League game was a one-hitter. I watched the game from right field at Eldredge Park, a dual-purpose baseball and soccer stadium adjacent to the local middle school. The park is unique in that there is no wall separating the fans from the outfield, so players who try to catch a foul ball will encounter a wall of people in lawn chairs. In addition, the clubhouse is in center field, behind a symphony shell and next to the bullpen. Fans are allowed to stand behind the fence, and in between innings younger fans venture out onto the field to play catch. The Firebirds, the home team and the team that I supported, being that our generous hosts have a cottage there, are rife with talent. This year's edition boasts two former first-round picks from the 2010 draft, Karsten Whitson of Florida and Dylan Covey of San Diego.

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aug14 Orleans

Voices on Orleans wastewater planning getting louder

"Town meeting has endorsed the comprehensive wastewater plan three times." "The science has been reviewed by different outside experts on two separate occasions." "Three studies conducted by engineering professionals show a centralized approach is more cost effective." "It appears there are some citizens who do not want to address the wastewater problem at this time preferring to pass it on to the next generation: [we] can't support this." Several residents approached the microphone at Wednesday's selectmen's meeting and said these statements, and many more, asking the board to move ahead with the town's comprehensive wastewater management plan. "At some point, we need to be begin listening to the professionals," said resident Judith Bruce. But at least some residents believe that point is not now. The Orleans Water Alliance, which has several engineers in its ranks, has called into question the latest - but not yet final - report of Weston and Sampson. The engineering firm was hired, after an overwhelming town meeting vote, to put the question of whether small pipes or a large centralized system (which the current wastewater plan is based on) would be best both economically and environmentally. In earlier presentations the consultants detailed how a centralized system, at $141 million, was about a million dollars cheaper than a decentralized system. And that a decentralized system would cost about a million dollars more in operating and maintenance costs. But Alliance members say the Weston and Sampson report is flawed. "A list of significant erroneous assumptions have inflated cost estimates by $30 million to $40 million dollars," said Nello Trevisan, a member of the Alliance. Paul Ammann, a licensed engineer and member of the Alliance, spent the last few weeks going over that plan and outlined the errors for selectmen. The problems fall into three major categories: the reliance on trench, not directional, drilling and "inflated" costs of replacing and repairing septic tanks and of operation and maintenance. Ammann called a number of contractors to see if directional drilling would be feasible and was told it was, which would drop the capital cost down from $57 million to $40 million. He also called septic tank companies who gave him numbers that were far smaller than the ones provided by the consultants, dropping the price tag by another 12 million. Ammann also said Weston and Sampson engineers had also duplicated a capital cost, another unnecessary $3 million. His analysis also showed that operation costs for the small pipe system would only be about $300,000 more, not a million. All those changes dropped the cost of the decentralized to around $103 million, Ammann said. That is more in line with the savings that many expected from decentralized, or small pipe systems that use septic tanks.

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aug14 Brewster

Selectmen toss bone to Brewster dog owners

Dogs and skateboarders could both find a place to play under a proposal for a multi-use park behind the Brewster police station. The Brewster selectmen Monday discussed a plan for a park in the wooded, town-owned land off Route 124. Selectman Dan Rabold, chairman of the board, has been doggedly pursuing a solution to the pooch park problem after the Brewster Board of Health banned canines from Drummer Boy Park in March. The ruling outraged dog owners and prompted a homeowner to sue the board of health. That suit, filed by Jordan Sprechman, of Manhattan and Brewster, is pending in Barnstable Superior Court. Meanwhile, Rabold has been pursuing a place for dogs to run free without annoying neighbors or other pedestrians. A possible location behind the police station has been tossed around before. But Rabold and the town's recreation department have come up with a concept that may satisfy people and pets. According to a conceptual drawing done by a volunteer architect for the town, the proposed dog park would occupy two acres in the middle of about 14 acres of town-owned land, Rabold said. The park would be fenced in so dogs could run free, he said. The fence, of undecided material, would be hidden by a buffer of trees, he said. "We want a 20- to 50-foot buffer," Rabold said. The proposal also calls for walking trails and recreation facilities like a basketball court and a skateboard park on the property. Still conceptual in nature, the plan as yet comes with no price tag on the cost of removing trees or constructing the courts and trails, he said. There's also no design or formal plan for the property at this point. The drawing presented to the selectmen was just a broad sketch of an idea.

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Monday, August 13, 2012

aug13 Wellfleet

Parkington Sisters to perform for WOMR's 30th Anniversary Celebration

The Parkington Sisters will be performing at the Wellfleet Congregational Church Saturday, August 25th as part of WOMR's 30th Anniversary Celebration for Community Radio on Cape Cod. Half of the proceeds will go to WOMR. Tickets on sale via phone (508-487-2619) or https://secure.publicbroadcasting.net/womr/concert_tickets/form.pledgemain. Tickets: $20 in advance $25 at the door.



aug13 Truro

Push is on to preserve Truro meeting house

A concerned group of Truro residents have joined together to raise funds to restore the old Truro Meeting House and generate wider awareness of this major historic landmark that once served, quite literally, as a beacon of light for the entire community. Currently the building is home to the small but dedicated First Congregational Parish, United Church of Christ. Bolstered by a $75,000 historic preservation grant from the town's community preservation committee, given with the understanding that a nonsectarian group, in harmony with the existing parish, would be formed to involve the broader community in raising funds and promoting expanded use of the building, the Friends of the Truro Meeting House have been working to do just that. Chaired by Ann Keenan, the group has already sponsored a number of activities, including a concert by the Atlantic Ensemble that drew a generous audience of 100 music lovers and the very recent Blessing of the Animals. Now in the peak of summer, Keenan and the group's board, including Nick Norman, Ann Dickerson Swanson, Jonna Sundberg, Breon Dunigan, John Marksbury and Carlotta Dyer Zilliax, are planning a public "Founders Day Celebration." It is scheduled to start at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 15, to introduce the group to the Truro community, encourage new membership and promote the group's goals to restore and preserve the meeting house, once the cultural center of Truro and the site of town meetings. Highlights of this event will include a special ringing of the historic Paul Revere foundry bell and entertainment by local children. Built in 1827, this oldest public building in Truro was definitely built to last. It has survived its share of gales, blizzards and general wear and tear brought on by the passage of time. It was significantly restored in 1955. However, today the building is again in serious need of repair, thanks in no small part to the ongoing ravages of dreaded powder post beetles and the constant presence of salt-laden air buffeting the exterior and seeping through window chinks. Recognizing that the overall restoration and preservation of the building represents a formidable undertaking, the Friends of the Meeting House have set a sequence of repair priorities. Phase one will involve the rebuilding of the bell tower. "Without substantial restoration, the historic bell tower faces the possibility of imminent collapse," Keenan says. In its present condition the tower threatens the overall integrity of the building, and it could pose a safety hazard for visitors and members of the parish. Climb up the narrow, steep, rickety steps that lead from the balcony level of the meeting house towards the at-risk bell tower and you will witness graffiti-style bits and pieces of Truro lore scribbled along an interior wall, including an annotation when Carlotta (Dyer) Zilliax rang the bell to honor Truro's 300th in 2007.

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aug13 Truro

Alec Wilkinson to read at Truro library

Alec Wilkinson, erstwhile reporter for The Provincetown Advocate, now a staff writer at The New Yorker, will give a reading at the Truro Public Library at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 14. The author of 10 books, including "Midnights," about the year he spent as a policeman in Wellfleet, and "The Happiest Man in the World," about Provincetown's Poppa Neutrino, he lives in New York City and spends time in Wellfleet each summer. His most recent book is "The Ice Balloon," about an aeronaut's attempt to discover the North Pole by hydrogen balloon. Books will be available for purchase and signing. The event is co-sponsored by the Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill.


aug13 Provincetown

Soldier Ride readies to roll out to Outer Cape

This is probably about the last place any of these soldiers expected to be. But after being wounded in combat and undergoing a painful rehabilitation at Walter Reed Army Hospital, Provincetown is indeed where they will come together, if only for one day. Twenty to 25 of these "wounded warriors" are slated to arrive on Sept. 20 to spend a day touring the town, its dunes and waterways as part of "Soldier Ride," a program operated by the Wounded Warrior Project, a non-profit group working to raise awareness of injured service members. The first part of the day will be spent biking from Yarmouth to Wellfleet along the Cape Cod Rail Trail, a particular achievement for the soldiers, some of whom have had limbs amputated and need adaptive bicycles. From there they will bus to Provincetown, where local resident Kim Hurd is working to put together a perfect day for the soldiers. "This is the first step between being released from the hospital and going back to wherever they're going," Hurd said about the visiting soldiers. "It's for them to feel they're not alone and to know they're not forgotten." The Lobster Pot restaurant has already committed to giving lunch to the soldiers when they arrive in town, and The Crown & Anchor Inn will provide dinner and tickets to one of its shows. In between, Hurd is hoping to give the soldiers a tour of town, either by trolley or bus, and get the soldiers out on the water in some way. She's also hoping to provide a gift bag to each soldier containing uniquely Outer Cape items. Hurd became involved in the Wounded Warrior Project through her friendship with Deputy Police Chief Steven Xiarhos of South Yarmouth, whose son, Marine Cpl. Nicholas G. Xiarhos, was killed in action in Afghanistan in 2009. After Nicholas's death, Xiarhos became involved in helping returning soldiers, and he recruited Hurd to help with this year's Soldier Ride, the first time it has ever been held on Cape Cod. "A country is judged on how it treats its veterans and it is critical that these young American warriors know that Cape Codders appreciate them and welcome them with open arms," Xiarhos said. The Wounded Warrior Project was formed in 2003 to help servicemen and women injured in Afghanistan and Iraq assist each other and to create direct programs to help meet their needs. What started as a program to provide comfort items to wounded service members has grown into a complete rehabilitative effort to assist warriors as they recover and transition back to civilian life.

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aug13 Provincetown

Groovy Sam Harris marshals & performs in 'Space Odyssey' 2012 Provincetown Carnival

For nearly three decades, Sam Harris has starred on Broadway, on TV and in concert. This week, Harris appears in concert at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15, at Provincetown Town Hall, 260 Commercial St., and marshals the parade Thursday, for Provincetown's 2012 'Space Odyssey' themed carnival week celebrations. Perhaps no other artist has chiseled so completely the niche of redefining the vast American Songbook, exploring songs from the roaring twenties up to today, and pleasing audiences of all ages. Harris brings this singular interpretation and inimitable style to an eclectic collection of Broadway and pop classics from Rogers & Hammerstein to Sondheim as well as U2 to Lennon to Hendrix to the stage in Provincetown. For tickets ($35, $45 balcony, $55 VIP meet and greet) to Harris's concert, go to www.ptown.org/Carnival.asp.


aug13 Brewster

Memories fond among old Brewster school chums

It's been almost 40 years since class was last dismissed but recess is over and Brewster Elementary School will be back in session Sept. 8, at 462 Tubman Road. That's not the school of course; it's Sandra Tubman's home. The old elementary school (built circa 1910) has served as Brewster Town Offices since 1976. The old school has been added onto but kids still play baseball and softball on the green field in front. "I can walk through town hall and still tell whose class was in which room," said Tubman - and she's not the only one. "When I go in to meet with [town administrator] Charlie [Sumner] before town meeting - that was an office you shouldn't want to ever to go into. It was the principal's office," Town Moderator Stephen Doyle recalled. "The office outside was the eighth grade class." "The town clerk's office was my sixth grade classroom," Jim Coogan, class of 1958, remarked. "I think about Mrs. Dunn when I'm in the town clerk's office researching history, looking at the wall where the blackboard is still behind the sheetrock. There are a lot of memories in that room, the whole building." Town hall nearly relived its school days but the town's plan to sell it to Cape Cod Light House Charter School and move the town's business to Eddy Elementary School fell through when the state threatened to reclaim $8 million worth of loans to build the Eddy School. "It's amazing the interest. Quite a few people live away but they want to come back and reconnect," Tubman said. "I'd like to get some teachers back. I know two are still alive. Two years ago Isabella LaPort did come. She remembered every single student that came to my house, and she really did remember. She loved it." That was a different era.

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aug13

On Cape Cod, upgrades come by the megabyte

Dan Gallagher is set to retire by the end of the year. And by then, if all goes according to plan, he will have saved Cape Cod from itself. As the volunteer CEO of the nonprofit OpenCape Corporation, Gallagher is months away from completing the installation of a fiber optic network that will run through every town on the Cape, enabling municipalities to communicate better and share resources, and businesses that rely on broadband Internet to relocate to the Cape. At first glance, OpenCape's purpose may seem straightforward: to provide a reliable Internet and phone service to network to a region suffering from a lackluster communications network. But Gallagher, the former information technology director at Cape Cod Community College, only sees these achievements as means to a broader end. Indeed, better Internet service could usher in a broader transformation on the Cape, where fears of attracting an even bigger crush of tourists in the summer often hamper efforts to upgrade a creaking infrastructure for year-round residents' benefit. For all its proximity to high-tech Boston, the Cape has transportation, water, and telecommunications networks that are desperately in need of updates; education and healthcare systems that need tweaking; and a whiplash-inducing seasonal economy that needs to diversify beyond tourism to thrive. Gallagher's vision for what better Internet service could mean for Cape Cod was clear at a conference co-sponsored by OpenCape last spring. There, 500 participants spent two days brainstorming the different ways OpenCape's network could spur development on the Cape. At the end of the conference, the ideas were folded into an "evolving document" outlining a vision for Cape Cod in 2025 that includes "smarter" use of the environment, "smarter" development, "smarter" education, "smarter" health care, "smarter" transportation, and "smarter" government. Of course, each "smarter" starts with technology enabled by OpenCape's new network. Most of the participants - representatives from town governments, members of various chambers of commerce - left the conference convinced of the transformative power of broadband. But not all. One veteran Cape Cod resident stopped me on my way out the door. "What do you think of all this?" he asked. I shrugged and returned the question.

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aug13

On this day in 1635: Mammoth hurricane pounded colonial villages, swept Cape

The winds whipped up to 130 mph, snapping pine trees like Pick-up- Stix and blowing houses into oblivion. A surge of water, 21 feet high at its crest, engulfed victims as they desperately scurried for higher ground. The merciless storm, pounding the coast for hours with torrential sheets of rain, was like nothing ever seen before. One observer predicted the damage would linger for decades. This wasn't New Orleans in August 2005. This was New England in August 1635, battered by what was later dubbed "The Great Colonial Hurricane" - the first major storm suffered by the first North American settlers, just 14 years after the initial Thanksgiving celebration in Plymouth Colony. Once the weather cleared and the sun rose again, the few thousand residents of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies were left to rebuild and recover from a hurricane as powerful as 1938's killer Long Island Express. The 20th century hurricane killed 700 people, including 600 in New England, and left 63,000 homeless. The settlers easily could have packed up and gone home," said Nicholas K. Coch, a professor of geology at Queens College and one of the nation's foremost hurricane experts. "It was an extraordinary event, a major hurricane, and nearly knocked out British culture in America." Coch said the pioneers from across the Atlantic likely endured a Category 3 hurricane, moving faster than 30 mph, with maximum winds of 130 mph and a very high storm surge - 21 feet at Buzzards Bay and 14 feet at Providence. Reports at the time said 17 American Indians were drowned, while others scaled trees to find refuge...


aug13

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 8/10
FOLTZ, Charles, 51, 2 Aldrich Road, Truro; being a fugitive from justice, June 13 in Truro, dismissed.

HAYES, Steven, 49, 70 Race Point Road, Provincetown; admitted sufficient facts to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), July 25 in Provincetown, continued without a finding for one year, 45-day license loss, $1,847.22 costs and $50 fee; negligent driving, dismissed; responsible for another traffic violation, filed; not responsible for another traffic violation.

McLEAN, Shanna, 24, 28 Alexander Drive, Dennis; admitted sufficient facts to OUI, July 2 in Brewster, continued without a finding for one year, 45-day license loss, $1,847.22 costs and $50 fee; negligent driving, dismissed; not responsible for three other traffic violations.

NIDWESKI, Kathryn, 22, 123 Old Main St., Yarmouth; admitted sufficient facts to larceny of less than $250, May 15 in Dennis, continued without a finding for one year, $780 costs and $90 fees.

PARENT, Kristofor, 31, 125 Bittersweet Farm Road, Wellfleet; kidnapping and open and gross lewdness, March 5 in Wellfleet, not prosecuted; defendant indicted in Superior Court.

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Sunday, August 12, 2012

aug12

CapeCast: What to do in a rip current



aug12 Wellfleet

Wellfleet's Ira Wood celebrates life and love in letters

Ira Wood, who stepped down this year after serving as a selectmen for 12 years, was once a young man who created his first work of fiction, a tragedy, at 16, won the love of a 17- year-old girl as a result, then went on at 30 to win the love of well-known writer and poet Marge Piercy, a woman 14 years his senior. "You're Married to Her?" Wood's latest book, released this month by Leap Frog Press, the company he and Piercy used to own, explores Wood's early years and his relationship with Piercy over their 30 years of marriage, in a delightful series of essays that deal with sex, drugs, politics, teaching, publishing and everything he did instead of writing. People have asked him why would Piercy want to marry him. "It was a question I sometimes asked myself," he admits. "Why in the world would a woman writer at the peak of her career put up with behavior that was rational only to an albeit sweet-enough guy who was unsophisticated and self-defeating?" If you read on, you'll find out why. He is a very funny man, sensitive, able to expose his own shortcomings and embarrassing moments and those of others with candor, but no malice. Wood possesses the "catastrophic imagination," which led him to tell the 17-year-old girl he had a crush on, that his parents had died instantly in an automobile accident, an outright lie that was exposed eventually but not before it opened new worlds to him, and his first sexual experiences. He spent his childhood fat and on prescription diet pills, he says. Imagine a 10-year-old boy in his bedroom, his mother, a petite woman, coming in and saying "How will anyone ever love you, you're so fat." He describes his mother as "a perfect size 5 petite who consumes nothing but Sarah Lee cake, her every vertebrae is as distinct as a swollen knuckle and as I envelop her in a welcoming hug, I imagine a skeleton shellacked with hair spray." He grew up in a home where honesty was something to be dreaded: "Honesty, in my family, is synonymous with vicious. To be open with each other is to attack, to unload every sordid impression." In one of his recollections, his parents are not talking to each other, his father has lost his business, forcing the sale of their home and a move to an apartment where the bathroom is the only place where there is some privacy: "Important information was conveyed loudly enough to be heard, but addressed solely to the children, so if I or my brother were not at home, my father might ignore my mother and tell the three-year-old, 'I'm getting a colon biopsy tomorrow. If they find cancer, my will is in my top drawer under the socks."

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aug12 Wellfleet

Wellfleet's flea market still thriving after 40 years

Just off of winding Route 6, past the motels, clam shacks, and myriad beach shops that line the Cape Cod byway, sits the decades-old Wellfleet Drive-in Theatre. Its massive asphalt parking lot often fills up by 10 a.m. during the summer. But the trailers, trucks, and vans are not packed with movie buffs out for an early matinee. Instead, they are laden with clothing, antiques, and knickknacks. Popcorn and soda will have to wait for later. Four mornings each week, the theater devotes nearly a square mile of parking lot to one of the Cape's largest and most legendary flea markets, where are many as 200 vendors line up to sell homemade jewelry, baseball cards, music, movies, and nearly everything else under the sun. The drive-in first opened in 1957 and vendors say the market - open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday - has been taking place for at least 40 years. For $1 admission, a crowd that includes vacationing college students, families, and locals can park their cars and walk the market in search of treasure buried amongst the piles of items for sale. "There seems to be plenty of selection," said ­Susan Fleming, 52, of Eastham, who despite living nearby, was visiting the market for the first time this week. "My friends are regulars here, so I decided to give it a try." Vendors say the bulk of the traffic during non-holiday weekends comes from repeat customers and those who have grown up coming to the theater and flea market. I first came here as a kid, to the movies," said Roger Drysdale, of Eastham, who, along with his son, sells wooden plant hangers, homemade soap, and gold-plated golf ball markers at the flea market. "It's great because you talk to your customers every day," Drysdale said. "It's one of the best markets in New England." Drysdale, a retired teacher, has been a flea market vendor for the past 10 years, splitting his time between the Wellfleet market and another one in New Orleans. After cleaning out his family's basement and cellar, he and his wife began searching for new products to sell. The soap, which comes in fragrances such as peppermint and lavender, they buy from a man in Iowa. The golf markers come from North Dakota. The plant hangers, Drysdale said, are an original design crafted by him and his adult son, Brandon. "Quality people shop at quality places," said Drysdale, who said much of the market's draw is due to the community feel. The vendors, most of whom have set up shop in the parking lot for years, come from across the country and direct shoppers as if they were all a coordinated sales team. Most know dozens of the other vendors by name.

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aug12 Wellfleet

Benefit fête in Wellfleet to fight Alzheimer's

The Wellfleet Alzheimer's Association will hold its 11th annual reception and charity auction from 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12 at Sweet Seasons at the Inn at Duck Creeke in Wellfleet. There will be wine, elegant nibbles and entertainment by the band Big Jazz with Lisa Brown. A silent and live auction will feature goods, services, vacations, artwork and more. All items up for bid have been donated by local people, restaurants, shops and organizations to benefit this not-for-profit group that spends every cent it raises providing services and help to those on the Lower Cape who are coping with Alzheimer's disease. Park your car at the town pier, and take the free shuttle bus that will drop you off at Sweet Seasons. For $20, you'll be able to get a string of raffle tickets as long as your arm, say organizers.


aug12 Truro

Stretching the limits of function in Truro

In his own words, Stephen Whittlesey's sculpture is "more about the innate sensuousness of material, and intimate connections, than about furnishings and décor." Unique, intriguing, amusing and exquisite, his work is on display at the Post Office Gallery, 38 Shore Road, Truro. The show opens with a reception from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, and runs through the rest of the month.


aug12 Provincetown

Storm plays havoc with boats at Provincetown Harbor

Several boats were blown loose from their moorings in Provincetown Harbor Friday evening, Aug. 10 One moored vessel was reportedly struck twice by wayward vessels causing significant damage. Diners at the restaurant 9 Ryder, at the foot of Fishermen's Wharf, had a front row seat as the approximately 42-foot cabin cruiser Seanacht of Nahant began banging on the seawall outside the restaurant. Provincetown harbormaster officials and the vessel's owner worked to put out fenders to protect the vessel from further damage. The water was too shallow to try the vessel's engine at the time, but it was able to be driven out at the next high tide. No severe weather was reported Cape-wide, though Barnstable County had been under a tornado watch during the late afternoon and early evening hours. NStar crews worked to repair a few scattered power outages due to trees tangling with wires and heavy downpours.


aug12 Provincetown

Boston to Provincetown, by ferry

Provincetown is the espresso of summer destinations. It's so concentrated that a little bit can be just enough. If you depart Boston on the first fast ferry of the day and return on the last one, you will have 10 hours to see the dunes and seashore, survey the art scene, shop, eat, and generally immerse yourself in the surreal parade that is P-town in summer. It's like running off to join the circus - and coming home the same night. The Boston Harbor Cruises (www.bostonharborcruises.com) ferry departs from Long Wharf at 9 a.m. and the 90-minute cruise allows plenty of time to get in a vacation state of mind. Decks of the big catamaran stand high above the water and the boat cruises at 33-34 knots. Within minutes we were passing Castle Island, the wind turbines and digesters on Deer Island, and Boston Light. There was, alas, no narration to explain the sights. Though we didn't have any luck, Captain Jason Nicastro says he often sights whales (minke, humpback, and finback), dolphins, and the more sluggish basking sharks and giant ocean sunfish. "The end of August is giant tuna season," Nicastro says. "They come right out of the water." Boston Harbor Cruises recommends arriving a half-hour early and it's a good idea if you want to score one of the window-side booths on the second-level deck. There's a small snack bar aboard in case you missed breakfast. The ferry docks at the end of MacMillan Wharf - literally in the middle of Provincetown. You can walk everywhere, but if you flag, hail a pedicab (Ptown Pedicabs, 508-487-0660). The fee is "what you want to pay," generally $6 per person. Throughout our trip, on-board concierge Donal O'Sullivan advised passengers on Provincetown sights and activities. He usually suggests a one-hour van tour of the dunes with Art's Dune Tours (4 Standish St., 508-487-1950, www.artsdunetours.com, one-hour tour adults $27, children ages 6-11 $18). "It's a good way to see the natural beauty of the area," he explains. If you would rather visit the Cape Cod National Seashore on your own, take the Shuttle from MacMillan Wharf (800-352-7155, capecodrta.org, $2 per ride, seniors $1, day pass $6, seniors $3) to the Province Lands visitors center. You can walk down through the dunes to the beach at Race Point. With traffic and scheduled stops, the Shuttle can be a bit slow, but it's also easy to pedal out to the Province Lands. One good bike rental shop is Arnold's (329 Commercial St., 508-487-0844, half-day rental $16). The natural beauty of Provincetown has long been a lure for artists. Some of their best work is shown at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum (460 Commercial St., 508-487-1750, www.paam.org, $7, free 12 and under and Friday evenings for all), where a major exhibition of work by Robert Motherwell is up through September. The town also owns a terrific art collection, much of it displayed at the Provincetown Public Library (356 Commercial St., 508-487-7094, free). The second floor of the library is filled stem to stern with a 66-foot half-scale model of the Rose Dorothea, the 1905 Grand Banks fishing schooner that won the Lipton Cup in 1907. A short video tells the tale.

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aug12

38th Cape Cod Lifesaving Competition







Saturday, August 11, 2012

aug11 Wellfleet

Harbor Stage Company Presents STICKS AND BONES

Beginning August 15th, The Harbor Stage Company launches the third and final chapter of its critically acclaimed inaugural season with David Rabe's tragic farce Sticks and Bones. The production marks the Cape Cod premiere of the much lauded, rarely produced play, a searing dark comedy whose Broadway production earned the 1972 Tony Award for Best Play. The New York Times calls the play "a poet's vision of the disaster of moral bankruptcy." A riotous and unflinching look at the haunting ravages of war, Sticks and Bones traces a Vietnam veteran's return to his boyhood home, and explores the traumatic effect of violent conflict on soldiers and their families. Helmed by Harbor Stage Company co-founder Lewis D. Wheeler, the production's cast includes Alex Pollock (Elliot Norton Award, Company One's The Aliens), Robert Murphy (Boston Playwrights Theatre, Underground Railway), Teddy Lytle (NY's Access Theater), and Harbor newcomer Caitlin Wilson as the enigmatic Zung. Harbor Stage Company Artistic Director Robert Kropf and co- founder Brenda Withers round out the cast as Ozzie and Harriet, Rabe's nod to the quintessential portrait of suburban domestic bliss. Director Wheeler notes that Rabe, a Vietnam veteran himself, is exploring "the unspeakable difficulties that young veterans - many of them just kids out of high school - faced both on tours of duty and in trying to readjust to life back home. The play dives into this chaotic absurdity of re-entry - both tragic and hilarious - and seeks a deeper understanding of what 'coming home' was all about." Forty years after the New York debut of Sticks and Bones, another American generation finds itself navigating a post-war landscape, with large numbers of veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan battling PTSD and seeking to reintegrate into life on the home front. To honor the service of local veterans, the Harbor Stage will offer a special performance of Sticks and Bones with free tickets for all veterans on Thursday, August 23 at 7:30pm. There will be a talk-back after the performance with the cast and director and members of local veteran's groups. Sticks and Bones will be presented from August 15th to September 8th, running Wednesdays through Saturdays at 7:30PM at the Harbor Stage Company in Wellfleet (15 Kendrick Avenue, by the town pier). Tickets are priced at $20 and are available online at www.harborstage.org or via the Harbor Stage box office (508) 349-6800. The first Friday performance of Sticks and Bones (August 17) will be a "First Friday" Pay-What-You-Can performance.

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aug11 Eastham

Eastham's Windmill Weekend coming up

The starting point for this year's Windmill Weekend Parade, Sunday, Sept. 9, has changed. The parade used to start at Brackett Road, which was a longer route and closed the highway for a longer period of time. This year it will start at the corner of Old Orchard Road and Route 6, next to Arnold's Lobster & Clam Bar. The weekend kicks off Friday, Sept. 7 on the Windmill Green at 6:15 p.m. with the Sentimental Journey Swing Band on the Main Stage. There will be fish and chicken fry at the Elks Lodge on McKoy Road from 5 to 7 p.m. This year's Honoree is Richard Ryder, and the Grand Marshall is Jack Dowman, who will both be recognized for their contributions to the community at 7:30 p.m. Friday, followed by the 26th Annual Talent Show at 7:45 pm. Be sure to bring your own chairs for this event.

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aug11 Eastham

"Fishermen may be found cheering for great whites" by Paul Newmier, Eastham

Over the past 30 years, Cape Cod has gone from being the mecca of surf fishing for striped bass to a virtual desert. Besides bass and blues, the surf was full of sand dabs, skates and even dogfish. Try to find any of those now. If you have the good fortune to hook up with a bass or blue, it's about three to one that a seal will get it before you can land it. Ask "experts" what they think those hundreds of seals pictured eat every day. I don't even want to think about the amount of fecal material each seal dumps along the beach each day. Wonder why beaches that never had a problem before now close for "high bacterial counts"? We'll take all the great whites we can get!

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aug11 Truro

Truro incurs $70,185 in legal expenses in Kline house suit

The town has paid $70,185 in legal expenses related to the Kline house since 2007, and the amount is likely to grow as the town defends its demolition order. On Tuesday there was a fourth attempt to save the house by the owner - a trust in the name of Andrea Kline, wife of the late developer Donald Kline. The trust filed a lawsuit in Land Court challenging the decision July 23 by the town zoning board of appeals to support the demolition order. Two other lawsuits filed by the trust this year in Land Court are pending, given hearings held Wednesday. The contemporary house, with a flat roof and glass and cedar walls, sits on 9 acres at 27 Stephens Way in South Truro. Plans for the house drew negative attention starting in 2007, in part because it was to be built on a barren landscape of rolling hills some say inspired American painter Edward Hopper. He summered next door in the mid-1900s. The house is also the largest in town, at 8,333 square feet of living space. There is no limit set right now for what the town will incur in legal expenses related to the Kline property, Truro Town Administrator Rex Peterson said Wednesday. The board of selectmen pre-approves Town Counsel E. James Veara's filings and court appearances related to the house, Peterson said. Truro annually budgets around $140,000 for legal expenses, the amount town meeting voters approved for the current fiscal year. The town pays $120 per hour plus expenses to Veara. He is part of the firm of Zisson & Veara in Dennis. The town issued building permits for the Kline house May 27, 2008. In September that year, four neighbors sued Donald Kline and the zoning board of appeals in Land Court, saying the house needed at least a special permit under zoning law because it was an expansion of a pre-existing, non-conforming structure. When the Land Court judge found in the neighbors' favor in 2010, the Kline family appealed that to the state Appeals Court. An Appeals Court judge in 2011 rebuffed the Kline family's claims and returned the case to the town with instructions, roughly speaking, to revoke the building permits. In 2010, Veara said the Kline family could go ahead and build the house - even with the appeals on the building permits - at their own risk. The house was built, and the town issued an occupancy permit in 2011. Truro intends to enforce the demolition order it issued Jan. 20, and recover fines that have accumulated while the house has continued to stand under the order, Veara said. That fine is $300 a day, which would amount to $109,500 by Jan. 21 next year.

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aug11 Provincetown

Lecture on local effects of sea level rise at Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies

Jeff Williams, scientist emeritus with the U.S. Geological Service and an educator in the geology and geophysics department at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, addresses "Sea Level Rise Effects on Cape Cod and The Islands: What to Expect With Climate Change," at 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 13, at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies' Hiebert Marine Lab, 5 Holway Ave., Provincetown. Prior to his retirement in 2010, Williams was a senior research coastal marine geologist with the U.S.G.S. at the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center, his work focusing primarily on the geologic history and processes of coastal, estuarine, wetland and inner-continental-shelf regions. He was co-lead author on the 2009 U.S. Climate Change Science Program SAP 4.1 report, which assessed the effects of sea-level rise on U.S. coasts. The program is the second in Coastal Studies' new Chase Miller Policy Forum, a series of free lectures and discussions designed to educate the public on the role of science in public policy as it relates to the marine environment. Upcoming lectures in the series include "Drawing Lines in the Sand: Mapping and Managing Community Aquaculture Development," presented by Owen Nichols, director of Coastal Studies' Marine Fisheries Research Program, and Henry Lind, retired shellfish biologist and director of Eastham's department of natural resources, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21, at the Chatham Community Center, 702 Main St., Chatham.


aug11 Provincetown

Squidding solution in Provincetown bogged down by bureaucracy

As squid buckets on MacMillan Pier pile higher, the harbormaster's efforts to curtail a perceived unlicensed commercial squidding operation have crossed into murky waters with the state. The state Div. of Marine Fisheries intervened last week when Harbormaster Rex McKinsey established a five-gallon limit per person on recreational squid fishing in response to a sudden increase in late-night, out-of-state fishermen taking the Cape Cod tradition to new extremes. According to the DMF, which oversees squid fishing but has no established catch limits, implementing the five-gallon rule was outside of McKinsey's authority. What remains to be seen is whether McKinsey merely overstepped his bounds or has exposed an unknown problem for the state. "This is a very unique situation," said Reginald Zimmerman, a spokesman for the state's Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. The department, which oversees DMF, has dealt with no other situation of this kind regarding squid or any other fishable marines species, he said. "There is always room for changing the regulations," he said. "Nothing is set in stone, but that would require more conversations." McKinsey and the Provincetown Police Dept. are standing by while town and state attorneys negotiate how to proceed. While they wait, it appears that the harbormaster's five-gallon limit has been reduced to a stern but unenforceable warning. And the squidders keep coming, as many as 75 a night taking in unprecedented hauls, McKinsey said. Earlier this summer, McKinsey enforced a four-night ban on fishing at the pier to address the sudden rise in activity and related instances of trespassing on boats. During a June 25 board of selectmen meeting, McKinsey called the ban "the most extraordinary action I have ever had to do as harbormaster."

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aug11 Provincetown

With a voice that soars to the rafters, Linda Eder flies into Provincetown to play Carnival

It isn't easy for Linda Eder to leave the life she loves: a horse farm outside of New York City and Jake, her 12-year-old son. A Minnesota native, she's a self-described "country girl" who doesn't enjoy flying. So when her career calls, she takes to the road like a gypsy, she says, heading to gigs all over the East Coast and as far away as North Carolina. "I'm 51 years old and I've been performing since I was 19," she says. "I enjoy my life at home; I wish I could just perform here and never have to leave." Luckily for audiences, she does leave. She'll perform "An Evening with Linda Eder" for two nights, Aug. 13 and 14, at 8:30 p.m. at The Crown & Anchor's Paramount Room, in Provincetown. She played Provincetown's Town Hall last summer in a benefit for the AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod. The size of venues matters not a bit to her as long as it's "a good atmosphere with good acoustics," she says. She's sung in spaces as prestigious as Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center, Radio City Music Hall, Boston's Symphony Hall and on the Esplanade with Keith Lockhart and the Boston Pops. She's also played spots as intimate as Feinstein's at Loews Regency in Manhattan. Eder's voice both soars to the rafters and drips velvet, and has earned her comparisons with legends like Barbra Streisand and Judy Garland. Her Provincetown show, she says, will offer "a mix of stuff," including material from "Songbird," the show she did at Feinstein's earlier this year to much acclaim. It features the music of female singers such as Patsy Cline, Lena Horne, Judy Garland and Etta James. "I'd done 'At Last' so much, and Etta James had just died, so it seemed like a good theme and a way to add new material," Eder says. She'll also perform songs from her newest CD, "Now," which consists of compositions by Frank Wildhorn, Eder's former husband and Jake's father. For years, the couple's careers were bound together: Wildhorn wrote the hit musical "Jekyll & Hyde," the show in which Eder made her Broadway debut in 1997 as Lucy Harris and which catapulted her to international fame.

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aug11 Provincetown

Photographer transforms dunes into living art in Provincetown

Maureen Sutter is not a native of Provincetown but she sure has the sense of a "townie" and a love for the nature of the lonely spit where the creative ghosts of the dunes wander aimlessly, often inspiring artists of all genres to let their juices flow at will. When Sutter, a photographer, was invited to accept an artist-in-residency program through the Peaked Hill Trust in 2002 she jumped at the opportunity to spend two weeks in the Margo-Gelb dune shack, also known as Boris. Built by painter Boris Margo and writer Jan Gelb, the shack, like many nestled in the moonscape, dates back to the early part of the last century and boasts frontier-like amenties such as a simple privy and candles to light the night. More modern updates include a stove and refrigerator (both gas), kerosene lamps, a wrap-around deck with expansive views of the ocean and dunes and a hand pump down the hill for fresh water. "I have been photographing the Cape since 1997," she says. "But this was something else. Everyone had told me you see more things out there. They were right. There was so much new subject matter, I consider my dune work to be my most important." And it is that work that will be on exhibit at the Blue Gallery, 389 Commercial St. in Provincetown, Aug. 9 to 23. Originally from Western Massachusetts, Sutter now lives in Northampton, where she is a teacher of photography as well as a dedicated photographer in her own right. After being "bounced out of nursing school," Sutter went on to study photography with Harold Feinstein. She then received her bachelor of arts and master of education degrees from the University of Amherst, where she studied with Jerome Liebling. She later earned her master of fine arts in photography from Bard College. Today she shares her expertise at several institutions, one of which includes Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill. Locally, her work has been exhibited at Tree's Place in Orleans, the Provincetown Art Association & Museum and the Cape Cod Museum of Art in Dennis, where she is a member of the exhibition and acquisitions committee. She has also shown her work at the Rice-Polak Gallery in Provincetown. "Marla Rice used to have an annual photography show. I submitted my photos two years in a row and each year got a very nice rejection letter," says Sutter, laughing. "The third year I submitted my black-and-white dune prints and tucked in an inflatable photo - you know, from that place on Route 6 past the drive-in with all the whales and boats. Well, that caught Marla's eye and I got accepted, she told me she didn't want the others."

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aug11 Provincetown

Richard Baker: A poet of realism in Provincetown

First known for portraits of magenta tulips standing solo, in pairs and in bouquet-style masses, Richard Baker paints like a realist but possesses the soul of a poet for whom the material world quivers with potential. Baker has lived, come of age and painted in Provincetown. He was a Fine Arts Work Center fellow from 1989-'91 and then a FAWC visual arts coordinator for two years. But except for the dismembered fish, squid and worn rope he used as subject matter on the road to his current paintings, his subject matter does not reference land, sea or sky. Having left those nautical themes behind, he now concentrates on portraits of inventive, colorful book jackets (many out of print) that prompt an "ah ha!" moment for their cover appeal as well as the narrative within. His visual goldmine is a used bookstore or library. The Wellfleet Library was the source for a paperback edition of Gertrude Stein's "The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas" with its cover profile of the expatriate art collector whose Parisian salon at 27 Rue de Fleurus was idolized and satirized in Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris." This copy and three other dog-eared editions of Stein's "Autobiography" provide signature image and associations inspiring Baker's "Tight," at the Albert Merola Gallery, 424 Commercial St., Provincetown. The exhibit runs through Aug. 30. Think of "Tight" as Baker's own homage to the artists' salon at the Rue de Fleurus, as well as to the artists who designed the book covers he admires. By means of trompe l'oeil (a form of "low art" he comments on even while using its tradition), portraits of time-worn, expertly crafted covers of books written by, about or associated with Stein and her circle, Baker wants to awaken the fervor of this time as we imagine it, peopled by Matisse, Hemingway, Apollinaire, Fitzgerald and Stein herself passionately inventing 20th century culture. More modestly, Baker's book portraiture inspires personal feelings and associations that the physical objects themselves generate, much as the cover art of a beloved book becomes a vehicle for association, a container of history and memory as well as a cultural marker to be unlocked each time that book is even handled - or viewed on a wall of an art gallery.

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aug11 Provincetown

Betty Buckley returns to Provincetown

Betty Buckley won a Tony Award for her role of Grizabella in "Cats," starred as Norma Desmond in "Sunset Boulevard," earned a Tony nomination for "Triumph of Love" and starred on television in "Eight Is Enough," in film in "Tender Mercies," "Carrie" and in many other memorable roles. In concert, she's appeared from Carnegie Hall to Feinstein's. At 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, and 5 and 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, she will perform at The Art House in Provincetown with Seth Rudetsky at piano, as the Broadway at The Art House series continues. For tickets, go to www.ptownarthouse.com or call (508) 487-9222.

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aug11 Orleans

Cape surfers cautious but confident sharing waves with sharks

Clad neck to ankles in a skintight neoprene wet suit, two slashes of black and gold war paint on each cheek and a white mask of untanned skin around her eyes when she removed her sunglasses, Maddie Gilbert-Koff, 13, was the very essence of a surf camper. At the end of a four-day session with Cape Cod Surf Camp, Gilbert-Koff munched a granola bar on Nauset Beach before heading out to the water. When she's out surfing, she said, her attention is focused on catching a wave. "But I do keep an eye out for them," she said. "I know they are out there." "They," of course, are the great white sharks that prey, not on people, but on the seals that now frequent the Outer Cape waters in ever-increasing numbers. "If I lose a limb, then I lost a limb doing something I love," Gilbert-Koff shrugged with all the innocence of youth. Camp director Dylan Murphy, 33, smiled a little at the bravado of the statement but winced a bit that Gilbert-Koff's words might have even the remotest possibility of becoming a reality. In the past three years, the knowledge that potentially man-eating giants were prowling along Cape Cod beaches close to people has spread from a select group of scientists, fishermen and surfers to the general public. People witnessed shark attacks on seals with more frequency, and photographs taken by spotter planes showed the brutes nosing close to shore, pursuing seals. The shark-tagging boat Ezduzit, carrying researchers and videographers from the Discovery Channel, is now a familiar enough sight that it raises cries of "Shark Week," a block of shark programming on that network, from those on the beach. Last week, great whites burst through the confines of speculation and research and into the real lives of those who love to go into the water when one bit Christopher Myers of Denver while he was swimming at Ballston Beach in Truro. Depending on to whom you talk, the hard-core watermen or those relatively new to the ocean, the shadow cast by the shark presence is either big and life-altering or elicits a fatalistic shrug. Although he has surfed the world and been in shark-infested waters elsewhere, Murphy, who founded his surf camp five years ago, doesn't want to put his students in jeopardy. "We're dealing with somebody else's children. I have children of my own. There's a lot of responsibility to keep them safe," Murphy said. Three instructors are in the water with campers, and lessons take place in water where they can stand up. The parents are certainly aware. Ninety-nine percent ask about sharks, Murphy said, whereas two years ago he didn't field a single question on the topic.

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aug11 Orleans

Orleans block party on Wednesday

The Orleans Police Department is sponsoring its 16th annual block party and antique and classic auto show Wednesday, Aug. 15, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Main Street, between Route 6A and Brewster Cross Road. Anyone wishing to enter a vehicle may do so after 5:30 p.m. There are no entry forms and no judging. The block party will include food and dancing from the 1950s to current releases played by perennial DJ Omar Chartrand. For more information, call Lt. Sean Diamond at 508-255-0117.


aug11

Cape Codders queried on coyote thoughts

Romney and Obama, Warren and Brown, taxes and budgets - are you sick of election poll questions? Professor Jennifer Jackman of Salem State is polling voters of Cape Cod but she has no interest in politics. Her topic is coyotes. Jackman is a member of the school's department of political science but one of her interests is animals and public policy. She is asking 1800 voters on Cape Cod what they think about coyotes. The poll has been mailed to voters because they're official residents of the peninsula, not summer seasonals. The poll contains 51 questions, covers other animals as well, and gages the person's general involvement with nature. "I live in Mashpee and wildlife is one of my major interests," Jackman said. "In 2005 I did a survey of attitudes towards coyotes on the Cape. I didn't live on Cape Cod at that time. I came here on vacation and I had some positive encounters with coyotes but I was aware of some conflicts that do occur." The current survey is to see if attitudes have changed since 2005, and to probe a little more deeply into different questions. Jackman added a four-part question on the famous Cape Cod bear. Attitudes on coyotes can be correlated with responses to questions on wildlife in general, hunting, the level of outdoor activity, pet ownership, whether the person has actually seen or encountered a coyote as well as where people live, what their attitudes are in general toward wildlife policies, how long they've lived here, how old they are and so forth. The survey tests people's knowledge and beliefs about coyotes, whether they think coyotes are an important part of the Cape, are they beneficial, overwhelming the Cape, where would you like to see them, what your coyote concerns are, do you see them often, never, on your property, along with many other questions. Jackman noted that both coyotes and the bear migrated naturally to the Cape, as have possums, fishers and porcupines during the last three decades. Humans will be interacting more with unfamiliar animals. She didn't want to discuss what issues that raises since that might influence the results of the polling, which is ongoing. "I will look at gender differences, regional differences, upper Cape versus lower Cape, whether people are year-round," she explained. "There is a lot of interest in this topic (attitudes toward wildlife). A lot has been done at the University of Cornell and there has been a lot of research in Colorado and different places."

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aug11

Are baseballs in Cape Cod League juiced?

This season, players in the Cape Cod Baseball League have hit 382 home runs. That's a 140 percent increase over the league's 2011 output of 159. Rich Maclone, a reporter for The Enterprise, did some serious digging and found out that the culprit is in fact the baseballs in use, with the league's current balls featuring a harder core then their 2011 counterpart that originated from the same company. Read Maclone's story on the Enterprise's web site, which details the differences in the balls and why everyone is beginning to believe they've been juiced. The numbers have worried scouts enough that they've already started making inquiries.

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aug11

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 8/3, 8/7, 8/8, 8/9
ALBANESE, Michael, 36, 2450 Herringbrook Road, Eastham; assault and battery, June 29 in Eastham, dismissed.

BAILEY, Michael, 45, 47 Galleon Drive, Falmouth; guilty of breaking and entering July 16 in Eastham, one year in Barnstable County Correctional Facility with 15 days to serve (deemed served), two-year probation, $50 fee.

PORTER, Adam, 31, 89 Prell Circle, Brewster; operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), Sept. 18, 2004, in Harwich, dismissed. DOWD, John R., 41, 466 Commercial St., Provincetown; guilty of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI) second offense, Jan. 20 in Provincetown, 90 days (suspended) in Barnstable County Correctional Facility, 14-day inpatient treatment program, two-year license loss, two-year probation, $1,560 costs; not responsible for two other traffic violations.

WOHLERT, Xavier, 27, 111 Connors Road, Centerville; admitted sufficient facts to breaking and entering a boat or vehicle in the daytime to commit a felony, June 9 in Harwich, continued without a finding for two years, $90 fees.

FUCCILLO, Anthony, 53, 1 Thistlemore Road, Provincetown; OUI, Jan. 16 in Provincetown, dismissed; not responsible for another traffic violation.

MIRANDA, Tiffany, 19, 17 Robert Lane, Harwich; assault and battery, May 12 in Harwich, dismissed.

RAE, Jennifer, 20, 62 Kiah's Way, Sandwich; admitted sufficient facts to OUI, July 9 in Brewster, continued without a finding for one year, 210-day license loss, $1,597.22 costs and $50 fee; negligent driving, dismissed; not responsible for three other traffic violations.

RICCI, Tyler, 21, 459 Main St., Harwich; admitted sufficient facts to OUI and negligent driving, May 24 in Brewster, continued without a finding for one year, 45-day license loss, $1,847.22 costs and $50 fee.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 8/3, 8/7, 8/8
COHEN, Jeremy, 31, 15 Arbutus Ave., Harwich; assault and battery, assault with a dangerous weapon, intimidating a witness, malicious damage to a motor vehicle and vandalism, July 30 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing Aug. 15.

DEROSA, Mark, 33, Pompano Beach, Fla.; three counts of assault and battery of a police officer, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct, Aug. 3 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing Aug. 9.

FITZGERALD, Michael, 18, 75 Old County Road, Wellfleet; operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), being a minor in possession of alcohol, negligent driving and two other traffic violations, Aug. 3 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Aug. 15.

GASTALL, Michael, 23, 484 Commercial St., Provincetown; assault and battery, Aug. 3 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing Sept. 20.

HANSON, Dana, 61, Mt. Vernon, Maine; OUI and negligent driving, Aug. 2 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Sept. 17.

RODRIGUEZ, Gabino, 37, 5 Anthony St., Provincetown; assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (motor vehicle) and two counts of assault and battery, Aug. 3 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing Aug. 16.

SILVI, John, 52, St. Thomas, VI; OUI, negligent driving and two other traffic violations, Aug. 2 in Truro. Pretrial hearing Aug. 15. BAIRD, Amy, 24, Route 6, Wellfleet; reckless endangerment of a child, Aug. 3 in Eastham. Pretrial hearing Aug. 10.

FARREN, Daniel, 32, 7 Crestwood Lane, Dennis; larceny of a credit card and larceny of a value less than $250 by single scheme, Aug. 3 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing Aug. 30.

PORTER, Adam, 31, 75 Kettle Hole Road, Eastham; OUI for the second time, July 25 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing Aug. 28. CHIUCHIOLO, Michele, 39, 2445 Main St., Chatham; shoplifting, Aug. 8 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing Sept. 12.

DAVIS, Corrine, 22, 165 North Sunken Meadow Road, Eastham; assault and battery, Aug. 5 in Eastham. Pretrial hearing Sept. 14.

LABRIE, Donna, 52, Chicopee; OUI, negligent driving and another traffic violation, Aug. 7 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing Sept. 7.

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Friday, August 10, 2012

aug10

"Hysteria" is Hysterical at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater

You have to admit, a play that inspires the stage manager to tweet, "We have to find a credible way to trip over the phallus" during rehearsal breeds a certain amount of curiosity. Hysteria: Or Fragments of an Analysis of an Obsessional Neurosis, which opened at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater on Saturday, deserves every bit of curiosity it has so far managed to stir up. It's one of those plays that gives small doses of information at a time, so you don't quite know what's happening-and you can't wait to find out. The synopsis is left intentionally murky, all the better for sucking the audience into the story. In 1938, Salvador Dali visited Sigmund Freud in London. Hysteria, in its simplest description, is a re-imagining of that visit. It's complicated by the simultaneous appearance of Jessica, a young woman who climbs the garden wall and demands to see Freud. Nearing the end of his battle with cancer, Freud wishes to refer her to another doctor, but she wants nothing to do with his referrals. It's Freud she wants. Playwright Terry Johnson is a brilliant storyteller, and this production does his script justice. Stacy Fischer captures the audience as soon as she appears, wrapping them firmly around her finger just as surely as if she had a razor to her wrist (which, incidentally, she does). One moment Jessica is hysterical, the next she is the most rational person in the room. Granted, when she's alone in the room with Dali, this isn't saying much. Michael Edwards as Freud had me arguing over breakfast about what the father of modern psychology was like, until I caught myself and realized I don't actually know the real Sigmund Freud. Hysteria balances laugh-out-loud comedy with deadly serious revelations. You don't know what's happening until it all becomes shockingly clear - at which point you may wish you didn't know what's happening. It's also one of those plays that makes you want to know more after you've left. I have several tabs open in my browser, including the Kristalnacht Wikipedia page, an essay titled The Myth of Freud's Ostracism by the Medical Community and a couple free digital editions of Freud's writing. Hysteria: Or Fragments of an Analysis of an Obsessional Neurosis is a co-production with American Stage Theatre Company, directed by Todd Olson. If you miss it at WHAT, you'll have to go to Saint Petersburg, Florida. But don't miss it here. If anything, go to Saint Petersburg to see it again.

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aug10 Wellfleet

WHAT's Hysteria filled with belly laughs and brain tickles

Hysteria: Or Fragments of an Analysis of an Obsessional Neurosis may not sound much like the name of a farce but if you add in Freud, Dali, Yahuda and a young woman named Jessica who may or may not be real, you get both laughs and well, hysteria. The play, written by Terry Johnson and directed by Todd Olson, is being performed at the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater through Aug. 25. It is a co-production with American Stage Theater Company of St. Petersburg, FL. In the beginning, we meet the elder Freud in his study as he contemplates his long past and what he perceives to be his shorter future. Played by Michael Edwards, this Freud is a bit more like a benevolent and confused Burl Ives than a cranky German psychiatrist, but it works. He is being attended by his doctor, Yahuda, played by the likeable Pete Clapsis, who is able to add a bit of subtle anxiety and piousness to his role, no matter what he is doing. It is the doctor's job to monitor not only Freud's health but to convince him not to publish his book claiming that Moses may not be who we think he is, thereby undermining what Yahuda claims as the basis of all of Jewish faith. This, he asserts, will mean that he and Freud will no longer be of the chosen and this will not do at all. Freud insists he must tell the truth.. But is that true? Enter a young lady who arrives at Freud's garden doors in the midst of a thunderstorm, demanding to be let in and heard. Jessica, played by the uber-talented Stacy Fischer, must have Freud's immediate attention and when she doesn't get it, she begins to disrobe. At this point Freud quickly pushes her into the bathroom and closes the door to avoid her being seen by the good doctor. Enter Salvador Dali, who also ends up in the closet, and the romp is in full swing. All is not fun and games, however, for the mysterious Jessica has a serious purpose and she is determined to find satisfaction. Her story was so appalling and wrenching that when the house went dark following Fischer's enthralling performance no one moved, applauded or spoke as they filed out of the theater for intermission. Even the ladies room was quiet, and that is rare indeed. WHAT always keeps us on our toes and keeps us thinking, and this production is no exception. You will find little pieces of this play creeping into your consciousness for days after you have seen it and hey, Freud and Dali would have liked that.. Hysteria is at the WHAT theater on Route 6 in Wellfleet through Aug. 24. For reservations, go to what.org or call 508-349-WHAT (9428)

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aug10 Wellfleet

Hysterical 'Hysteria' arrives just in time for vacationing therapists in Wellfleet

Imagine a New Yorker cartoon sprung to life. In it, Sigmund Freud reclines on the psychiatrist's couch, Salvador Dali perches over him scribbling notes on a sketchpad, and a mysterious young woman, dripping wet, clad in nothing but a trench coat, hovers over the pair, brandishing a straight razor. Instead of a witty caption that ties all the disparate details together there's a two-act play full of comic dialogue that, if not always connecting the dots, never fails to amuse. The play is "Hysteria, or Fragments of an Analysis of an Obsessional Neurosis," by Terry Johnson, on stage at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater through Aug. 25. It is a coproduction with the American Stage Theater Company of St. Petersburg, Fla., where its director, Todd Olson, is the producing artistic director. The time is 1938. The setting is the office of Freud's Hampstead home in London. Freud is played by a charming and curmudgeonly Michael Edwards, who takes us on a journey through the father of psychoanalysis's own psyche on the eve of WW II. Freud has escaped Nazi-occupied Vienna and fled to England with his daughter, Anna, but has not escaped a battle with cancer. We do not see Anna, but her stern, no-nonsensical voice on her father's office intercom and his arch, defeated response instantly put our sympathies in cahoots with the old man, who appears to have little left to do but confront his own rapidly diminishing mortality and question the value of the theories he unleashed on the world. The rise of the Nazis and facing one's impending death may not seem like the premise for screwball comedy. But, of course, it's the bagels and butter of Woody Allen's humor, or that of Larry David's "Curb Your Enthusiasm" or "Seinfeld." "Hysteria" isn't exactly a Jewish comedy, but that humor - a sort of shrug to God that says 'you want I should accept this too?' - ripples through the dialog. And with Salvador Dali, played with ebullient flair teetering on lovable buffoonery by Justin Campbell, this play ratchets up the zaniness, borrowing phallus sight gags and hiding-behind-doors comedy from the likes of Joe Orton's "What the Butler Saw" or even, at times, "Noises Off." And then there's that girl with the straight razor. The girl is Stacy Fischer, a WHAT veteran and cofounder of the Harbor Stage Company who recently appeared in Hedda Gabbler. Earlier this year, Fisher received an Elliot Norton Award for Best Actress for her role in Boston's Nora Theater Company's production of "Hysteria" as Jessica, a key player in a case study that comes back to further challenge the dying Freud's value to society. Fisher is hysterically funny, terrifying and visually riveting.

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aug10 Wellfleet

Provincetown/Truro/Wellfleet Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan

Planners aiming to improve bicycle and pedestrian opportunities and facilities around the Cape are sponsoring the second of several workshops focusing on a master plan for the outermost Cape towns. Representatives from Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, the Cape Cod National Seashore, and the Cape Cod Commission will host the second Provincetown/Truro/Wellfleet Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan Workshop on Tuesday, August 21, 2012, at the Wellfleet Senior Center at 715 Old Kings Highway from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Bicycling and walking are vital elements of a livable community. "This planning effort will focus on making safe connections for bicyclists and pedestrians between Wellfleet, Truro, and Provincetown," says Cape Cod Commission Planner Martha Hevenor. "Improving bike route connectivity in particular between the three towns will enable and encourage more people to choose the bicycle as a way to get around on the Outer Cape." Participants in the August 21 session will help develop study goals and objectives and preliminary route concepts and destinations. In addition, concepts for connecting the Cape Cod Rail Trail to Provincetown will be discussed.

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aug10 Wellfleet

Two-car crash briefly closes Route 6 in Wellfleet

Two cars collided Wednesday morning on Route 6, causing the highway to be closed for about 45 minutes. Three people were taken to Cape Cod Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries, Wellfleet Fire Chief Dan Silverman said. At 9:40 a.m., a Subaru station wagon heading north near Cottontail Road apparently crossed the center line of the highway and struck a Ford sedan heading south carrying two passengers.


aug10 Eastham

Local observatories offer a stargazer's ticket to the skies

On a dark, clear night, Anthony Chapman of Orleans can be found sitting in the sloping hills of Fort Hill in Eastham, scanning the universe for beauty through the eyepiece of his large, Orion telescope. It is a fascination with the heavens that he acquired in the most hostile of places: Iraq. When he served as an Army Sergeant during Operation Iraqi Freedom, he found the stars offered a break from desert life. "At night, I would use my military binoculars to scan the sky for unique star clusters and planets. On the other side of the world, the night sky shows an entirely different array of constellations, but right then, I became hooked." Since returning from his tour of duty, Chapman has acquired a sizeable telescope that gives him a wondrous view of the stars. "On Cape Cod, we have very dark skies due to few homes around certain beaches. Dark skies allow outstanding opportunities for astronomers like myself." Among the expanse of Fort Hill, Chapman chases down Hercules, Andromeda and double stars like those found in the handle of the Big Dipper. Along with vivid sunsets, the Massachusetts coast offers some of the best stargazing in the United States. According to National Geographic blogger, Rachael Dunlap, Cape Cod (specifically Surfside Beach on Nantucket, Chatham Light Beach and any beach in Truro or Wellfleet) offers some top picks for stargazing. Her post, "Dark Sky Destinations," can be found on National Geographic's Travel and Cultures site. Mike Hunter, president of the Cape Cod Astronomical Society (CCAS), believes the skies above our area lend themselves beautifully to the Werner-Schmidt Observatory at Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School. The society, which hosts star parties for the public every Thursday in August, contains several large-scale telescopes that have even caught a glimpse of the color in a nebula (interstellar clouds that often give birth to stars). Showing children the glories of space is exactly what Harwich Elementary School technology instructor Larry Brookhart does with the school's own astronomy room, which he spearheaded. Complete with large-scale telescopes, computer-linked tracking systems, curriculum and projection systems, the mini observatory is quite popular. "About two years ago Timothy Barker, who is an astrophysics instructor at Wheaton College, donated his massive telescope to us, which is the largest telescope in New England at 32 inches in diameter," says Brookhart. The Harwich Observatory's telescopes are all mounted on wheels, allowing them to be moved to any area on the school grounds for the best viewing. The facility, built through generous grants and donations from local businesses, also hosts star parties and has been used by Boston-area college students. According to www.seasky.org, this month is an especially good time to be looking up. Perseids Meteor Shower, Aug. 12 and 13, is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at the peak. The peak usually occurs Sunday and Monday, but you may be able to see some meteors any time from July 23 through Aug. 22. Find a location far from city lights and look to the northeast after midnight.

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aug10 Truro

Reality bites Cape law enforcement after shark attack

You can't arrest a great white shark, or chase him up a tree and "dart" him, but you can be ready to respond if and when he attacks. That's what local law enforcement officers are working toward in the wake of last Monday's incident off Ballston Beach. Leslie Reynolds, chief ranger at the National Seashore, whose jurisdiction includes most of the vast stretch of beach along the Outer Cape's ocean side, met with public safety personnel at Head of the Meadow last Thursday morning to address the potential threat posed by great whites. Provincetown Police Chief Jeff Jaran, Truro Police Chief Kyle Takakjian, Wellfleet Police Chief Ronald Fisette and Eastham Police Chief Edward Kulhawik were there, along with the fire chiefs from Wellfleet and Eastham, the two head lifeguards at the National Seashore, and all of the Seashore's law enforcement rangers. It's a rare event that unites so many badges on the Outer Cape. On July 30, Christopher Myers, a Denver, Colo. resident and longtime summer visitor, had a run-in with what scientists believe was a great white shark while he was swimming about 100 yards off Ballston Beach. He escaped to shore with bite wounds to his lower legs, setting off a burst of activity on the 911 switchboard as beachgoers made frantic calls to report the attack. The Truro Rescue Squad arrived on the scene about 20 minutes later, and Myers was transported to Cape Cod Hospital and then Mass. General Hospital in Boston, where he underwent surgery for severed tendons in his ankle. A National Seashore ranger also responded to the incident. Ballston is flanked by Seashore land to the north and south. It was clear after the attack that local authorities needed to "get together to communicate and be prepared" for future incidents, Reynolds said, particularly given the jurisdictional complexities involved. A great white can slip swiftly from Eastham waters to Wellfleet waters to Truro and beyond, potentially drawing out public safety officials from multiple towns and the Seashore, like a reckless driver barreling down Route 6. Great whites have stepped up their presence in Cape waters in recent years, lured by an abundance of their favorite food: gray seal. The sandbars off Truro's High Head have become an increasingly popular haul-out site for the seals, giving the sharks - which until now were more conspicuous around Chatham - a reason to wander down-Cape.

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aug10 Truro

Truro selectmen consider adding lifeguards at unmanned beaches

After the recent shark bite at Ballston Beach, the board of selectmen decided it was time to talk about adding lifeguards at oceanside beaches. Currently, lifeguards are positioned at Coast Guard Beach, Head of the Meadow and Ballston Beach, leaving Longnook and High Head unmanned. Beach Supervisor Steven St. Clair and beach committee member Gerard Kinahan told selectmen that while the town cannot prevent shark attacks, it could enhance residents' and visitors' safety by hiring a minimum of three to four additional lifeguards to patrol these town beaches. Because issues regarding funding and hiring still need to be addressed, however, no action will be taken until next summer season. "It will be very hard to find lifeguards this late in the season," said St. Clair. In the meantime, with the help of Police Chief Kyle Takakjian, new radios were installed allowing lifeguards to be able to communicate better in case of emergency situations. Signage has also been posted at all beaches, alerting the public of shark sightings and suggesting swimmers stay close to shore. "Prevention is a problem," said Kinahan. "If you want to swim out that far, then you are in their territory. . If you see seals, there are most likely sharks nearby." "There are lots of good reasons to have lifeguards," said selectmen chair Breon Dunigan. The others agreed. "Hiring lifeguards is not going to prevent shark attacks," said Selectman Jan Worthington. "But they can at least give warning, give time to get people out of the water." The selectmen agreed to review hiring additional lifeguards in the upcoming months.


aug10 Truro

Bidding begins at Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill

This year's annual silent auction to benefit Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill includes its traditional Castle Hill hand-thrown ceramic plates as well as other work by recognized historical and contemporary painters, sculptors, photographers, printmakers, jewelers and mixed-media artists. The silent auction starts at 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, in the Castle Hill Gallery, 10 Meetinghouse Road, Truro. For more information, go to www.castlehill.org.


aug10 Provincetown

P'town camp: Teens out and about

It might be in a squishy couch at a friend's house or a folding chair at a favorite beach. It might even be on a stool in an aunt's kitchen. For nine teens in Provincetown this week, Camp Lightbulb is a home - for gay, lesbian, transgender and bisexual youth. The overnight camp at Coastal Acres Campground - with tents, cots, bug bites and the buddy system - began its first summer season Sunday. It ends Saturday. The camp - with its focus on mid- to late teens hanging out with peers - is a rarity nationally, according to two gay and lesbian advocacy groups and a search of gay and lesbian youth resource Internet sites. Having an opportunity to explore fully who they are and share experiences with other youths in a safe and supportive environment is important, said Abbe Land, who heads The Trevor Project, a national group in West Hollywood, Calif., that works to prevent suicide among gay, lesbian, transgender and bisexual youths or those questioning their identity. Land was not familiar with Camp Lightbulb per se. Camp founder and Executive Director Puck Markham, who is gay and lives in Provincetown and London, got the idea for the not-for-profit camp a few years ago. A "light bulb" came on, Markham said Wednesday, explaining the camp's name. Born in Flint, Mich., Markham was raised in Europe. He attended the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Amsterdam, and worked for PaineWebber and Barclays. In 2007, Markam founded Community Money, a business in London that helps families with low incomes learn about finances. Provincetown was a very good place for Camp Lightbulb, Markham said, because it's where "being gay is unexceptional." The camp fee was $250 per person.

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aug10 Provincetown

Maryalice Johnston journeys back to painting in Provincetown

The auburn-haired Maryalice Johnston leads the way down the narrow spiral staircase to her studio. "My burrow," she calls it, her amused voice revealing an undercurrent of Southern roots. During the decade that Johnston was visual arts coordinator at the Fine Arts Work Center, she had a studio at FAWC. In 2011 she left that job, which, she said, felt more like a calling. When she left FAWC, her colleagues honored her with a retrospective of her inventive, large-scale wall installations curated by sculptor Lauren Ewing. Shortly after, Johnston's center of gravity shifted to this well-organized, partially underground space to the north of Bradford Street in Provincetown with high windows overlooking backyard gardens. Beyond are meadows that were home to a dairy farm. Just coming into the studio to work, she says, gives a sense of joy, reflected in the shift from found, manufactured objects used to her own end - plastic tubing, paraffin, crayons, bars of soap - to expressionist painting where she spreads plaster on panel or canvas and applies paint she has mixed herself. The paintings appear as a series of personal statements, textures and soft colors reflecting Johnston's love for air, dunes, ponds and Matisse-like floating gardens. One can't help but regard each piece, alive with drips and splatters, in an intimate way. Johnston's paintings will be exhibited at ArtStrand, 494 Commercial St., Provincetown, opening Friday, Aug. 10, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Also opening that night at the gallery are Breon Dunigan and Jessica Gandolf. Dunigan's interest is in repurposing discarded or forgotten objects, often with a humorous twist. She will show sculpture and prints. Gandolf, new to ArtStrand, will show landscapes describing an inner journey. The exhibit runs through Aug. 23.

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aug10 Provincetown

Nina West: Poster child for musical madness in Provincetown

It's about as close to an old-school Provincetown arts scene happening as you are likely to see this summer. Photographer Nina West is part of a group show at Art Market Provincetown, 148 Commercial St., which opens this Friday, 6 to 9 p.m. and it will be quite a party. Michael Cunningham will read and Billy Hough and Sue Goldberg of Scream Along With Billy fame will perform. Some things are just meant to be. That seems to be the case for Hough and Goldberg teaming up with West. She makes posters for their Friday shows where they sing an entire classic album start to finish. Ah, but these are not just posters, these are re-creations of those album covers that now feature Hough and Goldberg as - whoever. The AMP show features 36 of the album covers and a large portrait of Hough and Goldberg. It's been six years since West started doing the posters and she has done more than 60 of them. Depending on the album cover itself, she may drop their faces in, replacing one that's there or she totally re-creates the image with a photo shoot that simulates the original. "I have a whole collection of photos of them. Sometimes I download the cover and just a stick a head on like I did putting Sue on the baby in Nirvana's 'Nevermind,'" she says. She's learned the tricks of Photoshop by trial and error and finds new ways all the time to turn Hough into Bowie or Goldberg into Dylan. She mentions Bob Dylan's "Bringing It All Back Home" as one of the re-creations. "We went over to Sue's, she had the cat, the couch and a fireplace," West says. "But they didn't have the outfits. Sue was dressed all in black and Billy had a t-shirt on. I said, 'we need red.' And I took a red velvet dress I had and told Billy, 'Put it on.'" They pulled together the rest of the props and there it was, complete. Often albums are just faces and those can be done with overlays ("It took me years to learn about opacity," she says) as in the case of the David Bowie "Scary Monsters" cover or done as a re-creation, like in Tom Waits' "Rain Dogs." There are posters for Scream Along with Billy shows at Joe's Pub in New York also, the first being a re-creation of the iconic, mostly white Annie Leibovitz shot of John and Yoko.

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aug10 Orleans

Outdoor jazz service in Orleans

An outdoor jazz service featuring Boston musician Willie Sordillo and his quartet will be held on Friday, Aug. 10 at 5 p.m. on the Orleans Village Green, located at the corner of Route 28 and Main Street. The outdoor service is co-sponsored by The Federated Church of Orleans and Orleans United Methodist Church. Both musical and spoken meditations will be shared. A free will offering will be taken, and any net proceeds will be donated to Orleans Community Partnership. Chairs will be provided but beach chairs and blankets are also welcome. In the event of rain, the service will be moved indoors to the Orleans United Methodist Church across the street. Parking is available at the Nauset Middle School on Route 28.


aug10 Brewster

Little green thumbs grow a garden in Brewster

The auburn-haired Maryalice Johnston leads the way down the narrow spiral staircase to her studio. "My burrow," she calls it, her amused voice revealing an undercurrent of Southern roots. During the decade that Johnston was visual arts coordinator at the Fine Arts Work Center, she had a studio at FAWC. In 2011 she left that job, which, she said, felt more like a calling. When she left FAWC, her colleagues honored her with a retrospective of her inventive, large-scale wall installations curated by sculptor Lauren Ewing. Shortly after, Johnston's center of gravity shifted to this well-organized, partially underground space to the north of Bradford Street in Provincetown with high windows overlooking backyard gardens. Beyond are meadows that were home to a dairy farm. Just coming into the studio to work, she says, gives a sense of joy, reflected in the shift from found, manufactured objects used to her own end - plastic tubing, paraffin, crayons, bars of soap - to expressionist painting where she spreads plaster on panel or canvas and applies paint she has mixed herself. The paintings appear as a series of personal statements, textures and soft colors reflecting Johnston's love for air, dunes, ponds and Matisse-like floating gardens. One can't help but regard each piece, alive with drips and splatters, in an intimate way. Johnston's paintings will be exhibited at ArtStrand, 494 Commercial St., Provincetown, opening Friday, Aug. 10, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Also opening that night at the gallery are Breon Dunigan and Jessica Gandolf. Dunigan's interest is in repurposing discarded or forgotten objects, often with a humorous twist. She will show sculpture and prints. Gandolf, new to ArtStrand, will show landscapes describing an inner journey. The exhibit runs through Aug. 23.

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aug10 Brewster

Town of Brewster Brew Run this Saturday

On Saturday, August 11, the Town of Brewster will be hosting the 34th annual Brew Run. The Brew Run is a 5.2 mile road race beginning and ending at The Woodshed, located on Route 6A near Route 124. Traffic delays should be expected on Route 6A, Route 124, Route 137, Tubman Road, and Lower Road between 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Motorists should seek alternate routes if possible. There will be special event parking at the Eddy Elementary School on Rt. 6A. Shuttle buses will be running from 2:30 to 3:45 to bring runners to the start line.


aug10 Chatham

Fishermen learn new role in whale disentanglements

In 19 years of lobstering, Ben Bergquist has seen plenty of whales but never one entangled in fishing gear. That doesn't mean he hasn't experienced the effect of those tragedies at sea. He spent $20,000 a few years ago to comply with regulations meant to reduce the chances a loop of rope would get caught in a whale's mouth, front flippers or tail. But he knows that isn't enough. On Thursday night, Bergquist joined 50 other fishermen at the Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association in becoming certified in the first of five levels of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's whale disentanglement program. Each level comes with an increased level of responsibility, training and skill. NOAA looks to certify professional mariners like fishermen, marine patrol officers, naturalists and others with boating experience at that first level to put more people on the water who know what to do and what not to do. At the top level are people such as Scott Landry, director of the whale rescue program at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, who cuts the lines and frees snarled whales. What not to do, Landry told fishermen at Thursday's session, is to attempt to free the whale, even if they have the best of intentions. In a whale rescue earlier this year off Provincetown, someone attempted to free a small whale by cutting through the line off its tail that anchored it to the bottom by a series of lobster pots. If the person had been successful, a whale encased in line from nose to tail would have been freed, and difficult to find. At the entry level, fishermen would be expected to report a whale in trouble and stand by the animal until certified rescuers arrive and assess the type of gear and the extent of entanglement. Their expertise in knowing what kind of a whale had become ensnared in could actually prove more important than freeing it, Jamison Smith, NOAA's large whale disentanglement coordinator for the Northeast, told the group because it could show the effectiveness of gear changes or lead to other whale-saving innovations.

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aug10 Chatham/Harwich

Chatham Selectmen say yes to new high school, FinCom says no

Despite the fact that Chatham Selectman Board Chairman Florence Seldin told the board to remember that selectmen have never had oversight of school building projects or budgets even prior to regionalization and that such decisions have always been made by the elected school committee, the board voted to not endorse the new Monomoy High School. The Cape Cod Chronicle reports that board member Len Sussman agreed, but the session deteriorated into a major brouhaha with Selectman David Whitcomb reminding the board that "students began leaving before regionalization. The best way to get them back is to build this facility". In the end the selectmen voted 3-2 to recommend approval of the building project article. Earlier the Chatham Finance Committee debated the issue at length before voting 6-3 not to endorse the building project. Their vote came a day after the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA) Executive Director Jack McCarthy told school officials that, should Chatham or Harwich voters reject the building project, the nearly $30 million the state has pledged toward the project would likely be lost. Therefore voters at the upcoming special town meeting will be getting two completely different pieces of advice from these two top town boards on the Monomoy Regional High School building project. The Monomoy Regional High School construction project cleared one major hurdle recently when the Harwich Finance Committee recommended approval of the article seeking authorization to incur debt not to exceed $64.7 million in the upcoming special town meeting. That action came last Thursday at approximately the same time as the finance committee in Chatham, the other member town in the district, voted not to recommend the article in its special town meeting.

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aug10 Harwich

Woman hospitalized after Harwich accident

A section of Queen Anne Road near the Cape Cod Rail Trail was closed Wednesday for about an hour as police investigated a two-vehicle collision. A woman driving a Lexus ES350 was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis after the crash, which occurred at about 11:30 a.m., a witness at the scene said. A woman driving a Ford Crown Victoria, part of the John's Taxi and Limousine fleet, had minor cuts and was not transported. The taxi ended up straddling a boulder in a nearby yard.


aug10

The Local Food Report: Summer Beans

This week, Elspeth talks with growers at the Orleans Farmers' Market about summer bean varieties. An avid locavore, Elspeth lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her program airs on WCAI Thursdays at 7:30 on Morning Edition and 4:30pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30.





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Wednesday, August 8, 2012

aug08 Wellfleet

Pondering drama and deceit in 'The Agony and the Ecstasy of Mike Daisey'

The first words out of Jeff Zinn's mouth are "Hi. My name is Mike Daisey.'' A bell immediately sounds. "OK, that's a lie,'' Zinn says. That bell is heard often at Harbor Stage Company during Zinn's performance of "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Mike Daisey.'' It's Zinn's adaptation, with trenchant commentary, of "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,'' a monologue by Daisey that drew national attention earlier this year when it was found to contain fabrications. The cumulative effect of this auditory punctuation is devastating, given that the chimes resound every time Zinn recites a line that was found to be inaccurate in the original. It's fitting, too, because Zinn's mashup seems to be an attempt to make a little noise amid what he sees as the relative silence of the theater community about Daisey's transgressions. There is also a timeliness to the production that Zinn could not have anticipated, thanks to the resignation last week of New Yorker magazine writer Jonah Lehrer, after it was reported that his recent book on creativity includes made-up quotes by Bob Dylan. Of course, Lehrer is a journalist, and Daisey is a theater artist, but documentary theater is supposed to stick to the facts. He purported to be telling the truth in "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,'' which became an off-Broadway hit with its smoothly interwoven blend of stories about Jobs, the cofounder of Apple, and Daisey's descriptions - drawn, he said, from firsthand accounts - of working conditions in Chinese factories that produce Apple products such as the iPhone and the iPod. In the piece, Daisey castigated American journalists for not bothering to investigate those working conditions, something he said he'd accomplished with ease. But in March, NPR's "This American Life,'' which had previously aired the monologue, revealed that it contained numerous falsehoods. (Daisey has since revised the piece.) Zinn's mashup includes audio excerpts of a grilling of Daisey by "This American Life'' host Ira Glass. Zinn, the former longtime artistic director of Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater, reads a condensed version of Daisey's original script from an iPad, sometimes while seated at a desk on which sit an iPhone and a MacBook Air laptop. Loaded with evocative descriptions, the monologue is a reminder of what a compelling storyteller Daisey is. If only he'd stuck to the facts. About midway through his adaptation of Daisey's monologue, which he is performing on a stage that for decades was the home of Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater, Zinn makes an apparent allusion to his own resignation last year from that company. He informs the audience that he's going to depart from the portion of the script that describes how Jobs was bounced from his company by the Apple board of directors, because "we all know this part of the story: Guy starts a company which becomes wildly successful and then that company is basically stolen from him by his board of directors, who fire him. . . .'' Zinn pauses, then adds, deadpan: "I'm talking about Apple. Yeah. I couldn't really relate to that story so I cut it.''

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aug08 Truro

Great white attack in Truro verified

On the same day experts confirmed a July 30 attack at Ballston Beach was a great white shark, the board of selectmen gave the nod to the idea of adding lifeguards to the town's two unguarded ocean beaches next summer. Head of the Meadow and Coast Guard beaches have lifeguards, but Ballston and Longnook beaches offer little more than new "Caution" signs to keep swimmers away from dangerous fish. "I think it's a good idea to have lifeguards," Selectman Jan Worthington said. "It's not going to prevent an attack. If someone sees something in the water, there's time to get people out. I think we're going to see more (of this), not less." Lifeguards also help with emergency rescues, lost children and the like, Worthington said. But the practicalities - basically doubling the town's lifeguard staff - will need to be hammered out carefully and will take time, members of the beach staff said in response. "Housing," head lifeguard Janake Christensen said right away as she stood outside the selectmen's meeting room. "Truro is expensive." Training, too, takes at least a year of mentorship with more experienced lifeguards, Christensen said. The town currently has 10 lifeguards, and about eight are needed to cover Ballston and Longnook, as well, Truro town administrator Rex Peterson said. On the day he was bit, Christopher Myers, 50, of Colorado, didn't realize sharks could be swimming in the waters at Ballston. He and his son, J.J., swam out looking for a sandbar. At about 3:30 p.m., Myers was bitten on the legs as though in a vise, and a dorsal fin broke the water's surface. Myers kicked the shark away, and he and his son swam in as fast as they could. Myers was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis and transferred to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He was released Friday.

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aug08 Truro

Great white shark confirmed in Truro attack

Scientists have confirmed that a great white shark was the culprit in the July 30 attack on Christopher Myers off Ballston Beach. "Working with George Burgess, the curator of the International Shark Attack File, officials from the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries have determined that the injuries sustained by Chris Myers off Ballston Beach, Truro on July 30 can be attributed to a great white shark," Reginald Zimmerman, assistant press for the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, said in a press statement issued Tuesday afternoon. "This conclusion was reached after examination of the injuries and testimony from Myers." State officials stress that beachgoers should use common sense and be aware of their surroundings. DMF advises swimmers to avoid swimming at dawn or dusk, stay close to the shore, avoid areas where seals congregate and adhere to local beach closings and swimming advisories.


aug08 Truro

It's official: Great white bit Truro swimmer

Denver, Colo., resident Christopher Myers said it felt like his leg had been "caught in a vise" when he was swimming off Ballston Beach last Monday. On Tuesday, the curator of the International Shark Attack File in Florida confirmed what state scientists suspected: Myers was feeling the jaws of a great white shark. Myers, a frequent summer visitor to Truro, was rushed to Mass. General Hospital on July 30 with severed tendons and puncture wounds in his lower legs after a brush with an animal that scientists believed was a great white. The circumstances surrounding the incident - including the presence of seals in the water where Myers and his son were swimming and witnesses' description of the dorsal fin that surfaced near them - led Greg Skomal, Mass. Div. of Marine Fisheries' reigning authority on sharks, to state his near-certainty that a white shark was behind the attack. Skomal said he would need to examine the wound before making it official. Last Thursday, Skomal met with Myers at the hospital and collected photographs of the injuries, which he forwarded to George Burgess at the Florida Museum of Natural History. Burgess directs the International Shark Attack File, a compilation of all known shark attacks, administered by the museum. "I was able to get a very lengthy and candid interview [with Myers], as much of the facts as I possibly could," said Skomal, but in the absence of a state authority on shark bites, he needed to consult with Burgess before issuing a "final ruling, if you will." "The bottom line is, we don't get a lot of shark attacks here. Most of what we see is attacks on seals, and not on people," Skomal said. It is the first time in 76 years that a human being has fallen victim to a confirmed white shark attack in local waters. In Mattapoisett in 1936, a 16-year-old boy was pulled from Buzzards Bay with fatal wounds from a great white. "Avoid swimming at dawn or dusk, stay close to the shore, avoid areas where seals congregate and adhere to local beach closings and swimming advisories."

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aug08 Truro

Truro Considers Lifeguards At All Town Beaches After Shark Attack



aug08 Truro

A public service announcement about swimming with great white sharks



aug08 Provincetown

Expert expected testify for to driver in P'town fatal

An expert witness for Erika Salloux is expected to say at a coming jury trial the teen struck and killed by Salloux's 2006 Scion in July 2011 on Route 6 was likely walking on the highway's white line or inside it. The witness, William Dobson of Binary Engineering Associates of Spencer, is also expected to say Salloux's car likely sideswiped the teen, Blake Van Hoof Packard, rather than hitting him head-on. Salloux, 45, a professional organizer in Cambridge, is charged with motor vehicle homicide by negligent operation and negligent operation of a motor vehicle in striking the 16-year-old as he pushed his bike along the highway toward downtown at about noon July 14, 2011. Salloux is also charged with a civil infraction of failure to slow. Van Hoof Packard was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, where he was pronounced dead. He was a resident of Sarasota, Fla., where his father, Johannes "Joop" Van Hoof, lives. The teen was visiting his mother, Leslie Packard, and her family for the summer. Since receiving her driver's license in 1984, Salloux has had 28 driving violations for which she was found responsible, primarily speeding violations, state records show. She has been required to take two driving retraining classes as a result of those violations. Her license was revoked Sept. 27 because of the Provincetown crash, under what is called an "immediate threat" provision, and it remained revoked Tuesday, state spokeswoman Sara Lavoie said.

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aug08 Provincetown

Whoopi brings laughs to Provincetown women's health benefit

It was a long, fun-filled night for Whoopi Goldberg and Bruce Vilanch, who received more standing ovations than anyone could count as they repeatedly brought down the house. After two back-to-back, 90-minute comedy concerts that sold out Town Hall Sunday, Vilanch and Goldberg practically propped each other up as Goldberg received the 2012 Provincetown Care Award in honor of her commitment to raising awareness for and improving women's health. Shawn Nightingale Productions and Provincetown Cares worked together to put on the event, which raised money for the organization that promotes research, education, screening and treatment for breast cancer and other health issues for women.


aug08 Provincetown

Novel set in Provincetown shows how literature can heal old wounds

An old-fashioned romantic, novelist and year-round Provincetown resident, Heidi Jon Schmidt believes in the power of the word. Her perfectly resolved new novel, "The Harbormaster's Daughter," published on Aug. 7, is framed by "The Tempest," Shakespeare's farewell to the stage. "The Tempest," we learn early on, is the local high school's summer play. Before the final curtain, parallels between Shakespeare's remote island and Schmidt's extended village of Oyster Creek (a stand-in for the Outer Cape) become clear, as Oyster Creek's all-ages community production brings healing to its isolated island-like community, storm-tossed by mistrust, suspicion and a murder whose shadow looms large. The novel is loosely based on news coverage surrounding the January 2002 murder of Truro resident Christa Worthington. This horrific event occurs early in the novel, opening up Schmidt's focus, the childhood and especially the adolescence of the murdered woman's out-of-wedlock daughter, Vita Gray. Adopted by her mother's closest friend, Vita grows up in Oyster Creek, sheltered from the truth of a past whose secrets she gradually uncovers. This is Schmidt's second novel set in the mythical yet familiar village of Oyster Creek, a lyrical, demanding landscape she has made her fictional territory ("The House on Oyster Creek," Schmidt's last novel, combined romance with details about oyster harvesting). In "The Harbormaster's Daughter," Schmidt explores, with skill and sensitivity, the coming-of-age of a resilient trauma survivor. As Vita becomes involved in the town production of "The Tempest," she finds community and belonging (as well as young love). When Vita's Portuguese father, Franco Neves, agrees to join the cast, the stage is set for Vita to embrace her heritage, as the harbormaster's daughter. In her first interview for the new novel, the curly-haired Schmidt, a bubbly storyteller, describes the novel's use of theater - the "Tempest" as staged on the Outer Cape - to create a metaphor about healing and forgiveness at the core of her contemporary tale of family entanglement. It also allowed Schmidt to connect to her own Cape Cod life. "The Harbormaster's Daughter" was written as Schmidt's teenage daughter, Marisa Rose Skillings, a devoted thespian involved with the Harwich Junior Theater and Provincetown's Counter Productions, plans to leave town, as does the fictional Vita Gray, for the world beyond the bridge. Then, too, during Schmidt's teenaged years, her mother directed the summer theater in Sharon, Conn. Her experience was mostly off-stage, making sets and costumes. She'd watch every show numerous times, absorbing "the best literary education you could ever have."

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aug08 Orleans

Orleans school administrative cost are alarming




This chart shows that all four towns in School Union #54 have higher-than average costs assigned to administration. With Brewster at $948.76, Eastham at $1,747.80 and Wellfleet at $1,373.02, Orleans figure of $3,317 astonishes.
Data for Fiscal 2011 released by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) indicated that Provincetown and Orleans were the two most expensive school districts on the Cape in terms of per pupil expenditures. The Provincetown school district there is shutting down its high school and is sinking below critical mass. Orleans, on the other hand, appears to be a functioning district with a single elementary school. While it has suffered loss of enrollment, the school has not significantly reduced faculty in the past decade and many profess to be happy with the costs associated with running the 196 student district. Comparisons to neighboring Brewster tell a somewhat surprising story on cost versus results. In a state where the average administration cost per student is only $446.62, Orleans' administration cost of $3,317 is truly alarming. The administration costs for Provincetown and Orleans are, respectively, the highest and second highest in Massachusetts. We then tried to compare Orleans' administration cost to the other three towns that comprise School Union #54 - Brewster, Eastham and Wellfleet. As the accompanying chart shows, all four towns in School Union #54 have higher-than average costs assigned to administration. With Brewster at $948.76, Eastham at $1,747.80 and Wellfleet at $1,373.02, Orleans figure of $3,317 astonishes. Next we computed the administration cost per pupil for the four towns in School Union #54 and found they total over $1.7 million for the 1084 elementary students served. In comparison, the entire PK-12 Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District - with a population of 3,624 students - shows a cost of $1.3 million when one multiplies the number of students by their per pupil administration cost of $365.14. The Nauset Regional School District, which operates a middle and high school with a combined enrollment of 1,682 multiplies out to a total administration cost of $761,561.59 based on a per student administration charge of $452.61. Below are a three questions that might be of interest to taxpayers in Brewster, Eastham, Orleans and Wellfleet.

  1. How are the four elementary districts in School Union #54 coming up with this type of administration cost?
  2. Exactly what expenses are pulled together to compute the administration cost?
  3. Is 100% of the administrative cost going to staff and operate the school administration department on Eldredge Park Way or are indirect expenses of the individual towns being assessed to the elementary school districts?

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aug08 Orleans

Fundraiser for Orleans' French Cable Museum

Popular restaurateur and Copley Artist John Murphy has created an original oil painting for the French Cable Station Museum's 40th anniversary. The museum is holding a raffle for the painting and two framed, limited edition giclee prints. The painting is valued at $2,600 and each print is valued at $600. Tickets are $10 each or three for $25 and may be purchased at the museum on Route 28 or at Addison Art Gallery. Call 508-255-6200 for more information.


aug08 Brewster

Wreath Making class in Brewster

The Brewster Council on aging will host a wreath making class (sponsored by Comfort Keepers) on Monday, Aug. 13, at 1 p.m. A member of the Comfort Keepers Lifestyles Program will assist in making a beautiful Fall wreath. No experience is necessary. Class and materials are $3. Please call ahead to reserve your place, 508-896-2737.


aug08 Chatham

Chatham board narrowly recommends school project

In a 3-2 vote, selectmen voted to support the $64 million Monomoy regional high school construction project. The high school, which will be built in Harwich, will serve the two communities. Town Meeting will vote on the proposal Aug. 27.


aug08 Chatham

Chatham changes course, slightly

As a gesture of good faith in their discussions with the Chatham Bars Inn, selectmen decided to move, temporarily, the placement of the tee box on the second hole of the town's golf course, Seaside Links. CBI staff have said they want to minimize conflicts - errant balls - between its spa and the adjacent public course. That decision, made in executive session, was announced by Selectmen Sean Summers who said that the town has been meeting with resort officials in hopes of resolving parking at the fish pier. The pier is getting increasingly crowded and selectmen are hoping to gain control of parking spaces the have leased from CBI. The tee box adjustment - which will have no "measurable" impact on the public's enjoyment - was made to "ensure CBI continues negotiations that will resolve the parking situation at the fish pier this year in a way that will improve long-range public access," Summers said.






Tuesday, August 7, 2012

aug07 Wellfleet

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Blackberries

The art and ritual of picking blackberries. Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing. Robert Finch has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. He is the author of six collections of essays, most recently "The Iambics of Newfoundland" (Counterpoint Press), and co-editor of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing." His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday at 8:30AM and every Wednesday at 5:45pm.



aug07

CapeCast: Where sharks swim every day



aug07

CapeCast: In search of Cape land sharks



aug07 Wellfleet

Wellfleet library presents historical vignettes

Hear stories from the files of the Wellfleet Historical Society, selected by Barbara Kennedy, at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 8, at the Wellfleet Public Library. All are welcome to the free event.


aug07 Wellfleet

Officials hope manual will help lifeguards, beachgoers confirm shark sightings

Every time something with a prominent dorsal fin slices through the water off a Massachusetts beach, a question races through everyone's mind: What the heck was that? Now, officials at the Cape Cod National Seashore and the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries are hoping to provide some answers, by compiling a manual to help lifeguards and beachgoers identify what they have seen. The manual is only in the planning stages but officials hope to complete it in a few weeks. Shark concerns have been growing in recent years, with an increased number of great white shark sightings, particularly in areas along the Cape frequented by seals, a favorite food for some sharks. Last Monday, a Colorado man - who had been swimming with his son off Ballston Beach in Truro - needed dozens of stitches after being bitten in the legs by what officials believe was a great white shark. The national seashore has been contacting other national parks across the country for help with the manual, particularly the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in California, which often deals with great white sharks in its waters, said Leslie Reynolds, the seashore's chief ranger. The manual will include multiple marine animals, helping people to distinguish great white sharks from harmless animals that people can mistake them for, including basking sharks, sunfish, dolphins, whales, and even birds, Reynolds said. The officials do not expect the manual to turn into an all-encompassing encyclopedia, but a good reference for what people may encounter in New England waters. Along with the reference manual, there will be a questionnaire for the public to fill out after shark sightings, said Reynolds. The national seashore is also finalizing its manual for response to shark or other animal attacks, she said.


aug07 Wellfleet

Shark warnings spotty at area beaches

Martha Ganley studied the fact sheet tacked to a board outside the Nauset Beach administration building Monday afternoon, looking at two pictures of dorsal fins, an explanation of great white sharks versus basking sharks. Ganley said she already knows to stay out of the water when seals are around to avoid a shark bite. Still, she and at least six others stood in the full sun, some in wet bathing suits and sandy feet, taking several minutes to scan the pages for more information. Up and down the Cape's Atlantic coast, information about how beachgoers can keep themselves safe from a shark attack is appearing at beach entrances. It might be fair to say that Orleans and Chatham have a head start, given that great whites have been spotted there increasingly for at least three years. In Chatham, for example, a glossy brochure tacked to the entrance message board at Lighthouse Beach warns about sharks and strong currents. Of 16 beaches checked on Monday from Provincetown to Chatham, the fact sheet at Nauset Beach, managed by the town of Orleans, was the most colorful and comprehensive and seemed to attract the most attention. In contrast, Nauset Light Beach in Eastham, operated by the Cape Cod National Seashore, didn't have a warning sign either at the entrance booth or at the beach entrances, partly because the signs keep getting stolen, two lifeguards said. A week ago, on July 30, Christopher Myers of Denver, Colo., was bitten by what is believed to be a great white shark at Ballston Beach in Truro. He was released Friday from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. State shark specialists are still studying the evidence to confirm that it was a great white that bit Myers. If it is in fact a great white, the injury will be the first confirmed human bite in Massachusetts in nearly 80 years. In response to the incident, Truro and Wellfleet and the Seashore have begun adding signs or are considering signs along their ocean beaches. At Coast Guard Beach in Eastham, for example, there is an 8-by-11-inch sign posted by the Seashore that warns, "Caution, Recent Shark Sightings." In Wellfleet, none of the four ocean beaches managed by the town - Newcomb Hollow, Cahoon Hollow, White Crest and Lecount Hollow - had signs Monday warning bathers that there had been recent shark sightings in a neighboring town or telling them how to protect themselves. The other ocean beach in Wellfleet - Marconi Beach, which is managed by the Seashore - had one of the 8-by-11 Seashore signs about shark sightings on a message board at the entrance. The six ocean swimming beaches in Truro and Provincetown, which are either managed by the Seashore or the town of Truro, had at least one warning sign.

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aug07

Shark Sightings from Cape Cod to Wall Street

It happens every summer, reports of shark sightings off the shores of Cape Cod. This year, as in past summers, local authorities closed beaches in the towns of Chatham, Wellfleet and Truro. To some tourists, who looked forward to vacationing on the beaches of Cape Cod, this was not only a disappointment but considered an overly cautious decision since no fatal shark attacks have occurred in Massachusetts since 1936. Still, sharks do occasionally attack people. On Monday, July 31st, a tourist swimming at Ballston Beach on the Cape's National Sea Shore, had his legs bitten by a shark. Nevertheless, a recent University of Florida study indicated that shark attacks in the United States have decreased over the past decade, down from an average of 39 attacks per year to an average of 29 in 2011. Those attacks, often coupled with the public's memories of the horror movie, Jaws have consistently led the Cape's town fathers to err on the side of caution, even at the risk of losing business from unhappy vacationers. Ironically, marine biologists report that sightings of the great white shark -- the largest predatory fish in the ocean -- are more frequent off the Massachusetts coast than ever before, a result of an uptick in the grey seal populations that frequent the warm waters of Cape Cod. Simultaneously, there has been an sharp increase in reports of shark sightings on Wall Street and these seem to be multiplying at an unprecedented rate. Witness the financial crises of 2008, the Bank of America debacle, the Goldman-Sachs double dealings, J.P.Morgan Chase alleged miscalculations, suspected collusion in setting the Libor rates and most recently, the use of customer funds to stave off M.F. Global and the Peregrine Financial Groups' alleged embezzlements. Unlike marine biologists, economists and politicians have difficulty pinpointing the core cause of such attacks upon the American public. Like the carefree seals of Cape Cod, the average citizen swam blithely through the warm waters of the late 1990s and early 2000s, enjoying easy credit, a housing bubble and an enduring faith in the rock-bottom stability of financial institutions. Without warning, the submerged jaws of corporate greed suddenly surfaced, swallowing in its ravenous maw the America public's lifetime investments, stocks and pension plans, effectively consuming the once-bright futures of millions of aging baby boomers for the sake of big bonuses. A new generation of finance shark pups have been growing in the muddy waters of big business since the 1980s, at first by nibbling at the regulatory restrictions of the Glass-Stegall Act and then in 1999, with the assistance of government regulators, the U.S. Congress and the executive branch, by enabling the investment banks to swallow it whole. By the late 1990s and early 2000s, the pups, who were growing fatter and bolder in every fiscal quarter, stirred the bottom of the ocean floor with subprime loans made to gullible home buyers and in the ensuing murk offered rating-agency approved loans to feckless institutions. Among them were the nation's mutual, endowment and hedge funds and many of its pension plans. In those opaque but seemingly free-flowing waters of the first years of the twenty-first century, the American public blithely accepted offers of easy-to-obtain credit. That, combined with fathomless leveraging by the now fully-matured finance sharks, led to the cresting of an illusory affluence. Inevitably in 2008, the cross currents of financial engineering produced a whirlpool which sucked the American public's investments to the bottom of the ocean. Bereft remnants of America's middle class now cling breathlessly to the rocky cliffs of financial ruin as they contemplate an uncertain future dangling just above the still-snapping jaws of their Wall Street predators. The great white shark, for all the bad raps it has received, it is not a greedy creature. It never eats to excess but only for its own survival at the rate of one seal every three months. The same cannot be said about Wall Street. Had our politicians, economists and regulators respected the cautionary example set by Cape Cod's town fathers, the sharks of Wall Street might never had feasted upon the American public. Our economy might still be well afloat and our nation's homeowners never known the anxiety associated with being "under water."


aug07 Eastham

Lobster clambake at the Orleans-Eastham Elks

It's time for the annual Summer Clambake at the Orleans-Eastham Elks, which will be held Saturday, Aug. 11, at the Elks Pavilion, 10 McKoy Road. There's a choice of native lobster for $30 or for a sizzling grilled steak for $25, including all of the fixings. Cocktails served starting at 4 p.m., dinner at 5 p.m. For tickets and information, call 508-240-5846.


aug07 Truro

Weddings halted at Truro's 'Hedgebound'

Reversing an earlier decision, the town last week ordered that owners of a private home advertised as a wedding destination stop the activity. Building Commissioner Tom Wingard sent a cease-and-desist letter to the owners of 2 Holsbery Road, John and Anna Endicott of Los Angeles, Calif., ordering them to stop advertising their 20-room property, known as "Hedgebound," as a wedding and large event destination. Neighbors complained after four weddings were held over a four-week period earlier this summer. Because the property was listed on several websites as a spot for family weddings, Wingard said, the house was, in effect, being used as a commercial property, which violates zoning bylaws for the residential neighborhood at the intersection of Depot and Old County roads. "To abate this violation, you must cease the repetitious use for wedding/event purposes and remove all advertisements, either yours or external Internet links, indicating this as a commercial wedding/event site," said Wingard's letter, dated July 25. Initially, Town Administrator Rex Peterson stated on June 29 that holding four weddings at Hedgebound over as many weeks did not necessarily constitute a commercial use and was, therefore, allowed under town bylaws. His decision came after a group of neighbors, led by Rosalyn Baxandall, wrote a formal complaint about the noise, portable toilet smells and congestion caused by the back-to-back weddings. Baxandall persisted, however, writing a letter to selectmen showing that Hedgebound was advertised on several websites specifically as a wedding destination. Wingard said the additional information led him to believe the property was, indeed, being marketed as a commercial business. "There was more evidence they were advertising as a wedding and event destination," he said. Under town bylaws, the Endicotts can appeal Wingard's cease-and-desist order. It's not clear how many weddings - if more weddings are planned at Hedgebound this summer - will be inconvenienced by the order. According to the Hedgebound website at www.vrbo.com, the property is fully rented through the first week in October except for a few scattered days mid-week. However, it is unclear whether those rentals involve weddings or other large events. Short-term, non-commercial rentals are allowed in residential areas.

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aug07 Truro

Build a 'dream box' at Truro library

Jennifer Stratton, expressive arts facilitator, will lead a class for young people on how to create a dream box using mixed-media collage at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 8, at the Truro Public Library. Register by calling (508) 487-1125.


aug07 Orleans

"Spoon Man" performs in Orleans

On Tuesday, Aug. 7 at 4 p.m. the "Spoon Man," an author who offers a hilarious interactive comedy program for all ages, will give a stirring performance, pun intended. Wednesday the library offers pajama story time at 6:30 for 3 to 6 year olds. Marianne Sinopoli invites children to the library in their pajamas and to bring a soft, cuddly friend for books, finger rhymes, flannel board, songs and musical movement activities and fun. Siblings are welcome.


aug07 Brewster

Brewster Elementary School will hold reunion

Calling all graduates of Brewster Elementary School! There will be another informal potluck 'reunion' for all those who attended Brewster Elementary school. The date is Saturday, September 8, at noon, and the location is 462 Tubman Road. Please RSVP to 508-776-4112, 508-896-3128 or 508-896-5786.


aug07 Chatham

"Plan Bs" won't work for regional school, Chatham selectman says

With town meeting to decide on whether to spend $64 million for a new regional high school just weeks away, a number of people are coming forward with new ideas and different approaches. Selectman David Whitcomb, who is also on the Monomoy Regional High School building committee, got an earful of possible new plans Tuesday when his group came before his board. After close to two hours he had this to say - taxpayers aren't anteing up $64 million - the state is picking up half and Harwich is picking up 72 percent of that. "All of the plan Bs will cost more than $9.8 million and will give you an inferior facility," he said. And when he heard that Chatham taxpayers could end up paying for a school that had no Chatham students Whitcomb responded that indeed Chatham students had left for different school systems in recent years. But they left because student numbers were so low there weren't enough classes, sports, arts and social opportunities. Merging with Harwich provided students with a better educational experience, he said. But it was clear that not everyone agreed with Whitcomb's assessment. One of the biggest criticisms was that selectmen and the finance committee, having just received the schematics and background on the cost, were woefully at a disadvantage when it came to vetting. Selectman Sean Summers pointed out that suggestions made by the finance committee last week shaved more than $400,000 off the price tag. That's the type of constructive input there would be more of if the process wasn't so rushed, he added. Summers explained the consternation wasn't about whether to regionalize - that question had been answered - but about the lack of opportunity to offer input on building design and space needs. Others pointed to unanswered questions, such as the yet-to-be- revealed increased health and salary costs, because the two towns have different contracts, and if modular construction would be less expensive. Whitcomb said that if there were unanswered questions his committee would be more than willing to address them.


aug07 Chatham

Surprise dampens kayakers' trip in Chatham

What they believe was a particularly nasty sewage spill has a kayaking couple leery of going back to one of their favorite spots on the Cape. David Lewis of Arlington and his wife often kayak from Morris Island Road, across from the end of Stage Harbor, out between North Monomoy and South Beach. "We used to roll and play in the water," he said. But on Monday the sight of what he characterized as floating excrement quickly killed any thoughts of even touching the water. "We were shocked this time to find the entire way studded with raw sewage yes, sewage - and it stank," he wrote in an e-mail to The Cape Codder. Lewis said the sewage extended for basically three miles - in varying amounts - from the cove off the east side of Morris Island Road, opposite Stage Harbor to the "cul de sac" created by the recent land bridge between South Beach and South Monomoy Island. He said it was way too extensive to way too much to be a boat operator dumping waste and was man, not seal, made. Robert Duncanson, Chatham's director of health and environment, said he hadn't heard any reports of a sewage slick, but after speaking with Lewis he did some sleuthing by calling a number of people that would have been in the area - including the harbormaster and a local boat company - trying to get to the bottom of the mystery. He also went out to the area to investigate, but there was no evidence. In speaking with others who spend a lot of time on the water Duncanson said it may have been decaying mung, which gives off a scent rather like sewage and is brown, thick and gloppy looking. Sometimes, he added, people mistake bleached-out sea lettuce for toilet paper as well. "It appears to be a natural condition," he said. "There are no sources in the area." Lewis said it was the first time they had ever seen anything like that and they have paddled in the area countless times. "This used to be one of our favorite paddles anywhere, and we did it at least once a year," he wrote. "If it's a one-time event, then I hope somebody can explain what has happened and how to avoid it in the future."


aug07 Chatham

Chatham sign conundrum solved

Selectmen have spent many hours over the years approving signs for the popular traffic island on Main Street, making sure there weren't too many, they weren't up too long, and they were for community events. Recently, the issue involving the triangle to the right of the rotary at the intersection of Stage Harbor, Queen Anne and Old Harbor roads became more dicey as some were worried about safety and others were worried about too much free advertising for clam bakes and craft shows. This week the selectmen got the welcome news that approving signs at the triangle - which they have done for decades - wasn't there responsibility after all. The median island was on state property. The board decided to let their August approvals stand, but after that folks are likely out of luck. "All of our dilemmas should be so easily answered," said Selectman David Whitcomb.


aug07 Chatham

Chatham shellfish committee looks ahead

In the shellfish advisory committee's annual update to the board of selectmen, Chairman David Likos said that members are looking into whether to support a new county effort. Under the direction of Bill Clark of Cape Cod Cooperative Extension, the county is considering buying Aquaculture Research Corporation in Dennis. The private business now supplies much of the seed, or baby shellfish, to towns across the Cape to help them boost populations. The current owners would then lease the property and run the facility. The idea is have the towns get involved in the purchase by dedicating $50 of commercial shellfish permit fees and $10 of recreational to the endeavor, Likos said. Likos said the committee thought it was an important effort but several decades ago a similar plan fell apart so they want to do research first. The committee is having an open house for its shellfish propagation program on Aug. 10 from 9 a.m. to noon at the upweller, which is under the harbormaster's office at Old Mill Boatyard.


aug07 Harwich

Cape League: Harwich clinches East

Defending Cape Cod Baseball League champion Harwich wrapped up the East Division title Monday, scoring twice in the bottom of the ninth to post a 2-1 victory over Brewster at Whitehouse Field. Brett Austin (N.C. State), honored before the game as the Mariners 10th Player Award winner, singled home Matt Reida to bring the regular-season crown to Harwich.

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aug07

On this day in 1961: President Kennedy signs Bill to create Cape Cod National Seashore

On this day, Aug. 7, 1961, President Kennedy signed a the bill creating the Cape Cod National Seashore, a 26,666-acre strip of dunes, heath, cliffs and fresh-water ponds bordering the Atlantic Ocean. It would be another two years before his dream of a National Seashore to preserve a massive piece of Cape Cod for future generations, and by then he would be dead. Mr. Kennedy had first proposed the park years before when he was a first-term US Senator, and the politics of that gentler era enabled him to get the other Massachusetts US Senator, Levertt Saltonstall, a Republican, to co-sign the bill.

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Monday, August 6, 2012

aug06 Wellfleet

Pickup truck hits seven vehicles in Wellfleet

Police said two people were hospitalized after a pickup truck hit seven different vehicles in the parking lot at Great Pond Beach on Sunday afternoon. Wellfleet police received several calls of a car accident in the beach's parking lot at 4:30 p.m., The callers told police that two people were trapped between cars because of the collisions. When emergency personnel arrived on the scene, the trapped people had been free. Police said two people were taken to Cape Cod Hospital with unknown injuries. The National Park Service assisted with closing down Cahoon Hollow Road for a period of time.

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aug06

Freud, Dali and madcap madness at W.H.A.T.

Dreams clash with reality. Fantasies face off, and the unconscious surfaces in Terry Johnson's "Hysteria: Or Fragments of an Analysis of an Obsessional Neurosis," at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater this month. It truly is a mad, mad world - well, at least hysterical - as intruders burst into, you guessed it, Sigmund Freud's study at the somewhat quiet end of his life. Johnson's 1993 play is a madcap farce, a laugh-out-loud comic romp laced with dark interludes, which come to haunt Freud in the year before his death. Related to some of Freud's work and actual events, Johnson's play creates a scenario with witty dialogue and burlesquelike slapstick that imagines a meeting between Freud and Salvador Dali (the surrealist artist did visit Freud), and a haunting figure who arrives to challenge Freud's sexual theories and his integrity. In 1938, after the Nazis took over Austria and a year before he died of cancer, Freud and his family escaped to safety in England. When the play opens he is musing in his study when a woman in a raincoat persistently knocks on the garden door. He finally lets her in and she proceeds to taunt him, questioning his theory of "penis envy" and finally taking off her clothes and hiding in a closet (actually a bathroom). Yahuda, Freud's doctor, arrives questioning his manuscript "Moses and Monotheism," which expresses Freud's denial of God. With the death of God, Freud tells his Jewish doctor, "We begin to believe in ourselves." Yahuda responds to the psychoanalyst: "You relate to one invisible thing and refuse to recognize another." "Hysteria: Or Fragments of an Analysis of an Obsessional Neurosis" plays through Aug. 25.

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aug06 Eastham

Commission: Don't rename building after Tip O'Neill

The Barnstable County Commissioners voted Wednesday against a plan to rename the Salt Pond Visitor Center in Eastham for the late Speaker of the House Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill Jr. Commissioner William Doherty brought the issue to the county board after several people asked him why the plan had been proposed, and Brenda Boleyn, a former member of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission, wrote to him opposing the renaming. The Eastham facility at Route 6 and Nauset Road is the Seashore's only year-round welcome station for the roughly 4.5 million people who visit the park each year. On April 19, bills to rename the visitor center were filed in the Senate and House, introduced by U.S. Rep. Edward Markey and U.S. Sen. John Kerry, both Massachusetts Democrats. The visitor center's new name would be the Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. Salt Pond Visitor Center. A House report issued July 17 estimated the cost of a new interpretive sign at the welcome center would be $45,000. If any renaming is to occur, it should be for people who had important roles in the creation of the Seashore, Doherty said. He added that he bears no malice in the issue and has the greatest respect for O'Neill, who owned a home in Harwich where Doherty lives. "In the other parts of the country, they don't name parts of the national seashores for people," Doherty said Thursday. "I just had the impression that people were sitting around saying, 'Well, why don't we name something after Tip O'Neill.' At the end of the day, I just felt that someone should speak up. I don't think this was well-considered." By Thursday, the House bill had been placed on the calendar for consideration and the Senate bill remained under consideration by the subcommittee on national parks, part of the committee on energy and natural resources. The Seashore was established Aug. 7, 1961, with a signature of President John F. Kennedy. U.S. Sen. Leverett Saltonstall and Kennedy, then still a senator, along with U.S. Rep. Hastings Keith, introduced the legislation on Sept. 3, 1959. The state's full congressional delegation supported the filing of the O'Neill bill in April as a way to honor the congressman's 100th birthday this year. The bill also cites O'Neill's early support of the preservation of land on Cape Cod and his support of national parks in Massachusetts, along with his long and accomplished service in the House. O'Neill served 34 years in Congress - 10 as Speaker of the House - and retired in early 1987. But opposition has arisen locally against the idea, including from Keith's two daughters. The three county commissioners voted unanimously to endorse a letter of opposition written by Boleyn to U.S. Rep. William Keating, D-Mass., who represents Cape Cod, and Markey. The commissioners will also write a similar letter to Keating, county commission Chairwoman Mary Pat Flynn said.

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aug06 Eastham

Cape Cod National Seashore to Host Meet the Author Event with Nan Parson Rossiter

Henry Beston's beloved Cape Cod classic The Outermost House has been popular among readers since it was first published in 1928.Today, award-winning author/illustrator Nan Parson Rossiter has transformed this classic for younger readers in her new book The Fo'c'sle: Henry Beston's "Outermost House."Join Rossiter on Thursday, August 9 at 3PM at the Salt Pond Visitor Center in Eastham where she will read, answer questions, and autograph copies of her book. Most adults know, and many have read, Henry Beston's beloved account of the year he spent on the beach on the Outer Cape where he made a life in a 16' × 20' shack, simply furnished with a kitchen, a bed, a chest of drawers, a writing table, and a few chairs.He lived there, alone, through the changing seasons, the migration of birds, the howling of the winter storms, the occasional visits of surfmen from nearby Nauset Station, and the turning of the stars in the night sky.During the days, he would wander along the beach, take notes, and think.At dusk he would come home to write by lantern light.Rossiter's book brings to life the simple, descriptive nature of Beston's writing through beautiful illustrations and interpretations of his prose that can be appreciated by a younger audience.

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aug06 Eastham

What's happening at the Eastham Senior Center

The following events take place at the Eastham Senior Center, 1405 Nauset Road. For more information, call 508-255-6164. Join Nancy Reynolds, Director of Professional Relations for Hospice & Palliative Care as she presents "The Road We're All On: Dispelling the Myths of Hospice." Friday, Aug. 10, at 10 a.m. Enjoy music by Paul Ashley and a lobster roll luncheon with friends Friday, Aug. 17, beginning at 10 a.m., followed by lunch. Dine on a hearty lobster roll, chips, cole slaw, and a tall glass of ice tea, all for $8. Space is limited; reserve your spot today by calling the senior center. Free Flick Fridays continue in August at 12:30 p.m. Call to find out movie titles.


aug06 Truro

Truro man, 18, charged with drunken driving

An 18-year-old Truro man was charged with drunken driving after he allegedly rolled his car and crashed into a tree on private property. In addition to operating under the influence of alcohol, Gregory D. Takakjian, will face charges of negligent operation of a motor vehicle and failure to stay within marked lanes according to the Brewster Police Department logs. Police came across the crashed car in the front yard of a Tubman Road house at about 2:30 Sunday morning. It appeared that the vehicle had rolled over and crashed into a tree. Neither Takakjian nor a passenger in the car required hospitalization. Takakjian was released from police custody on personal recognizance.

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aug06 Truro

Sebastian Junger discusses his travels at Truro's Highland House

Author and journalist Sebastian Junger will talk about his 20 years of traveling the world, and the adventures they brought, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 8, at the Highland House Museum in Truro. Tickets, $20, are available at the museum; seating is limited.


aug06 Truro

Sharing the artist's life in Truro

Tom Watson and Francie Randolph's paintings differ markedly in scale, scope and media. Recently, however, they share a common marine theme and paired in one exhibit the works are quite complementary. On Tuesday, Aug. 7, from 5 to 8 p.m. the two painters will open their studios at 45 Depot Road in Truro to host a public reception celebrating a dual exhibit that is becoming a local tradition. Although they regularly hold open studios in season on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, this annual show is an expanded opportunity to display a tangibly unified collection of new or very recent work, see old friends, welcome new appreciators of their work and highlight how this work has grown and changed over the previous 12 months. The open studio format allows a collector access to the artists, and conversely Watson and Randolph stand to gain new perspectives about their work during on-site conversations with visitors. "I like verbalizing what I'm doing," Watson says. "For me, that's one of the great bonuses of exhibiting my own work and selling it directly to people. I get to articulate what I am doing and why I'm doing it. I think also you can make artwork and know why you are making it, but you can show it to people who have no idea what the work is all about from the artist's perspective. So, to be able to say this is my idea, this is what I am exploring, to try to make concrete what you are doing can add a whole new level of meaning for the collector." Watson occasionally paints in watercolors but prefers oils. "There is a lot more flexibility with oils. You can change things. With watercolor, once each layer of paint is dried you are committed. Watson's "Oceanus" depicts an expansive, dramatic, brooding image of a deep dark sea. This painting mixes tranquility with the possibility of impending danger, feelings many people share when contemplating a vast expanse of the Atlantic. Watson has been working on this immense canvas for a long time, part of his preparation for a major three-person show at the Cape Cod Museum of Art, which opens Dec. 1 and runs through Feb. 3, 2013.

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aug06 Truro

Boat propeller accident in Truro sends man to hospital

A man suffered lacerations to the arm after being struck by a boat propeller around 3:15 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 4. The incident happened in Cape Cod Bay off Kestrel Lane. The victim had to be carried up the tall dune to the ambulance and then was taken to Cape Cod Hospital.


aug06 Provincetown

Seashore Point expansion set to begin in Provincetown

Seven down. Five to go. That's the mantra Seashore Point executive director Kevin Comick has been repeating to himself lately. It refers to the number of condominiums in phase 2 of the senior citizen living facility that have been pre-sold so far - seven - and the number left to sell before construction can begin - five. That's the formula required by Cape Cod Five Bank, which is financing the expansion of the independent and assisted living community. As soon as 12 of the new condos are sold, the long-delayed expansion, which will add 38 new units to the facility, can begin. We think 12 is realistic by October," Comick said. "We want shovels in the ground by Thanksgiving." The phase 2 expansion, which would add to the existing building that holds 43 one- and two-bedroom apartments, a 41-bed nursing home and a wellness and rehabilitation center, was originally planned for 2009, approximately one year after Seashore Point first opened to tenants. But the drop in the housing market in 2008 caused about 50 percent - 21 - of the people who had put deposits down on apartments in phase 1 to pull out because they needed to postpone their retirement or didn't feel they could sell their existing homes in order to move to Provincetown. Since then, Seashore Point marketing officials have come up with several creative ways to fill phase 1, including hosting a wide variety of lectures, seminars and art exhibits to draw people into the facility. In 2009, the facility also began offering short-term rentals from two weeks to two months to give people an opportunity to experience the building and accompanying services, which, for a monthly fee, includes meals. And the rental structure of the facility was changed to condominium, allowing residents to own their units. That has all helped to boost sales and year-round rentals in phase 1. There are just eight out of 43 units still available. That was enough to give the go-ahead to phase 2, which will include outdoor balconies in some of the units, underground parking and concierge services. "People with a long-term horizon want to take advantage of appreciating [real estate] values," Comick said. "I'm fully convinced this is a very sustainable community when it is full. The trick is to get to that fill rate."

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aug06 Provincetown

'Mary Poppers' goes down in Provincetown in the most amazing way

All you really need to know about Ryan Landry and the Gold Dust Orphans' "Mary Poppers" - except this one is not for the kiddies - is that it's great entertainment. Always fun, Landry's shows can sometimes feel like wild and wonderful free-for-alls full of improvisational energy that threatens to fling the whole contraption off the tracks, and sometimes does in the most delightful way. In "Poppers," Landry and company seem to have every second choreographed, all of the lines and lyrics buckled in tight. Their latest production, which tore through Boston to rave reviews before landing in Provincetown for the summer, is slick and very well produced. But that doesn't mean they've lost any of their characteristic thrill-ride spontaneity. It just means they take the turns a little faster without putting on the breaks. Complete with big dance numbers, flying nannies and puppets of all shapes and sizes, "Mary Poppers" lands on stage at 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Sept. 4 at The Provincetown Theater, 238 Commercial St. And it's much more than an adult takeoff on Disney's 1964 classic movie and 2008 Broadway stage musical. Tweaking the central story only slightly - instead of a spoonful of syrup, we're talking a somewhat more potent drug operation here - playwright Landry has taken his parody-writing talents to a new high, freely pulling all sorts of classic and pop cultural references into a cohesive package that's so much more than an ironic send-up of an old chestnut. In "Poppers," the big musical numbers pay bawdy tribute to Great White Way song-and-dance routines from Busby Berkeley through Bob Fosse and beyond. Stepping way past "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious," the show pokes at the entire Disney songbook as well as classic gay show tunes. And it does it all with a sweetly lewd, down and dirty affection as much for the material as for the nostalgia its grown-up audiences bring to it.

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aug06 Orleans

Orleans Pops coming up

Pops in the Park, an annual concert sponsored by Orleans Chamber of Commerce will be held on Saturday, Aug. 25, on Eldredge Field. Gates open at 5 p.m. and the concert begins at 7 p.m. People can bring a picnic supper and listen to the celebrated Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Artistic Director Maestro Jung-Ho Pak, who will present music from Broadway to Hollywood, from familiar folk favorites to patriotic standards. Featured guest artists this year include the lively acoustic folk pop quartet Tripping Lily, the Chatham Chorale, vocalist Liz Saunders and violinist Ilana Zaks. A sneak peek at the program reveals something to please every musical interest - including a George M. Cohan tribute to TV themes of the 1950s, a "Tribute to Patti Page," "Star Wars Epic No. 2 Suite" to "Stars and Stripes Forever" and more. In keeping with Heritage Month, and in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, in which the town was directly involved, enjoy a rendition of the"1812 Overture" complete with the firing of muskets by the Yarmouth Militia. Folks may purchase tables for two or four, or seats at a large table for up to 10 persons, the cost is $75 per chair. Reserved table seating includes light refreshments. General admission tickets for lawn seating may be purchased in advance at $25, $30 the day of the concert and $10 youth tickets for ages 6-17. For tickets or information, contact Orleans Chamber of Commerce at 508-255-7203, or info@orleanscapecod.org, or visit www.popsinthepark.org.


aug06 Orleans

New logo for Orleans Community Partnership

Weston Doucette, a senior at Nauset Regional High School, won the logo design contest sponsored by Orleans Community Partnership. Second place was awarded to Laura Hammond and third place to Keegan Gilmore, also from Nauset High. Winners received gift certificates to Cape Cod Photo Art and Framing. The winning logo design was selected from a number of entries received during the spring semester. The winning design will be used for branding and awareness building initiatives for the partnership. "Weston's design successfully communicated the meaning of our slogan 'It's All In Orleans' by bringing emphasis to the arts, natural resources, recreational activities, and shopping that make our town such a vibrant hub of the lower Cape," said Jim Junkins, member of the OCP Executive Committee, adding that plans were under way to display the logo on a variety of merchandise.


aug06 Chatham

Chatham shellfish committee looks ahead

In the shellfish advisory committee's annual update to the board of selectmen, Chairman David Likos said that members are looking into whether to support a new county effort. Under the direction of Bill Clark of Cape Cod Cooperative Extension, the county is considering buying Aquaculture Research Corporation in Dennis. The private business now supplies much of the seed, or baby shellfish, to towns across the Cape to help them boost populations. The current owners would then lease the property and run the facility. The idea is have the towns get involved in the purchase by dedicating $50 of commercial shellfish permit fees and $10 of recreational to the endeavor, Likos said. Likos said the committee thought it was an important effort but several decades ago a similar plan fell apart so they want to do research first. The committee is having an open house for its shellfish propagation program on Aug. 10 from 9 a.m. to noon at the upweller, which is under the harbormaster's office at Old Mill Boatyard.


aug06 Chatham/Harwich

Chatham, Harwich FinComs disagree on new school plan

The Cape Cod Chronicle reports that with the clock ticking down to special town meetings at the end of the month, the finance committees in Chatham and Harwich are scrutinizing the $64.7 million Monomoy High School plan. Their scrutinizing, however, has not led to the same conclusion as one town's FinCom supports the plan while the other doesn't. Last week, the Chatham FinCom debated for about two hours before declining to endorse the project with a 6-3 vote. The same night, Harwich's finance committee voted 5-3 to recommend approval of the project.


aug06 Harwich

Smart planning in East Harwich

It's the kind of collaboration that state, regional and local planners have been dreaming about for more than a generation. For more than six years, a coalition of officials from Harwich, the Cape Cod Commission, the Association to Preserve Cape Cod and the East Harwich Community Association have been developing a plan to promote economic growth, encourage affordable housing, and protect fragile natural resources around routes 137 and 39 in Harwich. With grants from the Cape Cod Economic Development Council, the East Harwich Collaborative hired some of the best experts in planning and community development to help it design a comprehensive plan that concentrates a mix of commercial and residential village-style growth in the current commercial district around the busy intersection. To compensate for the concentration of new development, a Natural Resource Protection District, with reduced and clustered development, is proposed for outlying areas, including the Pleasant Bay watershed and the Six Ponds conservation area. The thoughtful plan was developed through an extensive public process and has gained the support of the Cape Cod Business Roundtable, Pleasant Bay Alliance, Friends of Pleasant Bay, Harwich Conservation Trust, and other groups and residents. State Sen. Dan Wolf, D-Harwich, said it makes sense to develop areas meant for density, and make up for it in an outlying area. "What do we want the Cape to look like for our children and grandchildren?" he asked. "The way we have developed the Cape for 50 years is not the way we want it to look for them."

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aug06

Cape Cod's Summer Baseball Grooms Players for Majors


As the sun sets on Cape Cod and the swimmers leave the beach, local ball fields light up as top college athletes face off in the Cape Cod Baseball League. "The talent is unbelievable here," says Jeff McNeil, a second baseman at Long Beach State University in California. He's spending the summer on the country's opposite coast, playing for the Brewster Whitecaps. "My dream in baseball, like everyone's, is to go pro and the Cape Cod League is a good starting ground for that." Hundreds of current major league players used to compete on these same fields and the top college prospects continue to draw scouts from the major league teams. During batting practice before a recent Brewster Whitecaps game, the players were watched by scouts from the Colorado Rockies and Chicago Cubs. "They're here at every game, they're here to watch batting practice," says McNeil. "They're watching your every move. Basically everything you do on the field, you're being evaluated for." For fans, though, the atmosphere is laid back. There's no admission fee and spectators line the field, filling the bleachers, settling in their own beach chairs or sitting in the grass like Max Finocchio, 9, and his father, Mark. "Oh it's great. We love baseball, it's a great sport to watch, a good chance you're going to catch a foul ball down here," says Mark. "Maybe [we'll] actually catch someone that's up and coming in this league who's going to become a major league baseball player." But this summer experience goes beyond baseball. Each player lives with a host family. McNeil and one of his teammates are staying with Julia and Bob Tulloch and their two children. Julia Tulloch considers the players adopted sons for the summer. "Having the boys around has been fantastic, absolutely fantastic," she says. "They're great kids." "I feel like I'm actually a part of the family," says McNeil. "They'll do anything for me."

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Sunday, August 5, 2012

aug05 Wellfleet

With sharks comes plan of attack

Was that a shark fin or an ocean sunfish? Beachgoers at the Cape Cod National Seashore's six ocean beaches will soon have a picture book to inspect to better identify what they see on the horizon. The new reference manuals at lifeguard stands, along with shark witness questionnaires, are part of beefed-up protocols planned by Seashore officials, in cooperation with the Cape's four outermost towns, after a man was bitten by what might have been a great white shark Monday at Ballston Beach in Truro. Christopher Myers, 50, an educator and entrepreneur from Denver, was released Friday from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston after being treated for bites on his legs. At 3:35 p.m. Monday, sunbathers at Ballston Beach made emergency cellphone calls reporting a man had been bitten by a shark. Witnesses said they saw a large, black dorsal fin emerge between Myers and a teen companion, who turned out to be his son, J.J. Posting signs on the beach about sharks would have made sense, Myers said Friday at a press conference in Boston. "I can say for sure if I had seen shark warning signs, I would not have been swimming that far out," said Myers, whose wounds required 47 stitches. Ballston Beach is one of two ocean beaches managed by the town of Truro that does not have lifeguards. Until Monday, it also didn't have signs warning beachgoers that sharks could be in the waters, given the presence of hundreds of seals along the coast. State shark expert Greg Skomal is still studying evidence of Myers' bite, including an examination of the wounds and eyewitness accounts, to make certain the animal was a great white, a state spokesman said on Friday. In Massachusetts, it's been nearly 80 years since there was a confirmed great white shark attack on a human. But in the last three years, the possibility of just such an attack along the Cape's Atlantic coastline has increased with a growing population of seals. In Truro, in particular, seals regularly gather along sandbars about six miles north of Ballston Beach, but on Monday witnesses said at least one was bobbing along the shoreline at the scene of the bite. Seashore Chief Ranger Leslie Reynolds met Thursday with 14 local police, fire and beach department supervisors from Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet and Eastham. Of those, the heaviest burden for safety from sharks falls on Seashore, Truro and Wellfleet officials because they each manage ocean beaches set aside for public swimming. "We collaborate a lot in emergency services," Reynolds said of the existing relationship between the four towns and the Seashore. "We talk all the time."

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aug05 Wellfleet

A Parisian in Wellfleet

Sebastien Taffara's education and infatuation with wine began at 15 years old, on the second floor of a brasserie in his native Normandy, France. Four years later, he moved to Paris, laboring as assistant to the wine director under famed French chef Joël Robuchon before heading up the wine program at Le Pergolèse. In Paris, he met Philippe Rispoli, a chef whom he would follow across the pond to Wellfleet. In 2009, the duo opened PB Boulangerie Bistro in Wellfleet. Taffara became the restaurant's manager and wine steward-selecting the wines for the restaurant, stocking the 1,000-plus bottles in the wine cellar, organizing staff tastings, and arranging special winemaker dinners. Cape Cod Life spoke with the 26-year-old Taffara to uncover some of his personal favorite glasses, how to best pair wine and cheese, and the transition from a cosmopolitan city in France to the majesty of the Outer Cape. The people who come here are really educated about wine and they don't hesitate to ask questions. Most want to drink French wines and 60 percent of our list is French. Many want to try a wine from Burgundy-rosé is also very popular since it's a wine for summer. People are very curious and like to discover new wines. One night we opened a six-liter bottle of Gevery-Chambertin and sold it by the glass for $18. It was sold out in two hours. This was a real treat to have an opportunity to buy such a good wine by the glass. We do this in France. People here are very open-minded. They really listen. They ask me what they should order and care about what they're going to drink. It's great to share their passion. I love the wines from the Rhone Valley. Châteauneuf-du-Pape and Côte Rôtie are very exciting to me. I love to have a glass of Gevrey-Chambertin. I'm getting more interested in American wines. I like the pinot noirs from Oregon. In France, there is more complexity in the pinot noirs. The region, the climate, the soil make a very big difference, especially in Burgundy. We also bring in Bordeaux blends from California. These types of wines from America are very interesting to drink.

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aug05 Wellfleet

Jeff Zinn's "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Mike Daisey" at Wellfleet's Harbor Stage

HE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY OF MIKE DAISEY Jeff Zinn, the former longtime artistic director of the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater, performs his adaptation of Mike Daisey's "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,'' which offers Zinn's interpretation of the original text and his take on the issues arising from the controversy that erupted when Daisey's monologue (which he has since revised) was revealed to contain fabrications. Aug. 5-7. Harbor Stage Company, Wellfleet. 508-349-6800, www.harborstage.org.


aug05 Wellfleet

Find your inner fish at Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary

University of Chicago paleontologist, anatomy professor and Wellfleet summer resident Neil Shubin will discuss his 2008 New York Times best-seller, "Your Inner Fish" at Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, Route 6, Wellfleet on Wednesday, Aug. 8 at 7:30 p.m. Shubin's book was in part the result of his 2006 "missing link" fossil discovery in the Canadian arctic, a fresh water fish that lived 375 million years ago. $9, $11 non-members. To register call 508-349-2615


aug05 Truro

A palette of time, discipline and passion: John Koch's work on display in Truro

John Koch of Truro knows art and knows what he likes. A former Boston Globe arts editor, over his long career in journalism he was immersed in the arts and visited many studios and reviewed countless shows. Now, in what could be called semi-retirement, Koch is rediscovering his artistic self, putting his own canvases up on the easel as he works at becoming the painter he always wanted to be. Although he is relatively new to creating art, he shows a remarkable flair and innate talent. He works in a range of media, often in unusual combinations of acrylic, oil, charcoal, pastels and oil sticks, all of which can be seen in his show "John Koch: Landscapes & Head-scapes." An opening reception takes place from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, in the COA Gallery at the Truro Community Center, 7 Standish Way, North Truro. The show runs through August. In his studio just off South Pamet Road, he enjoys inspirational views from many angles. The summer home he has shared with his wife, Sharon, for the last 25 years rests snugly against Cape Cod National Seashore land where they will never have to worry about the encroachment of developers or the presence of too-close neighbors. That knowledge allows him to enjoy the timelessness of the surrounding wooded landscape without fearing for its impending demise. His paintings of those outdoor scenes reflect great joy in that security. Koch has mastered the art of self-portrayal with no apologies for the varying inner moods or outward appearances of his oft-used subject. His are not simply pretty images as commissioned portraiture tends to be; instead, he paints what he perceives in the reflected face in the mirror. Through Koch's artistry these self-images take on a life of their own, with distinctive, intriguing personalities, not so much pictures of Koch at certain stages of his life, but engrossing, stand-alone images of a complex man with a story or experience worth sharing.

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aug05 Truro

Carmen Cicero talks art at Truro library

Artist Carmen Cicero, of New York City and Truro, will discuss his development as an artist, his perspective on aesthetics, the importance of art in his life and the significance of Truro and the Cape in his art at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at the Truro Public Library. Cicero's work is on view at the June Kelly Gallery in New York City, and he had a solo exhibition at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum earlier this summer.


aug05 Provincetown

New England Aquarium's plucky green sea turtle hails from Provincetown

One of the most popular personalities at the New England Aquarium has deep Provincetown roots. Myrtle the green sea turtle lives in the Giant Ocean Tank at New England Aquarium, a cylindrical 200,000-gallon tank, along with more than 600 other creatures - hundreds of reef fishes, Kemp's ridley and loggerhead sea turtles, barracuda, stingrays, moray eels and a nurse shark. But, somehow, among all those others, Myrtle manages to stand out. She is chockful of character - certainly something to do with her Provincetown background - and seems to attract the most devoted fans. Moms and dads bring their children specifically to see Myrtle because they remember visiting with Myrtle when they were kids, says Tony LaCasse, NEA's media relations director. And, with her rather feisty personality, she is the grande dame of the Giant Ocean Tank, with even the predators respectfully steering clear of her, he adds. Myrtle has lived at NEA since 1970, the year after it opened. But before that she was a resident of the Provincetown Aquarium, which opened at the former Paige Brothers Garage building, now the location of the Aquarium Mall, at 205 Commercial St., in late June of 1963, the weekend just prior to the Blessing of the Fleet. In 1965 it was said to be the largest aquarium in New England, boasting more than 100 species of fish indigenous to the Atlantic Ocean. A story in the Provincetown Advocate talked about some of the rarer fish to be seen in 1965 - sturgeon, wolffish, toad fish and wrymouth - housed in the tanks of the aquarium, and the range of creatures, from a giant 35-pound lobster, to sharks, sunfish, stripers, mackerel, squid, "the affectionate tautog and the gruesome goosefish," and more. The aquarium also featured three-dimensional displays showing different shark species and a working model of commercial fishing traps. The Provincetown Aquarium featured several tanks, including a dolphin pool and a large tidal pool for kids to play with horseshoe crabs and more.

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aug05 Provincetown

Provincetown's Pilgrim Monument scores big on state and local grants

In addition to some very generous donations from the community, the Pilgrim Monument & Provincetown Museum has received two large grants totaling more than $450,000 to pay for renovations to the Monument. The Massachusetts Cultural Council, through its Cultural Facilities Fund, awarded its maximum grant of $250,000 to PMPM for the project. The Hiebert Charitable Foundation made a significant second grant of $100,000, adding to its previous gift of $100,000. The two grants were added to generous contributions from Seamen's Bank, which pledged $50,000, and Cape Air, which pledged $25,000. Monument renovations to date have strengthened the interior structure through the use of state-of-the-art fiber technology, as well as increased structural preservation and addressed corrosion-related repair. Ongoing work will improve other elements of the campus, including a piazza suitable for public activities in the area between the museum building and the Monument. "These grants are extraordinary both in size and meaning," said John McDonagh, executive director of PMPM, in a press release. "They provide significant and needed financial support toward the $1.5 million project, and they validate in concrete terms our value to the commonwealth, the Provincetown community and our nation. We are deeply grateful for this important support, and - of course - we are hopeful these grants will inspire the philanthropy of others." The tallest all-granite structure in the U.S., the Monument was designed to resemble the Torre del Mangia, a 14th-century tower in Sienna, Italy.


aug05 Provincetown'

'Tides of Provincetown' symposium at Cape Cod Museum of Art

Don't miss a rare opportunity to hear renowned experts on Provincetown art and study the works in a comprehensive survey of American's oldest arts colony, "The Tides of Provincetown: Pivotal Years in American's Oldest Continuous Art Colony (1899-2011)." The symposium will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Aug. 6, at the Cape Cod Museum of Art on the grounds of the Cape Cod Center for the Arts, 60 Hope Lane (off Route 6A), Dennis. Speakers include Christine McCarthy, museum director, Provincetown Art Association and Museum; James R. Bakker, former executive director, Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum; and artists Thomas R. Dunlay, Dana Levin and Donald Beal. Tickets, $60, $50 for Cape Cod Museum of Art members, include lectures, admission to the museum and lunch at the Summer Stock restaurant next to the museum. For reservations and more information, call (508) 385-4477 or go to www.ccmoa.org.


aug05 Provincetown

Provincetown's Heidi Jon Schmidt is back with a Cape-based murder novel

Cape Cod is both home and muse to writer Heidi Jon Schmidt. The Provincetown resident and author of the New York Times best-selling "The House on Oyster Creek" has a new book "The Harbormaster's Daughter" inspired by, and set on, Cape Cod. Set in the same small fishing village of Oyster Creek, the story is inspired by the tragic 2002 murder of Cape Cod resident Christa Worthington. Meet 16-year-old Vita Gray, the illegitimate daughter of Franco Neves, a married fisherman of Portuguese ancestry, and Sabine Gray, an art restorer from "the other side of the bridge." When Sabine is brutally murdered, Vita is adopted by Sabine's closest friend, LaRee, who carefully shields the little girl from the knowledge of her mother's brutal murder, and the huge rifts it exposes in the small village. Now a teenager, Vita begins to emerge from her shyness and isolation. But when the shocking details of her past suddenly surface, Vita feels utterly betrayed by those closest to her, and LaRee must ask hard questions about herself as a mother. Here, Schmidt brings readers a tragic yet hopeful tale of a young girl on a search to find her identity - and more importantly, to find out who her mother truly was and why she was murdered. "The Harbormasters Daughter" is not only both a beautiful coming-of-age story, but a novel about the rich history and complex geography of life on Cape Cod that only Cape readers could truly appreciate. Schmidt lives in Provincetown with her husband and teenage daughter. She teaches in the summer program at the Fine Arts Work Center.

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aug05 Provincetown

Motherwell show colored with his seaside memories

Robert Motherwell (1915-91) first came to Provincetown in the middle of the Second World War, when enforced blackouts at dusk gave the town a thick and gloomy atmosphere at odds with its usual image of expansive, sun-kissed freedom. He came with the emigre Surrealist Max Ernst, art collector Peggy Guggenheim, Ernst's wife at the time, and Motherwell's own first wife, actress Maria Emilia Ferreira y Moyers. It was, in the event, a tense, unsettling stay. Motherwell knew no other painters in town. Ernst was expelled by the FBI, who required all Germans to live at least 10 miles from the coast. And without a car, Motherwell's own movements were restricted. Looking back on that first stay, he said "the claustrophobic silent dark of those World War II nights here remains with me like a black stone." The quote appears in an essay by Daniel Ranalli in the catalog accompanying "Robert Motherwell: Beside the Sea," an enchanting exhibition at the Provincetown Artists Association and Museum. Motherwell was one of the leading figures of Abstract Expressionism, the movement that grew out of European Surrealism in the 1940s and played a central role in shifting the art world's center of gravity from Paris to New York. He was around the same age as Jackson Pollock and a decade younger than Willem de Kooning, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko. In spite of that spooked first visit to Provincetown, Motherwell ended up returning after the war - this time in the company of de Kooning. He spent his next 40 summers there. Those summers were unusually productive. Upon arriving, he often took time to get going. But once he did, work came in a gush. Upstairs in a waterfront cottage on Commercial Street that he converted into a kind of barn with three floors, long arched doors, and an interior like a ship, he would paint on canvases or thick paper laid out on the floor. For many years, his second wife, the painter Helen Frankenthaler, occupied another studio on one of the two upper levels; the downstairs level was used as a beach house.

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aug05 Orleans

Author Anne LeClaire to speak in Orleans

Author Anne LeClaire will give a talk at Snow Library Wednesday, Aug. 8, at 7 p.m. LeClaire, author of "Lavender Hour," "Entering Normal" and most recently, "Listening Below the Noise: A Meditation on the Practice of Silence," will talk about her work. The free presentation is part of the 2012 Fred J. Brotherton Foundation Summer Series at Snow Library. For more information and a complete listing of the programs being presented call Snow Library at 508-240-3760.


aug05 Brewster

Pan-Mass ride rolls on Cape

Lucy Duffy describes herself as gutsy. Biking in 90-degree heat was an obstacle for some of the thousands of bikers on Saturday in the Pan-Mass Challenge, many of whom cycled the full 111 miles from Sturbridge to Bourne. But not for Duffy. The oldest female biker in the PMC at age 79, the Brewster resident has competed in marathons and triathlons for decades, raised more than $200,000 for cancer research and survived breast cancer. "It's fun at 79 to be treated like just another athlete and not a little old lady," Duffy said. "My friends are horrified I'm riding, but I'm gutsy. And maybe crazy." This is the first year Duffy has biked in the PMC, she said. She is riding in honor of 8-year-old Bennett Hartley of Brewster, who goes to her church. Hartley has acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Duffy was among the expansive fleet of cyclists who left Sturbridge at 5:30 a.m. Saturday morning and stayed at Massachusetts Maritime Academy in Buzzards Bay before continuing today another 81 miles to Provincetown. Hundreds of onlookers and supporters lined the driveway to the college campus Saturday to cheer on the arriving cyclists, some who trickled in as early as 10:30 a.m. Thanks to corporate sponsors, the PMC provided complimentary massages, medical service, live entertainment, food trucks and a host of activities for riders. Overnight, bikers were to stay on the academy's ship, in the dorms and in tents around campus before heading to Provincetown today to finish the 190-mile journey.

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aug05 Chatham

Power outage hits downtown Chatham

A problem at an NStar substation on Crowell Road left many Main Street merchants powerless for hours Saturday. Chatham police Lt. Michael Anderson said NStar had been working on the problem since about 1:30 p.m. He estimated the outage stretched from the traffic light at Crowell and Main streets and reached as far east as Shore Road and north as far as Orleans Road. Around 7 p.m., an additional transformer failed at the intersection of Old Queen Anne Road and Earls Way. This has caused the outage to spread farther west. The problem began as a brownout, but NStar had to shut power down to fix it. As of 10 p.m., power had yet to be restored.

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aug05 Chatham

Chatham residents asked to conserve water

Selectmen approved voluntary water restrictions because of the hot dry summer. Those in odd-numbered houses are being asked to do their outdoor watering on odd numbered days, those on the even-numbered side on the even days. Jeff Colby, Department of Public Works Superintendent, said that the pumps have been running close to 17 hours a day and that the heavy pumping rate not only reduces the groundwater, but can damage equipment. Selectman David Whitcomb said restrictions, albeit voluntary, are not often imposed. "In my 10 or 11 years on the board, this is only the third time we've had to do this," he said.


aug05 Harwich

Moving day at Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School

Joanne Amaru smiled broadly as she watched dozens of volunteers swarming the "underground mall" site that has housed Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School since 1995. A remarkable group of parents, teachers, students, alumni and community members turned up Saturday morning to help the school move classroom furniture and teaching materials from the old campus to the new school at the site of the former Regal Cinema multiplex on Route 137 in East Harwich. "There goes one of our very first students.. That's a founding board member we haven't seen in ages. This is the mother of one of our first-year students..", observed Mrs. Amaru, a long-time social studies teacher at the school who is entering her second year as Associate Director. The volunteers moved virtually everything from the old school--marker boards, pencil sharpeners, every chair and desk. In a typical public school construction project, most furniture and fixture are replaced when a new school is built. By bringing that material with them, CCLCS saved tens of thousands of dollars. CCLCS' old campus was in what Orleans residents call "the underground mall", a system of concrete domes built into a hillside back in the early 1980s. Many classrooms had no windows, ceilings were low and cavern-like. Dehumifiers were observed in many classrooms. Because the property was originally designed as a retail shopping center, there were few traditional corridors and many classrooms seemed to flow into each other. With dew points pushing 75 on Saturday, there was a pronounced dank aroma about the place. Contrast the old campus to the new facility in East Harwich. The new building has large windows in every room, plenty of natural light, high ceilings and wide corridors. There is a large multi-purpose room where school-wide gatherings can be facilitated. The centrally-air-conditioned building was quite comfortable and permeated with the aroma of "newness". Virtually nothing of the old theater remains in the public spaces. The second floor storage space has a few vestiges of the property's former use, but those are limited to the stairways and a few discernible features. CCLS spent about $4 million to purchase and renovate their new school, less than a recent window and roof maintenance project at Nauset Regional High School.

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aug05

'Beehive' musical at Harwich Junior Theatre doesn't fall flat

In Harwich Junior Theatre's second musical of the season, "beehive" becomes more than the towering hairdo its five actresses sport onstage. It's also the title of the show ("Beehive: The Musical"), the name of a song ("The Beehive Dance"), and a metaphor for the community of female performers who rose to popularity in the 1960s. Less a traditional musical and more of a concert (with the occasional anecdote about go-go boots thrown in), "Beehive" makes up for its lack of plot with number after number of well-loved, well-executed tunes. Just looking at the set list can have a dizzying effect - 40 songs, ranging from "My Boyfriend's Back" by the Angels to Janis Joplin's "Ball and Chain" - and with five actresses instead of the original off-Broadway six, the magnitude of "Beehive" alone is an impressive feat. The show begins in 1960, providing a soundtrack of classic girl group hits to the emerging political and social changes in the United States. Kristen Martone captures the overdramatic Leslie Gore with spot-on comedic timing, and Mills' powerful vocals shine in "Where Did Our Love Go?" and "Come See About Me." Children may get antsy during these song clusters punctuated by only a line or two, but adults, particularly those for whom the 1960s is a fond memory, will appreciate cultural references like Annette Funicello's perma-perky "Skippy Peanut Butter" ads. As the issues evolve, so do the song choices: "The Beat Goes On," sung with a heartbreaking weariness by Mills, is interspersed with recollections of JFK's assassination and the emergence of the Civil Rights movement. "Beehive: The 60s Musical" runs Aug. 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, 24-25, 31; Sept. 1-2, 7:30 p.m.

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aug05

Experts to study Cape's great whites

Maybe because it began life as a commercial fishing vessel, the big blue boat that cleared customs at the State Pier in New Bedford this week has attracted little attention on the waterfront. But the 128-foot Ocearch, a former Bering Sea crabber, has bigger fish to fry these days. After a 52-day voyage from Cape Town in South Africa, the boat will spend the next month hunting for great white sharks in the waters off Cape Cod. And the sharks will live to tell the tale. "These sharks are a 400-million-year-old secret. We don't know where they are breeding, feeding or giving birth," said expedition leader and vessel owner Chris Fischer. "What we do is provide the best scientists access to these sharks to gather information and help demystify the life of Jaws." The Ocearch's crew includes experienced sportfishermen who travel the world's oceans to catch the sharks, which are then corralled in a specially designed research platform. The sharks are raised out of the water to be measured, bio-sampled, tagged and released by teams of local marine scientists, he said. "Using Fischer's platform will give us a direct satellite linkup, and that's something we don't have," said Greg Skomal, a shark expert with the state's Division of Marine Fisheries. Blood samples taken from the captured sharks will also be measured to quantify the stress to the animal from its capture. Skomal said he will be happy if they succeed in tagging up to 10 white sharks. Scientists from the University of Massachusetts and the New England Aquarium have also expressed interest in joining the project, which is being financed by Fischer, he said. Tagging provides real-time tracking for up to five years, said Fischer, who founded and funded the nonprofit Ocearch by producing television shows about his work. His goal, he said, is to increase our knowledge of these animals to ensure that they have a future. Great white sharks are the great balance-keepers of the ocean, Fisher said, and they need greater protection.

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aug05

First responders struggle with drug shortages

The Cape is among many regions across the country affected by the national drug shortage crisis, leaving emergency medical workers at the mercy of the unpredictable market that supplies lifesaving drugs. On the Cape, medical professionals say they are coping with a short supply of 44 percent of the drugs given to emergency responders through Cape Cod Hospital. The effects of the shortage have trickled down to first responders, who are usually the first to administer such lifesaving drugs in ambulances. "It's a major issue out here on the Cape," said Bill Flynn, director of the Cape and Islands Emergency Medical Services System Inc., the liaison between emergency responders and medical professionals. "This has been an ongoing issue for the past six months, it's crazy. I know it's at the point where a lot of the national EMS organizations have contacted their legislators." But it hasn't reached the point where the drug replacing the drug is also in short supply, as has happened in other communities. "So far we've been very fortunate," Flynn said. There are several causes of the shortages, from sudden disruptions in the drug market because of discontinuations, production delays and issues with manufacturing. Shortages date back decades, but during the last two years it's officially become a crisis. Hospitals and emergency responders are turning to gray markets with inflated prices, rationing drugs and switching and swapping out one drug for a similar medication. This year, the University of Utah's Drug Information Service lists 275 medications in short supply, according to a report by The Associated Press. Last year, there were 213. From 2005 to 2010, the number of drugs on shortage has tripled, according to the Food and Drug Administration and the White House. They include painkillers such as morphine, Valium and fentanyl and drugs like epinephrine, which are used for a variety of medical problems. On the Cape there was recently a shortage of fentanyl, and emergency medical workers switched to using morphine instead. While the drugs are similar, the side effects and dosages are different.

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Saturday, August 4, 2012

aug04 Wellfleet

CapeCast: End of the line for leatherback turtle



aug04 Wellfleet/Eastham

National Seashore opens beaches to swimming

Nauset Light Beach in Eastham and Marconi Beach in Wellfleet were re-opened on Friday after they were closed to swimming earlier in the week due to high bacteria counts, the National Seashore announced. A section of beach at Truro's Head of the Meadow, between the main ORV access point and the northern access) has also been temporarily closed to all access, due to nesting shorebirds.


aug04 Eastham

Serious injury suffered in Eastham crash

Four people were injured, one seriously, in a two-car crash Friday night in Eastham. The accident happened at about 9:30 p.m., said fire chief Glenn Olson, near the Red Barn Pizza & More restaurant on Route 6. Four people were taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, he said.


aug04 Eastham

State offers loans to commercial fishermen

The state has launched a new low-interest loan program for commercial fishermen. The Department of Fish and Game's Division of Marine Fisheries was granted $1 million in federal funds by NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service to pilot the revolving loan fund offering low-interest loans to smaller fishing businesses. "The fishing industry is important to the character and economic vitality of Massachusetts," Gov. Deval Patrick said in a press release. The federal-state-local partnership is open to owner-operated fishing businesses. Loans for Cape and Islands fishermen will be administered by the Eastham-based Cape Development Partnership. John Pappalardo, chief executive officer of the Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association, said the loans will be helpful because traditional loan agencies, such as banks, now demand fishermen put their homes and boats up as collateral for small loans.

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aug04 Truro

Great White Victim Hadn't Heard 'There Were Sharks Off Of Cape Cod'



aug04 Truro

Courtney Allen's 'Lost Nudes' come to light in Truro

As an illustrator, Courtney Allen preferred to draw from life, often asking his models to pose in detailed costumes as he set to work on a particular scene. In a new exhibit of his work, the clothes come off. "The Lost Nudes of Courtney Allen," opening Saturday at the Truro Historical Society's Highland House Museum, features 10 charcoal sketches that pare the artist's subjects down to simple studies of line and form - intimate compositions that reveal the delicate quality of his draftsmanship. The pieces were selected from hundreds of drawings that Allen bequeathed to the museum upon his death in 1969, a sampling of which will go on sale during the exhibit. "They all represent something different," says B.J. Dyche, director of the museum and curator of the show. "Some of them are very innocent, and you can see the innocence and playfulness in them. Some of them are very bold and could be indicative of a different mood he was in. . They're not necessarily pretty but they're very, very detailed." Most of the pieces in the show, finished between the 1920s and '40s, focus on the female figure, she notes, which is treated candidly in quick strokes that capture its beauty as well as its imperfections. Several of his subjects are older women whose bodies show signs of childbearing and age. "I wanted to show that he didn't just draw pretty, young women," Dyche says. There is also a male nude, and a striking portrait of a young black woman that Dyche singles out as her favorite. It's different, she says, because of its directness. "There's something very bold, almost a defiant look about it," Dyche says. Allen, born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1896, began his career as an artist at age 15, when he started working in a commercial art studio to help with the family finances. He went on to receive formal training at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C., and in 1919 he enrolled in the Hawthorne School of Art in Provincetown. At the Cape End, he moved with a crowd of artists that included John Whorf, Jerry Farnsworth and W.H. Bicknell, and he became "great pals" with Norman Rockwell, who would come and visit him in Truro, Dyche says.

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aug04 Provincetown

Murder And Mystery In An Idyllic Cape Cod Town




aug04 Orleans

Driver crashes through patio of an Orleans restaurant

The owner of an Orleans restaurant barely escaped injury early Friday afternoon when a Subaru Outback plowed across the outdoor patio where he was working. The Nauset Beach Club Restaurant on Main Street was not open for lunch and was empty at the time of the 12:20 p.m. incident, Deputy Fire Chief Tony Pike said. The 20-year-old driver of the Subaru apparently had fallen asleep and drove off Beach Road and across the patio, Pike said. The accident is under investigation.

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aug04 Brewster

Brewster book sale ongoing

The Brewster Ladies' Library book sale is still in full swing, and it's about to get even more exciting. All the thousands of items still on the sale shelves - books, DVDs, puzzles, audiobooks, and more - are now half-price! As always, the money benefits the library, providing the funding for programing and purchasing new materials. The sale ends Saturday, Aug. 18, at 5 p.m. Until then, it's open every day: Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays and Mondays from noon till 3 p.m.


aug04 Chatham

Sharks sightings are good business on Cape Cod

Lighthouses and fried clams are as popular as ever on Cape Cod this summer, but they're sharing top billing with a surprise attraction: sharks. While skittish swimmers may be less inclined to go for a dip in the ocean following an apparent great white shark attack in Truro this week, officials and business owners say the publicity is boosting revenue. "Anything that brings people to town is good for tourism, and the sharks are bringing people to town," said Lisa Franz, executive director of the Chatham Chamber of Commerce, where there have been an increasing number of shark sightings over the past few summers. "It's a huge draw," Franz said. "It seems like there are a ton of people in town now." From the kayaker who was trailed by a shark off Nauset Beach in Orleans in July to this week's attack on Ballston Beach, the Cape has attracted national attention because of all the offshore activity. To up the drama, almost every report references "Jaws," the 1975 Steven Spielberg classic filmed largely on Martha's Vineyard. With the summer vacation season peaking during the first three weeks in August, the timing couldn't be better for the local economy. Tourism officials say that despite Monday's incident - the Colorado man who was bitten is on the mend - most visitors are not afraid to step on Cape beaches this summer. "If anything, people have been curious," said Wendy Northcross, chief executive officer of the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce Convention and Visitors Bureau. Other unusual animal sightings, like the bear that swam across the Cape Cod Canal on Memorial Day weekend and popped up in West Barnstable, have also spurred day trips this year, Northcross said. Overnight stays on the Cape were up 10 percent this June compared with last year, which Northcross chalks up to consumer confidence and an improved economy, not dorsal fins. For the fourth year in a row, the top-selling T-shirt at Chatham Clothing Bar features an image of shark jaws, followed closely by one that reads, "Every Week Is Shark Week in Chatham."

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aug04

Folks flock to the 25th Annual Taste of Chatham

Beneath a gloriously gigantic white tent, on the grounds of the Chatham Elementary School at 147 Depot Road, Chatham, this annual fundraising event benefited the non-profit Monomoy Community Services. Monomoy brings direct service, quality childcare, clinical counseling and family support services to more than 400 local families throughout the year. Tickets were $125 for patrons or $50 for the stroll. The Patron's Preview was the evening's early entry with table seating at 5:30 pm. The Gourmet Stroll was the later entry with limited seating, from 6:30-8:30 pm. Every summer, the local eating and drinking establishments, caterers, artists, floral designers, and beverage businesses participate. Past attendance at this event has been approximately 450-500 patrons. White linens, wine glasses and twinkling white lights made a classic, magical setting for the delicious tasting affair. Grass underfoot acted as a soft carpet for the countless pairs of Docksiders trolling around, looking for their next Chardonnay or ceviche. Chatham Bars Inn made their usual elegant, spectacular showing with a butter-poached sirloin with Truffle and Foie Gras Sabayon. The Red Nun's fish tacos saw people lining up again and again for a big bite of freshness. The Pampered Palate's spicy noodles and vegetable salad were outstanding, as was Hangar B's tuna ceviche with cumin popcorn. Chatham Candy Manor and Wequassett displayed their usual excellence, as did Celestino's. The music was lush and added just the right ambiance with Bert Jackson Group, featuring Lars Johnson on vibraphone.

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Friday, August 3, 2012

aug03 Wellfleet/Eastham

Marconi, Nauset Light beaches reopened

Cape Cod National Seashore officials re-opened Marconi Beach in Wellfleet and Nauset Light Beach in Eastham for swimming mid-day today, according to Seashore chief ranger Leslie Reynolds. The two beaches were closed to swimming on Tuesday because of high bacteria samples. Re-sampling on two consecutive days after the closure had to show clean results for the beaches to be re-opened.

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aug03 Wellfleet/Eastham

High-bacteria Cape beaches remain closed

Marconi Beach in Wellfleet and Nauset Light Beach in Eastham remained closed to swimming Thursday because of high bacteria samples taken Tuesday, Shelley Hall, chief of natural resources management for Cape Cod National Seashore, said. Both beaches will remain closed to swimming through at least midday today, Hall said, because two consecutive days of good samples are needed to reopen the waters. The source of the bacteria is not known, Hall said. Heavy rains in areas where properties have individual septic tanks, rather than a public sewer system, can flush more contaminants into the water than normal, Hall said. Of the Seashore's six swimming beaches, Nauset Light is the second most used. The Seashore was visited in 2011 by about 4.5 million people, according to federal records.


aug03 Wellfleet

Patty Larkin in Wellfleet

Eleven-time Boston Music Award winner Patty Larkin has written and performed countless songs since 1985. Lately, she says, her creative energy has come from spending time in a desolate one-room shack. The first time Larkin was dropped off at one of the 17 Cape Cod National Seashore dune shacks, she found herself surrounded by sand in a remote area of Provincetown. She approached the shack, which sat a few hundred feet from the Atlantic, and found two beds, a bench, a chair and table, kerosene lamps, a dry sink, a small gas stove, a small gas refrigerator and an outhouse. The pump for water was a short walk away. Larkin, who has since enjoyed multiple stays at the shack, describes her experience as "primitive" but says in a phone interview that the experience fed her creative spirit. Larkin will headline a benefit concert Thursday at the First Congregational Church in Wellfleet to benefit the Peaked Hill Trust - a nonprofit that manages five of the dune shacks in partnership with the National Seashore. Special guests Birdsong at Morning will also play. Larkin hopes funds raised at the show will help the trust with shack upkeep and maintenance so programs such as the artist-in-residence curriculum, a joint effort between the National Seashore, the Fine Arts Work Center, Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill and Provincetown Art Association and Museum, can continue. During the concert, Larkin will debut "The Peaked Hill Suite," a song which she wrote during one of her stays at the dune shacks. Information: 866-811-4111 or www.pattylarkin.com.

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aug03 Wellfleet

Nardin's photography celebrated in Wellfleet

A reception to honor Gloria Nardin, a photographer and 40-year resident of Wellfleet whose black-and-white and color images were recently published in a collection titled "Gloria Nardin: Photography," will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 4, in the garden outside the Wellfleet Preservation Hall, 335 Main St. The catalog offers an overview of Nardin's photographic work from the late 1940s until today. A limited edition of 280 copies has been printed, some of which will be available for purchase and signing.


aug03 Truro

Man attacked by great white shark off Ballston Beach in Truro jokes about surviving

A wisecracking Boston native today explained why he thinks he survived the first great white shark attack on a Massachusetts swimmer since 1936: I taste lousy. Chris Myers, who grew up on Joy Street in Beacon Hill but now lives in Colorado, was attacked Monday afternoon while swimming with his 16-year-old son, J.J., off the shores of Ballston Beach in Truro. Speaking with reporters today, Myers said he felt a "huge bite on my leg'' when the shark attacked. "I was quite sure it was a shark,'' he said. "It felt like my leg was caught in a vise. I kicked very hard with my free leg...and he let go.'' Myers now thinks he knows why the attack came to an end. "I figure the shark just didn't like the taste of me,'' said the Harvard University graduate. Myers, 50, was bitten first in his lower left leg and then suffered puncture wounds in his right leg when he kicked the shark in the snout. Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have used 47 stitches to close the wounds, which he said will mostly keep him off his feet or on crutches for about a month. During a joint press conference, father and son said they decided to swim several hundred feet off the shore in hopes of finding a good spot for breaking waves to body surf on. As they paddled out, J.J. asked his father a question, they recalled today. " 'What do you think would happen if a shark came along?,' " J.J. asked. " 'Well, we'd be history,' " his father replied. When they were some 400 to 500 feet off shore, the two decided a sandbar was too distant for them and decided to turn around and head back inland -- and that's when a dark object sliced through the water between the two of them. Myers said he has only one way to describe the size of the animal that attacked him -- "big" -- and said that it was dark in color. Once Myers was free of the shark's jaws, he and his son began swimming furiously toward land. They became focused on reaching the beach, and not just because his father had been bit, J. J. Myers said. "Seeing a shark is enough to get swimming back, fast, to the beach,'' he said. During their inbound swim, Chris Myers told his son that the shark "bit me pretty badly,'' but also made it clear to him that the wound was not going to be fatal. " 'Well, we're not history,' " the elder Myers told his son. Swimming frantically toward land, the two said they saw people on the beach. Once they got close to shore, people waded into the water to help them. Myers said he did not feel any pain until he was riding in the ambulance to Cape Cod Hospital, where he was first treated before being sent to MGH. Myers said he did not know seals were in the area of Ballston Beach, and was not aware of great white shark sightings near Truro before he went into the water on Monday. If he had known seals were about, he would not have gone swimming, he said. According to the state's top shark scientist, Greg Skomal, Myers is likely the first person to be attacked by a great white shark in Massachusetts waters since 1936 when a teenager was killed.


aug03 Truro

State expert meets shark victim

State shark expert Greg Skomal met Thursday at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston with the man bitten in the waters off Truro's Ballston Beach to determine if the culprit was a great white. Christopher Myers, who was taken off the beach Monday with serious wounds on his legs, is listed in good condition. Skomal examined Myers and asked for a detailed account of what happened. At 3:35 p.m. Monday, 911 callers reported a man bitten by a shark while swimming at Ballston Beach. Eyewitnesses said they saw Myers and his son, J.J., swimming far off the beach. They also described a large black dorsal fin rising up between them. The two men swam to shore, and bystanders and rescuers treated Myers for bites to his legs. He was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis and then transferred to the Boston hospital. On Tuesday, Skomal, a shark biologist with the state Department of Fish and Game's Division of Marine Fisheries, said the "weight of evidence" pointed to the animal being a great white shark. At that point, he had reviewed eyewitness accounts of the incident and considered factors such as the presence of seals in the area and the extent of the injury. But he said he still needed to talk to Myers and see his wounds. Great whites have long, pointed snouts with distinctive, triangular-shaped teeth serrated like a steak knife. They often attack from below and behind, similar to how the Ballston Beach attack was described. On Tuesday, the Truro Board of Selectmen and beach supervisor will discuss the need for lifeguards at Ballston Beach, one of four ocean beaches the town manages. Currently, the town hires lifeguards for only two of the beaches. Meanwhile, a meeting of emergency first responders from the towns closest to the attack - Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham and Provincetown - was held Thursday in Truro to discuss "policies, communication and procedures," according to Wellfleet Fire Chief Dan Silverman. He said the meeting, called by Cape Cod National Seashore Chief Ranger Leslie Reynolds, was to "make sure eveyone was on the same page" when it comes to dealing with an incident like this.

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aug03 Truro

Cape Cod officials taking steps to protect swimmers




aug03 Truro

Truro seeks new charges against former chief

Truro police have filed an application for a criminal complaint against former Police Chief John R. Lundborn alleging two counts of child endangerment, stemming from two incidents. Truro Police Chief Kyle Takakjian issued a brief statement Monday about the filing but declined to give further details "to allow Mr. Lundborn to exercise all due process and not jeopardize the investigation in any way." Takakjian cited HIPAA and protective custody guidelines as reasons to decline additional comment. HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which protects the privacy of individually identifiable health information. Protective custody is provided for in state law as a way to detain someone incapacitated from consuming alcohol, with the intention of treating public alcoholism as a disease and not a crime. The dates of the incidents were not available from the police. Lundborn is currently on probation after admitting to sufficient facts in December to a charge of operating under the influence on Oct. 14, when he crashed a new police cruiser on Pilgrim Heights Road in North Truro. At the Dec. 6 hearing in Plymouth District Court, Lundborn also admitted sufficient facts to a charge of driving negligently. Both charges were continued without a finding until Dec. 5, 2012, when there is to be a final disposition in the case. "Continued without a finding" is not a conviction and means Lundborn will not have a guilty finding entered on his record, provided he completes probation without incident and doesn't face additional criminal charges. Lundborn, who owns a home on Glacier Drive, was appointed Truro police chief in April 2011, but he resigned Nov. 16 after the police cruiser crash. He had been a police officer in Truro for 22 years. Lundborn also reimbursed the town $975.62 after town officials questioned his expense reimbursements for a September law enforcement workshop in Boston. His attorney, John Vigliotti, said the payment was not an admission of guilt.

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aug03 Truro

Blessing of the Animals at Truro meetinghouse this weekend

A Blessing of the Animals, officiated by Rev. Anastasia Kidd and her husband, Rev. Chad Kidd, will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 4, on the grounds of the historic First Parish of Truro Congregational Meetinghouse on Town Hall Hill. Bring your cat, dog, hamster, rabbit, parrot or goldfish (leashed, caged or contained), or a photo of your pet, and a chair or blanket to sit on during the service. Stuffed animals also welcome. The event, held by the Friends of the Truro Meetinghouse, includes refreshments for pets and owners. A tour of the meetinghouse will be offered following the service.


aug03 Provincetown

Pan-Mass. Challenge hits Outer Cape this weekend

On Sunday, Aug. 5, up to 5,500 cyclists will be riding through Wellfleet, Truro and Provincetown, part of the annual Pan-Massachusetts Challenge, which raises millions of dollars for adult and pediatric cancer research and patient care at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The riders are expected to hit the Outer Cape beginning about 7:30 a.m. Sunday morning. They're expected to pass through Wellfleet - the Cape Cod Rail Trail in Wellfleet down to the Rail Trail Parking Lot, onto Lecounts Hollow Road, to Ocean View Drive down to Long Pond Road, toward Lawrence Road down to the Wellfleet water stop, at Wellfleet Elementary School on Lawrence Road in Wellfleet - between 7:25 and 11:45. Between 7:50 a.m. and 1:15 p.m., riders will pass through Collins Road in Truro onto South Pamet Road down to Route 6A through to Castle Road and continue toward Route 6 in Truro. And between 8:15 a.m. and 2:15 p.m., riders are expected to pass through Route 6 in Provincetown onto Race Point Road down to Provincelands Road, continuing toward the official Provincetown finish located at Provincetown Inn on Commercial Street between 8:30 a.m. and 2:20 p.m. Riders who wish to go to the Provincetown Family finish will pass through Route 6 in Provincetown onto Shankpainter Road down to Jerome Smith Road and continue toward the Provincetown Family Finish, located on Winslow Street in Provincetown.


aug03 Provincetown

Provincetown celebrates Motherwell, Long Point

Robert Motherwell first came to Provincetown 70 years ago for one summer. It was wartime, the town was bleak with lighting curfews, and he did not return for seven years. But when he did, his commitment to Provincetown became firmly tethered. As the artist spent summers there throughout most of his life, Provincetown became an integral part of his work as he drew breath from its watery expanse and temperate luminosity. It's been 13 years since Motherwells' passing, and he finally gets the homecoming he deserves with "Beside the Sea," a major exhibition at the Provincetown Art Association that, for a while at least, is running alongside "Long Point: An Artist's Place," a companion exhibit about the gallery cooperative that Motherwell cofounded in 1977 with 13 of his notably talented friends. The Long Point show is captivating, but the Motherwell is commanding. Curated with sensitivity and hung with acute precision, "Beside the Sea" shows a surprising range within its 25 works: from major canvases from various periods to collage work, and, of course, the center piece, a beautiful suite of paintings from the "Beside the Sea" series which Motherwell began in 1962. Witnessing the violent spray that would break against the bulkhead of his Provincetown waterfront studio during a stormy tidal surge, Motherwell decided to use the force of nature himself in a series of paintings in which he deployed his own painted spray set against one or two broad lines at the lower portion of each painting. The irascible force of nature against the containment of the bulkhead. With Provincetown's mercurial waters, the act of painting becomes a primal mirror for Motherwells' own intensely private sensibility, the integrity of the mark revealing the integrity of its maker in a stripped-down measure. Close to 6 feet tall and 9 across, "Beside the Sea With Bulkhead" (1962) is a memorable, massive painting with an arcing black line that rises and crackles with whiplash smarts against a soft cloudy stain of faded blue. Motherwell was a master of weight and scale, and here it all feels right. One senses that works like these were the result of quick action after long consideration.

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aug03 Provincetown

Small, unpretentious things make bold statements at Kobalt Gallery in Provincetown

Thousands of glimmering safety pins become a grove of bamboo connected with nothing more than their own mechanism, while multicolor rubber bands float across a stark white canvas becoming a rainbow of soap bubbles happily adrift. Tamiko Kawata, who came to the U.S. from Japan as a young adult, is fascinated with small, unpretentious things and waste material from our daily lives, transforming them into three-dimensional observations on America life and the environment. An opening reception for her show takes place from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3, at the Kobalt Gallery, 432 Commercial St., Provincetown. Her show runs through Aug. 9.

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aug03 Orleans

Orleans' Celebrate Our Waters weekend bigger than ever

From more kid's activities, to aquaculture tours, to ghost stories the third annual Celebrate Our Waters festival boasts more than 50 free water-related lures. The Orleans Pond Coalition's water weekend is on Saturday, Sept. 22 and Sunday, September 23 and takes place at 35 spots, including locales in Eastham. The event was started by the 900-member organization to increase awareness of the area's watery blessings. Last year's event drew more than 1000 folks and this year organizer's have brought back some favorites, including the sand sculpture contest and the "walk through the whale" sponsored by the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies. The pond coalition has also added a number of new events, including talks, a family treasure hunt and concerts. For more information: www.orleanspondcoalition.org.


aug03 Orleans

Free concert in Orleans

The 2012 Nauset Beach concert series continues at the gazebo on Mondays from 7 to 9 p.m. The concerts are free and sponsored by the parks and beaches department. On Aug. 6, Greg Johnson and 45 RPM will perform acoustic folk, pop and rock. The following week, Aug. 13, is Last Men on Earth, a classic rock and roll band. Rain dates are Tuesdays.


aug03 Brewster

After testing, no new EEE cases on Cape

Since at least one mosquito tested positive for eastern equine encephalitis last week, no new cases have been found in mosquitoes tested Capewide. Cape Cod Mosquito Control Project staff members, who trap and test mosquitoes weekly throughout the region, have not found any more human-biting bugs with the EEE virus, a rare but severe illness that is fatal in one-third of human cases. Testing of a trap at Nickerson State Park came back positive for the first human-biting mosquito with EEE on Cape Cod. Mosquitoes with EEE were found previously in Dennis and Barnstable, but they were the type that target birds. The latest rounds of testing were done during the weekend and Monday, and no new cases were found, Gabrielle Sakolsky, an entomologist and assistant superintendent with the Cape Cod Mosquito Control Project, said. "That doesn't mean it's not here," Sakolsky said. "It just means there wasn't a big enough sample for us to find." Besides the normal insecticide spraying that goes on regularly, no additional emergency aerial spraying has been planned on the Cape.


aug03 Brewster

Mosquito carrying EEE found in Brewster park - but risk is low

It may not be safe to go back in the water but it's (relatively) safe to venture back into the woods. But precautions should be taken - as officially (according the Massachusetts Department of Public Health) the risk for Eastern Equine Encephalitis is moderate in Brewster and low in Orleans, Harwich and Dennis. On July 19, a mosquito of the species Coquillettidia perturbens, was captured in Nickerson State Park and tested positive for EEE. "Take precautions. Wear long pants, long sleeves, use repellant especially during dusk to dawn," advised Gabrielle Sakolsky of the Cape Cod Mosquito Control Project. "I've added more trap locations around Brewster and Orleans and trapped over the weekend which I don't normally do. I've gotten lots of calls from people - we're not planning any mosquito spraying unless we have multiple positives." Sakolsky spends her summer trapping mosquitoes to monitor populations and test for the presence of diseases. "This is the first time it's been found in a mammal biting mosquito ever (on Cape Cod)," she pointed out. "The only other time we found it was in 2006 in a pool in Dennis and in one in Barnstable. Those were bird biting mosquitoes." "It's a type of mosquito that's very unique," Sakolsky said. "They're usually in cattail swamps or swamps with a lot of emergent vegetation. In the larval stage they can attach themselves to the roots of plants and breathe through the plant. So they stay under water. Most species have to come to the surface to breathe." That makes them less likely prey for birds, fish and frogs - but on the plus side they aren't rapacious breeders. This is one of those mosquitoes that only goes through one generation a year.

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aug03 Brewster

Brewster crash causes clog on Route 6

A three-car accident on Route 6 sent two people to the hospital and snarled traffic for a few hours Thursday afternoon. The accident happened at about 4:45 p.m. near Freeman's Way, according a Brewster Fire Department spokesman. Two people were transported to Cape Cod Hospital with what were described as non-life-threatening injuries. State police said the highway was not shut down, but traffic was "getting through" by using alternating lanes for more than two hours. Brewster police are investigating the crash.


aug03 Brewster

Ancient Brewster whalebone stuns scientists

They thought they found a rock but they uncovered an real antique - dating from the time of King Charles. Last September workers at Ocean Edge were removing an exposed rock from the base of a stairway near Ellis Landing when they realized it was part of a whale's skull bone. It is an occipital bone from (most likely) a North Atlantic right whale. "When it was found we did a quick check through stranding records going back to 1974 and there was no record of a large whale stranding in that location or being moved and left there," recalled Brian Sharpe of the International Fund For Animal Welfare. "So we said it was likely older than 1974 but we found out it was much older than that." At the time a woman said her uncle had taken pictures of a stranding in that area in 1963, however, that turned out to be a whale that washed up in Wellfleet not Brewster. The whalebone was in fragile condition and it was lifted off the beach with the aid of a backhoe and carefully dropped onto a foam mat in the back of a pick-up truck and eventually taken to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute for analysis. "They used a mass spectrometer to carbon date it and they calculated it dated from between 1630 and 1700," Sharpe said. "They originally said it was between 1500 and 1650 but they zeroed in more. So they're saying it was probably around about the time Cape Cod was settled."

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aug03 Brewster

Life and laughs on 'Avenue Q' at Cape Rep in Brewster

Bright eyed and bushy tailed Princeton is a recent college graduate with a B.A. in English who has moved to Avenue Q in the eponymous musical, now at Cape Rep in Brewster. Princeton has just paid the rent to his superintendent, Gary Coleman when Gary hands him the phone. Speaking is his future about-to-be boss who tells him that he has been downsized before he has even started to work. Bad news? Not really, as Princeton, prompted by "PURPOSE" in big letters on the TV, wonders what his real purpose in life is to be. This leads to a song, "Purpose," rousingly sung by Princeton and all his new neighbors, Kate Monster, Nicky, Brian, Christmas Eve and Gary. This becomes the underlying theme of the show although it is overtaken by so many side tracks that can be illustrated by the titles of nineteen clever and revealing songs that flow through the action: "B.A. in English/It Sucks to be Me," "If You Were Gay," "Everyone's a Little Bit Racist," "The Internet is for Porn," "I'm Not Wearing Underwear Today," "You Can Be as Loud as the Hell You Want (When You're Makin' Love)," and "There is Life Outside Your Apartment," to name seven.

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aug03 Monomoy

School building authority head grilled about Monomoy project

The Monomoy Regional High School Building Committee has gone several months with only minimal attendance at their meetings as they planned the design of what is now an impressive 168,000 square foot building. More than 70 people filled the meeting room in the Chatham Town Annex Wednesday afternoon for a question and answer session that included an opening presentation by the MSBA Executive Director Jack McCarty. And in the midst of what began as a cordial meeting, eager questioners stated their opposition to the project and Harwich Finance Committee Chairman Albert 'Skip' Patterson angrily stormed out of the meeting room after being asked to sit down when he posed pointed questions McCarty was not comfortable answering. McCarty began his talk by speaking about the state authority that has overseen all school construction projects since 2004, approving $8.7 billion in funding. He explained that the MSBA doesn't normally participate in public forums in a host community after a vote by the board of directors but that an exception was made after opposing questions were raised at the July 25 meeting in Boston. McCarty said that he wanted to, "Focus on where we are," and said that the Monomoy School District now had 120 days to vote on the project. He described the members of the MSBA board and their backgrounds and explained the detailed process that a school district must go through before a vote is taken. McCarty said that the 51.5 percent in state funding that the Monomoy School District had been approved for was "A pretty good deal," compared to other projects, "Because you made some smart decisions," like regionalizing two schools into one and using a model school program to streamline design and construction. McCarty took a few questions from the audience but firmly said from the outset that he did not want to discuss the merits or get dragged into a philosophical debate on the project.

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aug03 Chatham

Rustic camps part of fiber of Chatham

Back in the 1950s Nelson Long remembers someone from off-Cape calling his mom, Etta, at Chatham Medical Center and offering to help the needy. His mom was baffled. Most people in town would have been. "There were no needy," recalled Long sitting in his living room two generations later. Everyone relied on one another. "It was no disgrace if someone needed a fish, you just needed a newspaper to take one home," he added. "You never worried about where your kids were, you knew the other parents. "It was a very nice way to live. A lot of that community spirit went by the boards." Where it still existed was in a place Long and others escaped to every chance they could, sometimes 40 weekends a year and for weeks in the summer. A place that is only several miles and under 10 minutes from the mainland, but forever frozen in a different time. A place that many believe is rich in the "social capital" that the country was built on, that Alexis de Tocqueville wrote about, what modern day sociologists have lamented the loss of and has been described as "as close to the way a community ought to act as could be found in modern society." As Chatham celebrates its 300th anniversary the offshore community that exists on the barrier beach is a shadow of its former self as villages with close to 50 sand-scalded homes have dwindled to six as tides and man have swept them away. But though the tangible connection to the past has diminished, the place the camps had in the culture and historical landscape of the town can't be eroded. The heritage of Donna Lumpkin's family's camp goes back to 1932 when Joseph Nickerson, a descendant of the man considered the father of the town - William Nickerson - built the shack for his sister, Sarah, who was marrying a man stationed at the Old Harbor Station. The station, built in 1897, sat out near the tip of what was then often called Great Beach, a changeable sandy arm that extended from Eastham through Orleans out to Chatham ending just north of Lighthouse Beach. The Ryders bought the camp soon after as David Ryder's father had been the keeper at the old harbor station, which later was owned by the Coast Guard. By the time Donna's parents purchased the camp from the Ryders in 1959 the Old Harbor Station had been empty for years and she remembers playing in the building, which still had the old log books in the tower, and the breeches buoy and old telephone poles that connected the station to town - now long gone - were there as well. As fewer ships foundered on the sand bars off the beach, the world around the camps had begun to change as well. In the 1960s the federal government had knocked down a similar village on nearby Monomoy Island, then attached to the mainland, to create a national wildlife refuge. And some of those who had inherited the old fishing shacks on Monomoy- the spot was 10 miles closer to the grounds which was important before gas engines were used - looked north toward North Beach when they were gone. The federal government, this time the Cape Cod National Seashore, owned several camps on North Beach that were built after 1959, but instead of burning them had given long-term leases to those who had built them.

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aug03 Chatham

Sailing programs celebrate Chatham's 300th

Last Saturday, junior sailing programs from Little Pleasant Bay joined their counterparts on Pleasant Bay to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the founding of the town of Chatham. Sponsored by the Friends of Pleasant Bay, an estimated crowd of 150 boaters showed their appreciation with a sail boat race. The dramatic beach start at Jack Knife Cove had all four sailing programs racing a course to the beach at Strong Island, accompanied by a host of power boats and kayaks. All of the racers were members of Namequoit Sailing Association, Arey's Pond Sailing School, Chatham Yacht Club and Pleasant Bay Community Boating. Prizes were awarded to each of the seven participating classes, followed by a tug-of-war face off between the four programs. Chatham Yacht Club pulled their way to victory and was awarded a specially designed inaugural trophy. The Friends of Pleasant Bay wish to thank the Cashman family for providing lunches for the kids and to Cape Cod Marine Trades for funding the prizes, as well as all the co-sponsors. Organizers hope that it will become an annual event.


aug03 Chatham

4 teens arrested for alleged vandalism in Chatham

Police found themselves in a foot chase early Thursday with teens they allege were caught in the act of vandalizing property. Just before 1 a.m., police responded to phone reports of four people vandalizing property near Holway Street off Main Street. Michael Deane, 18, Nico Capone, 18, Thomas Vickerman, 18, and a juvenile male, 16, all of Madison, Conn., were arrested and each charged with nine counts of wanton destruction of property more than $250. Two suspects were caught after a brief foot chase into nearby woods, police said. The remaining two were located soon after. Chatham police Sgt. Sarah Harris said neighborhood signs and fences were the targets of the vandals, and about $2,000 worth of damage was done. The three 18-year-olds pleaded not guilty at their arraignments Thursday in Orleans District Court. The three also were charged with possession of a false Registry of Motor Vehicles document. They are scheduled to return to court for a pretrial hearing Aug. 21. The 16-year-old is scheduled to appear in Juvenile Court at a later date.

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aug03 Harwich

Harwich entrepreneur finds success with sandals

The most telling part of Juliette Bench's office is a series of pictures, sketches and notes mounted above a fireplace across from her desk. These are not family images, to-do lists, or shots of a vacation in a distant country, but instead the culmination of two years of hard work designing a staple that most Cape Codders rely on as their preferred carefree footwear: the flip-flop. The pictures show the evolution of a shoe, from a close-up picture of a sailor's bracelet (which is the central part of her design) to several pencil sketches to an image of the final product: The Cape Cod Shoe Supply Co's new flip-flop called 'The Mainsail'. After beginning production in February, Bench's new company has already found promising success with six local stores such as Puritan Cape Cod (Chatham, Hyannis, and Falmouth) and Three Buoys in Harwich Port. One store in Maryland also just picked up the line. "It's been an incredible start," said Bench, who reports she had sold more than 1,500 pairs of her flip-flops in the last five months. Her design is basic and classic Cape Cod: A cotton braid similar to a sailor's bracelet serves as the top strap secured to the toe piece with a custom stamped leather band attached to a thick rubber bottom imprinted with a nautical blueprint in white. Bench, at 34, is living her dream of residing on the Cape full time after spending the last decade in the fast lane in New York City working for fashion juggernauts Kate Spade and Tommy Hilfiger on a number of their shoe designs. "I learned so much on the evolution of a shoe, from the creative first thoughts to manufacturing to distribution and designing the final packaging," she said of her experiences in New York.

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aug03

The Local Food Report: Food Trucks

Elspeth learns about the local gourmet food truck movement coming to Cape Cod. An avid locavore, Elspeth lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her program airs on WCAI Thursdays at 7:30 on Morning Edition and 4:30pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30.





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Thursday, August 2, 2012

aug02 Wellfleet

Seals equal meals for sharks

The great white shark that state officials believe bit a man Monday swimming off Truro was likely looking for a more blubbery victim. A burgeoning seal population has drawn the fearsome fish closer to Cape Cod's shores, primarily off Monomoy Island in Chatham. But both the seals and the sharks that eat them are far from stationary. Gray seals use several areas around the Cape and Islands as haul-outs, where they rest and mate, or rookeries, where they give birth to their pups. "The seal population on Cape Cod is quite dynamic," said Brian Sharp, stranding coordinator for the International Fund for Animal Welfare headquartered in Yarmouthport. There are three primary haul-outs on the Cape: Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, sand bars on the ocean side of North Truro and Jeremy Point, a peninsula of land that hangs like a stalactite from Wellfleet's Great Island into Cape Cod Bay. Muskeget Island, west of Nantucket, is home to the largest pupping colony of gray seals on the East Coast with 2,095 pups counted during the 2007 and 2008 season. The largest Cape haul-out on Monomoy hosts thousands of seals and has also been used as a pupping site, said Sharp and other marine mammal experts. But gray seals, which can grow to 6 feet and 400 to 800 pounds, can be found on beaches throughout the region, Sharp said. Smaller, harbor seals are also found on area beaches, although in fewer numbers. Seal populations in the United States were decimated during a long-standing bounty program and prior to the passage of the Marine Mammal Protection Act in 1972. Since then, seals from Canada, including a large rookery on Sable Island, more than 100 miles off Nova Scotia, have reinvigorated the population of seals in the U.S. In the 1970s, there were only about 500 seals in the waters around the Cape, said naturalist Dennis Murley with the Massachusetts Audubon Society's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. That number could now be 10,000 to 15,000, he said. On Jeremy Point, the increase was coupled with a shift in species, from a population dominated by harbor seals to one now made up primarily of gray seals depending on the time of year, Murley said. There are three basic conditions that make a location more ideal for seal haul-outs, seal experts said. The first is easy access to deep water. Because the tide recedes so far on cup-shaped Cape Cod Bay, seals are unlikely to set up shop on beaches deep inside it. Second, seals need an abundant food source. Here, that includes sand eels and fish. Many local fishermen complain seals have decimated the striped bass population, but wildlife experts say that's not true. Third, seals need to be safe from predators. Although there are now more sharks that prey on them in the water, the Cape's isolated beaches still offer safety on land. Seals at Jeremy Point are mostly juveniles or young adults moving away from the large males in areas such as Chatham, wildlife sanctuary director Bob Prescott said. Prescott wonders if the seals that choose to haul-out near Jeremy Point in a relatively shallow area west of what was formerly Billingsgate Island are changing their behavior because of sharks.

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aug02 Wellfleet/Truro

Cape tourists not so worried about sharks



So far, the sharks aren't taking a bite out of business. "There really hasn't been too much talk about it," said Nancy Chamberlin of the Truro Chamber of Commerce. On Wednesday, Chamberlin spoke to about 75 people during her stint at the information booth on Route 6. The booth is about five miles from Ballston Beach, where Christopher Myers was bitten Monday by what state officials say was a great white shark. Myers was in good condition Wednesday, a Massachusetts General Hospital spokesman said. If anything, Chamberlin said, visitors' minds were on other things. Several wondered whether they could swim at another ocean beach, Marconi Beach in Wellfleet, which was closed temporarily Tuesday because of high bacteria counts. Forget the shark, Al Silva, owner of the Top Mast Resort on the beach in North Truro, said Wednesday. He was caught up in reservations for the Pan-Mass Challenge, a fundraiser with about 5,500 bicyclists that ends Sunday in Provincetown. No guests or potential guests have mentioned Monday's shark bite, and there have been no cancellations, he said. The Top Mast is about seven miles from Ballston Beach. "The 'Jaws' movie raised a lot more questions and anxiety than this one," Silva said. Truro beach supervisor Steve St. Clair said Wednesday that beach activity was "pretty normal." The Wellfleet Chamber of Commerce has fielded a few questions about sharks this summer. But sales and rental agent Karen Arnold of Sweetbriar Realty in Wellfleet said her office hadn't heard "a single word" of concern from summer renters. Wellfleet beach stickers sales are staying steady, said Wellfleet beach administrator Suzanne Grout Thomas. The town sells about 11,000 seasonal beach stickers each summer for its beaches on Cape Cod Bay, the ocean and freshwater ponds. Wellfleet's ocean beaches offer two benefits over Truro: fewer seals and lifeguards on all the beaches. "We don't have that nice J-bar in Truro," Thomas said, referring to a well-known resting area for seals about two miles north of Head of the Meadow Beach in North Truro.

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aug02 Eastham

Wild Care Cape Cod swoops in to save ill bird

The eagle had landed, and something was wrong. "He was sitting on the beach between some badminton players and people sitting on lawn chairs," Alexandra Mueller, wildlife rehabilitator at Wild Care Cape Cod, said. "Definitely not normal behavior for an eagle, so we decided to pursue him." And so began a two-day bald eagle hunt. Mueller first saw the juvenile male bird Monday around Nauset Beach in East Orleans. On Tuesday, the ill eagle touched down on a roof near Coast Guard Beach in Eastham. Team Wild Care scrambled to the scene. Volunteer Ronald Kielb Jr. hoisted Mueller up a side of the building. "She climbed up on the chimney and scared him off the roof. And he kind of glided down and landed on a bridge." Then, "we just hid behind some bushes and jumped out and surprised him," recalled Mueller. "I had a net, and Ron had the eagle gloves, and between the two of us, we worked it out." That's how you catch a sick bird of prey with a 6-foot wingspan. The eagle was brought to Wild Care's Eastham facility and treated to a tube of liquid food. "The bird is anemic and really, really thin, which is not normal," Stephanie Ellis, executive director of Wild Care Cape Cod, said. "So we'll keep it hydrated and then we need further blood work and X-rays to see what is going on." The eagle was scheduled to be transferred to a Tufts University veterinary facility Wednesday for additional treatment. "Eagles in Massachusetts are designated as threatened, so they require special permitting to actually house them and care for them." The juvenile bird has yet to develop the trademark white head plumage that makes identification easier. But even in its weakened state, the power and size of the animal was impressive, even to veteran wildlife rehabilitators. "That's a huge honking beak. It's pretty threatening," Ellis said. "That's the biggest beak I've ever worked with."

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aug02 Truro

Cape Cod beach on high alert after shark attack


The first man to be bitten by a shark in Cape Cod in 75 years is making a recovery. Massachusetts General Hospital confirms that Chris Myers is in good condition. He was swimming with his son a couple of hundred yards off of Ballston Beach in Truro, Mass. on Monday when he was attacked.

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aug02 Truro

Silent auction preview show at Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill

The annual silent art auction to benefit Castle Hill Center for the Arts is best known for its popular hand-thrown ceramic plates by well-known local and national artists. Over the years these plates have become highly collectible items. Also available at this year's auction are works by widely recognized historical and contemporary painters, sculptors, photographers, printmakers and mixed-media artists. A preview show opens with a reception from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, in the Castle Hill Gallery, 10 Meetinghouse Road, Truro. The silent auction starts at 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11. For details oattending (or donating artwork), go to www.castlehill.org or call Kathleen Jacobs at kathy@castlehill.org.


aug02 Truro

Book & bake sale Saturday at Truro Library

The Friends of the Truro Library will hold a Book & Bake Sale from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Aug. 4, at the library. In addition to novels, non-fiction, artbooks, cookbooks and rare and collectible books, there will be cookies, cakes and pies to sample. Proceeds will benefit the library.


aug02 Provincetown

Pan-Mass Challenge set for this weekend

Thousands of cyclists participating in the Pan-Mass Challenge will pedal Saturday and Sunday across the Cape, raising $36 million for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. The PMC actually has 11 routes varying in length and difficulty. There are six two-day routes that range from 153 to 190 miles and five one-day rides that range from 25 to 110 miles in length. The main route, however, covers 190 miles Saturday and Sunday, from Sturbridge to Provincetown. Up to 5,500 riders are expected to participate. Cyclists will start out Saturday in Sturbridge at 5:30 a.m., finishing that day's journey in the afternoon 111 miles away at Massachusetts Maritime Academy in Buzzards Bay. During the second stint of the journey Sunday, cyclists will cover 81 miles, crossing the Bourne Bridge in the morning and arriving in Provincetown between 10 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. They will ride through Bourne, Sandwich, Barnstable, Yarmouth, Dennis, Brewster, Orleans, Eastham, Wellfleet, Truro and Provincetown. A complete map of the route is available at www.pmc.org.

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aug02 Provincetown

WOMR FM 92.1 class film series returns with a tribute to Sally Ride, first woman in outer space

The popular off-season classic film series, sponsored by WOMR FM 92.1, and WFMR FM 91.3, returns for one summer night to remember Sally Ride, the first woman astronaut to reach outer space, by screening Fritz Lang's 1929 silent classic "The Woman in the Moon" at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, in WOMR's Davis Space in The Schoolhouse, 494 Commercial St.






Wednesday, August 1, 2012

aug01 Wellfleet

Wellfleet lifeguards wield 'shark stick'

Lifeguards at Whitecrest Beach in Wellfleet have an extra tool up their sleeves in case of shark trouble. It's called the "SHARK STICK" and the pointed wooden implement hanging on the side of the lifeguard chair. Wellfleet lifeguard Vanessa Morton said the approximately 2-foot-long stick could be used to poke and discourage a shark if such an unfortunate situation came to pass. "This is an official lifeguarding tool," said Morton, though she also indicated that the shark stick was valued for its decorative and conversational appeal. The sturdy shark stick was fashioned last weekend, before Monday's shark attack at Ballston Beach in Truro. Morton said lifeguards at Wellfleet beaches were on the lookout for sharks. "If we see a fin, we're absolutely going to call people out of the water," she said.

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aug01 Wellfleet

In Wellfleet, Tokyo quartet delivers bittersweet farewell

The Tokyo String Quartet's opening concert of the Cape Cod Chamber Music Festival Monday evening at the First Congregational Church in Wellfleet offered a study in extremes. Extremes of emotion: Its appearance was a final, bittersweet chance to enjoy the estimable foursome on the Cape, as the group will retire next June after a worldwide tour. Extremes of musical expression as well: with a robust program that ranged freely, from the crystalline miniatures of Anton Webern, to the measured inventiveness of Haydn, and culminating in the florid Romantic vision of Schubert. Tokyo formed in 1969, a time when it was unusual for Asian musicians to explore Western music at all, much less create a quartet that would boldly examine all the major repertory through performance and recordings. Many seasons, and many great performances, have passed. The quartet has changed personnel over the years, and now the two longest tenured members, second violinist Kikuei Ikeda and violist Kazuhide Isomura, have decided to step off the stage. Cellist Clive Greensmith and first violinist Martin Beaver initially considered reforming the group, but in the end decided it was time to retire the ensemble. Tokyo has accomplished much. Any visit to an American conservatory, heavily populated with aspiring Asian musicians, will offer proof that it's no longer a unique proposition to cross cultures and acquire musical expertise. Tokyo helped make that a reality. The group recorded all the standard quartet repertory, and then went back and did it again. Multiple cycles of the Beethoven and Bartok quartets, among others, brought a new understanding to those challenging catalogs. A decades-long artistic residency at Yale inspired a new generation of players. And, not to be forgotten, they have won fans on the Cape. Because of a long professional relationship with co-artistic director Jon Nakamatsu, Tokyo has opened Cape Cod Chamber Music Festival for the past four seasons, and Monday's sold-out hall and general enthusiasm showed that it will be missed.

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aug01 Truro

Shark bite victim: Feeling good, considering

The man experts believe was bitten by a shark - likely a great white shark - while swimming Monday off a Truro beach says he plans on sticking closer to shore from now on. Christopher Myers of Denver told ABC's "Good Morning America" this morning that he and his son, J.J., were in deeper water trying to get to a sandbar 400 to 500 yards off Ballston Beach in Truro when he was bitten on the lower part of both legs. His son said he heard a scream and looked back to see the dorsal fin of a shark. Myers, feeling dizzy, said he and his son then "swam hard" back to shore. Myers, in Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston with bandages around both legs, said considering the circumstances, he feels "quite terrific." Myers described swimming with his son off Balston Beach when he "felt like having his leg in a vice. I felt like I'd been grabbed by something unbelievably big and strong. Like my leg was just stuck." Myers told WCVB that he kicked at the shark with his other free leg, which caused the shark to free its grip. The shark was between he and his son "looking so unbelievably freaky and shark-like and enormous." The last confirmed fatal injury in Massachusetts by a great white shark occurred in 1936. In 1996, summer visitor James Orlowski said he was bitten by a 5- to 6-foot shark that ripped into his ankle in shallow water on the bayside of North Truro. A shark expert at the time believed it was a small great white shark, but others questioned Orlowski's veracity. Orlowski said he feels vindicated by this week's shark-bite incident. "They told me sharks don't go in those waters," he said. "I said, 'I know what a shark looks like.' "

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aug01 Truro

Experts agree: Shark bit man

State marine biologists believe a great white shark was the likely predator that bit a man Monday as he swam in deep water at Ballston Beach. The man, identified as Christopher Myers, had severe cuts to his lower legs. He was being treated Tuesday at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The last confirmed injury in Massachusetts by a great white shark occurred in 1936. Shark expert Gregory Skomal of the state Department of Fish and Game's Division of Marine Fisheries concluded the Truro bite was likely the work of a great white shark after he reviewed eyewitness descriptions of the fin and considered the presence of seals and the extent of the injury. "However, only with examination of the injury and direct testimony from the victim will we have 100 percent confirmation," Skomal said. Great white shark sightings have increased off the coast of Massachusetts in the last several years, and state researchers have been monitoring and tagging the sharks since 2009. White sharks feed on seals and sea lions, and their migration to the state's coastal waters is linked to the growing number of gray seals that migrate here annually. White sharks grow to about 20 feet in length and can weigh up to 3 tons. They live for more than 30 years. On Tuesday, Ballston Beach was open for swimming based on a decision by town officials in conjunction with the Cape Cod National Seashore. The beach is within Seashore boundaries. Seashore and town officials posted warning signs in the beach parking lot and at the beach entrance. Ballston is part of a miles-long stretch of undeveloped beaches from Provincetown to Chatham known for their heavy surf, steep cliffs and isolation. "Sharks are not stationary creatures," Truro Town Administrator Rex Peterson said in explaining the decision not to close Ballston Beach. "It wasn't like a shark was lurking off that particular beach." State officials advised beachgoers Tuesday to avoid swimming in coastal waters at dawn or dusk and to stay close to the shore and avoid beaches where seals congregate. Truro police received a 911 call at 3:35 p.m. Monday asking for help at Ballston Beach, which is off South Pamet Road. Witnesses reported seeing a large, dark dorsal fin emerge between Myers and a teen companion. Some said the fin "torqued." After seeing the fin come out of the water, beachgoers saw the two begin swimming to the shore, with the teen calling for help, witnesses said. Beachgoers, including people trained in medicine, ran to help Myers, who reached the beach and lay down on the sand. Town rescuers and bystanders treated him, and he was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis. Myers was transferred to Massachusetts General Hospital on Monday night. The bites on Myers' legs were caused by the shark getting both legs at the same time. Ballston Beach is one of four Atlantic Ocean beaches managed by the town of Truro. The beach is also one of two ocean beaches, along with Longnook Beach, not monitored by town lifeguards. here haven't been lifeguards at Ballston Beach since 1982 as a result of budget cuts that occurred with passage of a state law limiting property taxes called Proposition 2½. The 13 seasonal lifeguards in Truro are being paid between $14 and $19 an hour and can cost the town in the range of $9,800 per lifeguard per summer season.

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aug01 Truro

Great white shark 'likely' perpetrator of attack on Truro swimmer, state says

A state shark biologist said Tuesday that the injury to a swimmer off Ballston Beach was most likely caused by a great white shark. If it's confirmed, it would be the first time since 1936 that the "white death" has drawn blood in Massachusetts waters. At 3:30 on Monday afternoon, panic erupted on quiet Ballston Beach as a dorsal fin surfaced about 100 yards offshore, near two swimmers later identified as Chris Myers, a Denver, Colo. resident, and his 16-year-old son. Eyewitnesses said the fin "torqued" through the water between the swimmers. Moments later the 16-year-old began crying for help. When Myers reached the shore, his lower legs were bleeding. "Shark attack!" exclaimed the woman who made the first 911 call reporting the incident. In a recording of the call, she can be heard consoling Myers in the background. "He's wounded. His whole ankle's been bitten," she said. "We've got a kid bitten by a shark," the second caller told police. "He's bleeding quite badly." Rescuers who responded to the scene carried Myers off the beach in a stretcher and transported him by ambulance to Cape Cod Hospital. He was later transferred to Mass. General Hospital in Boston, where he underwent surgery for a torn tendon and received 47 stitches for eight puncture wounds, four on each leg. The Truro Beach Commission held off on closing Ballston Beach to swimming on Tuesday, instead placing a sign at the foot of the dune to warn beachgoers of the potential threat offshore. "Caution. Recent Shark Sighting," the sign reads, in red and black letters. Though some authorities speculated that any number of things could have been behind the attack - from a running school of bluefish to a blue shark - Dr. Greg Skomal, a biologist with the state Div. of Marine Fisheries, said the "weight of evidence" pointed to a great white.

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aug01 Truro

Seals to blame for shark attacks, experts say



aug01 Truro

Man hospitalized after suspected shark attack off Cape Cod


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aug01 Truro/Provincetown

Warren to campaign on Outer Cape

Election season has already been pretty hot in these last several months, and on the Outer Cape it's heating up even more. U.S. Senatorial candidate Elizabeth Warren will make an appearance in Provincetown and Truro mid-month. She will arrive in Provincetown for an event at The Crown & Anchor from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12. Immediately following, Warren will head over to Truro Vineyards for another fundraising event from 5 to 7 p.m. Donation levels for both events start at $50 and rise to $250 and $500. Warren, a Harvard Law School professor who specializes in American bankruptcy law, conceived of, and was appointed by President Obama to establish, the country's new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

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aug01 Provincetown

VP Biden to make Provincetown visit

It hasn't happened for 16 years - a sitting vice president visiting the Outer Cape. Well, that's going to change this month. Vice President Joe Biden is scheduled to alight in Provincetown on Sunday, Aug. 26. He's coming to be the guest of honor at a reception up at the Pilgrim Monument & Provincetown Museum. It is being organized locally by Provincetown homeowner Bryan Rafanelli as a fundraiser for the Obama Victory Fund. The event is open to contributors at a range of levels, from $250 a person all the way up to those who pledge to give or raise $25,000. Those interested in ordering tickets online can visit https://my.barackobama.com/August26Provincetown. Rafanelli, who has had a home here for 10 years, is CEO of Rafanelli Events, a high-end event-planning business that has offices in Boston, New York, Palm Beach, Fla., and Washington, D.C. Working with Robert Duffy, president of Marc Jacobs International, he helped coordinate and plan Provincetown's Beaux Arts Ball last October as a benefit. In addition to celebrity and political-type functions - his company was hired to throw Chelsea Clinton's wedding - he's also known for planning benefit events for non-profits like the American Red Cross, Boston Public Library and Massachusetts General Hospital.

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aug01 Provincetown

Shellfishing enterprises gearing up in Provincetown

Just offshore of Beach Point, within wading distance of the sand flats in front of the Seagull Motel, three rows of floating oyster cages join the languid assortment of swimmers, kayakers and windsurfers that make up a typical summer seascape in North Truro. Arranged almost as an afterthought to that leisurely scene, they're a hint of the hard work underlying life on the Outer Cape - and a sign of industry to come. The cages belong to Dana Pazolt, a local fisherman whose family owns the motel as well as the acre of sand and water that will provide the setting for his oyster nursery. Pazolt plans to raise baby oysters from seed in the floating mesh containers, a technique that allows the young shellfish to feed at an ideal depth while avoiding the threat of bottom-dwelling predators like starfish and snails. "I'm not trying to reinvent the wheel, I'm just trying to find another way to make a living," said Pazolt, who works primarily as a lobsterman. He will start growing oysters as soon as he gets his seed permit, a $20 slip of paper from the state Div. of Marine Fisheries, he said. Farther offshore, another shellfishing project is in the works, this one undertaken jointly by the towns of Provincetown and Truro. On Tuesday, July 17, the Provincetown Conservation Commission signed off on a 25-acre deepwater aquaculture area to be located in the bay approximately one mile from shore near the Provincetown-Truro town line. The area will be divided into one-acre, submerged shellfish grants that will be made available to local residents through an application process set up by the town. Truro has been working to set up its own 25-acre aquaculture area next to the Provincetown grants. Tony Jackett, shellfish warden for both towns, plans to bring the Truro project before the Truro Conservation Commission in August. Originally proposed by the local shellfish committees, which worked closely with the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies to bring it to fruition, the project was envisioned as a way to remove some of the bureaucratic obstacles facing prospective shellfish farmers by making the towns, rather than the state, responsible for administering shellfish grants.

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aug01

Provincetown Theater receives esteemed challenge grant

The Provincetown Theater has received a 2012 challenge grant of $14,000 from the Hiebert Charitable Foundation. In the award letter, the foundation trustees stated that "they valued the contribution The Provincetown Theater makes to the community" and support its efforts to "promote the health and well-being of the residents of Provincetown, including distributions for the arts and protection of the environment." The theater plans to use the grant to buy a state-of-the-art, high-definition projector and lens, a convertible screen and a new surround sound system. With this new equipment, says theater board treasurer Joy McNulty, the theater "will be able to book more diverse and cutting-edge cultural events for the community because of the enhanced technological capabilities." "This is the first of several strategic steps the board of directors is taking to update the theater facility to better serve the arts and culture community of Provincetown and Cape Cod," says Brian Carlson, board president. "We thank the Hiebert Charitable Foundation for recognizing the value The Provincetown Theater has as a regional center for cultural economic development, cultural tourism and new play development." The theater must match the grant award by raising $10,000 in the next six months. Tax-deductible donations, which must be received by Dec. 31, 2012, should be made out to The Provincetown Theater, c/o Challenge Grant, 238 Bradford St., Provincetown, MA 02657.


aug01 Orleans

August is Heritage Month in Orleans

The town has designated August as "Heritage Month" and throughout the month the historical society, the chamber of commerce, and other Orleans organizations will present activities as varied as "Pops in the Park", catboat races, guided cemetery walks, militia encampments, lectures, gallery tours and free concerts, all organized around the theme of history brought to life. Starting with the Firebirds Heritage Home Game at Eldredge Field at 7 p.m. on July 31, and running all the way through to the full moon on Aug. 31 and the farmers market the next morning at 8 a.m., a packed schedule of recreational and educational diversions is available for visitors and residents alike. In response to a request made by the Orleans Historical Society in collaboration with the Orleans Chamber of Commerce, and many other organizations and businesses, the Orleans Board of Selectmen proclaimed August to be Orleans Heritage Month. For a listing of events, www.orleanscommunitypartnership.org or www.itsallinorleans.org.


aug01 Orleans

New finance committee members in Orleans

After living in a Russian city with 20 million people, Joshua Larson attended his first town meeting in his new hometown that boasted about as many people as his former apartment building. He was hooked and seeing his background was in finance Larson immediately volunteered to serve on the finance committee. Larson, whose background is in investment banking, private equity and a smidgen of municipal finance (a bank he worked for provided Moscow with a $10 million loan), was quickly tapped by Town Moderator Duane Landreth and attended his first meeting with the other new member, John Laurino, earlier this month. Both men have owned homes in Orleans for about 15 years, but have only made it their primary residence recently. Laurino told the board that he is immersed in his third career, running a global software company, which he can do from anywhere in the world and chose Orleans. Larson too has embarked on a new career, having retired from international banking so his children could attend high school locally. Along with serving on the board of a large Scandanavian utility company - which requires him to travel to Helsinki regularly - he started and web-based sports company focused on coaching. Laurino spent 18 years in insurance banking and brokerage and also served on the board of finance in Westport Connecticut, which has a AAA bond rating, and he used to comment to his peers: "You know Orleans actually runs better." He said that he plans to take the wise advice of his dad, who is 94, and treat every appropriation like it's his own money. Both Laurino and Larson are taken by the smallness of the community and how individuals can make a difference. They are replacing John Hodgson, now a selectman, and Ed Barr.


aug01 Brewster

YMCA opens child care center in Brewster

The YMCA Cape Cod is pleased to announce that our Child Care Center currently located at St. Peter's Lutheran Church in Harwich will be relocating to the Stony Brook Elementary School located in Brewster in the fall of 2012. The demand for our services has been growing and growing over the years and our wait lists demonstrate the quality program that families on the Lower Cape desire to have access to. We provide infants through pre-school children an environment that is safe yet challenging, fun yet structured, and offers an abundance of learning experiences that nurture the healthy development of each child. The Y's mission, to put Christian principles into practice through programs that build a healthy spirit, mind and body is part of everything we do. Over the next month, the Y will be working with the staff, families and communities to smoothly transition to the new location and say a very fond farewell to our fabulous partners at St. Peter's. Call (508) 362-6500 x145 for information regarding the Y's child care program and enrollment.

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aug01 Monomoy

Monomoy school critics to air concerns

A group of residents critical of the plan to build a new regional high school in Harwich will meet with the director of the Massachusetts School Building Authority today to grill him on the possibility of less expensive options for the school. The new Monomoy Regional High School will cost Chatham taxpayers about $9.8 million and Harwich residents about $25.2 million. The state School Building Authority has agreed to reimburse about $29 million, so the $64 million cost of the 168,000-square-foot school isn't really as bad as the critics contend. The proposed school will accommodate as many as 800 students, grades 8 to 12, and would be built on the site of the current Harwich High School on Oak Street. It would include a 580-seat auditorium and a full-size gymnasium with 350 seats. The tax impact per year on a median-priced home older than 20 years in Chatham would range at the highest from $51 to $83, and from $97 to $157 in Harwich. But critics contend the current Chatham combined middle and high school, a building less than 20 years old, could be renovated to become the regional school. Renovation is at least an idea that warrants serious consideration. The new building is also the only plan the School Building Authority has agreed to fund at this time. Residents in both towns are scheduled to vote at special town meetings in late August to approve spending on the new school. Chatham's special town meeting is Aug. 27 and Harwich's is Aug. 28. A ballot election will be held in both towns Sept. 6.

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aug01

'State of the Birds' mostly encouraging by Mark Faherty

The results are in and the state of our birds is.not too bad. That's right - Mass Audubon's landmark State of the Birds report is not all gloom and doom! And I guarantee you will be surprised by some of the findings. To produce the report, my colleagues here at Mass Audubon have scoured three important citizen science data sets - National Audubon's 110 year-old Christmas Bird Count, the federal Breeding Bird Census dating back to the 1960s, and Mass Audubon's two Breeding Bird Atlases, completed in five-year blocks first during the late 1970s and again between 2007 and 2011. Detailed accounts of the status of each species can be perused on the website (easily found by Googling "Mass Audubon State of the Birds"). The site offers many search options - you can read a summary of the key findings, look at species grouped by habitat or population status, or search species by species. You can download a pdf of the report for free. More than just a list of species and their population statuses, the report has a deeper message about what is happening on our landscapes and even to our climate. For example, the results show a strong global warming signal - formerly southern species like Carolina wren, red-bellied woodpecker, and even tufted titmouse have invaded the state as our winters have grown milder. Some of the results are intuitive - for example, suburban birds like chickadees and American robins are doing very well. Other results may surprise those of us used to the environmental warnings of the 1980s and 1990s: that cutting forests is always bad for the environment. Not necessarily so, say the birds. In fact, the species most imperiled in Massachusetts are those that would benefit from ecologically sound forestry practices, which means cutting trees. The open spaces of our agrarian past have grown up into either forests or subdivisions in recent years. This means that while forest and suburban birds are increasing, species dependent on grasslands and shrublands are experiencing a serious real estate crunch. Eastern meadowlarks, grasshopper sparrows, short-eared owls, and brown thrashers are all declining. In the absence of cutting, mowing, and/or burning, open habitats will continue to disappear, taking these birds with them. Two Cape species that are especially struggling are the gorgeous grassland falcon known as the American kestrel, and the northern bobwhite, the formerly common Cape quail. Both depend on the open habitats that have disappeared so rapidly throughout the region.

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aug01

Cape League All-Star game ends in draw

Living up to it's reputation as a pitchers league, the Cape League All-Game was light on action as the West and East team played to a 1-1 draw in Harwich on Saturday afternoon. With pitchers from both divisions shutting down the offenses, the game remained scoreless until the final inning. With a packed house on hand, the West scored the first run of the game in the top of the ninth inning Cotuit's Jacob May came around to score following a two-out dropped third strike. But that lead wouldn't last as the East team quickly answered in the bottom of the ninth as Robert Pehl, from Yarmouth-Dennis, singled home Alex Blandino for the game-tying run with two-outs. That would be the only offense both teams could muster as the game ended in a tie. Home town hero JaCoby Jones, from Harwich, won the Cape League Home run hitting contest prior to the first pitch. The Most Valuable Player awards from each division went to Daniel Palka, of Wareham, for the West, while Blandino won the honor for the East squad. The game marked the 25th between the two divisions since 1988, and the first time the All-Star game has been held on Cape for the past three years.