News Archive

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

apr30 Wellfleet-Eastham-Truro-Provincetown-Orleans

Lower Cape police departments starting gun buy back program

Five Lower Cape police departments will initiate what they hope is an annual voluntary gun "buy back" program May 11-19, as a way to help prevent gun violence following the school shooting Dec. 14 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. The voluntary turn-over can give families a way to dispose of guns that were owned by deceased relatives, as one example, Wellfleet Police Chief Ron Fisette said Tuesday. Also, removing unwanted guns from a house can lower the chance that it might be stolen and used to harm someone, Fisette said. When the gun is brought in police will attempt to determine and notify the owner if the gun has any monetary value, he said. People turning over guns would be asked to sign a release form that conveys the gun to the police and allows it to be destroyed. "This will spur people to think, 'Do I need that firearm?'" Fisette said. "It provides an avenue to dispose of it." People who turn in unwanted guns will receive a gift or gift certificate from a local business. The hours for the events are 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. in all the towns. In Provincetown, guns can be turned in on May 11 at the police station at 26 Shank Painter Road; in Truro on May 12 and May 19 at the police station at 344 Route 6; in Wellfleet on May 13 and May 15 at the police station at 36 Gross Hill Road; in Eastham on May 14 and May 18 at the police station at 2500 State Highway; and in Orleans on May 16-17 at the police station at 90 S. Orleans Road. Tax-deductible gifts and gift certificates donated from local businesses are being sought as well. For further information on the gift program, contact Lydia Vivante at vivantelydia@gmail.com. For information about the gun "buy back" program, contact any of the police departments. The "buy back" program follows the lead taken by the Falmouth, Yarmouth and other police departments in the state, the organizers said.


apr30 Wellfleet

As coastline erodes, is beach living sustainable?

Along America's coast, extreme erosion is replacing homes and parking lots with dunes and beach. By the end of the century it's predicted the sea level will rise three feet, which could redraw Florida's coastline and swamp the Jersey Shore.



apr30 Wellfleet

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Unexpected Signpost of Aging: My Last Pope?

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. He has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday morning at 8:35am and Tuesday afternoon at 5:45pm. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.




The high percentage of seniors on Cape Cod can make personal indications of aging easier to ignore. On A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch tallies some of the signposts of aging, including failings of the body, and encounters with professional figures younger than appears seemly. Recently, he was struck by a fresh age-related realization: the newly elected Pope might just be his last.




apr30 Truro

Fire staffing dominates Truro's annual warrant

Voters will have a chance at the annual town meeting Thursday to weigh in on the future of the call fire department, as the town considers paying for year-round, 24-hour-a-day coverage at the fire station. In Article 11 of the 34-article warrant, voters will be asked to approve a $141,400 Proposition 2½ override to pay for one round-the-clock firefighter-paramedic position at the station every day of the year and a second, similar position during the six-month tourist season. Currently, the fire station is staffed during the day and evening, but at night firefighters respond from home. Truro has a year-round population of about 2,000 and a heavy influx of seasonal visitors and second-home owners. The $141,400 fire department override, if approved, would become a permanent addition to the town's annual operating budget and would add an estimated $24.62 in taxes in the first year to property assessed at $350,000, Town Accountant Trudi Brazil said Monday. The $141,000 could be used only with the written approval of a majority of the selectmen, a majority of the finance committee and Town Administrator Rex Peterson. "That was a compromise, a last-minute idea," Peterson said, because a plan for the fire department's future has not been completed. In Article 4, Peterson proposes using $60,000 in free cash for a comprehensive study of the fire department and various options for reorganization, including regionalization with neighboring towns. The selectmen discussed a possible study at a March 19 meeting but have not given the go-ahead. At a minimum, in Article 6, voters would be asked to bump up the current $333,300 annual operating budget for the fire department to $350,700 for the next fiscal year. Article 6 assumes the same staffing structure that is currently in place. The fire department has fewer than 20 call firefighters but the town could use at least 40, one fire captain said in 2011. In Article 16, the selectmen voted 3-2 to endorse purchasing a $42,000 four-wheel-drive vehicle for the fire chief, as a Proposition 2½ debt exclusion. The proposed borrowing would add an estimated $7.31 for one year only to a property assessed at $350,000, Brazil said. A second Proposition 2½ override, in Article 10, would increase the weekly hours for the assistant to the council on aging director from 25 to 35, amounting to an addition of $12,194 in the first year. If approved, the estimated property tax increase in the first year for property assessed at $350,000 would be $2.12. A third override seeking a new part-time assistant health and conservation agent position, is expected to be indefinitely postponed, Peterson said.

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apr30 Provincetown

4 seek selectmen posts in P'town

The four-way race for two seats on the Provincetown Board of Selectmen pivots around issues related to the police department, management of the waterfront, housing and overall leadership. The annual town election is May 7, but voters may use an absentee ballot for the race during today's U.S. Senate primary election, Town Clerk Doug Johnstone said. Thomas Donegan, Austin Knight, Raphael Richter and Francis John Santos will compete in the selectmen's race. Both positions are three-year terms. Catherine Russo filed nomination papers but withdrew March 25. The town's annual operating budget for the next fiscal year is $22 million, as approved at the annual town meeting earlier this month. Donegan, 53, a retired marketing executive, believes planning and setting priorities for spending and services will allow the town to achieve its goals. He believes federal grants for large municipal projects will end, but the town will continue to need the money. "We're going to face hard choices," said Donegan, chairman of the finance committee. "All elements of our budget will be under analytic review. I bring those analytic skills." Projects like a new police station or a wave attenuator to protect the town pier need that type of analysis, he said. In the case of the police station, the selectmen did not involve the community enough, translate the community's ideas into policy, explain it to town staff or sell it to the public, he said. Donegan said he believes there is tension between police and townspeople about too many traffic stops. He has asked that a complaint line be established. In his experience in community policing, Donegan said, having an outlet where someone can ask a question and receive a top-level explanation can be helpful. Donegan opposes a heavy police presence on the town pier, which he said gives visitors and recreational boaters the idea they are not welcome. He said the emphasis should be on education if someone violates a law. He said pier and town officials should remember that gay residents and tourists, at least those of his age, have been afraid of police based on their past experiences of oppression. Knight, 55, the current chairman of the board of selectmen, has served for six years, and he's proud that big projects such as paving Commercial Street, renovating town hall, making a deal with Truro for a backup drinking water well and developing 50 units of year-round rental housing have occurred on his watch. He remembers his first meeting as a selectman when the state Department of Revenue had the town on a "watch list" for poor financial management. "We're off the list now," said Knight, a builder. "We've moved the town forward, and that's the goal of my election." Knight said he knows how to ask questions, listen, get answers and make decisions, and "keep going." After a few years of trying to figure out the best place, cost and design for a new police station, and delegating the research to a subcommittee, the selectmen have recently decided to tour newer police stations in the region. "I think you have to go," Knight said, based on the assumption he is re-elected. "We have to get a better understanding of what's needed." The tour would be after the election, he said. Knight wants the town to build on the last six years, and focus on housing for older citizens and seasonal workers, acquire use of the now-private Fisherman's Wharf and figure out how to expand parking on the outskirts of town. He would like the town to turn a section of the downtown waterfront into a park with big-name concerts during the summer, and to take a much more active role in preparing for the 400th anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims in 2020. Richter, 28, co-owner of two taxi businesses, is worried that everybody his age is leaving town, based on recent census numbers, and that by 2025 the town could lose its social and economic diversity. "I want this to be a place that is exciting and vibrant when I'm 40 years old," Richter said. He wants the town not to sell the community center and an older public works building on Alden Street, but to retool those structures for housing for seasonal workers. That move would help businesses thrive, he said. Richter said he thinks the downtown waterfront could be reconfigured through a public and private deal involving the town pier and Fisherman's Wharf. He wants more ferry and technology services explored to encourage a year-round economy. He thinks that yacht owners should be better accommodated, and that the town should offer to host a private high school and offer services such as ballfields or buildings. "We're a naturally beautiful place to live," Richter said. "You can attract people here." Richter opposes a high profile for police on the town pier but supports what he said is the relatively low profile of police on the streets in the summer. "My business relies on the police," he said. "I'm not anti-police by any means." Richter in general believes that the key issues with a new police station are location and price, and that the town should sponsor a larger discussion through several types of forums including social media. Santos, 66, is a semi-retired boatyard owner and boat repairman, and a native of Provincetown. He was first elected selectman in 2010. "I've been in it for 50 years," Santos said of his public service. He said he believes a new police station is needed and could come in at around $5 million, but he opposes the use of highway garage property because, he said, that land is needed by the public works department. He's not in favor of rebuilding at the current police station site because of the cost. A new police station is among the biggest projects to undertake in the next three years, along with a new public works building, he said. Santos said he sees the harbor and waterfront as the town's biggest assets. The town pier is a friendlier place for visitors and recreational boaters, Santos said, because of the current harbormaster, Rex McKinsey, who used to work for Santos. Town staff should not manage the pier, Santos said, because of mismanagement he said occurred in previous years when the town was more deeply involved. More needs to be done to improve parking for visitors and traffic flow from Route 6 and to encourage the use of bicycles, Santos said. He also said all town construction projects, including school committee projects, should be managed by the department of public works. The town should prepare for the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrim's landing in 2020, Santos said, by taking lessons from Plymouth and investing in infrastructure to accommodate anniversary activities.

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apr30 Provincetown

P'town proposes splitting harbormaster job

In reaction to an unflattering audit of the harbormaster's office, the selectmen and members of the Provincetown Public Pier Corp. agreed Monday that the job of harbormaster as it now stands is too much for one person. But their agreement on this point stands in sharp contrast to the widely diverging reactions to the audit itself, which criticized Harbormaster Rex Mc­Kinsey for failures of record keeping and enforcement on the waterfront. The audit, conducted by management consultant Robert Pomeroy, was done at the request of Town Manager Sharon Lynn, who said she wanted an independent person to look into a number of complaints she had heard over the years about the harbormaster's office. These criticisms and incidents included complaints about derelict boats and angry statements on the "ineptness of pier personnel," she said. Also during her tenure, she said, one assistant harbormaster has been arrested and another was seen drinking in a bar in his uniform. These complaints, she said, prompted her to suggest to the harbormaster that any future assistants be hired by the police department, she said. But the audit itself came under intense criticism from Scott Fraser, a member of the Provincetown Public Pier Corp. He said Pomeroy's report told Lynn exactly what she wanted to hear. "It was not balanced or objective," Fraser said.

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apr30 Brewster

Brewster averts battle over golf funding

The golf commissioners performed a nifty save chipping out of a sand trap to within a few feet of the hole, at Monday night's selectman's meeting in Brewster. Captains Course had been looking at a $271,000 deficit for Fiscal Year 2014, on top of projections of close to $1.4 million in deficits through 2020. That's all due to a debt load ranging from $595,000 to $720,000 till the bonds from the extra 18-holes (built in 1999) are paid off in 2020. The finance committee was quite upset by the outlook and voted to disapprove the golf budget by a 7-0 vote last month. They were contemplating an alternative budget presentation at town meeting (May 6) but the golf commission devised their own alternative. The solution, in part, was to add debt. That may be counter-intuitive but by consolidation all their planned capital expenses projects for the next several years into one project, to be done next winter, they'll save money in time and set-up expenses. In addition the course will dip into its Golf Receipts Reserved for Appropriation Account - basically a reserve fund comprised of golf cart revenues - to spare the general taxpayer some annual expenses. "There are no changes to the budget itself," Captains' Director of Golf Mark O'Brien said. "But I think this more realistically represents what the capital requirements will be." The five-year plan called for $90,000 a year for sinkhole repairs, tee box repairs and annual cart path work. Instead, Captains will forgo this year's $90,000 request (cutting capital expenses from $166,620 to $76,620) and ask for authorization for a $400,000 bond at the fall town meeting. If that's approved the work will begin immediately. Interest would be around 4 percent over an 8 years. The course will also ask for $150,000 each year for capital improvements (replacing equipment) - which is much less than the annual $300,000-plus that had been predicted just a few years ago. O'Brien will also take $125,000 a year from the GRRA account, $75,000 more than originally planned. So next year's deficit will be cut from $271,000 to $114,000 - effectively splitting it with the town. FY2015's deficit will fall from $192,252 to $67,252 and so on down the line. In essence the course is kicking in $450,000 more than they'd planned over the next six years for a total of $750,000 from the cart receipts fund. All of that will drain the GRAA from a healthy $831,551 back in FY2012 to just an estimated $31,515 by FY2019. That'll be cutting it close if people decide to walk instead of riding in a cart. At that point, with the 18-hole-bond it's last year, O'Brien hopes to begin replenishing the fund.

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apr30 Brewster

Brewster Garden club finale

The final meeting of the season of The Garden Club of Brewster will be held Wednesday, May 1, at 10 a.m. at Brewster Town Hall. "Our Favorite Gardens" will be the theme of the meeting featuring a slide show of members' favorite gardens. A short business meeting will follow and the meeting will end with light refreshments. Membership is open to all and guests are welcome.


apr30

Boaters warned to watch out for right whales

State officials Monday warned boaters to watch out for North Atlantic right whales in the western part of Cape Cod Bay, after about 60 were seen over the weekend. The state Division of Marine Fisheries issued the high-risk advisory because of the number of whales, their behavior and closeness to the shore and the local abundance of zooplankton. Right whales feed on zooplankton both at the surface and below, so they are often difficult to spot. Vessel strikes are a major cause of death for right whales, of which only 500 are said to exist. The species is protected under federal law. Ships are urged to proceed with caution, reduce speed to less than 10 knots and post lookouts to avoid colliding with the whales. The whales are expected to remain for several days. Report sightings at 866-755-NOAA, or hail the Coast Guard on Channel 16.


apr30

Exclusive interview with OpenCape CEO Dan Vortherms

The Capewide fiber optic network is about to go live. OpenCape has created one of the most advanced and capable fiber optic networks in the country and is now on the verge of making it available to the region. Exactly how it gets used and how it develops over the next few years is largely up to the businesses and citizens of the region. OpenCape is open access network that can be attached to and used in a wide variety of ways. It is expected that the fiber footprint will expand, but also that people and companies will use multiple technologies, including wireless and copper lines, to best meet local needs, and then connect to OpenCape. It is OpenCape's role to provide the best middle mile network services possible and the people's role to use them to further both their own and the region's interests. Both OpenCape and CapeNet have been candid and open in their interactions with Cape Cod Today since we started this series of articles a few weeks ago. They effuse optimism and are proud of the technology they have brought to Cape Cod. Especially significant in this interview was Mr. Vortherms' response to our question about Google Fiber. Right now OpenCape/CapeNet competes with Comcast for what most would consider the high end of the market - a tiny corporation and nonprofit, pitted against the Goliath of Comcast. Should Google Fiber enter the Cape market, perhaps riding on the OpenCape network, this might bring fiber optic service down to the level where small businesses and individuals might benefit. Google would be a far more daunting competitor to Comcast, perhaps across the entire broadband landscape - not just at the high end. Comcast has made it abundantly clear to us both in their virtual interview and in emails with various company officials that they are not prepared to cede business to CapeNet without aggressive competition. Such competition is good for the customer and tends to bring us better services at lower prices. Verizon was invited to sit for a virtual interview but respectfully declined.

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Monday, April 29, 2013

apr29 Wellfleet

Climate change forum in Wellfleet

Planning for Climate Change: A Free Community Forum will be held Saturday May 4, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, sponsored by the Wellfleet Community Forum, Wellfleet Conservation Trust and CapeCool.org. State Sen. Dan Wolf is among the panelists. For more information call 508-349-2615 or email wellfleet@massaudubon.org.


apr29 Wellfleet

Gestalt workshop in Wellfleet

he Gestalt International Study Center in Wellfleet will hold a workshop, "Life Strategies for Navigating Personal and Professional Transitions, May 16 through 19 at the center. This program is for those facing a major transition, whether this change is planned by choice or imposed by circumstance. It is also recommended for coaches supporting the transition of others. For more information call 508-349-7900 or email office@gisc.org.


apr29 Eastham

Girls and dolls tea at Eastham United Methodist Church

Bring your special girl to tea along with her favorite doll at "Tea for Girls and Their Dolls" Church from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 4, at Eastham United Methodist Church. In addition to crafts, tea or lemonade will be served with tea sandwiches and little pastries. The first two tickets are $10 each. Additional tickets are $5. There is a $25 maximum charge per immediate family. This event is a fund-raiser for the Christian Education Committee. For reservations, call the church office at 508-255-8774 or Betty Steele Jeffers at 508-255 -3535.


apr29 Provincetown

CapeCast: Endangered giants feed in Cape Cod Bay



apr29 Provincetown

Provincetown airport terminal expansion heads upward

More than planes will be going up at the Provincetown Airport. Plans to raise the terminal three feet above the ground and expand it with a second story are on the drawing board. Airport manager Butch Lisenby and engineer Mike Garrity met recently with the National Seashore's advisory commission to talk about the proposal, a revision of an earlier one outlined in the environmental assessment of the airport's capital improvements plan. According to the schematics Garrity presented, the new terminal building would be raised three feet above floodplain level to comply with FEMA regulations, and a second story would provide additional space for offices and a public waiting room. The renovations would raise the building's profile by 12 feet above the existing terminal, Garrity said. The footprint would remain the same. To comply with requirements of the American Disabilities Act, the parking lot would be graded to approach the new terminal building, a process that would entail bringing in fill. The area to be filled is so small that the impacts of the work are expected to be negligible, Garrity said. The airport, situated within the boundaries of Cape Cod National Seashore, abuts extensive wetlands. Lauren McKean, Seashore planner, said the plan was always to add a second story to the terminal but that, when the design review process began, it was discovered that the existing building "couldn't handle" the upward expansion. Garrity said the difficulty arose from the building's location "right in the middle of a floodplain." The existing terminal, constructed in the late '90s, is just 15 years old. Lisenby said the reason it must be renovated is that it was built "pre-9/11." Since the 2001 terrorist attacks, the Transportation Security Administration has taken over about a third of the building's space, he said. Funding for the rebuild will be "part state, part local," Lisenby said. He added that, due to the complexities of the permitting process, it could be "a few years" before the project commences, or it could be six to seven years. Some concerns have been expressed about the visual impact of the new terminal, since it will be higher than the existing one and could possibly include reflective surfaces such as solar panels. "We have to consider that this is a prominent building out in the dunes," said Mark Robinson, director of the Compact of Cape Cod Conservation Trusts and a member of the Seashore's advisory commission. Garrity stressed that the design was not final and that the solar panels could be "antireflective." He noted that the National Seashore so far has determined that the building would have "no visual impact." The Provincetown Municipal Airport is one of just two airports in the country built on national parklands. The second is located in Jackson Hole, Wyo., in the Grand Tetons. Seashore Supt. Price said the Provincetown Airport is one of the only aviation hubs on the Cape and that the Seashore would do what it could to make sure that it remained a "viable" airport.


apr29 Provincetown

Health fair Wednesday in Provincetown

A free health fair is being offered by the town and the Visiting Nurse Association of Cape Cod from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 1, at the Provincetown Council on Aging, 26 Alden St. The fair is open to town residents of all ages and will include screenings for: blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, body mass index (height and weight), colorectal cancer and bone density. In addition, information will be available on aromatherapy and Reiki as well as other health education materials and giveaways. No appointments are necessary except for bone density screenings. Call the COA at (508) 487-7080 to schedule a bone density appointment. The town of Provincetown and the VNA are also offering a free six-week walking program beginning in early May; it is open to all town residents. Call Chris at the COA at (508) 487-7080 for more information.


apr29 Provincetown

Four vie for two school spots in Provincetown

With the school district on the brink of major transitions, four people are running for two seats on the Provincetown School Committee. Kerry Adams, Anthony Brackett, Peter Grosso and Loretta Stewart will compete at the town election May 7. Voters may use an absentee ballot for this race during Tuesday's primary election for U.S. Senate if they choose, Town Clerk Doug Johnstone said. In the coming school year, the school district will begin to educate all its high school students at out-of-district schools and move into a challenging new International Baccalaureate academic program for the remaining students. Adams, 52, who is running for his third term, believes he has the institutional memory on the board, compared with the other, newer members. The International Baccalaureate program is the committee's and Adams' main focus, he said, because it is the district's chance to grow, particularly as parents in neighboring towns see the heightened level of education. Brackett, 51, is a classically trained clarinet player and a music instructor, and father to 5-year-old twins. He wants to strengthen the relationship between the school and the town and have more intergenerational programs to help children learn about their heritage. Brackett has worked in education for about 30 years, and in after-school programs for at-risk children, primarily in New York. Grosso, 67, served on the school committee for nine years, and he hopes to return to the board after a two-year hiatus because of term limits. He considers his support of ending high school classes in Provincetown as unfortunate, but nevertheless an accomplishment. Incumbent Stewart, 63, has worked in schools and with technology in Vermont and on Cape Cod. She hopes to continue the evolution of the school district's new International Baccalaureate program.

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apr29 Orleans

Orleans faces 'life-changing' wastewater vote

The May 13 annual town meeting will focus on the complex and emotional issue of wastewater. Borrowing for wastewater planning and infrastructure is requested in two of nine purchases being voted on as debt exclusions that go beyond the limits of Proposition 2½, the cap on annual increases to local spending that can only be exceeded with voter approval. If all articles pass town meeting and the May 21 election, the tax bill for a $500,000 home will go up by $85 a year for the life of the loans, said Town Administrator John Kelly. The two wastewater articles - one presented by the selectmen and the other by a citizen's petition - are expected to be contentious. The first, Article 11 on the special town meeting warrant, requests $3.5 million from taxpayers to do the engineering design for a sewer system and treatment plant for downtown Orleans, and further study of wastewater treatment in the Meeting House Pond area. Converting the commercial area of Orleans from septic systems to sewers could revitalize downtown and will clean local waters, but it will be costly, said Jon Fuller, chairman of the Orleans Board of Selectmen. "This is a life-changing decision for Orleans," Fuller said. "I've lived here my whole life and there's never been a decision like this." More than 24 businesses have been unable to settle in Orleans or expand because of limits on the ability of septic systems to clean wastewater, said George Meservey, Orleans planning director.

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apr29 Orleans

Championing the chestnut in South Orleans

South Orleans was once a land of giants. And it still is in a somewhat ghostly fashion - the 46-acre Kenrick Woods is home to over 100 American chestnut trees - five or six of which are large enough to flower and produce progeny. "One of the few places chestnuts are reproducing is in Orleans," Chris Ramsey of the Orleans Conservation trust told 20 or so people on hand for a tour last Thursday. "It's the largest area I know where reproduction is taking place," agreed Rufin Van Bossuyt of the American Chestnut Foundation. "There are still millions in the woods but they are mostly small shrubby sprouts and never flower." The chestnut's natural range was from southern New England south to northern Georgia, most covering the Appalachians west to Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee. Through these forests grew about four billion trees. "American chestnuts were one of the most abundant trees in the Eastern United States," explained Van Bossuyt. "The tree produced a lot of food for wildlife, called mast (dry fruits like walnuts, acorns, hazelnuts and chestnuts). It was an important tree for wildlife and for timber. A lot of old barns have chestnut timbers and it was used for sills and furniture." Chestnut wood is decay resistant. Old logs still lay on the ground in Kenrick Woods. "I don't think chestnuts are native this far out on Cape Cod," Van Bossuyt ventured. "But farmers would plant them. The remnants of old chestnuts would last a long time. I think the trees are planted here. There is a grove in Yarmouth and chestnuts on the other side of the canal in Bournedale." Chestnuts are closely related to oaks and oaks grow happily on the Cape and the chestnuts adapted well. "Chestnuts like acidic soil, like pines," Van Bossuyt noted. The fungus that kills them is imported. The fungus enters the bark through a wound and causes cankers that eventually girdle the trunk and kill all the growth above the disease location. The fungus doesn't affect the roots of the tree so chestnut can re-sprout from the stump. What used to be dominant, 100-foot tall trees are reduced to surviving as short-lived shrub like clumps or small trees racing against the disease.

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apr29 Orleans

A sunny summer at the end of Nauset Beach

Yesterday we drove our Land Rover to the bitter end of Nauset Beach in Orleans. That's my grandson Will soaking up the rays, and in front of him below is a boat going through the new cut with Chatham's North Island in front of him. The off-road path is now open to the end of the beach - at least until the plovers drive us away while they mate. And don't forget last years's beach stickers expire at the end of April. The prices haven't gone up for the 2013 stickers They are still $80 for Orleans year round residents and $180 for others. Orleans beach stickers can be purchased at the former American Legion building, located across the street from Town Hall. The sticker office is open from Monday - Friday, 9AM - 3PM. Visitor beach stickers are sold at Nauset Beach, on weekends from 9AM - 4PM and 7 days a week after June 18th. For more information on Orleans beach stickers, call 508-240-3780. See the details here. The Town of Orleans Parks & Beaches website is here.


apr29 Brewster

Brewster in Bloom Parade






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apr29

Outer & Lower Cape Wildlife sightings

Spring migration is heating up, and new arrivals this week included the first green herons (reported from Wellfleet Bay sanctuary), willets (numerous locations), least sandpipers (4 at Bell's Neck Rd. in Harwich), blue-gray gnatcatcher (Beech Forest in Provincetown), and northern parula (Wellfleet Bay sanctuary). Birds at Bell's Neck Rd in Harwich included 2 blue-winged teal, 27 green-winged teal, a long-tailed duck, 7 snowy egrets, 59 greater yellowlegs, 11 lesser yellowlegs, a pectoral sandpiper, 4 least sandpipers, 11 Wilson's snipe, and 2 barn swallows. Birds and cetaceans noted in a boat trip out of Provincetown last week included a Manx shearwater, 8 Iceland gulls, a glaucous gull, an Atlantic puffin, fin, humpback, minke, and right whales, as well as Atlantic white-sided dolphins and harbor porpoises. Hawks migrating past Mass Audubon's hawk watch at Pilgrim Heights in Truro included 13 turkey vultures, 5 sharp-shinned hawks, 8 American kestrels, and a merlin. An Iceland gull and 2 right whales were also noted from the watch. Other sightings around the Outer & Lower Cape included 23 American oystercatchers at Scatteree landing in Chatham, 2 northern bobwhites in Eastham, 750 red-throated loons off Cahoon Hollow in Wellfleet, and single sooty shearwaters at Head of the Meadow in Truro and Race Point in Provincetown.

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apr29

Exclusive interview - Comcast talks high speed broadband

Competitors define the Cape's fiber optic "information superhighway." The OpenCape fiber optic network is set to go live in a few weeks. When Cape Cod Community College chose Comcast as its fiber optic broadband provider last month, many Cape Codders did a double take. No institution had been more instrumental in advancing the Open Cape than CCCC. However when it came down to a decision, the college chose Comcast based upon ready availability and "record of service". In the weeks that followed we conducted exclusive interviews with CCCC President John Cox and CapeNet CEO Alan Davis. Dr. Cox explained why his institution chose Comcast and Mr. Davis offered candid answers to a daunting list of questions we submitted. There are links to these interview below.

This week we invited Steve Walsh, Vice President of Comcast Business for the Greater Boston Region, to our virtual parlor for a chat. Comcast remains a very big fish in our small pond here on the Cape. Comcast is an enormous corporation with resources beyond the imagination of small, regional Internet Service Providers. That said, local ISP's like CapeNet face an uphill battle for fiber optic broadband customers. On the other hand, some schools, libraries, town governments and businesses may feel more comfortable dealing with a small, independent company. Folks usually qualify statements like this "with all things being equal." Whether all things are "equal" remains to be seen. Over the past three weeks this writer has contacted several school, library and town government officials to talk about the OpenCape network and their plans regarding OpenCape/Capenet. Anecdotally, we are not sensing a lot of confidence in OpenCape for mission-critical service. Much of CapeNet/OpenCape's future will be written in the first weeks of its life as a network. If the system satisfies those who do sign on with CapeNet, then CapeNet may be in a position to build a sustainable service over time. Should the network prove less than rock-solid reliable, we expect many of those still "on the fence" may remain on the Comcast side of the fence for the next few years. What if Comcast competes so well that OpenCape/CapeNet cannot secure enough customers to survive? This could be a case of "be careful what you wish for", especially if another deep-pocket player such as Google Fiber came to control the OpenCape network. One imagines Google Fiber might be a tad more daunting a competitor for Comcast than tiny CapeNet. Competition is nearly always good for the consumer. Prices are likely to fall and speeds increase as Comcast and its smaller competitors grapple to define the Cape's fiber optic "information superhighway."

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apr29

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 4/23
KOSTKA, Jillian, 27, 158 Whittier Drive, Dennis; larceny from a building, larceny by check of less than $250, check forgery and passing a false check, Aug. 3 in Brewster, dismissed.

NEEDHAM, Kemar, 23, 276 Chatham Road, Harwich; assault and battery and intimidating a witness, Jan. 31 in Dennis, dismissed.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 4/23
ELLIOTT, Robert, 42, 35 Long Pond Drive, Harwich; larceny of a credit card, document forgery and larceny of less than $250, March 27 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing May 22.

GAMELLA, Ronald, 43, 8 Bradford St., Provincetown; assault and battery, vandalism and disturbing the peace, April 23 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing May 22.

LITTLEFIELD, Kevin, 51, 2 Alden Lane, Truro; possession of marijuana with intent to distribute and assault and battery, April 22 in Truro. Pretrial hearing May 22.

VOGEL, Brittany, 27, 8 Pond St., South Yarmouth; larceny of more than $250 by single scheme, larceny of more than $250 and document forgery, April 22 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing May 22.

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Sunday, April 28, 2013

apr28 Eastham

2013 Nauset 5K Run/Walk - May 11th

The 3rd annual Nauset 5K Run/Walk is scheduled for Saturday May 11th. The race will start at 9 AM with a beginning and end point at Nauset Regional High School on Cable Rd. in Eastham. There will also be a free "Kids Fun Run". The race is sponsored by the Eastham Elementary School Parents Group and was created to promote health and wellness for both adults and children in our communities. The full 100% of the proceeds go to the Eastham Elementary school students. The 5K race route is fairly flat with one short gradual uphill on Old Orchard Rd. Check-in will begin at 8:00 AM and race time is 9:00 AM. The first 100 registrations will receive a Nauset 5K Race t-shirt. The race is sponsored by 'The Black Dog' and the Eastham Police Department. Register online at www.Nauset5K.com. 


apr28 Truro

Truro boards at odds over 'street' definition

What makes a street a street? It's a seemingly simple question, but Truro town officials remain at odds over the answer as residents prepare to vote on the issue at Town Meeting next week. Members of the planning board appeared before the board of selectmen Tuesday night to make their final pitch for a proposed bylaw that would redefine the town's roadways to more closely resemble the state's one-size-fits-all model. The proposed bylaw would eliminate a reference to outdated design standards in the current definition and replace it with less immediately restrictive wording for establishing compliance. "It corrects the fact that we currently have a bylaw that makes a lot of streets nonconforming," said planning board chair Karen Snow, referencing the problems nonconforming roads can cause for property owner's seeking building permits. Under the new definition, taken almost verbatim from Massachusetts state law, Truro streets would be classified in one of three categories: A public roadway maintained by the town, a subdivision road that meets the requirements stipulated by the town when the project was approved, or an existing roadway constructed prior to 1955 that meets the planning board's adequacy requirements for emergency vehicle and municipal services access. The planning board has lobbied aggressively for the change, claiming that the new definition would improve the town's ability to bring existing roads up to compliance, address building permit requests appropriately, and avoid future litigation. "What we're trying to do is deal with the large number of nonconforming roads in our town," said John Pendleton, a member of the planning board. "We're trying to propose a mechanism to address proposed construction." But the selectmen appeared unswayed again Tuesday, opting to forego a re-vote in favor of upholding its 4-1 decision to oppose the article at Town Meeting on May 2. The planning board voted unanimously to recommend the warrant article. A fear of inviting new litigation upon the town has been a driving factor on both sides of the issue from beginning. The town has dealt with legal issues related to the definition of its roadways in the past, including, most notably, the five-year saga surrounding the construction of a large seaside home on Stephen's Way. In 2007, property owners Donald and Andrea Kline were approved by the town to begin construction on the home. The permit was later revoked in court - a ruling that was later upheld in a Massachusetts state court of appeals - after the roadway servicing the property was found to be noncompliant with town requirements.

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apr28 Provincetown

Rescuers aid kayakers in Provincetown

Three people were taken ashore Friday evening after rescue crews responded to a report of a capsized kayak near the West End breakwater, according to Provincetown police. Crews responded around 5 p.m. and found a kayak "upright and floating" with a woman and child inside, according to a Provincetown police press release. A second kayak was found nearby, but that one was sunk next to a woman standing chest-high in water. All three were taken ashore and evaluated by EMS crews. None of the people reported injuries, and they declined to go to the hospital, police said.


apr28 Provincetown

Endangered whales filling Cape waters

Two North Atlantic right whales skimming for zooplankton Saturday afternoon in waters off the coast of Bourne nearly had a head-on collision, but the two managed to change courses at the last minute and avoid hitting each other. "I've never seen them put on the brakes," Charles "Stormy" Mayo, director of right whale studies at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, said half-joking from the top deck of the research vessel Shearwater. "That's really cool." It was crowded, very crowded, on the water: First a handful of adult right whales were in the distance as the Shearwater left Provincetown, then four whales appeared, then another 14 and then right whales were everywhere, mostly skimming by the boat with mouths open, their baleen showing like human gums. It was a very unusual afternoon, given the volume of whales in that location. Typically right whales congregate off Wood End and Race Point lights and Herring Cove Beach in Province­town. The new location is worrisome because of the shipping lane from the eastern end of the Cape Cod Canal to Boston. The area is also outside the boundaries in Cape Cod Bay that are defined as right whale critical habitat under federal guidelines. "It's a little unsettling," and unsafe, Mayo said. This spring, the center's right whale team has been conducting aerial surveys across the bay and the Atlantic coastline, as it has done since 1998. On Friday, the aerial team saw 113 right whales, the most in one day since 2011. The center also conducts boat-based environmental studies on the entire bay and areas where right whales feed, a program that has been in place since 1984. Right whales are rare and endangered, with a slowly growing population of about 500 in the world. Federal laws protect the whales, and the center's studies are funded as part of that effort. The goal of the studies is to get a better understanding of right whale habitat, as a way to improve conservation efforts. Federal funding cuts, though, are making it harder and harder, Mayo said.

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apr28 Provincetown

Brigantino sisters play coffee house in Provincetown

An original member of Lez Zeppelin, the world's first all-girl Led Zeppelin tribute band, singer-songwriter Lisa Brigantino went on to write, record and perform her own work, earning her seventh place in the 2012 Indie Music top 25 list. Brigantino is a multi-instrumental master of groove, whether she's playing with a group, solo or in a duo, as she'll be on Monday, April 29, when she brings her sister Lori to the Coffeehouse at The Mews. Monday's show marks Lisa's second time as featured performance at The Mews. The pair shares the open mike night microphone starting at 8 p.m. Sign-up for all other performers who'd like to join in starts at 7:30 p.m. The Mews Restaurant and Café is located at 429 Commercial St. A $3 donation is suggested with all proceeds going to community organizations such as WOMR/WMFR community radio and The Provincetown Theater.


apr28 Brewster

They don't call it Brewster in Bloom for nothing

Sunday marks the last day of the annual Brewster in Bloom celebration. This annual springtime festival is a signal for Cape Codders and early visitors that hibernation is over. At the beginning of April, daffodils (a tad ahead of schedule) began to burst open in front yards, fields and along the roads of every Cape town. But there always seems to be a lot of them in Brewster. This home on Satucket Road in Brewster has been shining like the sun since the beginning of the month. The last day of springtime celebration in Brewster features the annual Brewster in Bloom Parade which kicks off at 1 p.m. at Underpass Road. The parade heads west on Main Street to Swamp Road. Awards will be presented at Stony Brook Elementary School on Main Street following the parade.

apr28 Brewster

Surplus school stuff sale in Brewster

The Stony Brook Elementary School has declared certain equipment surplus. The equipment is available for $5 a unit to the general public on Wednesday, May 8, from 8 to 11 a.m. and free to the general public on Thursday, May 9 from 8 to 11a.m. Disposal will follow. The town also has 14 student desks, 4 metal desks and 18 steel chairs that it will sell on GovDeals.


apr28

Wolf urges Patrick to attend the May 15 rally at Pilgrim Nuclear

Senator Dan Wolf urges Gov. Patrick to attend the May 15 rally at Pilgrim Nuclear. A robust crowd gathered to participate in a workshop sponsored by Cape Downwinders entitled "No Escape from the Cape: Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station and the Threat to Cape Cod." Speakers included Pine DuBois of the Jones River Watershed Association, David Agnew and Diane Turco of Cape Downwinders and State Senator Dan Wolf. Some of the points made by Senator Wolf:

me of the points made by Senator Wolf:

  • "Pilgrim is an accident waiting to happen."
  • "The horror of Fukushima and the age of the Pilgrim facility make us all guinea pigs being tested to see if this plant can last 60 years. The facility was recently relicensed for another 20 years by the NuclearRegulatory Commission to satisfy Entergy's desire for profit. This was a failure of our federal government which chose to satisfy business executives at the expense of the health and safety of us all."
  • "Pilgrim is becoming more of a nuclear waste dump than a nuclear power plant. We didn't sign up to have a nuclear storage dump in our backyards."
  • "The consequences of an accident at Pilgrim would be dire. The evacuation plans for Cape Cod are bogus. The health affects and damage to Cape Cod would be devastating. You don't see people going on vacation to Love Canal."
  • "Cape Downwinders is a very important group. Their activist role to pressure the state and federal authorities is of prime importance in dealing with this priority."
  • "Governor Patrick and other government officials would do well to attend the upcoming May 19 Cape Downwinders rally at the Pilgrim facility."
apr28

Lyme disease patients step out of the shadows

Under normal circumstances, an invitation to ride in an open convertible in today's Brewster in Bloom parade would have 11-year-old Lauren Dalpe breaking out a warrior princess costume. But Lauren's family lost its grip on normal life when the child came down with the red bull's-eye rash of Lyme disease while still in preschool. Diagnosed with the tick-borne illness at 4 years old, Lauren has experienced everything from joint pain and facial paralysis to headaches and fatigue so severe she would fall asleep in kindergarten class, her mother, Angela Healy, said. At times her hands stung so badly from nerve damage she had to dunk them in and out of ice water. "I started to cry," said Lauren, who is being treated with intravenous antibiotics. Today the fourth-grader at the Oak Ridge School in Sandwich plans to ride in the Brewster springtime parade dressed as her nemesis - a giant deer tick. Chronic Lyme disease is an illness some medical experts say does not exist - except in the mind of the afflicted. But as Lyme disease has spread from coastal areas in Connecticut and Massachusetts across New England to other states, a growing number of people claim that the traditional 30-day course of antibiotics does not always cure the illness - and they are demanding action. "Lyme disease is spreading geographically. It's increasing a little bit each year," said Dr. Brian Fallon, director of the Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases Research Center at Columbia University in New York City. As the disease transmitted by the bite of the deer tick becomes more common, "you'll find patients with chronic symptoms more often," he said. The lingering effects of Lyme are worse than the acute phase of the illness, said Ronald Gangemi of Mashpee, who founded Lyme Awareness of Cape Cod after his wife, Pamela, was diagnosed 14 years after coming down with symptoms. The advocacy groups plan to use the opportunity to press for passage of a bill requiring mandatory insurance coverage for long-term Lyme disease treatment - action recommended in a report on the disease by a special state commission in February. With insurers often refusing to pay for treatment, out-of-pocket expenses for Lyme patients run into the thousands of dollars. "This has just ruined a lot of lives," state Sen. Dan Wolf, D-Harwich, who co-sponsored the bill that created the legislation, said at the time. The idea that Lyme symptoms can persist - and worsen - sometimes even after a 30-day course of antibiotics, is still meeting resistance, however.

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apr28

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 4/19, 4/22
OLENICZAK, Cameron, 22, 15 Charlie Noble Way, Eastham; admitted sufficient facts to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), April 18 in Orleans, continued without a finding for one year, 45-day license loss, $1,597.22 costs and $50 fee; negligent driving, dismissed; not responsible for another traffic violation.

TATE, Orren, 30, 33 West Road, Orleans; admitted sufficient facts to violating a protective order, April 16 in Orleans, continued without a finding for one year, $780 costs and $50 fee.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 4/19, 4/22
BRADFORD, David Jr., 54, Norfolk; OUI and another traffic violation, April 18 in Eastham. Pretrial hearing April 29.

TALIAFERRO, Joseph, 54, Middleton; OUI, negligent driving and two other traffic violations, April 18 in Chatham. Pretrial hearing May 16.

O'NEILL, Timothy, 32, 15 Duck Farm Lane, Orleans; assault and battery, April 20 in Orleans. Pretrial hearing May 3.

WEST, Myles, 22, 2825 Route 6, Eastham; possession of marijuana with intent to distribute and a traffic violation, April 20 in Wellfleet. Pretrial hearing April 26.

YOUNG, Jennifer, 34, 152 Mayfair Road, Dennis; possession of heroin, March 27 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing April 30.

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Saturday, April 27, 2013

apr27 Wellfleet

Three vie for two top seats in Wellfleet

Three people are competing Tuesday for two positions on the board of selectmen, and the candidates are thinking ahead about education, housing, jobs, the economy and trash. Polls for the annual town election will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the senior center at 715 Old King's Highway. The candidates are Berta Bruinooge, Jerry Houk and Mary Ellen Manning. Both positions are three-year terms, and there are no term limits in Wellfleet. Bruinooge, a retired banker, is currently chairwoman of the board of selectmen. This year, she said, the board hired a new fire chief and unexpectedly handled the hiring of a new town administrator, which meant spending about $10,000 more than what had been planned. She and other town officials testified before a state legislative committee on the need to expand the room occupancy tax beyond just large bed-and-breakfasts, motels and hotels. Bruinooge conducted her own research on one vacation rental Internet site and found, she said, 35 homes in Wellfleet renting seasonally for between $5,000 and $9,200 a week, and about 300 with lower rates. She said the expanded room tax could net at least $1 million a year for the town. The biggest single issue coming up for residents, Bruinooge said, is the town's negotiations for trash hauling. The selectmen are very interested in a pay-as-you-throw program, with the idea that the tons of trash normally hauled away would be reduced and recycling would increase. The upcoming restoration of the floodplain and salt marsh of the Herring River and reconstruction of the Chequessett Neck Road dike is "huge," she said. "When it gets fully open, people are going to have waterfront properties that they never had before, and some will have homes that will be compromised. It's going to happen." She said keeping property taxes down is very important. Houk, a sales manager for surplus marine products, was first elected a selectman in 1983, and has served on and off since then, most recently from 2000 until the present. Like Bruinooge, he considers the biggest issues in the past few years to be top administrative changes, such as the fire chief, police chief and town administrator. Houk said he supported new sidewalks and curbing along Commercial Street, upgrades around the marina for pedestrians and renewable energy projects at the library. Still, Houk would like to see the town hire a full-time building inspector, and he wants the town to investigate the dredging of the harbor, which he said could cost about $10 million, and look into ways to ease the buildup of sediment that has occurred with the construction of the harborfront parking lot. Houk served on school boards before becoming a selectman, and he wants to encourage the town to offer free preschool. "Every study I've read really suggests that 4-year-olds should be in pre-kindergarten," he said, "and not all parents can pay for that." There are specific licensing and zoning restrictions Houk said he'd like to tackle, to ease what he says are mystifying restrictions on property owners, such as the loss in some cases of the right to rent an apartment at market rate if it has been vacant for two years. Manning, an artist and former public relations specialist, believes public service is a noble endeavor, and she said she has the desire and time to serve as a selectman. If elected, she would encourage dredging of the harbor to ensure a clean, healthy environment for what is "vital to the local economy." She also supports the shellfishing industry, more affordable and community housing, a clean water supply and clean ponds, preserving open space and the expansion of Outer Cape Health Services. "We're so far from medical care. That's essential to the health and well-being of our community." Manning cut her teeth on politics in Wellfleet, she said, by founding in 2002 a citizens group that opposed construction of a regional trash and sewage sludge facility in Wellfleet. She served as chairwoman for public meetings, set agendas, served on the steering committee and handled the public relations campaign. The facility was ultimately not built, as least partly because of the group's pressure, Manning said. She said she has gained communication and team-player skills working in hospital administration in Boston in public affairs and project management, and in the U.S. Air Force as a public affairs specialist. "I could bring new energy and a fresh perspective to the board. Plus, I would love to serve. I really care a lot about Wellfleet. I think it's a really special town."

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apr27 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Breakers Soccer Club fund-raiser

The Wellfleet Breakers Soccer Club is hosting its annual fundraiser Wednesday, May 1, from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Wicked Oyster Restaurant. HillCrest Pizza will be providing free pizza, the Sharks will play a set and DJ Slim and DJ Ryan will be spinning dance music. There will be raffles and prizes from local merchants, restaurant and artists. Suggested donation is $10 and includes three free raffle tickets. come join the fun and support your local soccer club as it prepares for the upcoming Cape Cod Amateur Soccer League season."


apr27 Eastham-Nauset

Nauset High School makes U.S. News 'Best' list

When U.S. News & World Report released its 2013 Best High Schools Rankings earlier this week, it was no surprise to see Nauset Regional High School in North Eastham once again on the list. Nauset Regional High School has an 8 percent minority enrollment and 9 percent in the economically disadvantaged category. U.S. News uses three steps to rank high schools. The first two determine whether the schools serve all levels of students well, based on how schools perform on state proficiency tests. Schools that make it past the first two steps are then judged on how many of their students take college-level courses (through Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate programs) and how well the students do on program exams. Nauset Regional High School, also a silver medal winner, was ranked 774th nationally and 32nd in the state. The high school serves 975 students from towns along the Lower Cape. Schools Superintendent Richard Hoffmann said Nauset is a regular on the U.S. News list. "We have absolutely outstanding teachers," Hoffmann said. Nauset teachers encourage "all kinds of kids" to take the school's college level advanced placement offerings, according to Hoffmann. "They are really good at getting kids to try and achieve their highest potential."

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apr27 Eastham-Nauset

Tribute planned for former Nauset coaches

They roamed the sidelines for more than 100 combined years, now longtime Nauset coaches Leo Miller and Jack Donahue will be honored by the Nauset Warriors Booster Club. "This is something that is long overdue, but this something we wanted to do to honor these coaches for what they've done for sports at Nauset High school," said Paul Bohannon, from the Nauset Booster Club. Miller was a longtime basketball coach, that had winning season in all but two of his years on the Nauset sidelines, while Donahue was the first Nauset football coach and one of the founders of the program. Although neither still coaches, Bohannon said sports at Nauset was "forever changed by these two men." The event will be held at the Nauset Regional High School auditorium on June 7, starting at 6 p.m. Following the program of ceremonies, a reception will be held afterwards in the school cafeteria. The event is open to the public and the Booster Club has encouraged all who played under these coaches to attend. Tickets are available in advance or at the door the night of the event. For more information on the event, or to purchase tickets, call Paul Bohannon at 508-255-7363.


apr27 Eastham-Orleans-Brewster

Eastham-Orleans-Brewster Tri-town closure discussed

Selectmen and town administrators from three towns met Wednesday at Orleans Senior Center to discuss the steps discuss the next steps and timelines for the closing of the Tri-Town septage treatment facility on Overlook Drive that has served Eastham, Orleans and Brewster since 1985. Orleans selectmen in January voted not to renew their agreement with Eastham and Brewster to run the plant, giving notice that the plant will shut down when the intermunicipal agreement between the three towns expires in May 2015. The town of Orleans has plans to erect a wastewater treatment facility on the site. John Kelly, Orleans Town Administrator, outlined the reasons for the selectmen's decision not to renew the agreement. The selectmen considered both financial and regulatory factors in making their decision, he said, noting that the plant, while breaking even, has minimal cash reserves on hand, about $150,000, and cannot maintain or upgrade the plant in the long run. On the regulatory side, the plant's groundwater discharge permit with the Department of Environmental Protection expires in December 2016, the plant has no nitrogen removal equipment in place and "it is highly unlikely a renewal permit will be issued that does not require significant nitrogen removal capacity," Kelly said. There is also the problem that the plant site is a habitat for the threatened species the Eastern box turtle and the potential reuse of the site may be limited to the footprint of the existing site. Aimee Eckman, chairman of the Eastham board of selectmen, who attended along with colleagues John Knight and Martin McDonald, wondered if the plant would be closed May 30, 2015. "Obviously, there will be a need for lead time," Kelly said. "I thought if we started sooner, rather than later, that would give us some time to be as flexible as we need to at that stage." Orleans Selectmen Sims McGrath said the May 30, 2015 date was not a date that the Orleans selectmen picked when they took their vote in January. Rather, it is the date specified in the intermunicipal agreement. Kelly said it was possible the plant could be out of operation before then. "We are one main break away from not being able to open," he said "Something could happen next week, and with no cash to fix it, the doors would close." Eckman noted there was mention in previous minutes that Eastham and Brewster are not interested in regionalization. "That is not correct, she said. "We definitely are interested in regionalization. We have no place in our town to put any wastewater plant. We would like to have some capacity in your new facility."

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apr27 Provincetown

WOMR: Poets Corner with Joe Gouveia - Tribute to Boston




apr27 Orleans

Art show open in Orleans

The Orleans Cultural Council announces the opening of the 2013 Biennial M.F. Dole Open Art Show featuring 76 original works of artists from 13 towns. This will be the first M.F. Dole exhibit fostering collaboration between three Orleans town entities: Orleans Community Partnership, Orleans Cultural Council, and Snow Library. This show will also be the first to be exhibited at two locations simultaneously, the Old Firehouse Gallery and Snow Library. All pieces will be shown at the new Firehouse Gallery at 44 Main St. in Orleans until April 30. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. or by appointment. On May 1, the art works will become two newly curated shows. One continuing at the Firehouse Gallery and the other displayed at the Snow Library Craine Gallery. Viewing hours there will follow the library schedule. "Viewing such a large group of artwork, I was struck by the diversity of mediums. Well represented all around, this exhibition shows the work of many artists with strength, creativity, and knowledge of their chosen medium. Subject matter aside, each artist presented themselves with confidence in their ability to create art," said Michael Giaquinto, exhibit curator for Cape Cod Museum of Art, juror of this exhibit. The public is invited by the Orleans Cultural Council to tour the galleries Saturday, May 11, from 1 to 4 p.m. Beginning at Snow Library, Bart Weisman Smooth Jazz Group performs from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Craine Gallery. Artist awards will be presented from 2 to 3 p.m. including artist talks and refreshments. The reception then moves to the Firehouse Gallery at 3 p.m. continuing with awards, artist talks and light refreshments. Margaret Fernald Dole was an accomplished artist who spent summers painting at her family home in Orleans. Upon her death, her family established a memorial fund in her name to use for exhibitions of art in Orleans. Sponsored by the Orleans Cultural Council, this exhibit is funded by the M.F. Dole Fund and by an anonymous grant to help the Orleans Cultural Council promote the arts in Orleans The cultural council is seeking volunteers to help extend the exhibit hours at the Firehouse Gallery; call Dole Show coordinator JoAnna Keeley at 508-255-1367.


apr27 Brewster

Brewster Bird items available

This year's Brewster for the Holidays 2013 limited edition ornament, which is being unveiled at this weekend's Brewster in Bloom Festival, features a pair of cardinals alongside one of Brewster's beautiful ponds. The ornament is the creation of Brewster artist MaryLou Foley. This year's raffle is a beautiful birdhouse aptly named "Brewster Flats" which is valued at $425 and donated by the HandCraft House. The ornaments are $15 each and raffle tickets for the birdhouse are $2 each or 3 for $5. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of the ornaments and raffle will be donated to the Cape Cod Children's Place. MaryLou Foley will be at the festival signing the scrimshaw style ornament throughout the weekend. The ornament is the second in a nature series. The limited edition ornaments are personally signed and numbered by the artist that created them and have become highly collectible. The Brewster Flats birdhouse is made of yellow cypress and features a verdigris copper roof with a cast iron spire that is removable for quick clean-out. The eight separate compartments with 1 ½" holes will entice a variety of birds. The ornaments and raffle tickets will be available at the Brewster in Bloom arts and crafts fair as well as at several venues throughout town. A listing of venues that will be selling the ornament this year is available at www.brewsterfortheholidays.org.


apr27 Brewster

GUEST COMMENTARY: Finally, a good Brewster dog park plan

Thanks to a generous gift, Brewster has the opportunity to establish a well-designed dog park. In 1979, Brewster resident Mariette Arthur donated 15 acres of land to the Town. She could have sold it or donated it with a mandate that it never be altered. But she didn't. In her gift to Brewster, Mrs. Arthur directed the property be controlled by Brewster's Conservation Commission and used "to meet the recreational needs of the Town." Some town officials and residents searched for an alternate location and this Spring their research finally paid off. A group of residents, working with Brewster's Natural Resources Department, analyzed the property donated by Mrs. Arthur and conducted extensive research on dog parks. They concluded the location would provide Brewster with an ideal dog park and they presented a proposal to Brewster's Conservation Commission in March. This park proposal respects Brewster taxpayers. Fencing, water stations, and other park amenities would be purchased only with private funding. Brewster's Town Counsel has cleared the proposed plan and has received support from the Brewster Board of Health and Housing Authority. The Arthur property lies just south of the Brewster Council on Aging building on Route 6A. It's bounded by Brewster Road to the west and Route 137 to the north. The park planners were considerate of abutters. The recommended placement of the dog recreation areas is as far as possible from private homes. This is aligned with guidance in the Environmental Handbook for Massachusetts Conservation Commissioners about dog parks on conservation lands. There would be several hundred feet of thickly wooded buffer between the fenced areas and private homes if built as proposed. In sparse Winter woods, only one nearby home is visible from the proposed park area. The closest abutters are two public housing complexes and a number of residents (both dog-owners and non-dog owners) are enthusiastic about the plan.

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apr27 Harwich

Harwich police: Driver accused of 3rd OUI

A Watertown woman was arrested on her third charge of drunken driving Thursday night after police said she drove her SUV over a rotary curb. Susan Pekcok, 48, was charged with operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (third offense), having an open container of alcohol and driving to endanger. Around 6:30 p.m., police found that Pekcok's SUV had struck a granite curb at the Queen Anne Road and Route 39 rotary, according to Harwich police Officer Aram Goshgarian. A handful of calls reporting erratic operation and describing a vehicle matching Pekcok's were placed to state police before her arrest, Goshgarian said. She pleaded not guilty at her arraignment Friday in Orleans District Court and is scheduled to return for a pretrial hearing June 13.






Friday, April 26, 2013

apr26 Wellfleet

Ira Wood on WOMR: Thoughts on Town Meeting

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



apr26 Wellfleet

What's in Store for Wellfleet's Cahoon Hollow Beach?

Erosion from below has cut away the face of the dune, creating a sheer drop. Town officials are trying to figure out how to handle this situation. Todd E. LeBart owns the Beachcomber. He writes "[the Town's initial plan was] to 'cut back' by about 1/2 of the parking lot at Cahoon Hollow Beach. The remainder would be used for free parking with no supervision from the Town. Here is the latest info, from the Town Administrator: "On Tuesday Dennis Murphy, Mark Vincent, Paul Lindberg, Suzanne Grout Thomas and I met with Todd LeBart's engineer (Bob Perry) and his general manager to review the plans to repair the Cahoon Hollow Lot. Todd's engineer agrees that Mark's plan is reasonable and understands that it may be modified as the work progresses. Work is scheduled to begin sometime in the next 10 -12 days. It looks like Cahoon Hollow will be less severely impacted than previously thought although there will be some reduction in parking. We will know exactly once the work is done. While this season's repair does not look too bad, future years become problematic as Mark's supply of fill material is being exhausted so repairs in future years will increase sharply in price and will result in progressively smaller parking lots. Suzanne will determine how best to use the lot once the work is finished."

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apr26 Eastham-Nauset

Fundraiser Saturday for Nauset grads' cruise ship send-off

Faced with the challenge of providing newly minted graduates with a meaningful, exciting and memorable celebration while at the same time keeping them safe, Nauset Regional High School parents, assisted by teachers, seized upon an innovative solution some 17 years ago. Although the idea of a party for teens designed and orchestrated by a group of well-meaning adults was initially met with a great deal of skepticism by the target celebrants, over the years "Project Graduation" has really taken hold as the unifying post-commencement event. This year, on June 9, shortly following graduation ceremonies for the class of 2013, some 180 young people will be bused to Boston to embark on an Odyssey Cruises ship for a well-chaperoned all-night cruise around Boston Harbor. (By universal agreement, no parents may take part in the actual cruise; oversight duties stay in the realm of teachers who volunteer for the honor and the security personnel provided by the host, Boston Harbor Cruises.) From roughly 11 p.m. until 3 a.m. classmates will enjoy a continuing sequence of dining, music, entertainment and activities in what might prove to be their last time together as a group before they head off for the next stages of their lives. As Katy Kmiec, Wellfleet resident and mother of NRHS senior Kayla Crosby, explains, "This Project Graduation is completely run by parents. I became involved because keeping our kids safe and alcohol free is very important. It may be just one night, but it is a very important night. If we didn't provide an event like this the kids would be out partying somewhere." Although the event is for NRHS students, it is not an official school event and does not receive school funding. This year to cover costs parents must raise $15,000. To achieve this goal, they are staging their main fund-raising event - a live auction on Saturday, April 27, at Nauset Middle School in Orleans. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. so folks can peruse the auction bounty. The auction proper will start at 6:30 p.m., with Bill Fidalgo as auctioneer. There also will be a 50/50 raffle, brown bag raffles and a "choice of lot" raffle during the course of the event. Parents and students will help run the auction. Over the years various local business and community groups have generously donated goods for this important fund-raising event, and the Capt. Linnell House additionally hosts a separate dinner from which 90 percent of the proceeds support the cruise.

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apr26 Eastham-Nauset

Warriors end drought, continue hot start

Breaking a three-year drought against their top rival, the Nauset baseball team continued their torrid start to the season, defeating Dennis-Yarmouth 7-2 recently to run their overall record to 7-1 this year. "It was a great overall effort, especially a league road game, to be able to come out and play well is huge for us; these guys were really up for it," said third year Nauset coach Lou Elia. Starter Ray Rowell was sharp early, allowing only one run through five innings while the Nauset offense kept up their hot hitting. In the fourth, with the game tied at one, Colin Ridley drove in a pair of runs with a key two-out hit up the middle. Freshman right fielder Kino Gray followed with another two-out, RBI single to give the Warriors a 4-1 lead. In the top of the fifth, the Warriors kept up the pressure, scoring a run on a Nick Taber sacrifice fly, followed by a two-run double by Colin Mason to shut the door on the Dolphins. The Warriors defeated Sandwich 12-1 on Monday, after a double-header sweep of Whittier Tech last Saturday. Nauset will play D-Y two more times this season, including the Atlantic Coast League Showdown at the end of the regular season. The Warriors are on their way to back-to-back tournament appearances after winning their way into the Div. 2 South quarterfinals last year after a dramatic win over Falmouth in the first round.

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apr26 Eastham-Orleans

Red tide shuts down Nauset shellfishing

All of the Nauset estuary system, including Nauset Harbor and Town Cove in Eastham and Orleans, has been closed to shellfishing for all species because of elevated levels of red tide toxins in the meat of sampled shellfish. The order from the state Division of Marine Fisheries went into effect Thursday morning. Red tide algae bloom in the cool waters of the spring, fed by nutrients in the water column as well by as the increasing sunlight offered by the lengthening day. Shellfish such as mussels and clams filter-feed on these algae, which contain a toxin that can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning, a potentially fatal condition that affects the lungs and respiratory system. The toxin continues to accumulate in the tissues of the shellfish until the algae bloom is over. Shellfish can then purge themselves of the toxin by metabolizing it into harmless components and they then are deemed safe to eat. Generally, red tide closures are driven by algae blooms that drift down from Maine, which has a large red tide algae population that survives the winter in cyst fields on the bottom of inshore waters. The Nauset estuary system generally closes well before the rest of the state because it also has cyst fields that hatch new algae in the spring when environmental conditions are right.


apr26 Truro

It's almost time to tour Cape Cod (Highland) Lighthouse in Truro

To this day, the Cape's maritime history reflects in the beacons of the many lighthouses that still mark our shores. For centuries, lighthouses and the keepers within helped keep ship captains and crews safe as they navigated Cape Cod's often treacherous waters. Nestled in the highlands of Truro, Cape Cod's oldest lighthouse (1857) is a major attraction for visitors. Since 1797, there has been steady erosion at the cliffs in front of the lighthouse. In 1990, Truro residents raised funds locally and internationally, and in July 1996, the lighthouse was moved to its present location. The 430-ton lighthouse, lubricated with Ivory Soap, was pushed 453 feet to a safer location, to the tune of a $1.54 million dollar cost. Maintained by the United States Coast Guard, Highland Lighthouse continues to help ships navigate. Highland Lighthouse is open to the public from mid-May to mid-October, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and group discounts are available. Off-season tour hours are by appointment, on a donation basis. Gift shop hours are 10 to 6, and there is a $4 admission to climb the lighthouse. Requirements: Children need to be 48 inches tall to climb. Some limited handicap parking is available. If you're not up to climbing, you can view a free 10-minute video tour of the lighthouse history, including the moving of the lighthouse in time lapse photography and the re-lighting of the light. Cape Cod Highland Lighthouse, Highland Light Road, North Truro, 508-487-1121. See the lighthouse on Google Maps here.


apr26 Truro

The Local Food Report by Elspeth Hay: Local Ferns a Tasty Addition to Your Table

Elspeth Hay is an avid locavore who lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30am on Morning Edition and Thursdays at 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30am.




Under a canopy of tall hardwoods in Truro, there grows a small forest of Cinnamon ferns. On the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay harvests these edible local greens - a springtime ritual - with forager Charlie Grimm.



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apr26 Provincetown

Provincetown selectmen allow amnesty period for shellfish grant applicants

Five fishermen were likely as happy as clams after being the first to receive an acre each of Provincetown's Aquaculture Development Area Monday. Selectmen unanimously approved grants for Selectman John "Grassy" Santos, Rocco Paccione, Jesse Cartwright, Daniel Andresen and Stephen Busa. Shellfish Constable Tony Jackett said they could receive a second acre if they like after working the grant for a year, if there is room. Provincetown regulations stipulate that residents can only apply for a grant between Nov. 15 and Dec. 15, Jackett said, and worried that some people didn't know there was a "window to apply" because the ADA did not receive its Army Corps of Engineers permit until late January. There were those who were disappointed to miss the deadline, he said. "This is only for the ADA area, not for the tidal flats that we're asking for this amnesty period," Jackett said, adding that the amnesty application period should run from May to June. After that, applications will not be accepted until the usual time period rolls around. "I encouraged them to apply and said that we would bring them before our committee," he said. Provincetown's ADA is a 25-acre area about a half-mile off shore that has been designated for shellfish farming. There is an additional 25 contiguous acres in Truro, 11 acres of which have already been farmed out to four Truro fishermen. While the state Dept. of Marine Fisheries worries that endangered North Atlantic right whales and leatherback turtles will become entangled in the vertical lines of the floating cage systems used on the Truro grants, all but one of the Provincetown fishermen plan to grow shellfish on the ocean floor. "Most of them are going to be bottom culture," Jackett said, adding that Santos, who has been working a shellfish grant on the West End for five years, plans to use floating gear. However, the Coast Guard has given an order of condition for the permit "based on proposed activity" that strobe lights mark the grant area, Jackett said, and he is looking to see if he can simply place one on each end. The grants were approved, by the board of selectmen, as was the May-to-June application amnesty period, in a 4-0-1 vote. Selectman Santos recused himself.


apr26 Provincetown

Everything old is (brand spanking) new again at the Provincetown Theater

Spring cleaning is often one of those things put off until the buds, birds and blue skies are back and it's too late to get much accomplished. Not so for the hardworking volunteers at The Provincetown Theater. Nearly every weekend since the first of the year, they've thrown a series of "pizza-and-cleaning," "pizza-and-purging" or "pizza-and-painting" parties and the results over at 238 Bradford St. are impressive. The theater, converted nearly 10 years ago from a car repair shop and having suffered scuffs, scratches and piles of props over that ensuing decade of productions, is now looking like its old self again. In fact, it's looking better than its old self. In the lobby, after board member Ron Robin brought in a design consultant, volunteers have stripped the dark paint off the walls and floor. They've spread a brighter shade on the walls and polished the floors, which now seem as smooth and as sprung as a dance studio. They've slipped the bar into a neat corner so tables and chairs fit into a café-style set-up, moved the grand piano to the side and rearranged the comfy sofas and armchairs into more intimate areas. It's a great, fresh space for readings, small concerts, salons and other events. In the box office, fresh order and new equipment greet theatergoers. Backstage, prop rooms, dressing rooms and storage spaces have been cleared out and renovated. "The small office at the foot of the stairs had become a catch-all for everything. It was crazy," says board member Margaret Van Sant. "In that poor little room were layers of shows - Gold Dust Orphans' puppets. Puppets from 'Cirque de Sea.' Layers upon layers of puppets and 10 years of debris." In the auditorium, the seating arrangement has been restored to its original configuration, which also allows for a larger audience, better sightlines and at least three times as many universally accessible seats.

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apr26 Provincetown

Poet-novelist serves up night of whodunit dinner drama in Provincetown

Provincetown writer Jeannette de Beauvoir has several projects underway this spring. The award-winning North Truro playwright, novelist and poet's most immediate endeavor, "Murder Most Academic," a participatory murder mystery dinner theater, comes with a four-course dinner Sunday evening at the Hot L Bar and Grille. Even the menu is creatively titled. Dishes such as Medicated Mushrooms, Sinful Salad, Interrogated Salmon and Death by Chocolate are among the many choices. For those who haven't experienced this kind of drama, "[Participatory] dinner theater is different from regular theater," de Beauvoir explains, "because the actors know who they are and what will happen in each scene, but from there, they improvise." Audience members begin the evening sitting at the Hot L's bar along with the actors, who include Heather Baker, Pat Medina, Justine Alten, Daniel Portillo, Dianne Kopser, Kevin Doherty, Paul Halley and Terry Rozo. "The performers will be talking with people and, at first, the attendees won't know who is an actor and who is a patron," de Beauvoir says. After the audience has enjoyed a drink and hors d'oeuvres at the bar, they will be escorted into the next room to dine and view a staged college awards ceremony.

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apr26 Provincetown

WOMR: Outer Cape News for April 26, 2013




apr26 Provincetown

WOMR: Arts Week with Jeannette de Beauvoir - Interview with Braunwyn Jackett and Suni Pope




apr26 Provincetown

Noise complaints plague Provincetown affordable housing complex

Some folks who won the lottery aren't feeling so lucky these days. That's because some residents of Province Landing - a much sought-after 50-unit affordable housing development on Shank Painter Road, whose residents were chosen by a pick of the draw - have serious noise complaints. Ron Wheeler dreamed of living in Provincetown when he moved to the Cape from New York City back in 1997. But, with furniture in tow, the only apartment he could afford in which he could fit all of his stuff was in Harwich. When that rental ended, he moved to a basement apartment in Wellfleet for a decade - until he got a call that he was next on the list for an affordable apartment in Province Landing. "I was a really lucky guy to get this, I thought," he said Sunday, standing in his spacious one-bedroom apartment. "I never [imagined] that I'd be chosen in the lottery." When he went to look at the apartment he specifically asked about noise, he said, and was told that a family with children would be living upstairs from him. Wheeler chose the slightly smaller apartment across the hall where a single man, whom he assumed was older, maybe his age, would be living. "But it turns out to be this young kid," Wheeler said. "He's like 6 foot 9 inches and lives up there." It's not about partying, Wheeler said. He couldn't hear conversations or the television through the floor, but the "reverberations" of heavy steps were thunderous. Resident Tom Bifani said he, too, has problems with noise in a similar apartment. In fact, there's even a one-bedroom-first-floor-apartment group that meets about the noise problem, he said. While Province Landing was meant to be a nice development with energy-efficient appliances and windows, Bifani said, he now wonders whether the project was "short-changed" by builders or suppliers. After many complaints, Bifani said, the developer, The Community Builders (TCB), which also manages the property, sent sound engineers to take note of the noise level between floors and, indeed, found "there are sound issues going on with the buildings." A third inhabitant, who wished to remain anonymous, said that he receives bangs against the wall to let him know that he should turn down the television. Some residents have complained about headaches, he said, and health problems.

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apr26 Orleans

Afternoon of poetry at Snow Library

The Friends of Snow Library will be sponsoring an afternoon program of poetry featuring noted poets Peter Saunders and Tim Joyce Saturday, April 27, at 2 p.m. in the Craine Gallery at Snow Library. Saunders, who has published several books and whose latest work, an anthology titled, "Silent No More," is a frequent presenter at the Friends Lifetime Learning Program, holds workshops at the Academy of Lifelong Learning at Cape Cod Community College, attends Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill and the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center each summer and is frequently invited to do tapings on WOMR-FM's Poetry Corner. Joyce, a former teacher at Nauset Regional High School and now a facilitator with the Access Program, has been instrumental in fostering young poets through the "Other Voices" poetry series and has recently published a new collection of poetry, "Stone Mad." Admission is free. Seating is on a first come, first serve basis.


apr26 Brewster

Brewster principal promoted to Nauset post

In one night, Brewster lost a school committee member and a school principal, but the Nauset Regional School District gained a new assistant superintendent. Keith Gauley, principal of Eddy Elementary School, was selected Wednesday at the Nauset joint school committee meeting as the new assistant superintendent for the Nauset district. His position, which begins July 1, gives him a raise from $117,846 as principal to $128,532 as assistant superintendent, said Nauset Superintendent Richard Hoffmann. Gauley was one of three candidates for the assistant school chief in the Nauset district that includes Wellfleet, Eastham, Orleans and Brewster. Jennifer Rabold, another candidate, served as a member of the Brewster School Committee until Wednesday night when she formally resigned in order to be interviewed for the assistant superintendent's job. Hoffmann said when Rabold first approached him about applying, he checked state law and found that school committee members can apply for school jobs, but they cannot serve on a school board once they are an employee. Later, Hoffmann said, he found there was a local policy from 1979 stating a school committee member must resign before seeking employment. Rabold, whose husband, Daniel, serves as chairman of the Brewster Board of Selectman, said neither she nor Hoffmann knew there was a local policy. But she resigned her school committee post when they found out. "I have my superintendent certification and I'm almost done with my doctoral dissertation, so I am qualified," Rabold said. "But frankly, because it would have been my first administration job, I knew it was a long shot. I'm just very grateful for the opportunity to be interviewed." Hoffmann said only three candidates - Rabold, Amy Roberts, who is a Nauset Middle School teacher, and Gauley - applied for the job to replace current Assistant Superintendent Bonny Gifford. She was hired last month as superintendent of Falmouth schools. Gauley has been principal of Eddy Elementary School since 2007. He was a principal in Abington and Cohasset from 1998 to 2007, Hoffmann said.

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apr26 Brewster

WOMR: This Place Matters with Susan Lindquist of the CDP - Interview with Kyle Hinkle of the Brewster Chamber of Commerce




apr26 Brewster

Brewster author takes pen name for Ben Franklin novel

Fans of Brewster author Sally Gunning might be surprised to see a new name on the cover of her latest historical novel, "Benjamin Franklin's Bastard." But rest assured that Sally Cabot is indeed Sally Gunning, and her latest offering is just as satisfying as her other novels and quite a page turner. The story line is deeply compelling and the characters are so richly drawn they feel like flesh and blood on the page. But why change her name, when she has had such success with her three previous historical novels? The idea came from her new agent Kris Dahl at International Creative Management. Dahl pointed out that Gunning has written 13 novels set on Cape Cod with series characters and that this new book is neither of those things. It's a stand-alone novel set mostly in Philadelphia. "You want old readers to know that this is something different, but you want new readers who might not have been interested in the Cape books to come along for the ride," Gunning says. "Cabot is actually a combination of my mother's and my father's names: Carlson and Abbott. I really liked that very much because my grandmother Abbott was a writer and she was the most excited person on Earth when I sold my first book. So I just felt like it brought it around full circle." At the center of "Benjamin Franklin's Bastard" is William Franklin, who was born to an unknown woman, but reluctantly raised by Franklin's common law wife, Deborah. The novel focuses on both Deborah and William, who are real historical figures, and the fictional character Anne, the poor young waitress that Franklin impregnates who later goes on to become a prostitute. "To write for me is to explore an area that I don't think has been explored and I felt the psychology of these three people, these two women and the son had really not been explored," Gunning says. "So I set out to explore them. I didn't really plan on Benjamin Franklin being a huge focus in the story, but as I got into the minds of these three people I realized that he is the focus of these three people. It started to evolve into this thing where here you have this sun in the sky, which is Benjamin Franklin, and these three planets revolving around him and each one is closer or more distant to the sun."

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apr26 Brewster

Tracy Grammer show in Brewster

Tracy Grammer, who partnered with the late Dave Carter, for many years, will be singing at the Brewster Meeting House Saturday April 27. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. and the concert is at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance until April 26, at 508-487-2619 or online at www.womr.org. They are also available at the Brewster Book Store in Brewster and Main Street Books in Orleans. The price is $20 at the door. The concert benefits Brewster FLATS (Friends of Land Acquisition, Trails and Shellfish) and WOMR radio.


apr26 Brewster

Marge Piercy to read poetry in Brewster

Marge Piercy will perform a reading of her poetry at the Brewster Meeting House during April, National Poetry Month. The author of 18 volumes of poetry will read Friday, April 26 at 7:30 p.m. in the First Parish Brewster sanctuary, 1969 Main St., Brewster. Piercy will be also be conducting a poetry workshop on Saturday, April 27, in Brewster. Details for the reading and workshop as well as the purchase of tickets ($15 online and in cash at the door) can be found


apr26 Brewster

The Herring are running at Stony Brook in Brewster

The herring are back at Stony Brook - and so are the gulls and people.




apr26 Brewster

GUEST COMMENTARY: Ocean Edge addresses plan 'misinformation'

Albert Einstein once mused, "If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts." The facts as they relate to Blueberry Pond in Brewster, a bucolic 22-acre state pond south of Route 6A, west of Nickerson State Park and adjacent to Ocean Edge, are a matter of record, but in the spin of public vetting of an Ocean Edge proposal for two seasonal docks, the facts have given way to hyperbole, and have been taken out of context. As the largest taxpayer and employer in the Town of Brewster, Ocean Edge is a proud member of the community, and fully shares the interests of neighbors in protecting this magnificent pond and the town's extraordinary natural resources. For many years, Ocean Edge has contributed generously to conservation causes and community programs, for example at Nauset schools, Latham Centers for children and adults with special needs, Brewster Ladies' Library, the Town of Brewster Recreation Department (by sponsoring the annual Town Easter Egg Hunt, Breakfast with Santa and Halloween Haunted House); Town of Brewster Department of Natural Resources FLATS, the Brewster Whitecaps, the Brewster Conservation Trust, Brewster for the Holidays, Brewster in Bloom, and other community groups. Our success at Ocean Edge is imbedded in the fabric of Brewster and respect for its remarkable beauty. For the record, Ocean Edge owns a third of the Blueberry Pond shoreline, and at present does not have a beach, dock or any managed access way to the pond that all property owners around the pond enjoy by right.

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apr26 Brewster

Brewster Cleans Up

Brewster celebrated Earth Day Saturday, April 20, with Beautify Brewster Day. The town wide event had 17 town leaders and more than 100 volunteers cleaning up streets, the bike path, parks, and school grounds. In spite of the pouring rain Saturday morning the seventeen groups collected 1,415 pounds of trash and 880 pounds of recyclable materials. Volunteers ranged in age from first graders to retirees, from town employees to girl and boy scouts. Local businesses supported the clean-up with donations: True Value Hardware in Brewster with bags and gloves and the following with donations of delicious food for the volunteer lunch celebration after the clean-up: Brewster Pizza, Ferretti's, Laurino's, Local Flavor, Ocean Edge, Stop and Shop, Shaw's, and Trader Joe's. The effort of these volunteers is visible as one drives around the Town.


apr26 Chatham

Major donors in Chatham help Cape Cod Healthcare grow

At 9,000 square feet, the Oppenheim Medical Building in West Chatham will provide patients of Cape Cod Healthcare with services ranging from primary care to physical therapy to laboratory services. "Given the demographics in Chatham, this place will be so busy," said David Oppenheim, 64, who, with his wife, Gail, provided major financial support for the project. The $2.6 million facility, which opened April 16, comes on the heels of Cape Cod Healthcare's expansion into urgent care services at the Stoneman Outpatient Center in Sandwich earlier this month and the company's plans to double the size of the emergency department at Cape Cod Hospital at a cost of $20 million. The improvements are arriving at a time when the parent company of Cape Cod and Falmouth hospitals is facing the loss of millions of dollars in federal funds because of national budget issues and changes in Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. Hospital officials and analysts say the new construction is necessary to upgrade aging buildings and take patient care into the community. And it's been possible through millions of dollars in philanthropic support to open new medical centers inside and outside its hospitals in recent years.

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apr26 Chatham

Talk on naturopathic medicine at Chatham UU church

Dr. Joyce Young will present a talk on Naturopathic Medicine at the Unitarian Universalist Meeting House, 819 Main St., Chatham Sunday, April 28, at 2 p.m. The talk is free. Young will address naturopathic medicine's basic premise that the body can heal itself if given the chance. Young is a Board Certified Naturopathic Doctor with a doctorate in Naturopathic Medicine from the College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Ore. She is also a Board Certified Lactation Consultant and is earning a Master's in Oriental Medicine. She has degrees in biology from the University of Illinois and botany from University of Massachusetts. The talk is part of the Meeting House's Learning for Life series.


apr26 Chatham

Can Chatham's Route 28 have a conference center?

An analysis of Route 28's development potential will be presented Thursday, May 2 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the community center. The public workshop is sponsored by the town and will center on the Cape Cod Commission's analysis of current town regulations governing land use and development along the state highway from the Harwich line to Crowell Road. The focus of the workshop is a build-out analysis that estimates future development. The commission is in the midst of a study to identify potential opportunities to enhance or change development patterns along the Route 28 corridor. There is more information on the town's website. This will be the first of three planned workshops.


apr26 Harwich

Harwich police warn of Medicare card phone scam

Police are alerting residents of a phone scam and telling the public not to give out personal or financial information to strangers. The caller is telling residents he will send a new Medicare card to them, asking for Social Security, bank account and bank routing numbers, according to a statement from Harwich police Sgt. David Jacek. At least four residents have called the police station in the last week to report the scam, Jacek said. One woman had to cancel some of her bank accounts after giving information to the suspected con artist, Jacek said. "Fortunately the others did not," he said. Jacek thinks the scam - which intentionally targets the Cape's older population - has spread. "If it's in our town, it's in other towns," he said.


apr26

Where to vote in Tuesday's election

WELLFLEET
Wellfleet Senior Center, 715 Old King's Highway


EASTHAM
Eastham Town Hall, Route 6


TRURO
Truro Community Center, 7 Standish Way (Library Lane)


PROVINCETOWN
Provincetown Town Hall, 260 Commercial St.


ORLEANS
Council on Aging, 150 Rock Harbor Road


BREWSTER
Brewster Baptist Church, Route 6A


CHATHAM
Chatham Community Center, 702 Main St.


HARWICH
Harwich Community Center, 100 Oak St.






Thursday, April 25, 2013

apr25 Wellfleet

Familiar faces vie for Wellfleet town moderator post

Voters will decide at the annual election Tuesday who should preside over town meetings for the next year: incumbent Bruce Bierhans, an attorney, or former Moderator Daniel Silverman. The town moderator, who holds the position for one year, oversees town meetings and also appoints members of the finance committee, the social/human services committee, the bylaw review committee and two members of the Cape Cod Regional Technical High School Committee. Silverman, 65, served as town moderator from 1999 to 2006, when he gave up the position to become the town's fire chief. He retired from that position earlier this year. Silverman said he loves and respects town meeting as an institution, one that is unique to New England and allows citizens to directly participate in democracy. He wants to get more people to attend, with services such as free child care. "It's older than the United States," Silverman said. "It was the first way that Colonists governed themselves." One of his main goals as moderator, he said, would be to ensure that people feel comfortable speaking up. Typically there are a few dozen people who regularly speak at town meeting, he said, but once in a while someone who doesn't typically go to the microphone will stand up and make an important point. "You can watch the meeting get swayed," he said. He admires what his immediate predecessors have done to make town meeting a place where no one is berated and people are encouraged to talk about issues. Silverman, a woodworker, moved to town as a carpenter in 1972. He joined the fire department in 1982, and has served on a handful of town committees. He is strongly in favor of citizens giving their opinions on the larger issues of the day, such as nuclear energy and war. Bierhans, 58, has roots in the community that go back to his teens when he performed at a theater in Eastham. Performance skills help when it comes to being a town moderator, he said. He also brings skills in parliamentary procedure and a desire to make the meetings both productive and enjoyable, he said. "Hey, I'm learning," Bierhans, who was first elected in 2011, said. "It does take years to become a good and effective moderator." He left the Cape after graduating from high school. He went to law school, worked as a senior aide for a state senator and worked as a trial lawyer in the Boston area. He and his wife decided to live full time in Wellfleet in 2000. He has recently given up his role as head of the board of directors of Outer Cape Health Services. He is now president of Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater and co-chairs that board of directors. He's also on the board of Wellfleet Preservation Hall.


apr25 Wellfleet

Wellfleet voters say yes to Tasers, Baker's Field bathrooms and charter changes

Town Meeting opened Monday with all on their feet as the Nauset Regional High School Honors Chorus sang the Star Spangled Banner with professional aplomb to loud applause. Moderator Bruce Bierhans explained he arranged on short notice for the award-winning chorus to perform not only at the opening, but several songs as townspeople made their way to their seats. It was not to be the only entertainment of the night. The meeting ended a few minutes short of 11 p.m., with all 44 articles acted on. Among the highlights, voters approved Tasers for the police, agreed to make the town clerk-treasurer and tax collector positions appointed, not elected, approved public toilets at Baker's Field, rejected the moratorium on medical marijuana facilities and amended the zoning to allow for a large scale solar photovoltaic installation on land at the transfer station. Voters quickly approved the $18,147,845 operating budget in article 1, then started picking apart the $2,504,514 capital budget in article 3, focusing on the $10,000 in the police budget earmarked for Tasers. Dawn Rickman, town clerk-treasurer for 30 years, said this was the first time she ever got up to speak about an article. She urged voters to approve article 7, the charter change to make her positions and that of the tax collector appointed, rather than elected. When she was first elected, it was a "popularity contest," she said. The town was much smaller, there were fewer employees, and the town had no computers. "Tax bills were produced on the relics we used to call typewriters," she said. The jobs have become much more complex and now "require extensive education and training." If the positions were appointed, criminal and credit checks would be done on applicants, which is not done now with elected officials. Nancy Vail, assessor, said she liked the idea of these positions remaining elected. "I appreciate that there are two people who are employees of the town who are accountable only to the electorate," and she noted that both Rickman and the tax collector, Marianne Nickerson, did not have specialized training for the jobs. "Those jobs can be learned," she said. Voters agreed with Ramone Rustica, who worked as a tax collector before he moved to Wellfleet, that this is "a very complicated job today and should go to the most qualified people. You want the best people doing the best job and hopefully keeping our taxes down." Voters were generous when it came to approving a new fire truck for $250,000 and a new bathhouse for Baker's Field at $324,000. Fire Chief Richard Pauley said the new tanker would replace one that is 26 years old.

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apr25 Wellfleet

On this day in 1874: Cape Cod's radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi born

Radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi was an electrical engineer and inventor born in Bologna, Italy on this day, April 25, 1874. At the age of 16, he successfully transmitted wireless telegraph signals between tin plates mounted on posts in his mother's garden. Marconi gradually increased the distance between radio transmitter and receiver. At the age of 23, he couldn't convince the Italian government of the worth of radio. He and his mother traveled to England and demonstrated his invention by sending a signal across the English Channel on March 27, 1899. In 1900, Marconi set up a high-powered transmitting station at Poldhu, on the English coast at Cornwall. In 1901, Marconi built a wireless station at Signal Hill, Newfoundland and on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Marconi selected Cape Cod since it had been described by Thoreau as a place "Where a man may stand and put all of America behind him." After passing up a location in Barnstable and being denied permission to build his wireless station near the Highland Light, Marconi settled for an eight-acre site on a high bluff in South Wellfleet. Marconi set up headquarters at the Holbrook House in Wellfleet. The South Wellfleet station was similar to the Poldhu one with a circular series of twenty 200-foot ship's masts set back 165 feet from the edge of the bluff. Storms blew down the aerials at Poldhu on September 17, 1901 and a Nor'easter toppled the aerials on Cape Cod on November 25th. Nevertheless, Marconi received the first transatlantic signal - the three-dot Morse code letter "S" tapped out from Poldhu on December 12th at the Newfoundland station. The aerial at Poldhu was held aloft by a canvas kite. Fearing competition from Marconi's wireless, the Anglo American Cable Company ordered Marconi to shut down operations in Newfoundland. On December 22, 1901, the Canadian government offered him a location for a station at Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. A year later, on December 17, 1902, the Glace Bay station was sending and receiving transatlantic messages..

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apr25 Truro

Sun shines on Kane Farm in Truro

A black lamb, a ram named Patches and a busybody goose joined the small group of animals basking in the spring sunshine Tuesday morning at Tom Kane's farm, where life has taken on a decidedly brisker pace now that the longer days have arrived. There are seven new arrivals to tend to in the sheep's fold - including the aforementioned lamb, named "Inky" - as well as pigs to feed, hens to protect from marauding foxes and coyotes, and dozens of seedling sedums to care for in the hoop-house down at the bottom of the hill. "We'll start working 12-hour days now," said Kane, who welcomes the new season after "a hell of a winter." February's nor'easters blew branches through the plastic siding on his greenhouses and toppled an old locust tree at the farm on Hatch Road, leaving a substantial mess for Kane and his son Carter to clean up. Now that the brush has been carted away, Kane can focus on the other things that February delivered. "Inky" and her siblings and cousins were born at the end of that month, leading Kane to add night nurse to his list of duties. Inky's mother, an elderly ewe, had trouble nursing her newborn, so Kane has been rising in the wee hours every morning to bottle-feed the lamb. He uses a special formula that he mixes with water, "like you do with a baby," he said. Kane, who is in his 70s, inherited the farm from his father, who inherited it from his mother. "I was raised with animals," he said. "We had goats and chickens and rabbits. My grandmother made me go out and feed the animals every morning before I was allowed to eat, myself." He experimented with other careers - including cement work, roof work and hand-lining for cod 25 miles off Chatham while battling sharks and fog - before becoming an electrician and settling down on the farm. Now he is watching the fifth generation of Kanes take root on Hatch Road. He carved out a piece of land for his son to build a house on, and his grandchildren have become active participants in the day-to-day business of the farm. Granddaughter Sabrina gave "Patches" the ram his name. (Patches replaced Rex the ram, who replaced the late Bucky, son of Rambo, who was descended from Elwood III.)

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apr25 Provincetown

'Carnage' crackles, sizzles and seethes with ferocity & precision in Provincetown

Yasmina Reza's "God of Carnage" is not for the faint of heart or for people looking for an evening of breezy entertainment. Yes, the dialogue is snappy, fast-paced and laced with acerbic humor, but this dramatic comedy offers a visceral, no-holds-barred view of marriage and contemporary culture that will make you squirm at times. This fully realized production now on stage at The Provincetown Theater, which presented the play last fall as a staged reading, gives its cast of four (and their audience) a total emotional workout. The actors crackle, sizzle and seethe with anger, frustration and outright horror. Triggered by a relatively mundane schoolyard altercation between their children, all hell breaks loose when two couples meet and attempt to discuss the incident in order to settle upon a mutually agreeable solution. Think Freud's "Civilization and Its Discontents" updated to the 21st century. Think Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" in a contemporary living room. Playwright Reza certainly has a bleak view of human nature under stress.

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apr25 Orleans

Shark license plate campaign would help fund research program

The Atlantic White Shark Conservancy unveiled the design of a license plate Wednesday that could become the centerpiece of the organization's campaign to raise $25,000 to fund shark research. The Orleans-based nonprofit would funnel most of the money to the Massachusetts Shark Research Program led by Division of Marine Fisheries shark scientist Greg Skomal to pay for five trips to tag great white sharks and 10 acoustic tags. The group has until June 20 to recruit 1,500 people to commit to buying the new plate so that the state will manufacture them. "We're pushing to get those guys out on the water as soon as the sharks come back," said conservancy Director Cynthia Wigren. Since 2009, Skomal has documented the increasing numbers of great white sharks coming to prey upon the large seal colony on Monomoy Island. He's tagged more than 30 sharks in the past three years. The research has been paid for largely through private donations and some corporate funding, although the state pays the salaries for Skomal and assistant John Chisholm. Skomal was encouraged when Wigren, her friend Priscilla Bloomfield, and their husbands formed the nonprofit this past winter because it allows people to deduct donations to Skomal's work from their taxes, something they couldn't do when writing a check out to the state. Money for shark research is scarce, said Skomal. The state recently refused to pay $100,000 for Skomal's program that was part of a state challenge grant application from 11 Cape and Island towns. Those wishing to purchase the plate will pay $40 over the normal fees charged by the state Registry of Motor Vehicles. Initially, $28 of the $40 fee will go to the conservancy and $12 will go to the state to pay for manufacturing the plate. When the license plate is renewed two years later, the entire $40 will go to the conservancy. Some of the money from the license plate will go to summer camp scholarships for children at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History in Brewster and the Massachusetts Audubon Society's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. The group had a good indication of local interest when they held a fundraising event last week at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History. More than 100 people attended, with some coming from as far away as Rhode Island.

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apr25 Orleans

Cape Cod Five to sponsor Pops in the Park in Orleans

The Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank will be the new producer and official sponsor of the Pops in the Park concert in Orleans on Aug. 24, the Arts Foundation of Cape Cod has announced. This summertime tradition, formerly organized by the Orleans Chamber of Commerce, will celebrate its 24th anniversary this year and feature the Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Artistic Director and Conductor Jung-Ho Pak. The concert proceeds will support the Arts Foundation's mission to promote and support the arts and culture of Cape Cod.For further information or to purchase tickets, visit www.artsfoundation.org, call the Arts Foundation at 508-362-0066, or email info@artsfoundation.org.


apr25 Orleans

Orleans group to hold pre-town meeting on Saturday

The Orleans Taxpayers Association will sponsor its annual pre-town meeting from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Orleans Historical Society. The meeting will give residents an opportunity to ask about the town and education budgets before the annual town meeting May 13, according to a press release from the association. Panelists will include Town Administrator John Kelly, Selectman Jon Fuller, finance committee Chairwoman Gwen Holden Kelly, Nauset Regional School Committee member Brian Kavanaugh and Orleans Elementary School Committee member Joshua Stewart. Jeff Eagles of the Orleans Water Alliance also will be on the panel. Each will give a brief overview of the town or school budget. For more information, go to www.orleanstaxpayersassociation.org.


apr25 Orleans

Red Tides shuts Nauset Marsh

As happens every year around this time all of Nauset Estuary has been closed to shellfishing due to red tide. Also closed is Meeting House Pond, north of the floating docks at Meetinghouse Pond, north of a line drawn around the floating docks at Nauset Marine East. Lonnies Pond, from the launching ramp at the town landing to the Herring run, is open for family permits only. The entirety of Paw Wah Pond and the creek is closed for the taking of all shellfish. Quanset Pond and Little Quanset Pond to a depth of 3 feet as measured at low water are open to the taking of shellfish for family permits only. Pochet Creek, north of a line drawn from the "No Shellfishing" sign on Pochet Neck to the "No Shellfishing" sign on the opposite shore (Nauset Beach), is closed for the taking of all shellfish. The remainder of the Pochet Inlet area will be open. The Rock Harbor, Namskaket and Little Namskaket Creeks, inside of lines drawn across the mouth of each, are closed to the taking of shellfish. The entirety of the inter-tidal flats from Rock Harbor to Namskaket Creek, out to the low-water mark, are open for shellfishing.


apr25 Brewster

Sen. Warren to speak on Lower Cape in Brewster

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., will be the guest speaker at the Community Development Partnership's annual meeting May 1 at The Captains Golf Course. The meeting will be at 1 p.m. in the Back Nine Cafe. "This will be Sen. Warren's first official trip to the Lower Cape as our new senator, providing a great opportunity for CDP members, citizens, funders, business leaders and elected officials to hear her thoughts on affordable housing and economic development," said Jay Coburn, the partnership's executive director. The organization also will present its ninth annual Gwen Pelletier Award for Excellence in Community Service to Robert Murray, longtime housing advocate and president and chief operating officer of Falmouth Housing Authority. The event is sponsored by 3 Harbors Realty, Kerry Insurance Agency and Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank. Tickets are $125 for CDP supporters, $75 general admission and $25 for CDP residents and business clients. To purchase, go to www.capecdp.org or call 508-240-7873, ext. 22.


apr25 Brewster

Brewster run dedicated to bomb victims

The Brewster Chamber of Commerce announced that this year's Cape Cod 5 Bloom Run will be dedicated to the victims of the terrorist attacks on the Boston Marathon. Prior to the start at 10 a.m. Saturday April 27 at the Brewster Inn & Chowder House a brief dedication ceremony and moment of silence will take place. Non-runners are welcome to attend: parking is available at Eddy Elementary School and Brewster Town Hall. Day-of registration begins at 8:30 a.m. The presenting sponsor is Cape Cod 5 Cents Savings Bank. Co-sponsors include the Brewster Inn & Chowder House, Brewster Recreation, Pomeroy Photography & Graphics, and Bayside Runner. The Brewster Chamber of Commerce in collaboration with the Town of Brewster host Brewster in Bloom which raises funds to help Brewster students further their education. For more information please call 508-896-3500 or visit www.BrewsterBlooms.com.


apr25

Aereo TV-Over-Internet coming to Cape May 15th

Broadcast-TV-Over-the-Internet arrives on Cape Cod next month. Prices start at $8 a month. The first new coverage area for Aereo since the service's March 2012 debut in New York is Boston, Cape Cod and The Islands. The Barry Diller-backed company, Aereo TV-Over-Internet announced today that it will begin offering its service in the Boston market (including Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket Counties) on May 15th. Pre-registered customers will receive an invitation to sign up on May 15th and then general enrollment will commence on May 31st. There are some 4.5 million potential Aereo customers in the Boston market. "Aereo is simply the easiest, most convenient way for consumers to access broadcast television online using an antenna," said Aereo CEO and Founder Chet Kanojia. Aereo's innovative remote (cloud-based) antenna/DVR technology makes watching television simple and user-friendly. Using Aereo's technology, consumers can pause, rewind and fast-forward any program that they are watching live, or save a program for future viewing. In Boston, there are 28 ove­the-air broadcast channels accessible through Aereo's antenna/DVR technology, including major networks such as WGBH (PBS), WBZ-TV (CBS), WCVB (ABC),WHDH (NBC), WLVI (CW) and WFXT (Fox); special interest channels such as The Country Network, PBS Kids, Ion and Qubo; and Spanish-language broadcast channels such as Univision and Telemundo. In addition, consumers can also add Bloomberg Television, for a total of 29 channels. ereo works on 'smart' devices from tablets to phones to laptop computers. Aereo is currently supported on iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, Chrome, Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Safari, Opera, AppleTV (via airplay) and Roku devices. Aereo is offered as a low-cost alternative to traditional cable TV service. Ideal for "cord cutters" (those who have discontinued cable service) or "cord nevers" (mainly younger people who have never subscribed to cable TV) , the services converts broadcast television signals and sends them down the Internet to your tablet, Roku, Apple TV and other digital streaming devices.

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Wednesday, April 24, 2013

apr24 Wellfleet

Debt exclusion OK'd for restrooms at Baker's Field in Wellfleet

Town meeting agreed late Monday night to a $324,000 Proposition 2½ debt exclusion for constructing public restrooms at Baker's Field, facilities that are sorely needed, according to town officials. But the measure will still need approval at the April 30 town election. Annual town meeting voters finished all 44 warrant articles by 11 p.m. Monday. Earlier in the evening, a second debt exclusion of $250,000 was approved to buy a new fire department tanker truck, a measure that will also need a second nod of approval at the ballot box. Voters also took the board of selectmen's suggestion to negotiate an easement for a strip of land for sale by the Chequessett Yacht and Country Club rather than buy it with a $130,000 debt exclusion. The public easement will not require any additional borrowing, town officials said. Earlier in the evening voters approved a $14.85 million annual operating budget for next fiscal year, and an additional $151,000 to pay for collective bargaining agreements. For the restrooms, the additional property tax in the first year would be $1.05 for property assessed at $350,000, according to town records. Grants could significantly reduce the cost, town officials said at the meeting. Later on Monday, voters also approved the use of $60,000 from free cash for a feasibility study for a new roof planned for the elementary school, and use of $15,000 to help pay for the town's 250th anniversary celebration. The town adopted a zoning amendment that allows large-scale, ground-mounted photovoltaic installations in one zoning district. The zoning amendment will help the town qualify as a "green community" for state grants. Also later on Monday, voters turned away from a 15-month moratorium, as recommended by the selectmen and health and planning officials, on any building and occupancy permits for medical marijuana treatment centers. Town officials had hoped to adopt a moratorium until June 30, 2014, to study whether and how to create zoning provisions to regulate the treatment centers.


apr24

Salt Marsh Awakening: Juvenile Horseshoe Crabs Active on Outer Cape Cod

It isn't springtime for the Turtle Journal team until juvenile horseshoe crabs emerge from winter slumber from underneath the soft, muddy bottoms of salt marsh channels. Like everything else this year, that emergence seems to have been delayed nearly a month by a chilly March and April. We first discovered active horseshoe crabs on April 18th in South Wellfleet on Outer Cape Cod. Last year we recorded a mid-March emergence of juvenile horseshoe crabs. Juvenile horseshoe crabs spend their first couple of years in protected salt marsh channels before venturing outside this nursery habitat. As we peeked into marsh creeks of South Wellfleet last Thursday, we saw a large number of juvenile horseshoe crab tracks carved into the soft bottom.

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apr24 Wellfleet

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Unknowingly in the Eye of the Storm

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. He has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday morning at 8:35am and Tuesday afternoon at 5:45pm. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.



A pretty spring day in Harvard Yard

Between two spasms of violence that gripped the nation's attention - the Marathon Bombing and the subsequent manhunt that shut down Boston - Robert Finch found himself seated on a bench in Harvard Yard reading poetry. It was only later, looking back, that he perceived how unknowingly that pretty spring day embodied the eye of a storm.




apr24 Wellfleet-Eastham-Orleans-Brewster-Harwich

Turn in unwanted, expired medications

Police departments across Cape Cod will take part in the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's National Take-Back Initiative from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The program offers the public an opportunity to prevent pill abuse or theft by getting rid of potentially dangerous expired and unwanted prescription drugs. Medications may be taken to participating police stations for proper disposal. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked, according to a press release from the Brewster Police Department. As of Monday, the following departments had signed on, according to the DEA website: Barnstable, Bourne, Brewster, Dennis, Falmouth, Harwich, Eastham, Nantucket, Orleans, Sandwich, Wellfleet, Yarmouth and Edgartown. Other departments may be added. To check, go to: www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback.


apr24 Wellfleet-Eastham-Truro-Provincetown-Orleans-Brewster

Nauset job fair Thursday, April 25

Nauset Regional High School will host its seventh annual Nauset Workforce Job Fair for local residents from 3 to 5 p.m. on Thursday, April 25, in the school's cafeteria. Including full- and part-time positions for both seasonal and year-round employment, the jobs are open to high school and college students as well as adults. Employers include banks, retail stores, restaurants, lodging establishments, town recreation departments, theaters, landscapers and more. The jobs fair is co-sponsored by the Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham, Orleans and Brewster chambers of commerce. For more information, contact Noreen Thompsen at (508) 240-1616 or Brian White at (508) 255-1505, ext. 8222. Employers interesting in recruiting may request a registration form from any of the sponsoring chambers of commerce. Priority will be given to employers from the towns in the Nauset school district, but employers from other towns may register on a space-available basis. There is no charge to register. Deadline for employers to request a booth is April 23.


apr24 Truro

Truro planning board seeks to redefine 'street'

Town Planner Charlene Greenhalgh parodied a poem by Gertrude Stein when she explained why Truro is proposing to adopt the state's one-size-fits-all definition of a roadway. "A street is a street is a street," Greenhalgh said, "street" in this case being the subject of article 32 on the Town Meeting warrant, which asks voters to amend the zoning bylaw to bring local byways into conformance with commonly adhered-to standards. The amendment, borrowed almost verbatim from Mass. General Law, would define "street" as a public way maintained by the town, a subdivision road built per the requirements at the time the subdivision was approved, or a road in existence before Dec. 8, 1955 (when the local subdivision law went into effect) that has, "in the opinion of the planning board, sufficient width, suitable grades and adequate construction" to allow for the passage of emergency vehicles. It's that third category that has proven contentious, with some residents and members of the board of selectmen arguing that it gives the planning board too much leeway in determining that a street may not be a street after all. They say that details such as width and grade should be clearly quantified to make the process of defining a street more objective. The selectmen voted 4-1 not to recommend the article, which is set to come before voters at May 2's Annual Town Meeting. The planning board has unanimously endorsed it. "I just didn't feel like it was completed yet, and that it was open to subjective interpretation rather than [being] sort of fact-based," said board of selectmen chair Breon Dunigan. "I think a lot of people felt this way about it, that it was very vague. . Anything that leaves the town up to more litigation, I would not support." The town has racked up heavy legal bills in an ongoing court case that hinges, in part, on its definitions of roads and frontage. Five years ago, property owners Donald and Andrea Kline applied for and received permission from the town to build a large house on Stephen's Way, a narrow, twisting road that lacks the 40-foot width required under current zoning and has therefore been deemed non-conforming. Neighbors sued, and Kline attempted to bring his property into compliance by applying for an approval-not-required plan that described the road in front of his property as 40 feet wide. A Land Court judge threw out Kline's plan, noting that Truro's bylaw "does not cast its requirement for a road 40 feet wide so it can be satisfied merely by drawing a new line on a paper plan." The judge noted that frontage roads must "exist on the ground."

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apr24 Orleans

Orleans' Skaket Beach being spiffed up

The Skaket Beach facilities and parking lot will undergo a significant renovation this spring. Work includes a new Title 5 septic system and parking lot drainage improvements. The lot will also receive new asphalt paving in the disturbed areas. A full topcoat of asphalt paving is scheduled for next spring. As of April 12, some work has begun with the installation of a silt fence along the parking lot's beach edge and electrical enhancements to the administration building. Because some abutting residences rely on the parking lot for access, an effort will be made to keep the lot partially open. Unattended areas of excavation will be secured for public safety. The project is scheduled to be completed before Memorial Day Weekend. If more project information is needed, contact Ron Collins at 508-240-3700, extension 354.


apr24 Brewster

Historical Society hosts open house in Brewster

The Brewster Historical Society will hold an open house at its museum at 3171 Main St. from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday during the Brewster in Bloom celebration. The open house will feature the "Faces of Brewster" exhibit, more than 400 images from the Caro A. Dugan Collection of turn-of-century glass plate negatives. Among the images is the earliest known Brewster photograph of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan, taken in 1888. There also will be tours of Windmill Village at Drummer Boy Park. Tickets for the "Widow's War Tour of Satucket Village" on July 11 and 15, Aug. 8 and 22 and Sept. 12 and 26 will be available. Tickets are $30 ($25 for members).


apr24 Brewster

Ira Wood on WOMR: Dogs in Brewster's Drummer Boy Park with Paul Simons and Jo Glazebrook

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



apr24 Brewster

Marge Piercy poetry reading in Brewster

For the second year in a row, Marge Piercy will perform a reading of her poetry at the Brewster Meeting House during April, National Poetry Month. The author of 18 volumes of poetry will read at 7:30 PM Friday, April 26, 2013 in the First Parish Brewster sanctuary (also known at the Brewster Meeting House) at 1969 Main Street in Brewster. Also a novelist and teacher, Piercy is considered by many as a Cape Cod treasure. A Wellfleet resident for many years, Piercy is a powerful advocate for progressive causes, including equality, peace, and environmental justice. The Boston Globe has described her this way: "Marge Piercy is not just an author, she's a cultural touchstone. Few writers in modern memory have sustained her passion, and skill, for creating stories of consequence." Piercy will be also be conducting a poetry workshop on Saturday, April 27, in Brewster. Details for the reading and workshop as well as the purchase of tickets ($15 online and in cash at the door) can be found at www.brewstermeetinghousepresents.org/events.


apr24 Chatham

Chatham Senior Center serving food for seniors

Salad Nicoise with black olives. Crostini with white bean hummus. Peach tart. All that and a beverage for $7. Welcome to lunch at the Chatham Senior Center's new Monday cafe. "You can't beat it," diner Nancy Broberg of Brewster said. "I ate the whole thing." Chatham is one of the latest senior centers to offer a weekly cafe lunch experience, designed to acquaint residents with their senior centers' programs and encourage healthful eating. "Food is a universal draw. It makes everybody comfortable," Chatham Senior Center director Mandi Speakman said. "Every week they have something different," Stu Tuchinsky of Chatham, another diner, said Monday. The previous week, Bailey had prepared seared chicken breasts with black bean salsa verde, served with corn and tomato salad. There was dark chocolate cake with raspberry sauce for dessert. Chatham started its weekly cafe program in January, following in the footsteps of similar programs in such towns as Bourne, Wellfleet and Truro. One recent Monday, 20 diners got together to break crostini, served by volunteers in red aprons. It's been a nice way to meet new people, said Broberg, seated with others at a small round table topped with a vase of carnations, baby's breath and daffodils. Speakman wants to make the cafe a fun experience so diners feel comfortable returning to the senior center for exercise class, Scrabble games or computer school. "The program is still in its infancy. I'm trying to build up a following," she said. She might be careful what she wishes for. Iris's Cafe at the Wellfleet Senior Center - named after chef Iris Sands - attracts 34 to 40 people for Thursday lunch, Suzanne Grout Thomas, executive director of the Wellfleet Council on Aging, said. "That's huge for Wellfleet," Thomas said. "When she does her shrimp scampi, we have to cap it at 50."

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apr24 Chatham

Chatham's tax rate a bit lower than expected

The tax rate will be $5.03 per thousand dollars, which is about three cents less than the officials had projected, said Finance Director Alix Heilala, adding that the bills should be in mailboxes momentarily The town also went through a revaluation process so although most residents won't see much of a change in their assessments some areas of town went up significantly while other pockets lost value, said Andy Machado, director of assessing. Machado added that since 2012 the real estate market has begun to improve. The total value of the town has decreased by .86 percent, leaving it at just more than $5.8 billion. In 2010 the town was valued at $6.3 billion.


apr24 Harwich

Harwich school program ties Earth, music together

When the orchestra stopped playing on Tuesday, a group of Harwich Elementary School students, sitting in rows on the music room floor, enthusiastically shot their arms into the air, eager to name the piece. "'The Four Seasons'!" one girl confidently exclaimed. "'Spring,'" said another girl. These fourth-graders recognize Vivaldi and other composers thanks to the Music Works! Everyday in-class lessons, presented by the Cape Cod Symphony. The goal is to get students engaged with music on a personal level. As part of the ongoing lessons, students listen to classical music at the outset of every school day for five minutes. Organizers say that by listening to the same piece during a week's time, the students learn about the music and its composer, as well as gain improved focus. Tuesday afternoon, the students saw a four-piece orchestra perform the pieces through a likeminded effort, called the School Concerts Program, now in its third year, which dovetails with Music Works! Everyday by bringing in musicians from each instrument family and including a lesson with each presentation. "We opted for save the Earth with the recycling component," said George Scharr, director of community education for the Cape Cod Conservatory of Music and Arts, on this year's theme that tied an environmental message to the music world. The conservatory partners with the symphony on the School Concerts Program, and Scharr credits Jung-Ho Pak, artistic director and conductor of the symphony, with redesigning the program, which was previously known as In-School Ensembles.

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apr24 Harwich

Harwich Chamber of Commerce seeks 66 percent increase in town funding

The Chamber of Commerce is asking the Town of Harwich for a $14,000 increase in funding in order to begin a multi-year economic study to better brand the Harwich name to lure more companies and visitors to the area. For more than a decade, the Chamber has received an annual grant from the town to help offset the nonprofit organization's efforts as an informational center, advising visitors from their office on Route 28 in Harwich Port. Last year, the town grant was $21,000 and the current town meeting request for 2013 would increase the total to $35,000. Chamber Board President Tony Guthrie, a real estate agent with Robert Paul Properties, said that the Chamber has been working for several years to improve the way it communicates with its membership, visitors, and potential new businesses. "If we want to be forward thinking, then we need to look into the future and become a more modern organization. We need to attract new businesses, be active in government affairs, and have a comprehensive approach to what Harwich has to offer for everyone," said Guthrie. Guthrie has some experience in transforming businesses. During the last decade, he has held leadership positions at the Wequassett Resort and Golf Club, Chatham Bars Inn, and most recently, the Wychmere Beach Club. All three companies underwent significant physical and operational changes during his tenure to increase their business offerings and modernize facilities. If the additional $14,000 is approved at town meeting on May 6, the Chamber will partner with the town to put out a request for proposals for a consulting firm to guide the organization through an economic study and branding analysis. "Branding is almost a living and breathing thing. It's the beauty and productivity of the cranberry bogs and the vitality of the fishing fleet. It's the deep woods and open spaces across town and it's the unique villages that each have their own charm," said Guthrie.

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Tuesday, April 23, 2013

apr23 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Voters back Tasers for police force

Town meeting Monday night approved buying Tasers for police and decided that the town should appoint its next town clerk, town treasurer and town collector given the increasing complexities of the jobs. "Up to 30 years ago the positions were considered popularity contests," said Town Clerk/Town Treasurer Dawn Rickman, who has held the job for more than 30 years. "Now this position requires extensive special education and training." Voters decided by a near-unanimous vote to change the three elected positions to appointed positions. The same measure was rejected at last year's town meeting. The charter change still has to be approved at the annual town election in 2014 to take effect. Incumbents Rickman and Town Collector Marianne Nickerson would be the first appointees, according to the warrant article. Rickman told the roughly 260 residents who attended the annual town meeting that certifications for the positions can take six years and, with appointed candidates, much-needed criminal histories and credit checks could be done, unlike with elected officials. The positions would be appointed by the selectmen. "She finally got that off her chest after 30 years," Town Moderator Bruce Bierhans said, joking, after Rickman gave a long recitation about the tasks of the job. Voters on Monday night also approved a Proposition 2½ debt exclusion for $250,000 for a fire department tanker truck. The old one is 26 years old, Fire Chief Richard Pauley told residents. The borrowing above state taxation limits would still have to be approved at the town election on April 30 to go into effect. If approved, the tax increase on property assessed at $350,000 would be 81 cents in the first year of the 20-year borrowing period. Voters also approved a capital budget of $2.5 million for the next fiscal year. Voters also agreed to set aside $150,000 to help pay for health insurance for future town retirees, and put $50,000 into a stabilization fund. Voters also approved all recommendations for use of Community Preservation Act funds including to further rehab the Pond Hill School.

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apr23 Eastham

Repairs scheduled on Nauset bike path

A section of the Nauset Bike Path in Eastham, between Tomahawk Trail and Coast Guard Beach, will be closed for a month starting Wednesday as part of a two-phase upgrade. The section will be closed to pedestrians and bikes.
A portion of the Nauset Bike Path from Tomahawk Trail through Coast Guard Beach will be closed for restoration beginning April 24.
It will reopen May 24, in time for Memorial Day weekend, according to Cape Cod National Seashore Superintendent George Price. In the second phase, in the fall, the section between Tomahawk Trail and the Salt Pond Visitor Center will be upgraded. The improvements to the 1.6-mile path, built in the 1960s, are intended to make the path safer. The upgrades include widening the path, repaving it and straightening dangerous curves, Price said in a press release. Visibility on the path will be improved and the shoulders stabilized as well. The repairs are paid for through the Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks program, which is administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration. The contractor on the job also completed upgrades to the Province Lands Bike Path in Provincetown in recent years, Price said. "We have confidence that they will deliver a quality project," he said.


apr23 Eastham

Final Eastham water info session is Saturday

The selectmen will hold their final informational meeting on the proposed townwide public water system at 1 p.m. Saturday. The previously scheduled 10 a.m. meeting has been canceled. This session will include a short presentation on why Eastham needs a public water system, how the project is designed and would be installed, and how much it would cost. Expected guest speakers include state legislators and officials from the state Department of Environmental Protection. The session is designed to provide residents with information on the water system proposal that will be voted on at the May 6 town meeting.


apr23 Provincetown

Top Broadway stars headline Provincetown series

Some of Broadway's most acclaimed musical-theater actresses will be in Provincetown this summer, as The Art House presents an even more star-studded season of concerts/chats than in the past two summers, courtesy of producing artistic director Mark Cortale and music director Seth Rudetsky. Tony Award winners Chita Rivera, Audra McDonald, Sutton Foster, Patti Lupone, Joanna Gleason and Christine Ebersole, as well as TV's "Smash" star Megan Hilty and Sam Harris will be featured as part of the Broadway @ The Art House series. Back as host, interviewer and pianist will be Rudetsky, a Broadway accompanist and expert, who is also a Sirius radio host, actor, comedian and writer.

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apr23 Orleans

Benefits of conservation moorings touted in Orleans

There have been a number of studies about so-called conservation moorings, but none on whether they improve water quality. Town meeting could change that. "You guys would be the leaders in providing that sort of information for other communities," said Kristin Uiterwyk of the Urban Harbors Institute. Uiterwyk, who co-authored a recent study on conservation moorings, was one of three speakers who spoke about conservation moorings, or elastic moorings at Snow Library last week. The trio, which also included Royce Randlett of Helix Mooring Systems and Tom Hill of Hazelett Marine, were invited by a group of residents who are interested in cleaning up the town's waters of nitrogen pollution without only relying on infrastructure, such as pipes and plants. The moorings, which don't have chains that drag along the bottom, are recognized for protecting eelgrass - which is of paramount importance for shellfish and finfish - and improving water clarity because they don't kick sediment up off the bottom. But there are no studies, thus far, that say whether they improve water quality. An article on the town meeting warrant asks voters to approve $200,000 to do a pilot project to change the moorings in Meetinghouse Pond from traditional moorings to conservation moorings. "Information sharing is so crucial to what we want to do," said Selectman David Dunford, who supports the pilot program. Many in the audience wondered about the cost of the moorings and whether they worked. Renlett, of Helix Mooring Systems, said the anchoring portion - which holds what folks see above the water - would cost about $1,000 each to buy and install, but that depended on the basin bottom. Meetinghouse Pond, for instance, has a mucky bottom so the shafts of the mooring, which are completely buried, have to go deep to find "friendly soil." Unlike concrete blocks on the bottom the Helix mooring is predominantly underground, the only piece that is visible is about the size of a fist, he said. "The anchor length 7-15 feet. The only thing fish will see is connection," he said.

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apr23 Brewster

CapeCast: Biting into the shark mystique



apr23 Brewster

Open House at Captains this Saturday

Captains Golf Course in Brewster will host an open house this Saturday, April 27 from noon to 3 p.m. All are invited to take part in the free activities and to view the facilities. The event will include free buckets of balls at the driving range, golf clinics, a 25 percent discount off all gear in the pro shop, Callaway Demo Day at the driving range, and a 50/50 raffle, half of which will support the Friends of the Captains organization. Free clinics, 1-1:30 putting; 1:30-2, chipping will be led by professionals Steve Knowles and Jay Packett. A putting contest at 2 p.m. will earn a Callaway Odyssey putter. There will be an orientation at 3 p.m. for potential members. Captains has two 18-hole courses. For more information, visit captainsgolfcourse.com or call 508-896-1716.


apr23 Brewster

Brewster town warrant ready

The Brewster Town website now has the 96-page spring town warrant available for download. There are 38 articles for consideration including four zoning bylaw changes, three dog-related articles, school and town budgets totaling about $40-million dollars, road betterments and a citizens petition to postpone the implementation of pay-as-you-throw at the transfer station.


apr23 Brewster

Rabold leans on experience in Brewster selectman's race

Three years ago Dan Rabold was the new kid on the Brewster Board of Selectmen. Now he's the incumbent fending off challengers as he runs for one of two seats on the board up for election May 21. "Probably everything about it surprised me being new," Rabold said looking back on his initiation to town politics. "There's a learning curve to it. But I learned and Ed [Lewis], Peter [Norton], Jim [Foley] and Greg [Levasseur] in the first year taught me things and helped me pick it up. And I learned a lot this past year as chair." Lewis is stepping down to run for Nauset Regional School Committee while Pat Hughes of the comprehensive water planning committee and Ben DeRuyter of the finance committee are running for the BOS. "As the only incumbent there's an advantage, I'm a known quantity," Rabold reflected. "So if you like me it's an advantage and if not, it's not an advantage." He's now comfortable in the job. "The override in the first year was one of the reasons I ran in the first place," Rabold recalled. "It helped in a lot of ways and helped stop the cuts in the schools and established a base for the tax levy. It's one of those things, as selectmen, we have to ask every now and then. If you don't ask, you never know if people are willing to help out - and they were. The vote was 3-2 in favor (of putting it on the ballot) so I wasn't there we might still be struggling with those issues." Rabold is also an advocate for renewable energy in Brewster. He's disappointed the wind turbines were never built. "I think we're on the right track with renewable energy. The landfill site will see some work this summer with the construction of solar panels and hopefully we'll be signing a contract at the next selectmen's meeting for the other solar array (on Freeman's Way) that will take the place of the wind turbines," he said. "That will more than cover what we lost for production of green energy and make us some money." Rabold was also pleased the negotiations with the town unions went well and helped Brewster reformulate benefit packages. While those were the big three achievements of recent years every issue hasn't gone smoothly.

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apr23 Chatham

Chatham to host trash disposal forum

Residents are invited to a forum on trash disposal options practiced in other towns and across the state. The informational meeting will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the Chatham Community Center, 702 Main St. Nantucket Department of Public Works Director Kara Buzanoski, Sandwich DPW Director and Town Engineer Paul Tilton, and former Needham selectman and planning board member Jack Cogswell will talk about how other communities have managed their solid waste disposal costs and increased their recycling. For more information, call the Chatham Health Department at 508-945-5165 or 508-945-5164.


apr23 Chatham

New medical building in Chatham to celebrate opening

An opening ceremony for Cape Cod Healthcare's new medical office building is scheduled for 5 p.m. Wednesday. The facility, at 1629 Main St., was donated by David and Gail Oppenheim of Chatham and will be named the Oppenheim Medical Building in their honor. The 9,000-square-foot building houses primary care practices, Cape Cod Hospital Physical Therapy and a C-Lab service center.


apr23 Chatham

The future of trash in Chatham

Since costs for trash disposal will skyrocket in the coming years, towns are exploring how to increase recycling and thereby cut costs. Selectmen and the town's solid waste advisory committee are having an informational meeting on several possible solutions including pay-as-you-throw programs and increased monitoring of trash. They are also looking at how private haulers will be integrated into the new trash regime. To discuss the changing landscape, representatives from Sandwich - which has a PAYT program, Nantucket, which relied on heightened enforcement, and Needham, which worked with private haulers will speak at a public meeting Thursday, April 25, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the community center. Town officials will also be on hand.






Monday, April 22, 2013

apr22 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Town Meeting Borrowing

There are four articles on the 2013 annual town meeting warrant which propose borrowing. The articles and the amounts proposed are: Article 22 - Fire Department tanker - $250,000; Article 23 - Land purchase on Chequessett Neck Road - $130,000; Article 24 - Baker Field restrooms - $324,000; and Article 26 - Elementary School re roofing - $375,000. The four articles total $1,078,000. If all were to pass and the full amount of each was borrowed we would borrow over a five year period for article 23 and over a ten year period for the remaining three articles. Assuming that we can borrow at a 4% interest rate, the amount added to the real estate tax bill on a property valued at $350,000 would be at its highest in fiscal 2015 - $27.52. The amount would decrease as the debt is retired with a final payment in 2024. By then the tax impact on a $350,000 property would have decreased to $14.81. These figures are all estimates, but they are close enough to provide a feel for the real estate tax cost if all proposed borrowing was approved. On a $700,000 property the tax bill impact would double. Also on the horizon are borrowings for other projects including the restoration of the Baker Field tennis courts, harbor dredging and needed repairs to some Town buildings. According to our auditors Wellfleet's debt, which is about $15,000,000 is not out of line for similar communities. But it's still important to assess the timing and rationale behind each borrowing proposal.

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apr22 Wellfleet-Eastham

Alleged pot peddler arrested during Wellfleet traffic stop

A Route 6 traffic stop in Wellfleet Saturday night resulted in the arrest of a 22-year-old Eastham man. According to Lt. Michael Hurley, Myles West was pulled over on Route 6 at Old Truro Road just before 6:30 p.m. for speeding. Rather than a speeding ticket, officers arrested West and confiscated more than 20 ounces of marijuana, police said. Police estimate the street value of the marijuana at $4,000. West also had $3,300 in cash which was also confiscated by police. West was transported to the Wellfleet Police Department where he was booked and charged with speeding and possession of a Class D substance (marijuana) with intent to distribute.

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apr22 Eastham

Fast food, old style in Eastham

Dave Poitras sat briefly at one of the indoor booths at Poit's on a recent April day. The busy season for the restaurant and miniature golf course remained weeks away, but Poitras wasn't resting. He sat briefly to discuss the restaurant's history with a visitor but popped out of his seat to help his young sons with a customer and answer questions such as whether potato chips went with an order. The flurry of activity will only accelerate once summer hits and the crowds come for mini-golf, ice cream, hot dogs, cheeseburgers and other attractions until the business closes in September. But the start of the season never feels monotonous, he said. "Come Feb. 1, I'm ready to get open," he said. Poit's, a fixture on Route 6, is celebrating its 60th season this year. It's been a family affair since Dave's father, Norm Poitras, started the business in 1954 with his own father, Joseph Poitras. Now, Dave is the sole owner and his sons - Joshua, 11, and Jacob, 13 - help out. He met his wife, Eileen, an elementary school music teacher, in the 1990s when she worked at the business's ice cream and sandwich shop. And Norm, 80, still works every day during the busy summer season, as does his wife, Dolly Poitras. He was a teenager in the U.S. Army when he convinced his father, a loom fixer in the textile mills of New Bedford, to open a business. "I felt the only way any one could be successful in the future is you had to determine your own destiny," he said. He and his dad searched the Cape for property but found prices too high in the Hyannis area, where a 10,000-square-foot stretch of land cost $10,000. The 1-acre lot in North Eastham that became the business cost $3,000, Norm said. At the time, there were no businesses anywhere around the area, he said. "We went further down (the Cape) and let the rest of the world catch up to us." The business started as a drive-in restaurant with carhops. Over time, the carhops were replaced with waitresses, and the family created indoor seating and expanded the menu. The original miniature golf course was added in 1970. A new building for an ice cream shop, which Dave's sister Donna Poitras runs, was added in 1984. Seafood, once a huge draw for the business, was gradually dropped, said Dave and now hot dogs and hamburgers are the staples. He no longer serves beer and wine, preferring to keep it more family-focused. "We just wanted to go back to what we originally were in the '50s, which was basically family fare ... making it more affordable to the families." Nine years ago, he invested in a new mini-golf course. Out went the boxy course with the clown mouth, seal and other obstacles. In went winding holes and a small river that cuts through the 18 holes.

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apr22 Provincetown

Town should pay for dredging, Provincetown Pier Corp says

When the tide goes out, so does John Salvador's opportunity to take people fishing on the Wendy Jo, his charter boat. That's the case until the town manages to dredge the area where the two-sided float he shares with his brother Edward, who owns the commercial fishing vessel Mary Sue, will soon be situated near the municipal parking lot. The dredging of about three to four feet of sand that was pushed into the area by winter storms is expected to cost about $25,000, according to Harbormaster Rex McKinsey. The leased float brings in about $9,000 per season. But the Pier Corp., which is spending $155,000 of the $200,000 in its marina reserve fund to repair the floating docks and finger piers damaged by the Feb. 8-9 blizzard, indicated last week that it wants to see the money for dredging come from somewhere else. "This is an emergency situation and I believe the town has money set aside for emergency situations," said Carlos Verde, a Pier Corp. member. "My feeling, too, Carlos, is it's not the pier itself," Lee Ash, Pier Corp chair, said. "It seems almost like it would be a public works [project]." "I'm not sure we have the fiscal responsibility to remove the sand," said Pier Corp. member Scott Fraser, who wondered aloud what part of town should pay for it. The float's lease runs from April 1 to Nov. 30, but Salvador would like to see the boats there by the second or third week of May. "Principally, [it was caused by] the blizzard event, but the next storms after that made it worse," said McKinsey, adding that the Salvadors currently wouldn't be able to get their vessels in or out of harbor at low tide. "This is sand being stopped by the bulkhead of the municipal parking lot." When the area was dredged last spring, it was done using a crane from land, but McKinsey said a crane on a barge would be more effective. He is considering using the Barnstable County Dredge, a hydraulic dredge that works by sucking up water and sand and then depositing it in a different area. The dredge is being moved from Martha's Vineyard this week, and McKinsey said the county charges much less than commercial operations.

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apr22 Provincetown

Seen on scene: Provincetown banquet honors women in science

The Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies' Homeport Banquet was held at the
From left to right, PCCS development specialist Kathy Shorr, "Future Weather" director and writer Jenny Deller, Land's End Inn owner Eva Sikorski, former Provincetown International Film Festival executive director Gabrielle Hanna, actress Lili Taylor and PCCS executive director Rich Delaney.
Provincetown Inn on Thursday as a benefit for the Ruth Hiebert Memorial Fellowship, which provides scholarships to women who are pursuing a career in science. Special guests included Jenny Deller, writer and director of the new movie "Future Weather," a feature of this weekend's "Science on Screen" film fest in Provincetown, as well as actress Lili Taylor, one of the stars of the film. Laura Ganley, flight coordinator for the center's right whale aerial survey, was announced as the recipient of this year's Ruth Hiebert Memorial Fellowship, with Lauren Bamford, who is researching gray seals, the runner-up.


apr22 Provincetown

Open-hearted entertainer plays coffee house in Provincetown

Known by her friends as a quiet soul, the singer-songwriter Annie Rich is a dynamic performer onstage who's known to electrify audiences with her lyrical melodies, sensitive lyrics and big rich sound. Rich is the featured performer at Coffee House at The Mews' open mike night on Monday, April 23. Show time is 8 p.m. at The Mews Restaurant & Cafe, 429 Commercial St., Provincetown.


apr22 Orleans

Adult immunization clinic in Orleans

Orleans Board of Health and Visiting Nurse Association Cape Cod are cosponsoring an adult immunization clinic Wednesday, April 24, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at town hall. Vaccines offered include shingles, hepatitis A and B, chicken pox and pneumonia. There are costs involved, including $160 for shingles. For a full list and costs call 508-957-7613.


apr22 Orleans

Wastewater forum in Orleans

On Earth Day, Monday, April 22, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the parish hall of the Church of the Holy Spirit on Monument Road, Orleans residents are invited to the first of three educational forums on the important wastewater issues that will be voted on at Orleans Town Meeting on May 13. The first of these is "Ask the Scientists about Namskaket Marsh" and will have several scientists who are experts in different fields and have studied the marsh for many years. The experts invited are Brian Howes and Ed Eichner, who helped develop the state nitrogen pollution reduction levels the town is expected to meet; Peter Weiskel, U.S. Geological Service; Amy Costa, Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies and Tara Nye, Association to Preserve Cape Cod. The moderator is Richard Delaney of Coastal Studies. "It's time to move forward together as a town that loves its waters and wants to redeem and protect them. But we need now to get to the facts and unpack the Orleans comprehensive wastewater plan so that ordinary folks like us can understand what the science is telling us and what needs to be done," said Doug Fromm, chairman of Orleans Can, one of the several sponsors of the forum. Fran McClennan, who chairs the Orleans Pond Coalition, a cosponsor, agrees and said, "We know that the issues are complicated, and this is a way for all of us to hear what the scientists have to say and to ask them questions that concern us. We will also hear at the next two forums from engineers who design wastewater systems and then from our neighboring town, Chatham, on their experience building and expanding their own sewer system. We hope that voters will have their questions answered about the important issues that we will face at town meeting." Subsequent meetings will be held Thursday, May 2, at the Courthouse at Old Jailhouse Tavern on West Road, at 4 p.m. and Tuesday, May 7, at 7 p.m., also at the Old Jailhouse Tavern.


apr22 Brewster

Herring return to Brewster



apr22 Brewster

Gardening with natives talk at Museum in Brewster

On Sunday, May 5, at 2 p.m. the Friends of the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History will present "Natives and Nice: Using Native Plants in Landscape Design" with Barbara Conolly, owner of Gardens by Barbara Conolly, one of the series Gardening for Life: Cape Cod Native Plants held at the Museum. Tickets are $5 and reservations are recommended. Call 508 896 3867, ext. 133 for information.


apr22 Brewster

Solar powered church in Brewster

The First Parish Church in Brewster has completed construction of a solar array in their parking lot across Route 6A from the Church at the intersection with Route 124. The array should provide the same amount of electricity the church uses in its facilities. The array will be dedicated formally on Sunday at 10:20 a.m. on Earth Day between services at the First Parish.


apr22 Brewster

Brewster Taxpayers Association meets

The Brewster Taxpayers Association will hold their quarterly meeting Tuesday April 23, at 4 p.m. in the lower level of Brewster Town Hall. The topics for discussion are: the May town meeting warrant and what are your priorities for spending tax revenue? Anyone interested may go online or stop at town hall to get copy of warrant. Any questions please call Jim Geisler at 1-508-255-7045.


apr22 Brewster

Breaking personal boundaries at Cape Cod Sea Camps

John Kelly's walkie-talkie continually blasted as he hustled around the Cape Cod Sea Camps grounds Sunday, overseeing the final preparations for the Rotary Youth Leadership Award weekend. "What's your job right now?" Jaclyn Gonsalves, 18, of Bourne asked as he passed by her. "Everything," he replied with a chuckle. Less than an hour later, John, 18, an RYLA youth leader from Swansea, stood before a cabin full of mostly youths filling plastic bags with rice and beans that would be distributed to 20 food banks across Southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island as part of the District 7950 Rotary Club's Drive to End Hunger. The drive was the culmination of a month of planning and a weekend of leadership and team-building activities on the campground. The weekend is put on to empower youths within their district, which includes the Cape and Islands, said Lew Gordon, a Rotarian from Attleboro. "They break their personal boundaries," Gordon said as he viewed the organized chaos of dozens filling single-serve meal bags in the cabin. With 16,000 pounds of food, the group expected to package at least 50,000 individual meals, said Joe Clancy, governor of the 7050 Rotary Club district. One hundred and forty-four youths across the district, which covers 67 Rotary clubs, participated. Participants in the annual weekend are often recruited and invited to apply by local Rotary clubs, Clancy said. They are often recommended by high school guidance counselors and principals. Upon arrival on Friday, one of the first things the teens learn is how to break a board with their hands, John Kelly said. Each person breaks one in front of the group while being cheered on. "You literally punch through a board," he said, adding that the gesture represented achieving something that did not seem possible.

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apr22 Chatham

Shark art aims to raise money for research

While scientists may not know how many great white sharks swim in the waters just off our shores, Chatham Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Lisa Franz knows just how many will be in Kate Gould Park come May 18. "Fifty-two sharks for the park," she said. The 5-foot-long plastic cutouts, decorated by local artists in a variety of mediums such as broken pottery, mosaic tiles and paint, will be displayed in the park from May 18 to June 2. They will then be moved to different venues before being auctioned off Aug. 1 to kick-start the drive for a shark and marine-life education and research center in Chatham. Companies or individuals can sponsor a shark for $150. The artists will get 10 percent of the auction price. "There's so much potential (in Chatham) for monitoring and research," Franz said. "We have to start somewhere. We are hoping to show that this is a viable, real idea that the town is behind 100 percent." Both shark and seal researchers at a big seal symposium held last month at Chatham High School were frustrated at the lack of funding for their research, she said. "People think they have a ton of money for it and they don't," Franz said. Blessed with plentiful harbors, vessels and maritime experience, not to mention proximity to the largest colony of gray seals and densest aggregation of great white sharks on the East Coast, Chatham is a natural site for a research center that could include both labs and an educational component, Franz argued. "At a center, we could bring (researchers) under one roof and create a research and educational center that would be world-class," she said. The seed money could go to hiring a consultant to create a business plan and line up donors, Franz said. The hope is that a center, possibly located in the hotel at the Chatham Marconi Maritime Center, would attract visitors to town year-round.

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apr22 Chatham

Mussel farm OK'd off Monomoy

Close to 85 percent of mussels eaten in the U.S. come from Canada, but a small pilot program in town may help locals cash in on that $26 million a year industry. On Tuesday, selectmen approved a deepwater aquaculture grant for Chatham Fisheries on the site of one of their existing weir grants north of Monomoy Island. The Eldredges will use the bottom to try and grow mussels in bags - they look like "socks" said Shannon Eldredge - over the next 18 months. "If it works for you it could open up possibilities for other folks," said Selectman Sean Summers. Selectmen Chairman Florence Seldin agreed. "It could be extremely advantageous for Chatham fishermen," she said. The experiment has already received support from several committees and department heads, including the shellfish advisory committee and the shellfish constable. At the meeting Bob Duncanson, the director of health and environment, also voiced his support saying that the endeavor could help provide further research in how filter feeders can improve water quality.

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apr22 Harwich

Corporate personhood and campaign financing in the spotlight in Harwich

Undeterred by heavy rain and the aftershock of a week of bombs and manhunts in Boston, some 50 people from across the Cape joined in conversation at the League of Women Voters' "Money in Politics" forum at the Harwich Community Center Saturday morning. The forum focused on what has happened and how we can respond to the influx of money into the political process triggered by the Citizens United decision, and touched on topics ranging from corporate governance to term limits. The 2010 Citizens United Supreme Court decision gave the nod to political spending by corporations, unions, and other organizations, saying that paid political spending by these entities constituted a form of First Amendment-protected free speech - and that the corporations have the same constitutional rights as people. "Slavery is the legal fiction that a Person is Property. Corporate personhood Is the legal fiction that Property is a Person," said panelist Mary Zepernick, co-founder of Yarmouth-based Program on Corporations, Law and Democracy, starting off the debate of the morning. "Corporations are not people and money is not speech," she said. Of course, money and power have long provided access to policy and politics; that hardly counts as news. But the Citizens United decision ripped away the past several decades worth of attempts to bring balance between interests and overhaul campaign finance. It opened the floodgates to unlimited spending by corporations with seemly bottomless pockets, as well as by special interest-funded political action groups, the Super PACs. With the onslaught of dollars, in 2012 the individual citizen had less and less chance to be heard. In fact, in its hand-out material, the League of Women Voters (LWV) noted that in 2012, 20% of all money spent on federal elections came not from a candidate or a political party, but from one of these outside sources. State Sen. Dan Wolf, another panelist, started his company Cape Air the same year his first child was born. He nourished them both and loves them both... "But we never got up in the morning and sat at the breakfast table and said "Good Morning Little Cape Air," he said, drawing a chuckle from the crowd. "There was never any confusion in our household which was the person and which was the business," he continued in a more serious vein.

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apr22 Harwich

Human rights advocate to visit Harwich High School

The Students Taking Action Now: Darfur (STAND) of Harwich High School will host a visit by Carl Wilkens on Wednesday and Thursday at the school, located at 75 Oak St. Wilkens is known for being the only American to stay in Rwanda during the country's genocide of 1994, during which time he worked to provide for and protect hundreds of orphans in Kigali. Harwich STAND invited him to the high school after meeting with him in March at the Sudan Emergency Action Summit in Arlington, Va. On Wednesday, Wilkens will address a schoolwide assembly and then meet with history classes to discuss his experiences and how individuals can learn to take meaningful action to help others. On Thursday, the high school will host "An Evening with Carl Wilkens," which is open to the public, beginning at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. The premiere screening of a documentary on Wilkens' experience in Rwanda, titled "We Stood Together," will be featured. The $10 ($5 for students) suggested donation will benefit the World Outside My Shoes, Sister Schools Project. For more information, contact John Dickson, Harwich High School STAND adviser, at jdickson@monomoy.edu.

apr22 Harwich

Harwich man faces OUI, drug charges after arrest

Harwich police arrested a man with a "substantial" police record Sunday night on drunken driving and heroin possession charges. Derek Morgan, 39, of Harwich is due in Orleans District Court this morning for arraignment after his arrest late Sunday night. At about 11 p.m. Sunday, Sgt. Adam Hutton heard from state police that a car was driving on the wrong side of the "Suicide Alley" section of the Mid-Cape Highway. Hutton waited for the car and saw Morgan driving on the road's shoulder. After being pulled over, Morgan allegedly failed several field sobriety tests and was arrested on charges of operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol. Police later searched Morgan's car and allegedly found a small amount of heroin.

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apr22

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 4/16, 4/17
O'NEILL, Dennis, 64, 4 Gimlet Way, Eastham; admitted sufficient facts to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), Nov. 7 in Brewster, continued without a finding for one year, 45-day license loss, $1,597.22 costs and $50 fee; negligent driving, dismissed; not responsible for another traffic violation.

OSTRER, Marsha, 64, address unknown, Chatham; admitted sufficient facts to assault and battery, Oct. 11 in Chatham, continued without a finding for six months, $300 costs and $50 fee.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 4/16, 4/17, 4/18
DUBOIS, Adrienne, 56, 102 South Sea St., Yarmouth; two counts of possession of oxycodone with intent to distribute, two counts of conspiracy to violate drug laws and possession of marijuana, April 12 in Truro. Pretrial hearing May 1.

MARCOUX, Marcene, 64, 180 Bradford St., Provincetown; assault and battery, disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace, April 13 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing May 14.

WALKER, Clarence, 73, 180 Bradford St., Provincetown; OUI, negligent driving and two other traffic violations, April 13 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing May 14.

WOOD, Lyndsay, 24, 115 Main St., Orleans; OUI-second offense, negligent driving and two other traffic violations, April 13 in Orleans. Pretrial hearing May 3

GARBARINO, Dominic, 42, Shrewsbury; operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI) and two other traffic violations, April 16 in Truro. Pretrial hearing May 6.

GONZALES, Phillip, 31, 2 Amos Circle, Mashpee; larceny of more than $250 by single scheme, Feb. 2 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing May 23.

OLENICZAK, Cameron, 22, 15 Charlie Noble Way, Eastham; operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), negligent driving and another traffic violation, April 18 in Orleans. Pretrial hearing May 6.

PISKURA, John, 19, 8 Cahoon Lane, Harwich; OUI (snowmobile) and trespassing with a motor vehicle, March 20 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing May 6.

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Saturday, April 20, 2013

apr20 Wellfleet

Wellfleet officials: 'Not a lot of fluff' in budget

There might be a handful of articles on the annual town meeting warrant that create discussion among voters Monday but given the tight budget, there will probably be relatively few financial controversies, Town Administrator Harry Terkanian said Friday. Voters will be asked in Article 1 to approve a $14.85 million operating budget for the next fiscal year as proposed by the board of selectmen, roughly a 1 percent increase from the current fiscal year. Article 22 asks voters to pay $250,000 as a Proposition 2½ debt exclusion for a new fire department tanker truck. The debt exclusion, if passed Monday and at the annual town election April 30, would add an extra 81 cents to the first year's tax bill for property assessed at $350,000, based on financing over 20 years. "It's so hard to cover the cost of doing the things, we have to do it," Terkanian said. "There's not a lot of fluff in the budget," he said. "You really have to look hard to find something that's a target for adjustment." The finance committee endorses the proposed budget, but is keeping an eye on town employee salaries and the unfunded liability for future town retiree health insurance benefits, finance committee chairman Stephen Polowczyk said Thursday. A second debt exclusion for $130,000, in Article 23, to purchase property from Chequessett Yacht & Country Club to provide a public way to the harbor, may be proposed, Terkanian said. The town is still negotiating a public easement as an alternative to spending the money. The strip of land has been considered open space and received a tax break from the town. Because it is now up for sale, the town has the first right to purchase it. The selectmen will likely ask voters to indefinitely postpone a third debt exclusion of $324,000, as proposed in Article 24, for public restrooms at Baker's Field. Instead, in Article 25, the selectmen will seek $45,000 to design what is needed, Terkanian said. A fourth debt exclusion of $375,000, in Article 26, will likely be reduced to $60,000, to be paid from available funds, to specify the needs for roof repairs at the elementary school. A fourth debt exclusion of $375,000, in Article 26, will likely be reduced to $60,000, to be paid from available funds, to specify the needs for roof repairs at the elementary school. In a charter amendment proposed in Article 7, voters will be asked, as they were last year, to change the positions of town clerk/town treasurer and town collector from elected to appointed. The selectmen endorsed the idea with a 4-1 vote on March 12, with Selectman Jerry Houk in opposition.

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apr20 Eastham

Karoo features 'infusion' cuisine from South Africa in Eastham

Monkey ribs have nothing to do with monkeys at Karoo, the new South African restaurant that opened Easter weekend in Eastham's Main Street Mercantile. In fact, they actually are St. Louis pork ribs cooked in Karoo's own "monkey gland" sauce. "I even put on the menu, "No monkeys were harmed in this sauce," says owner and chef Sanette Groenewald. Monkey gland sauce is a common name of a South African barbecue sauce that comes from the history of a South African Dutch ruler, so finicky that one day his chef threw everything in his kitchen together to please him, poured it over the ruler's dinner, and told him it was called "monkey gland sauce," explains Groenewald, who grew up in the "Little Karoo," on the outskirts of Great Karoo in South Africa, a region that resembles northern New Mexico in its climate. "It's an old name for something like A-1 steak sauce, here," she explains. Groenewald also runs Karoo Kafe in Provincetown, a 20-seat restaurant. Karoo's menu offers a fusion of Dutch, Malay, Indian, British, Mediterranean and African fare. The dishes range from exotic meats like ostrich and snail, to vegetarian and gluten free offerings. There are fun-sounding names like Peri Peri, an African-Portugese spiced tomato based sauce and Bunny Chow, a South African fast food consisting of a hollowed-out loaf of bread filled with curry that "does not contain bunnies;" assured Groenewald. Bobotie, a slang term for meat loaf, and in this case, is Groenewald's mother's recipe for a mild, soft curried ground beef. Her family is seventh generation South African of Dutch-German descent. She grew up on the family farm. After studying food service management, she traveled around Europe, returned to Karoo, and worked in a restaurant there where she met an American business couple from Brooklyn who she stayed with in New York City for three days when she first arrived in the U.S., in 1995. Just before she was scheduled to begin working at a restaurant in New York, she visited Provincetown one weekend. That was also an Easter weekend. "Cape Cod had the safety and secure feeling I wanted," she says. She decided to stay. When she opened the first location of Karoo in Provincetown in 2002, it was one of only two South African restaurants in the United States, with the other in Brooklyn. Now, Groenewald says, there are a few more in New York, and some on the West Coast.

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apr20 Eastham

Nauset trail in Seashore to be partially closed April 24-May 24

Cape Cod National Seashore will close a portion of the Nauset Bike Path this spring for the first of two phases of rehabilitation and safety improvements. The section of the trail between Tomahawk Trail and Coast Guard Beach will be closed from April 24 to May 24 for construction. During this period pedestrians and bikes will be prohibited from using this section of the trail. The Nauset Bike Path is a steep, 6-8 foot wide twisting route that was constructed in the 1960's to the standards of the day. The old bike trail asphalt will be recycled and mixed in with new asphalt and laid down in the same alignment but with a 10 foot width where possible, sharp curves will be alleviated and site visibility will be improved. Areas of poor drainage will be raised and side slopes will be stabilized. Detour signs and informational maps will be in place prior to the start of construction. Phase One of the project will be completed and open for public use by Memorial Day. The contractor will suspend construction during the summer months and will return in the fall to rehabilitate the stretch of the trail from the Salt Pond Visitor Center to Tomahawk Trail. The project has been funded by the Paul Sarbanes Transit in the Parks (TRIP) program, administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration. Superintendent George Price stated that there is never a good time to close a popular bike path such as the Nauset Bike Trail and apologized for any inconvenience. "We worked with this contractor on several other projects, including the Province Lands Bike Path and we have confidence that they will deliver a quality project. This is a good opportunity to have the work done and will be a great benefit to those visiting the area this summer," said Price.

apr20 Provincetown

Town manager wants cop named harbormaster in Provincetown

If Town Manager Sharon Lynn has her way, police Officer Scott Chovanec will become the town's new harbormaster. This comes on the heels of an audit report dated April 1, penned by former Plymouth Police Chief Robert Pomeroy, which found enforcement and record-keeping severely lacking at the harbormaster's office. The Pier Corp. is scheduled to meet jointly with the board of selectmen to discuss these matters on April 29. Chovanec, who has worked as an undercover drug investigator in New Hampshire and is a retired Milford police officer, has been on the Provincetown police force for two years. He has been stationed at the pier as the year-round marine patrol officer. The MPO program, which began last year, has about three seasonal officers on the pier 24/7 in the summer, where they perform security patrols, safety checks and traffic control. While MPOs get some direction from Rex McKinsey, current harbormaster and pier manager, they are charged with enforcing the law at the pier. In Lynn's scenario, Chovanec would take on the duties of the harbormaster while McKinsey, who has held the position since 2005, would "stay on" as pier manager, Lynn said Friday. Just how their duties would be divvied up remains unknown until job descriptions are written, she said, though the harbormaster would deal with mooring field enforcement. Pomeroy's report, while criticizing the lack of mooring rental verification, stayed away from the controversy that led to the audit - a complaint by Ken Kinkor, a trustee of 16 MacMillan Wharf Reality Trust, who claimed that 17 years ago 35 mooring blocks had been stolen from a town mooring field by Flyer's Boat Rentals, a private mooring rental business. This had some members of the Pier Corp. crying foul at their April 11 meeting. Scott Fraser said that the audit of the harbormaster was recommended because of the allegations surrounding stolen moorings, but that nothing about that appears in the report.

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apr20 Provincetown

Wanted: more horses - Nelson's Riding Stable in Provincetown seeks boarders

It's sort of an accident that Kerry Castle has her horse Amber. A friend, Linda Fisk, buys a mare at auction 17 years back. She brings her home, settles her into the stable, and time goes by. That's when something strange starts happening. "The horse keeps getting fatter and fatter, and out pops Amber," says Castle, sitting in her Flying Changes Farm barn, the old Nelson's Riding Stables. Amber is standing by, her head moving back and forth, watching people as they talk. A wheelbarrow is leaning nearby, as are a pick and shovels. The sweet dusty scent of hay and horse recalls times past, but there's a small carrot-packed refrigerator in the corner of the barn. Heather Bruce is telling her horse Charley how much she loves him. A third horse, Joe, stands in his stall; he's preparing to soon move out of town, which is a bummer because he's a good horse, they say. Castle and Bruce love all horses, and more than two are needed to keep the barn going. "Part of the reason I think it's so hard to get boarders is because there's no riding ring, per se," Castle says. "This is strictly a trail-riding barn." Which is exactly what the barn was built as. Clifton and Katharine Nelson acquired a large tract of land in the Race Point Road area, on which, in 1963, Nelson's Riding Stables opened. There the couple held commercial trail rides, leading people on horses from the stables over private roads into the Cape Cod National Seashore. The business eventually ended after a ruling prevented the Nelsons from profiting off the use of privately owned roads. "I think that there are the most stunningly beautiful trails that I've seen in my life that go through the National Seashore," Castle says of trails she rides two or three times a week through sand dunes to beaches and more. The horses don't wear shoes because sand doesn't hurt their hooves, she says. The stalls have an open turnout area so horses can move in and out as they wish. "Veterinarians say that's the healthiest way for animals to be kept," Castle, who feeds and cares for the horses during the day, says. Bruce takes over at night.

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apr20 Provincetown

'Snapshot' etchings capture bygone era of life in Provincetown

Writer Amy Whorf McGuiggan, curator of "Albert Edel, Moments in Time, Pictures of Place," which opens Friday at the Provincetown Art Association & Museum, was inspired to create the show by the artist's gift for re-creating intimate scenes of Provincetown's working waterfront. "Though I very much admire Edel's artistic abilities," she says, "I am most attracted to the nostalgia of his work, his storytelling, the way he captures the details of daily life in Provincetown. I can hear the voices, smell the smells. Art is a slice of life. He captured a particular time in Provincetown's evolution, and his work reminds us of the foundation upon which Provincetown was built." The granddaughter of noted artist and town resident John Whorf (1903-'59), McGuiggan spent her childhood summers as a West Ender immersed in town lore and seaside activity. As a result of her acquaintance with her grandfather's friends, McGuiggan has evolved into an unofficial but ardent keeper of Provincetown's historic record, especially as it pertains to artists and their work. After receiving a birthday gift from her brother some years ago, McGuiggan unexpectedly found herself focusing upon the art of Edel, who lived from 1894-1970. "I had never heard of Albert Edel until I opened my gift," she says, "but so enchanted was I with the etchings that I began keeping an eye open for Edel's work at local auctions."

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apr20 Provincetown

Provincetown Film Society hosts Earth Day screenings & talks

Along with six high-quality films, the Waters Edge Cinema's "Science on Screen" series that celebrates Earth Day (April 22) brings some special talent to the event, which runs in Provincetown all weekend, April 19-22. The mini-festival kicks off April 19 with "Future Weather," the impressive debut feature from Jenny Deller, who will attend the 7:45 p.m. screening with the film's co-star, Lili Taylor. Deller's film is a coming-of-age story about Lauduree, a 13-year-old girl who is abandoned by her mother and who finds comfort in the facts of science yet is alarmed by thoughts of ecological disaster. Set in the writer-director's native Illinois, the rural imagery of open fields and mobile homes provides color and authenticity to the film. "I wanted to tell a story about people I knew, who'd overcome difficulties. Where did they get their sense of self? How did they survive?" Deller says. Themes of family abandonment and fears about the future of the planet coalesced while she was writing the script, she says. "I've been interested for a long time in environmental issues. I remember reading an article in The New Yorker about climate change," she says. "It scared me and no one was talking about it. I started thinking, how might that affect a 13-year-old? It felt interesting and timely." "Future Weather" is anchored by an extraordinary performance from young Perla Haney-Jardine, who plays Lauduree. "She was the first actress we saw," says Deller, who adds she did not want a "precocious Hollywood kid" for the part of this sensitive, feisty, science geek. An actress herself, Deller is obviously skilled in directing actors; besides Haney-Jardine, she gets terrific performances from Taylor as Lauduree's smart, attentive science teacher and Amy Madigan as the boozing, tough-as-nails grandmother who takes Lauduree in after her troubled, single mother (well-played by Marin Ireland) runs off to California. None of the women are reduced to stereotypes; all are complex characters that keep the film from the predictability that often marks first features.

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apr20 Orleans

Live music approved at Orleans restaurant

When residents of the condominiums on Old Colony Way expressed worries about a nearby business, Guapo's Tortilla Shack, hosting live music, owner and manager Kyle Parker quickly moved to allay their concerns. He told the group of residents from Old Colony Village that he had installed soundproofing and other measures, but when someone suggested a decibel reader he readily agreed. "I am happy to purchase one and keep a log," he said at a hearing on his new entertainment license Wednesday. "We are very sensitive to our neighbors and we want to be good neighbors." Although the worries of several neighbors weren't allayed, the board of selectmen were convinced enough to give Parker a chance, particularly since he has a good reputation in the community. "If it doesn't go well it isn't going to last long," said Selectman John Hodgson, who - along with the rest of the board - was sympathetic to residents' worries. Selectman Sims McGrath agreed, adding that when live music was suggested at other restaurants in town it often generated opposition, but when the bands played concerns weren't borne out. Parker said when he had earlier received one-day licenses for music, he and other managers walked outside when the band was playing to see if the sound traveled. It didn't. Nonetheless he encouraged people to contact him if they had noise complaints. He also explained he applied for a seven-day license only because that was the only one available. He would only be having bands a few days a week, and, he stressed; Guapo's was not a night club. It was a family restaurant, and its personality was created by its customers: those in their mid-30s to mid-50s, he said. Still, the possibility of noise and the lateness of the hour - until 12:30 a.m. - bothered those on Old Colony Way who are used to the quieter Blockbuster that used to exist where the restaurant is now. "Please reject the request. We are in hearing distance of the shack. [and the live music] devalues our property. We will be subjected to live music (which) interfering with our quiet New England retreat," wrote neighbor Alice Blood in an email to the board. But one audience member, who realized what restaurant Parker owned, was impressed enough to approach the podium with a commendation. Paul Cass had recently attended a fund-raiser at El Guapo's. Parker, a Nauset Regional High School grad, holds monthly fundraisers for local nonprofits. "I went to a charitable event at this place and they donated money, so you are good neighbors," Cass said. The board's approval is subject to Guapo's meeting all town codes. The building where the restaurant is located is in the midst of receiving fire safety upgrades.


apr20 Orleans

Orleans' green week needs you

Orleans Green Week, a week's worth of events, the idea of AmeriCorps workers Meg Quirk and Sebastian Wheeler, who wanted to honor Earth Day and Arbor Day. Quirk and Wheeler will be working with various groups, including students from a variety of local schools, on projects from removing invasive species to improving diamondback terrapin habitat. Special events: Tuesday, April 23, Trail Beautification Day, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., at 245 Tonset Road and 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., 13 Champlain Road. Go on a nature walk, improve the trails of Orleans Conservation Trust and build a footbridge or two. Loppers and shears will be provided. Bring water. Grand finale: Next Friday, April 26, middle schoolers will be planting close to 620 native plants and shrubs and 11 trees. The new, extensive beds will replace the several huge red maples that stood in front of the school for decades. NStar removed the maples Wednesday because they were interfering with the electric wires. Info: orleansgreenweek@gmail.com, 508-375-6863.

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apr20 Brewster

Golf accord looms in Brewster: Friendly times on the Fairways

Brewster's town meeting (May 6) may be less exciting but it should go a little quicker. The selectmen and finance committee hope to avoid a "floor fight" over the golf budget. The committee voted 7-0 against supporting the golf budget last month and rather than appearing to be against spending any money on the course, they floated four alternative budgets Wednesday night. In the end, Selectman James Foley assured the committee their concerns were being taken into account and there would be a new better-looking golf budget by town meeting. While Captains Course has an operating profit, the debt load from building the extra 18 holes in 1999 has pushed the course into the red since the stock markets fell and losses are projected until 2020 when the bonds will be paid off. The deficit for Fiscal Year 2014 is forecast at $269,000 and the finance committee believes the course and members should cover some of that - as opposed to the burden falling entirely on taxpayers. Greg Levasseur suggested the budget could be balanced or converted to profitability in four years time. He suggested $45,000 be taken from free cash initially and that would be followed by spending cuts. Dennis Hanson suggested reducing operating expenses by $150,000 and taking the rest from free cash. "This would make the place leaner for the short term," he said. "If the golf course didn't have the reserve fund to go back to the business would fail. This is a bump in the road, I understand that, but we can't let it go for ten years." He suggested the consultant's report, that taxpayers paid for, could be mined for ideas in marketing and expense reduction. "I'm concerned we're not taking seriously the consultant's report," Hanson said. He said marketing could be better and maintenance costs could be trimmed. Chairman Mike Fitzgerald, obviously inspired by Herman Cain's 9-9-9 plan, offered a 90-90-90 "shared responsibility" approach to address the $269,000 shortfall. He would reduce costs by $90,000, increase revenues by $90,000 and take $90,000 from the taxpaying public.

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apr20 Brewster

Brewster youth trip fundraiser

The Northside United Methodist Church Youth Mission Trip Team will hold a fundraiser Saturday May 4, from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Church at 701 Airline Road in Brewster. The team is going to Sturgis South Dakota in July so they will be selling handcrafter sterling silver Silpada Jewelry at the fundraising party. RSVP by calling 508-385-8622 by May 3. If you can't attend but wish to order go to www.mysilpada.com/barbara.surette and put youth mission trip in as the hostess at the checkout.


apr20 Brewster

Brewster dog owners unite to push for leash-free park

Proponents of the citizen's petition to permit dogs to run free, unleashed, on occasion at Drummer Boy Park in Brewster will meet on Saturday at Brewster Ladies' Library at 4 p.m. to organize their informational campaign. The petition is one of three dog-related articles still on the warrant for the May 6, Brewster town meeting. Fred Rice, who helped organize the meeting, is concerned voters could be confused by the overlapping articles. "This is to coordinate the tasks we felt are necessary to be done before the town meeting," Rice said. "To get volunteers to help with phone calls and fliers to counter some of the issues that have arisen." Article 25, the citizen's petition, proposes dogs be allowed unleashed at Drummer Boy Park from Oct. 1, to May 1, and before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m. from May 1, to Oct 1. This regulation is similar to one passed by the board of selectmen March 19, 2012, the day before the Brewster Board of Health banned all dogs from Drummer Boy Park - voiding the selectmen's rules. Brewster resident Jordan Sprechman sued to overturn the ban, and Judge Christopher Muse agreed and voided it on Dec. 19. The town has appealed that decision and the town contends the ban is still in effect during the appeal while some residents disagree and have brought their dogs to walk at the park. "My guess is that it will pass because a lot of people feel this was mishandled from day one - and a lot of people like to have Drummer Boy Park as a place to take dogs to," Rice said. The selectmen drew up two articles proposing fenced in dog parks, withdrew one in March, but Article 26 remains on the warrant. It proposes to fence in 1.25 acres along the driveway and in front of the parking circle at Drummer Boy Park for an off-leash dog area. The fence and dog area would be funded through a "dog park gift fund" and the selectmen would create rules for operation, maintenance etc. While the selectmen opposed the citizen's petition by a 5-0 vote they have yet to vote on their own plan. The finance committee voted 4-3-1 in favor of the citizen's petition and 5-2-1 in favor of article 26. While articles 25 and 26 are not incompatible, Rice is against the selectmen's proposal.

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apr20 Chatham

Musical revue in Chatham

On April 22, at 1:30 p.m. "Our Time," a musical revue presented by the Cape Rep Theatre, will be held at the senior center. The musical traces the careers of two young, aspiring performers from high school through college and beyond. Combining classic favorites and unknown songs, this show features local favorites Jared Hagan and Caitlin Mills with Robert Wilder at the piano and directed by Robert R. Troie. Reservations are required. Lunch at noon is available for $7; the show is free.


apr20 Harwich

Harwich Fire moves communications center

The Harwich Fire Department has moved its emergency communications from the Harwich Police Department to the regional dispatch center at the Barnstable County Sheriff's Office in Bourne. "We're excited," Harwich Fire Chief Norman Clarke Jr. said Thursday in a press release about Monday's transfer. "This is a real step forward for us in terms of efficiencies, capabilities and response time. Neighboring town fire departments have made the transition. They're happy with it. I expect we'll have much the same experience." The town employed two dispatchers per shift to handle calls and anticipates some cost savings as that will now be reduced to one. The sheriff's emergency communication center, headquartered at the Massachusetts Military Reservation in Bourne, now serves seven towns (Bourne, Brewster, Dennis, Harwich, Mashpee, Orleans and Wellfleet) and three district stations (Barnstable, West Barnstable and the military reservation).


apr20

An exclusive interview with CapeNet CEO Alan Davis

Internet competition heats up as OpenCape activation imminent. CapeNet is the firm selected by OpenCape to build and run their regional fiber optic broadband network. The OpenCape network cost $40 million in Federal and State funds. CapeNet CEO is Alan S. Davis. Prior to joining CapeNet, Mr. Davis was founder and lead general partner of Nashoba Communications, a cable television company that was ultimately sold to Cablevision. At Nashoba he personally supervised the construction of a 1000 mile cable system which included the first fiber optic backbone for a cable system in Massachusetts. OpenCape network expected to go live around the end of May. CapeNet will be providing Internet access to its customers over the OpenCape network. That's the simplest explanation. CapeNet is the network operator and we sell many flavors of broadband service, just like Comcast does. That's where the similarities to Comcast end. We operate an Open Access network, meaning any law-abiding service provider can use the OpenCape network to deliver last-mile services. By contrast, Comcast and Verizon don't do that and can block competition. We can't, and we don't want to, because as the operator of the new network, we make money if other service providers use it. Apart from price pressure and competition, the real value that CapeNet brings to the region is a superior fiber optic network, which for one thing means a capacity per fiber - per fiber - of 100 gigabits per second. Each gigabit is 1000 megabits, so that's 100,000 megabits per second, about 65,000 times faster than a T-1 line and about 400,000 times faster than a typical DSL line.

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apr20 Wellfleet

The Local Food Report by Elspeth Hay: From Egg to Bird: Raising Chickens on Cape Cod

Elspeth Hay is an avid locavore who lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30am on Morning Edition and Thursdays at 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30am.




Temperature is important, and so is humidity, when incubating eggs. On the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay speaks with Susan Knieriem of Miss Scarlett's Blue Ribbon Farm in Yarmouthport about raising chickens from egg to bird. Susan does it using an old-fashioned incubator-it looks like an old wooden icebox, and it holds about 100 eggs. She collects the fertile ones-which is most of them since she's got roosters-and dates them and lays them on the trays. After 21 days: peep. Peep. PEEP. PEEP! Babies.



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apr20

Outer & Lower Cape Cod wildlife sightings

A Pacific loon was at Herring Cove in Provincetown once again this week. Some early shearwaters were noted this week, including a Manx shearwater in Wellfleet, 2 sooty shearwaters off First Encounter in Eastham, and another sooty shearwater off Race Point in Provincetown. ther birds noted from First Encounter in Eastham during strong northwest winds included 245 dunlin, 16 black-legged kittiwakes, 262 Bonaparte's gulls, 4 little gulls, a lesser black-backed gull, 2 glaucous gulls, 57 common murres, 2 thick-billed murres, 532 razorbills, and an Atlantic puffin. A half day of birding around Truro on the 15th tallied a northern harrier, 2 broad-winged hawks, 13 eastern phoebes, 70 red-breasted nuthatches, 43 golden-crowned kinglets, 2 ruby-crowned kinglets, 2 brown thrashers, 44 pine warblers, 10 white-winged crossbills, and 16 red crossbills. Mass Audubon's hawk watch at Pilgrim Heights in Truro is under way on days with favorable south winds. This week's sightings included 15 American kestrels, 7 merlins, a red-shouldered hawk, 5 locally nesting northern harriers, plus an American bittern, an Iceland gull, a North Atlantic right whale, and 3 river otters. Other Outer & Lower Cape sightings included 2 northern bobwhites in Harwich, snowy egrets at Cockle Cove in Chatham, a yellow-crowned night-heron in Nauset Marsh in Eastham, and 2 black vultures by the Provincetown dump on the 16th.

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Thursday, April 18, 2013

apr18 Wellfleet

Committee favors a permanent relief plan in Wellfleet

At the 2012 Annual Town Meeting, Wellfleet voters turned down a request from the Comprehensive Wastewater Planning Committee to build two restrooms: one seasonal at Mayo Beach, and one year-round for Bakers Field. We heard your reasons - cost of the project especially with other public works on the warrant, and the process. These legitimate concerns have been better vetted by an ad-hoc committee (with members of the Board of Health, Wastewater, Conservation Commission, Planning Board, Building Needs Committee and Recreation Committee). Some concerns raised last year were unfounded, such as the suggestion that building restrooms would result in pollution. To the contrary, the purpose of sanitary facilities is to prevent pollution. We embraced composting toilets to eliminate the need for expensive denitrification, avoiding typical leach field discharge in this highly sensitive area. The nutrient pollution of standard plumbing and septic isn't a problem with this proposal. The many visitors to the Bakers Field area are better served with proper restrooms, avoiding the pollution associated with "direct discharge" (so to speak) by swimmers at Mayo and recreationalists at Bakers seeking relief in the creek. We have selected Bakers Field as a pilot location for composting toilets specifically because it supports many users:

  • Year-round Playground and Skate-Park enjoyed by all ages, toddlers to grandparents
  • 3-season Tennis Courts, Baseball and Softball Fields, Soccer Fields for youth and adult programs
  • Summer Recreation Camp program and Tent Events -- theater, arts, music
  • Host location for many community events.

See the committee's Baker's Field Bathhouse 2013 Town Meeting Presentation here.

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apr18 Wellfleet-Provincetown

WOMR: This Place Matters with Susan Lindquist - Green Certification with Pam Anderson of the CDP and Ted Wilson of The Wellfleet Motel




apr18 Provincetown

Step inside a right whale in Provincetown

Jesse Mechling lifted the plastic flap on the inflated, life-size North Atlantic right whale and a half-dozen children stepped inside, without shoes. Mechling followed, he too in his socks. It was the middle of school vacation week, and the Province­town Center for Coastal Studies was hosting a day of learning about whales: an inside talk Wednesday morning with Delilah, the inflatable right whale, and then an afternoon talk and binocular scan for whales at Herring Cove Beach in the Cape Cod National Seashore. Cape Cod Bay is a popular feeding area for North Atlantic right whales, particularly at this time of year. So far this season, 94 different animals have been seen in aerial surveys conducted by the center, Mechling, who coordinates the center's marine education programs, said. There are an estimated 500 North Atlantic right whales in the world. At the beach, Virginia and Peter Heymanns of South Hadley were the first to see spouts of water far out, most likely belonging to a finback whale, based on the shape of the spout, Mechling said. "It's nice to have these areas preserved," Virginia Heymanns said. Typically, right whales, along with minke, finback and humpback whales, are seen in the waters off Provincetown and to the north at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Mechling said. Delilah, though, in the morning session, was close enough to touch: She is literally the size of a conference room, about 6 feet tall, with a floor fan at one end to keep her puffed out with air. She's made of black and white garbage bags and duct tape, with felt cloth for her eyes and the patches of hardened skin and whale lice on the top of her head.

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apr18 Provincetown

Provincetown hosts third annual green arts festival

Some art takes us to other worlds. Some art makes us better see and care about the world we live in. This art does both. Sponsored by the Provincetown Conservation Trust, "Appearances 2013," the third annual green arts festival in Provincetown, is a town-wide celebration and artistic exploration of nature and the ways we coexist with the world around us. For 10 days, April 19-28, outdoor and indoor art installations, talks, readings, film screenings, theatrical and musical performances and a workshop or two, including a "sustainable chocolate" demonstration, will spring up all over town. Go to provincetownconservationtrust.org for a list of exhibitions and events - but impromptu happenings are sure to also crop up so keep your eyes and ears open as you meander around town over the next two weeks. Festivities begin with an opening night party at 6 p.m. Friday, April 19, at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, 115 Bradford St. A new complement to the festival, the "Science on Screen" film series, spearheaded by Gabrielle Hanna, executive director of the Provincetown Film Society, runs through the first weekend, Friday, April 19, through Monday, April 22 (Earth Day). Poet Elizabeth Bradfield organized the readings and festival co-founders Dorothy Palanza and Tina Trudel, with a hardworking team of volunteers, labored all year to launch the whole affair. While many artists are staying in private homes and guest houses, at least 25 are camping at the Dune's Edge Campground, making the site, which doubles as the festival's central sculpture garden, something of a cross between the deCordova sculpture park and Burning Man, complete with a drum circle at the closing ceremony at noon on Sunday, April 28.

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apr18 Provincetown

Changes at Provincetown Theater debut with new season

Provincetown Theater leaders have relied this winter on the "community" part of their emphasis on community theater, with well-meaning volunteers helping with everything from moving seats to programming computers to painting walls and cleaning closets. As a result of that and renewed fundraising and grant-writing efforts, patrons will find a lot of changes - both visible and behind the scenes - as the award-winning "God of Carnage" kicks off the second season for the board of directors that last year took over the financially ailing venue. "The board decided this past winter to not do a lot of productions except the winter reading series and really spruce up the building," explains board president Brian Carlson. "We wanted to celebrate the building that the community built almost 10 years ago, celebrate a lot of people putting a lot of time and money into having a theater in town and make people feel a part of it." Weekend painting parties resulted in fresh coats throughout most of the building, areas have been scrubbed, and the theater's large lobby has been refinished. Volunteers helped move the seating back to its original configuration, with the stage to the right of the entrance door, toward a goal of 140 to 180 seats fitting rather than last year's 95. The prop room was reorganized.

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apr18 Orleans

"Snowmobile" launched in Orleans

The Friends of Snow Library, in partnership with the Orleans Council on Aging, is launching a new book delivery program called "The Snow Mobile" designed to bring requested books and other library materials to residents who are home-bound, either temporarily, due to illness, or permanently because of declining health. Materials available for home delivery include books in regular and large print, movies, audio books, CD music and magazines. Volunteers, who have been trained by the staff of the Orleans Council on Aging and are under the umbrella of the COA's Friendly Visitor Program, are ready and eager to help. To become a recipient of the Friends' service, please call the library at 508-240-3760 and ask for the reference librarian. Indicate your interests; request specific titles or ask for guidance in choosing materials. A volunteer from the Friends of Snow Library will contact you to schedule deliveries.


apr18 Brewster

Mothers Day Brunch at Captains in Brewster

The Friends of Captains are inviting everyone to celebrate Mother's Day on May 12, with an all-you-can-eat brunch at the Captains Golf Course. Enjoy fresh fruit, breakfast foods, muffins, pastries, omelets made to order, carving station, pasta, salads, select entrees, & desserts. A cash bar is available. The cost is $30 for adults, ages 4 and under is free, ages 5-12 are $13. The fee includes tax, tip and donation to the Friends. Choose the 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. The deadline for registration is May 5. Register at the Captains Pro Shop or call 508-896-1716. Payment is due at registration; no refunds will be given after May 5. For more information on the Friends email friendsofthecaptains@comcast.net.


apr18 Chatham

Whitcomb won't seek re-election in Chatham

David Whitcomb said if folks knew him growing up he would be the last person one would expect to get into politics, but after close to 20 years in the arena, the last 11 as selectmen, it was difficult to leave. "It was a very hard decision, because I have been doing it so long and I am very committed," Whitcomb said. But he decided he wanted to concentrate on his role as the co-chairman of the Monomoy building committee, which is shepherding the construction of the new high school that will serve Chatham and Harwich. We need "to get that school built in time for 2014, which is when the students will realize the educational benefits of regionalization. This past year it has been really tough to do both. I had to choose one," Whitcomb said, adding with a slight smile, that with two children in college next year he also had to concentrate on that pesky job. He owns Monomoy Tree Service. He said his decision not to run was made easier because Jeffrey Dykens, a long-time school committee member and friend, decided to run for a seat on the board. Dykens will square off against incumbent Tim Roper and Seth Taylor, whose family has deep roots in town, in the May 16 election. "I have a great deal of respect for him," Whitcomb said. He said he also feels comfortable redirecting his energies because the town has accomplished a lot during his tenure. "We have totally rebuilt our infrastructure," Whitcomb said. "You don't have room in the paper to go through all we have done." He did begin to rattle off a number of projects, including the community center, town annex and police station, the fish pier, and the ongoing wastewater project - which Whitcomb is particularly proud of because residents have taken responsibility and committed to cleaning up the town's waters, thereby protecting its economy and culture. "All of our buildings were 40 years old or more and we invested wisely," he said. "It's incredible all we have done."

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013

apr17 Wellfleet

Sol is closing in Wellfleet

Bad News: Sol is closing. Sol lost its lease and is selling everything this Saturday.

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apr17 Provincetown

Provincetown center offers walk to see whales today

Adults and children can learn about North Atlantic right whales, and potentially see them offshore, today. Visitors can "step inside" an inflatable, life-size right whale replica named Delilah at 11 a.m. at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies' Hiebert Marine Lab at 5 Holway Ave., as part of a talk sponsored by the center. The center will then offer a guided walk to see right whales near the shoreline at 2 p.m. at Herring Cove Beach in the Cape Cod National Seashore. For the guided walk, visitors are asked to meet at the beach's northern parking lot, which is to the right at the beach entrance off Province Lands Road. All the events are free. For more information, contact the center's education coordinator, Jesse Mechling, at 508-487-3623, ext. 103, or jmechling@coastalstudies.org.


apr17 Provincetown

Leatherback turtles topic of free talk

The habitat, health, physiology and pathology of leatherback turtles off the coast of Massachusetts will be the topic of a free talk sponsored by the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies at 7 p.m. April 24. Researchers Kara Dodge of the Large Pelagics Research Center at the University of Massachusetts and Scott Landry, who directs the marine animal entanglement response team at the center, will lead the talk. The talk will be at Napi's restaurant at 7 Freeman St. For more information, contact Cathrine Macort at 508-487-3622, ext. 103, or cmacort@coastalstudies.org.


apr17 Provincetown

Married board members face criminal charges

Two town officials, a married couple, were arraigned Tuesday in Orleans District Court on charges related to an afternoon of alleged drinking Saturday at the Lobster Pot restaurant. Finance committee member Clarence Walker, 73, pleaded not guilty to charges of driving under the influence of alcohol and negligent driving as well as a marked lanes violation and not having a registration in his possession, police and court records say. Marcene Marcoux, 66, who is a member of the town's historic district commission, pleaded not guilty to charges of disorderly conduct, assault and battery of a police officer and disturbing the peace, records say. Both were released on their own recognizance Tuesday and are scheduled to return to court for pretrial hearings May 14. Police stopped a blue Lincoln Town Car at 9:10 p.m. Saturday as it headed east on Bradford Street, near Pearl Street, after observing the car take wide, swerving turns and drive in the opposite lane of travel, the police report says. Walker, the driver, declined to take any field sobriety test, police said, but was arrested because of his driving and evidence of impairment. Walker and Marcoux arrived at the Lobster Pot around 1:30 p.m. and cashed out their check at around 7:30 p.m., the police report says. Both were put in jail cells at the police station after their arrest. Because of their apparent high level of intoxication and inability to understand the bail proceedings, the bail commissioner did not respond to the station until 8 a.m. Sunday, police said. They were released on their own recognizance. Walker's term on the finance committee ends in April 2015 and Marcoux's term on the historic district commission ends in December of that year. Both are appointed positions.


apr17 Provincetown

'God of Carnage' opens at Provincetown Theater

For its first fully staged, full-length production of the season in its newly renovated digs, the Provincetown Theater is presenting "God of Carnage," an unsparingly brutal, comic psychological drama of love and conflict among New York City's bohemian class. The play opens at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 18, and runs through April 28. A post-show opening party will be held on Saturday night at the theater, located at 238 Bradford St. in Provincetown. For details, see theater listings or go to www.provincetowntheater.org.


apr17 Orleans

Imagining downtown Orleans without wires

People talk a lot about what the Village Center would look like without utility lines overhead, but those at this week's planning board meeting were able to suspend reality for a moment. Thanks to the staff at Cape Cod Photo and Art, the board and audience members were treated to several views of Main Street - as it is currently, with the thin black power lines, held up by poles, crossing overhead, and how it may look if the wires were buried under the street. The planning board heard from Sertex Corporation, a construction management firm that works for municipalities and utilities across the northeast, about the possibilities of putting utilities underground. The idea would be for Orleans to be a pilot program for underground utilities--focused to start on Main Street from Route 28 to Namskaket road, integrated with the state's plans to revamp intersections and roadways and the town's plans for wastewater infrastructure sewer. With the plethora of storms that hit the Cape this year, more and more people have been concerned about power outages and that prompted the board to reach out to Sertex. The planning board has also worked with the Cape Cod Commission and others to develop a "Streetscape Plan." Jim Junkins, who owns Friends' Marketplace, told the board that his business alone has lost tens of thousands of dollars in power outages in recent years resulting in food spoilage, system restoration costs and operations over. And those numbers do not include lost business, he said. Sertex representatives said underground wiring improves reliability, cuts tree-trimming costs, and improves the quality of life. They also pointed out that according to the Edison Electric Institute, half of new construction undertaken by investor-owned utilities is being deployed in underground installations.


apr17 Orleans

Orleans staying with Old King's Highway

Neon green homes, or even shutters, shallow pitched roofs, and vinyl siding not disguised as wood will still be verboten in a large section of town after a recent vote by selectmen. Mostly at the behest of Selectmen Chairman Jon Fuller, the board has been discussing withdrawing from the Old King's Highway District, the largest historic district in the state, which was created to preserve the historic character of Route 6A. But being in the district costs the town about $10,000 a year to pay for appeals from other towns and some say the added level of regulations shouldn't apply to a subset of citizens. "I feel it is unfair for those people to jump through those hoops as big or small as they may be," said Fuller. But the majority of the board disagreed, particularly since there were no local protections in place and no convincing evidence ones with parity could be developed. "It provides greater protections for the character of the town that I don't think our zoning can replicate," said Selectman Sims McGrath. "I think we should be very, very careful before we give it up." Selectman David Dunford agreed saying there had been few, if any, complaints from those in the district, and if it wasn't broken, don't fix it. For the most part, residents chose what areas should be protected when the legislation was passed back in the early 1970s. Town meeting settled on most everything north and west of Route 6, including the Baker's Pond area as well as near Skaket Beach and Rock Harbor. The scope of the district is also a pet peeve of Fuller's. "The [district] has no relationship to the Old King's Highway," said Fuller. Getting out of the district is an involved process, requiring state as well as town meeting approval. Bourne and Harwich have both successfully disentangled themselves. Harwich was doing so almost as soon as the ink was dry on the legislation. Harwich Selectman Ed McManus said areas around Long and Hinckley ponds were included and the area hadn't yet been developed. "There were maybe 100 houses existing," he said. Headwaters, a large Harwich subdivision, hadn't been built and McManus said the first developer had gone bankrupt and the second developer argued that he didn't need the additional restrictions.

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apr17 Orleans

Orleans chamber spiffs up for summer

Thanks to donations from chamber members, Orleans Chamber of Commerce recently improved its first impression for visitors in preparation for the 2013 summer season. "Our goal was to improve the environment where we welcome tourists to Orleans, our redesigned welcome center accomplishes this. Without the support of our members we would not have met our objective and we are thankful for their help" said Noelle Pina, executive director. Visitors to the center on Main Street will see fresh paint, a revamped brochure section, new space for a greeter and more room in the administration area. The chamber acts manages the information centers and visitor welcoming program at Eldredge Park Way and Parish Park. Donations were provided by Snow's Home & Garden, Dr. William Scheier of Advanced Family Dentistry of Cape Cod, Agway of Cape Cod, McCray Painting, The Yardarm Restaurant, Nauset Disposal, Goff Brothers Construction, and chamber board members. For more information call 508-255-7203 or visit www.orleanscapecod.org.


apr17

FAIR Plan proposes Cape rate hike

The FAIR Plan has filed a proposal with the state Division of Insurance to raise homeowners insurance rates by an average of 6.8 percent statewide. But the Cape and Islands and New Bedford would be hit with the highest overall rate increase - 9.9 percent - the highest allowed under the proposal, said Robert Tommasino, general counsel for the FAIR Plan. Without the cap, the insurance association's formula called for a 13.3 percent rate increase on the Cape, Tommasino said. The last FAIR Plan increase was in 2006, when homeowners insurance rates jumped 25 percent on the Cape and Islands. The FAIR Plan, formally known as the Massachusetts Property Insurance Underwriting Association, sought a 6.7 percent rate increase on the Cape and Islands and 7.2 percent statewide last year. That request was dismissed by Joseph G. Murphy, commissioner of the Division of Insurance. Tommasino said it would provide more detailed information this year in seeking the increase. The FAIR Plan is often considered the insurance of last resort. About 55,000 households on the Cape and Island are insured under the plan. The insurance association administration said the Cape would witness higher rate hikes than inland areas partly due to hurricane models. "Hurricane models are predicting there would be more significant losses on Cape Cod than, say, other parts of the state," Tommasino said. He also pointed to higher reinsurance rates on the Cape. Reinsurance companies insure the insurance companies.

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Tuesday, April 16, 2013

apr16 Wellfleet

Wellfleet Transfer Station Economics - Where Does Pay As You Throw Fit?

To understand pay as you throw ("PAYT") it is helpful to begin with an understanding of transfer station economics. Understanding where we are helps define the issue and provides a context for PAYT as a solution. This overview of transfer station income and expense does not include the cost of providing employee benefits such as medical insurance, retirement contributions, etc. While not exact, adding 20% to the cost of salaries gives a conservative estimate of those costs. In FY 2012 it cost $321,024 to run the transfer station. The major portion of the expense is divided almost equally between salary costs for three full time and one seasonal employee ($128,235) and the cost of municipal solid waste disposal ($123,685). The latter breaks down further into tipping fees to SEMASS ($86,217) and transportation costs ($37,468). In addition to these two cost centers, the additional costs for vehicle maintenance, supplies, amnesty day, landfill monitoring expense and other miscellaneous expenses add another $69,004 to the total. Where does the money come from? The largest single source is transfer station stickers and one time use fees ($168,085). Fees are also collected from commercial haulers ($35,284), for construction demolition materials ($75,428) miscellaneous fees for things like bulky items, appliances, sale of compost bins, etc. ($28,760) and scrap metal($34,996). In FY 2012 total transfer station revenue was $340, 752. Before including the cost of employee benefits, the transfer station operations in FY 2012 generated a surplus of $19,729. (Through the first 9 months of FY 2013 the net results of operations is about a $19,000 deficit.) Any operating deficit is funded from property tax revenues. What does the future hold? Cost increases, of course. In most cases the cost increases are small enough to be absorbed by modest increases in transfer station fees. One instance where this is not the case is in the cost of disposing of municipal solid waste. That cost is the sum of tipping fees paid to SEMASS and the cost of transportation to SEMASS. We are nearing the end of a long term contract with SEMASS under which our tipping fees are among the lowest, if not the lowest, paid by any town. We still have not settled on a new contract, but it is likely that the tipping fees we pay will go from around $18.50 per ton to close to $70 per ton beginning with calendar. What that cost increase, and a rise in transportation costs (which I'll estimate at 10%) does to our solid waste disposal costs is to increase the cost to about $350,000, a 283% increase, beginning with calendar 2016! How can we deal with challenge presented by the expected increased expenses? There are three ways: increase fees; reduce the amount of solid waste; or subsidize the deficit with property taxes. The other demands placed on property taxes and the limit on how much property taxes can increase under proposition 2 ½, limiting the use of property taxes as a solution. Transfer station fees could be increased to cover the added cost, but this may require a doubling or even a tripling of fees, also not an attractive solution. If we could reduce the amount of solid waste generated in Wellfleet by one-fifth of the total, or about 360 tons, our future disposal costs would be reduced by about $70,000. Greater reductions in tonnage would result in greater cost avoidance. Efforts to reduce solid waste disposal costs by reducing the amount of solid waste through education alone have produced limited reductions. Where does PAYT fit in all this? A significant amount of experience with PAYT in other towns has shown that linking user costs directly with the amount of solid waste generated produced reductions in solid waste tonnage as high as 40%. Using a more conservative figure of a 20% reduction still results in avoiding almost $70,000 in tipping and transportation fees. Reducing the tonnage of waste disposed of at SEMASS also saves on equipment operation and maintenance costs. Increasing the amount of recycling can also have a positive effect on transfer station fee income.

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apr16 Truro

Truro man charged with possession of Percocet

Police arrested a local man Saturday night after pulling him over on Route 6 and finding him in possession of 200 Percocet pills. Colin Perel, 23, of Pine Ridge Road, North Truro was at the center of an illegal narcotics investigation conducted by police from Truro, Eastham, Provincetown and Wellfleet. Truro police stopped Perel's car at about 6 p.m. Saturday as a result of the investigation and found the pills. Police seized the drugs, a small amount of money and a Ford Explorer. Perel was charged with possession of a class B substance with intent to distribute.

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apr16 Provincetown

PTV series captures life of a busker in Provincetown

Blink, and in that instant you could learn something new about Provincetown, even if you have been here for a long, long time. Case in point, the real story about "buskers," those ubiquitous warm-weather presences downtown that some people adore, some decry and go out of their way to avoid and many assume are here to stay, regardless. Poet and musician Anne Stott, a street artist herself, has been busy over the past few months taping interviews with a sampling of these performers, and in the process she has uncovered hints of their delicious and varied inner lives. They come here with different dreams, goals and musical or dramatic tastes, but they all seem to share a particular affection for Provincetown as their collectively voted "best place ever" for street performing. Stott's cross-section of buskers reflects the range of Provincetown's unpredictable variety of talent. Although the late Ellie Castillo is still mourned, many gifted people with their own compelling stories have stepped onto our sidewalk stage, before, during and since her celebrated tenure. We have PTV and Anne Stott's program "Word on the Street" to thank for bringing these people into clearer focus. According to her, it all began last fall. "Beth O'Rourke [of PTV] asked me if I'd like to be interviewed by Cape Conversations, a Sandwich TV show," Stott recalls. "After the interview, Beth asked if I would be interested in hosting my own show. I realized that I only wanted to do it if there was a creative component for me, so I thought I'd invite all my street musician friends into the studio to talk about our experiences and make some music together."

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apr16 Provincetown

Provincetown student to visit Honduran orphanage

Should they take stuffed bears or puzzles? Donated T-shirts or toy dinosaurs? Or Mr. Potato Head? On May 1, Provincetown High School senior Kaitlyn Silva and her mentor, Emily Edwards, will fly to Honduras for three weeks to volunteer at an orphanage in La Ceiba and at a school the kids from the orphanage attend. On Thursday, the pair was at Silva's house fiddling with mosquito netting for the beds they'll use while volunteering. Two big suitcases sat at the front door, stuffed primarily with gifts, both fun and practical, for the children. One child at the orphanage will get a special gift. For more than a year Silva, 17, has been giving $30 a month to the orphanage for the care of Mainor Garcia. This visit will be the first time they meet. A backpack? No, Silva said, he'd outgrow it. He's about 9 years old, she said. Sheets? No. Same thing. He'd outgrow them. The surprise for Garcia can't be too big, out of consideration for the two dozen other children at the orphanage. Still ... "We haven't exactly decided yet," Silva said. "I want to bring him something really, really special. He knows I'm coming." The Hogar de Amor Children's Home, an orphanage, whose name literally means "loving home," and the Jungle School are both run by Helping Honduras Kids, a nonprofit organization based in New York. The school is a free, private school with more than 100 children from kindergarten through sixth grade. Silva learned about the organization as a sophomore in Edwards' Spanish class. Edwards, 29, taught Spanish at Provincetown from 2007 through 2012. She learned about the orphanage through family friends in Eastham, including Hannah Marvin, who has volunteered at the orphanage since 2010 and usually visits once or twice a year. Follow the travels of Provincetown senior Kaitlyn Silva and her mentor Emily Edwards as they travel from May 1 to May 23 to La Ceiba, Honduras, to volunteer and work at the Hogar de Amor Children's Home, an orphanage, and the Jungle School run by Helping Honduras Kids, a nonprofit organization based in New York. Kaitlyn's blog: hhktravelblog.blogspot.com

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apr16 Provincetown

WOMR: Art Talk with Chris Busa - Sculptor Didier Corallo Pt. 2




apr16 Orleans-Eastham

Orleans town truck's beach plunge a mystery

A town of Orleans pickup truck ended up in the water on the Eastham side of Nauset Harbor on Sunday morning - but how it got there is still a mystery. Commercial clammer Jean Eaton of Eastham got a photograph of the truck, which she described as being on the Eastham side of the harbor. In the photograph, half the truck is on the sand and the other half is partially submerged in the water. Eaton said she was on a friend's shellfish grant when they saw the truck at about 10:30 a.m. It was towed out eventually.

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apr16 Orleans-Eastham

Town truck in Nauset Harbor described as accident

The Orleans town truck that ended up in Nauset Harbor on Sunday slid in by accident. The Department of Natural Resources vehicle was being used to install plover fences on the beach when sand underneath it collapsed, causing it to skid into the water. At the time the truck was being used by a veteran town employee. The truck was towed out of the water by Nauset Recovery. Right now, the town is treating it as an accident.

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apr16 Orleans

April cabaret in Orleans

Upon request, Laura James, specializing in music from the 1950s and 60s, will be at the senior center Wednesday, April 17. The show begins at 11 a.m. with lunch, featuring ham and cheesy cottage potatoes, following at noon. Folks are asked to purchase the $10 tickets in advance at the Orleans COA. Tickets won't be sold day of show and there are no phone reservations.


apr16 Brewster

Section of Route 6 in Brewster to close today

The westbound lane of the Mid-Cape Highway in Brewster between exits 11 and 12 will be closed from 8 p.m. today until 4:30 a.m. Wednesday for emergency bridge repairs at Freemans Way in Brewster, according to Brewster police. A detour will be designated, but emergency vehicles will be allowed to pass on the Mid-Cape.


apr16 Brewster

Vintage Brewster photos on display

The Brewster Historical Society will open an exhibit, "Faces of Brewster," the Caro A. Dugan collection of turn-of-the-century glass plate negatives on Saturday April 27, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the society's museum at 3171 Route 6A. The exhibit consists of 60 framed negatives of Brewster including the earliest known photograph of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan taken in Brewster in 1888. The display also includes 400 related images in a looping slide show. Refreshments will be served.


apr16 Brewster

Pat Hughes runs for Brewster selectman

Pat Hughes wants to bring the 80's back to Brewster. She was a selectman from 1989 to 1992 and she's running again. "I really like Brewster and I was away for 12 years (in North Carolina)," she explained. "When I came back in 2008 I started to get involved in the community. I served as a selectman 20 ago and I like contributing in that way, working with the other board members. I feel I've gotten my feet back on Cape Cod after four years." Hughes has a background in marine biology and has worked for the state's Division of Coastal Zone Management for 17 years and six more years at a similar job in North Carolina as well as toiling at the Cape Cod Commission and Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies. She's married to Hal Minis and they have two daughters. There are two selectmen seats up for election in May. Ed Lewis is stepping down to run for a spot on Nauset Regional School Committee and chairman Dan Rabold will run for re-election. Ben deRuyter of the finance committee is also running.

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Sunday, April 14, 2013

apr14 Wellfleet

They may have paved paradise...But Mother Nature is taking it back in Wellfleet

The most recent winter storms have certainly left their mark all over Cape. But Mother Nature's revenge is especially evident in Wellfleet and at LeCount Hollow Beach/Maguire's Landing where she has exacted her pound of pavement. There, access is currently unavailable to the beach below--a straight drop to the sandy shore. As with lighthouses and homes in the past, some beaches and parking lots are moving towards the interior. A portion of the paved lot at LeCount Hollow has been cut back making "no parking", "no p". But the lot remains open.




apr14 Wellfleet-Provincetown

Could Cape bear return again?

David Paynter looked down at the huge paw print in the sand dunes in Provincetown. "I was, like, that's one big coyote," Paynter, a seasonal Cape Cod National Seashore shorebird monitor, said. Kelly Annis of Grafton had a hunch she'd see the bear but was still shocked when it actually ambled across a path at the Province Lands Visitor Center in Provincetown. "I could hardly fire off the pictures," Annis said. What startled Paynter and Annis was a true rarity: a black bear, the first on Cape Cod in about 175 years.
Lezil Rowell and her son, Walter, 16, hold a photo she took of the Cape Cod bear on June 11 last year in her Wellfleet backyard. The animal was captured by wildlife officials in a thicket near where they are standing.
The 2½-year-old male weighing about 180 pounds, known now as the Cape Cod bear, made its appearance here last Memorial Day weekend, on May 26. He stayed for 17 days, walking and swimming and eating his way east and then north to Provincetown. By the time the bear was in Province­town, it was very far afield - about 150 miles - from the closest occupied bear territory, and possibly at risk and a public safety hazard, and state officials began to support the idea of trapping the bear and moving it. It eluded two traps and headed south again before being darted June 11 in Wellfleet and taken to Douglas State Park. The bear showed up again on June 26, high up in a tree in Brookline, where it was darted. He dropped to the ground and was then taken farther into central Massachusetts, according to state documents and Jason Zimmer, who heads the southeastern district of the state Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. The Cape Cod bear was the first to get into "some significantly densely populated areas in my district," Zimmer said. It was one of only two in the district since the 1800s, he said. It was the first black bear on Cape Cod since 1837, according to Cape wildlife historian Theresa Barbo. This year, so far, the Cape Cod bear hasn't been seen - although a wildlife expert would have to get pretty close to read his ear identification tag to know for sure. Several black bears with ear tags have been seen so far this season in Massachusetts, Zimmer said. The likelihood of the Cape Cod bear returning this year is pretty low, he said. But, bears are coming - at least to Southeastern Massachusetts as permanent residents and possibly to the Cape as visitors or as a permanent population.

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apr14 Provincetown-Orleans

Tiny plovers trumping off-roaders

Nature gives and nature takes away. This winter's succession of storms that erased 20 to 30 feet of beach and dune in parts of the Cape's shoreline expanded nesting areas for endangered or threatened shorebirds. That's good news for plovers and least terns, but beach managers worry they could be facing longer and more extensive closures of off-road vehicle trails this year. That could mean another year of declining beach revenue for towns and the Cape Cod National Seashore, where off-road sticker sales have dropped precipitously in the past 10 years. "I would call it historic," Scott Melvin, the state zoologist for endangered species, said about the environmental change. "Over the 25 years since plovers were listed as a protected species, this was one of the top three or four years in terms of changes to habitat." Beach managers may have a hard time fencing off all the newly created nesting habitats before birds begin settling in this week, he said, and he is recommending keeping some trails closed until all the fencing is installed. Plovers create shallow nests scooped out of beach sand and sometimes line them with bits of shell and pebbles. They like flat barren stretches of sand so they can see predators coming. The camouflage coloring of eggs, chicks and adults helps them blend into the sand. Chicks will lie motionless as the adult tries to distract a predator away from the nest, sometimes by feigning a broken wing. Off-road vehicle trails are usually closed for about 30 days until hatched chicks learn to fly. The past year hasn't been all good news for plovers. A violent June 2012 storm swept away established nests and eggs at a crucial time. And despite a record high 1,890 nesting pairs along the Atlantic Coast last year, the number of plover chicks per pair that successfully fledged was the lowest in 25 years by a wide margin, nearly 40 percent below the previous historic low, according to a preliminary report from U.S. Fish and Wildlife.

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apr14 Harwich

Cape teen rescues beloved horse from slaughterhouse

A Harwich teenager and the horse she grew up with have become a leading face of the latest national effort to ban slaughtering horses and exporting them for meat. In a one-in-a-million happenstance, Brittany Wallace found her childhood companion, Scribbles, hours before the mare was to be shipped to Mexico or Canada to be killed and eaten. Last month, Brittany testified in the U.S. Senate, telling the story of how her 17-year-old pet - born five days before she was - became lost and, in the nick of time, saved. In an interview last week, Brittany said of transporting horses for slaughter, "It's honestly America's dirty little secret. ... It's happening every day, and unless we step up and do something, it's not going to stop." The story of Brittany and Scribbles' reunion begins at 6 a.m. Nov. 13, and reads like a novel. The Wallace family was awake early, comforting their much-loved dog, Kona, who was dying of kidney failure. Brittany went online to research a paper she was writing on horse slaughter. She saw a brown mare with a grisly leg wound on the Facebook page of Omega Horse Rescue and Rehabilitation in Pennsylvania, a nonprofit organization. "I saw a picture of her head and I saw her eyes," Brittany said. "I told my mom, 'I think I found Scribbles.'" Brown mares are as common as mud. Omega's founder, Kelly Smith, thought the Wallaces were another family carried away by wishful thinking. But she agreed to look for the scar they said would be on the horse's backside. "I thought there's absolutely no way this is remotely possible. When you have a brown horse, there are just so many of them, maybe 200 to 300 a week. What are the chances? But I picked up the tail the next day and saw a half of a horseshoe scar, just as they had described. There were tears on both ends of the phone," Smith said. Brittany's parents, Scott and Kay Wallace, said the family bought Scribbles for their daughter when she was 8½. "When she was a little girl, she would lay down in the paddock with Scribbles and a book. She and Brittany grew up together," Scott Wallace said.

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Saturday, April 13, 2013

apr13 Wellfleet

Claims of clam disease plague Wellfleet harbor

Is there a clam die-off problem in Wellfleet? That depends on whom you ask. Shellfish Constable Andy Koch said there have been deaths. In fact, he said, "It is pretty bad. But everything is cyclical. We've had problems since 2005, when we had QPX. Once it thrives, it is hard to get it to go away." The disease "gets in the soil and the only way to get rid of it is to stop planting for a few years, to let the soil come back and get rid of all the bad disease." Unfortunately, Koch noted, stopping planting for a few years "is not going to work economically for the fishermen." He said he could not estimate how many fishermen are affected by die-off, but he said he had it on the town bed three years ago and the result was "a pretty good size of die-off. It lasted a couple of years," he said, but now, "they've been doing pretty good down there." Koch said he thinks it was bamboo worms that caused the die-off three years ago. "Clams don't like bamboo worms," he said. "They actually jump out of the water and kill themselves to get away from them. They almost commit suicide." Koch added, "We are doing real well now." But he acknowledged in the past two weeks that he has received some complaints. "It is not something I had heard about until recently," he said. When asked for names of those who've complained about clam die-off, Koch said, "I don't want to give out anyone's names. People don't appreciate me putting their names in the paper. Sometimes, when disease hits, they don't want their names in the paper and I can't blame them. But hopefully, we will get over it. Unfortunately, there's not much you can do. There is not a pesticide you can sprinkle on your grant to get rid of it." Shellfish advisory committee member Helen Miranda Wilson replied by email to a phone call for information on clam die-off in the harbor. "Far as I know, it's just the same old [scenario], which goes through cycles," she wrote. "I spoke with Barbara Austin about it, and that's also what she thinks. It's a problem, but it's been an issue for quite a while now."

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apr13 Wellfleet

Herring River rising water raises fears

Martin Nieski never wanted a river view. "But they tell me it's coming," said Nieski, who owns a house on a wooded lot on Old Chequessett Neck Road. Nieski could soon have more than a water view. The Herring River restoration project, the largest marsh project ever attempted in New England, would increase the tides in Mill Creek basin, and possibly flood his house. The property is assessed at $490,000.
The Herring River dike in Wellfleet was built in 1909 to limit tidal flows and control mosquitoes, but over time has led to fish kills and degraded water quality. A restoration project aims to increase tidal flow and boost the ecosystem, but residents are worried the increase of tides will flood their homes.
"They're talking about all kinds of remedies," he said by phone last week from Connecticut. "The latest one is picking up the house, raising the foundation." Project planners hope to receive a grant to help figure this out for Nieski and other property owners. The Herring River project began officially eight years ago and is designed to reverse the negative effects of a 1909 dike at the mouth of the river on Chequessett Neck Road. The dike was built to limit tidal flows and control mosquitoes, but over time has led to fish kills, degraded water quality and atrophied salt marshes. The restoration would increase the tidal flow, refreshing the habitat and ecosystem. The river's estuary and floodplain is the largest in the Cape's outermost towns and covers 1,100 acres of salt marsh, tidal flats and open-water habitats. The acreage along the river, both private and public, falls within the boundaries of the Cape Cod National Seashore and the towns of Wellfleet and Truro. The Seashore and Wellfleet first agreed in 2005 to explore restoring the native tidal marsh to the floodplain. In 2007, Truro signed on to develop a detailed restoration plan. A third agreement is expected by September to formalize the roles, responsibilities and management of the project. As planned now, it would begin in 2016. About 370 private parcels, primarily in Wellfleet, would be affected in some way if tidal flows are restored to the estuary and floodplain, said Margo Fenn, who is coordinating the current stage of project planning. But the low-lying properties like Nieski's may need to have water wells, sheds, driveways, garages or even houses moved, elevated or protected by berms or flood walls. Property owners would not have to pay for the surveys, engineering studies or construction that may be required, Fenn said. Those costs will be absorbed in the project, she said.

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apr13 Wellfleet

Swingin' in Wellfleet til the cows come home

The Western gypsy swing jazz band that goes by the name of Hot Club of Cowtown makes a stop on its international tour at Wellfleet's Congregational Church, located at 200 Main St., at 7 p.m. Sunday, April 14. The concert is brought to the Outer Cape by the Payomet Performing Arts Center in Truro. Tickets, $25-$50, are available by calling the box office at (508) 487-5400 or at www.payomet.org.


apr13

Cape Sound Choice: Hot Club of Cowtown

It's an unusual combination: country-western music, jazz and swing. But combine all of those and you've got the unique sound of Hot Club of Cowtown, an Austin-based trio that mixes romantic, upbeat vocals with guitar, bass and fiddle. Cowtown will take the stage at 7 p.m. Sunday for its third Cape Cod concert. This show at Wellfleet Congregational Church will be presented by Payomet Performing Arts Center. Payomet also presented Cowtown's 2010 Cape debut in Truro, according to a press release. "The show sold out in one week," says Kevin Rice, Payomet's artistic director. "And the reaction was so strong that we wanted to give our Cape fans (another) chance to see this world-class band." With an international following, Cowtown, which started out in 1998, has performed around the world, including an appearance at Jazz at Lincoln Center, a performance at the Cambridge Folk Festival and a show in Azerbaijan, according to the band's website. The band has also toured with such acclaimed artists as Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson. Cowtown's three members are guitarist Whit Smith, fiddler Elana James and bassist Jake Erwin; all share the microphone. Smith has personal ties to the Cape, having grown up in Wellfleet. Western swing novices can enjoy Cowtown's relatable lyrics and electrifying, dance-worthy sound, the press release notes, while "instrument aficionados will drool over the 1925 Gibson acoustic, 1937 Gibson amp and all other classic gear the band brings to the show."

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apr13 Provincetown

Russo drops out of Provincetown selectmen's race, preferring to be 'provocateur'

A visit to the home of finance committee member Catherine Russo, tucked away on the fringe of the Fine Arts Work Center, is to be greeted by that variety of wash-ashore who puts time into looking past Provincetown's pristine landscapes and jacked-up night life to get down to the business of working toward social and economic parity. Russo, who despite recently announcing that she was stepping out of the race for one of two seats on the board of selectmen, shows no signs of slowing down in her determination to keep the concerns of the needy on the front burner. "In 1968, I was 18 years old and I joined the revolution," says Russo. "I've been kind of a radical since then - always involved in different political struggles, wanting people to take control of their lives and challenging government. Government always needs opposition. Now, I don't believe in government at all on any level." Originally from Boston, Russo, a videographer, spent many years documenting wars in Central America before meeting her partner, Donna Flax, in Mexico and relocating to Provincetown with her in 1994. As former chair of the cable commission and a founder of PTV in 2002, Russo worked to convince the board of selectmen and others that broadcasting town government meetings on the local television station was a progressive step in the direction of transparent government. As anyone hoping to develop a formed opinion prior to a vote at Town Meeting, but without the schedule or time to devote to the weekly meeting sampler at Town Hall might attest, the measure has paid dividends. But, on the issues facing Provincetown's struggle to support its artistic poor and day laborers on a season-to-season basis, Russo feels passionately that it will take more than talk to implement change: it will take a vision. "I feel like there's an elephant in the living room, and people are not talking about what's going on locally and nationally and internationally," says Russo. "Capitalism is in serious decline; Europe's going bankrupt, Japan's going bankrupt. Our economy isn't going to grow and recover, and I think people need to start thinking about how they're going to reorganize communities for themselves."

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apr13 Provincetown

WOMR: Outer Cape News - April 12, 2013




apr13 Orleans

Holocaust memorial planned for May 30 in Orleans

Lower Cape students and spiritual leaders will present a memorial program honoring victims of the Nazi Holocaust and other genocides at 7 p.m. May 30 at Nauset Regional Middle School. Leon Rubinstein, the guest speaker, survived the Holocaust after losing his family and home in eastern Poland. He hid in a hole for years, was conscripted into the Russian army as a teenager, and finally was smuggled into British Palestine during the Israeli war for independence. A resident of Falmouth until this past fall, Rubinstein currently lives in Dedham. The program is sponsored by the Interfaith Group on the Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights and the Nauset Interfaith Association, in cooperation with Nauset Regional middle and high schools and Harwich High School.


apr13 Orleans

Construction begins on Skaket Beach parking lot

The Town of Orleans announced Friday the beginning of extensive work on the parking lot at Skaket Beach. Work, according to a release from the town, includes new drainage, a new Title 5 septic system and paving in work areas. A silt fence is also being installed along the parking lot's beach edge and electrical work is being done in the administration building. Areas that have been excavated will be secured to avoid injury. The parking lot will remain partially open to allow abutting residents access to their properties. Areas where work has been done will be repaved. The entire lot is scheduled for repaving in Spring 2014. The work at Skaket Beach is expected to be completed before Memorial Day Weekend.


apr13 Orleans

Stars wanted in Orleans

Auditions for "Chicago" and "Les Miserables," on stage at the Academy of Performing Arts this summer, will be held on Monday and Tuesday, April 15 and 16, at 7 p.m. at the Academy School, 5 Giddiah Hill Road. In "Chicago," roles for men, women and older teens are available and for "Les Miserables," roles for men, women, older teens and some children are available. Come prepared with sheet music, a short monologue and expect to do a cold reading if necessary. For questions, information or if you cannot make these audition times but would like to be considered for either show call 508-255-3075. "Chicago" will run June 19 through July 20 and "Les Miserables" will run July 24- Aug. 17.


apr13 Brewster

Brewster Church arson case moved to early May

The case against the man arrested for allegedly burning the Cape Cod Bible Alliance Church in Brewster was continued until May 3 at Orleans District Court on Friday. Adam Finnegan, 29, of Brewster, has been in Bridgewater State Hospital, where offenders with potential mental illness are held, since his arrest on charges that he burned the large church on Route 6A on Nov. 30. Finnegan's court proceedings have been continued repeatedly. On May 3, he is scheduled for the probable cause hearing that had been set for Friday. His parents, Bill and Susan Finnegan, released a statement shortly after their son's arrest stating that he was mentally ill and had been living with them part time while being "in and out of psychiatric inpatient care."


apr13 Brewster

Election 2013 ballot final in Brewster

The ballot for the May 21 town election is finalized. Chairman Dan Rabold, Ben DeRuyter of the Finance Committee and Patricia Hughes of the Comprehensive Water Planning Committee are vying for two seats on the board of selectmen. Ed Lewis is stepping down to run for Nauset Regional School Committee. Susan Skidmore is running for the other NRSC that's open. Another contested race is for Brewster School Committee where incumbent David Telman, Patricia Hill and Jessica Larsen are running for two seats. Constable has a contest between constable Roland Bassett Jr. and Scott Collum of the planning board. Other races are uncontested; Board of Health with incumbent Lem Skidmore and Patricia Ottolini while Annie Sherwood runs for a one-year unexpired term on the board; Stephen Doyle for moderator, Sherrie McCullough (incumbent) and Allen Ryone for the Recreation Commission, incumbent Scott Collum for the planning while Jason Klump runs to fill out an unexpired three-year term. There is also a non-binding question to shut down the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station.


apr13 Chatham

Construction site thief eludes Chatham police

With an additional theft reported Thursday, police continue to look for a person they believe has robbed a handful of construction sites over the past week. There now have been four construction site thefts since last Saturday near Old Harbor Road, Westward Ho Drive and Champlain Road. The fourth case was reported Thursday at a North Chatham address, where copper was stolen, according to police Lt. Michael Anderson. The targets have been unoccupied homes. Copper downspouts, as well as a case of tools, are among the stolen items, with an estimated value of about $6,000, Anderson said. Anyone with information related to the thefts is asked to call the Chatham Police Department at 508-945-1213 or the anonymous tip line at 508-945-8847.


apr13 Chatham

Loading zone nixed for Chatham Main Street

Safety, priceless parking, and few if any complaints about delivery problems prompted selectmen not to create a loading zone on Main Street. Selectmen chairman Florence Seldin said the board would see how the summer goes. "We'll watch it," she said. In response to a request by Ronald Rudnick, who owns property downtown, the traffic study committee looked into creating a loading zone, from 9 a.m. to noon, adjacent to Sears Park by Seaview Street. In the past Rudnick allowed delivery trucks to park in his spaces at 595 Main St., behind the so-called Gallery building, but because Vining's Bistro was moving downstairs and would now boast outdoor seating he had to disallow the practice. He said that without that parking opportunity deliveries would be thrown into disarray. Most businesses didn't think so. A survey the chamber conducted showed overwhelmingly that a loading zone near Sears Park wasn't supported, said Lisa Franz, executive director of the chamber. "In talking to any of the businesses down there it wasn't a problem," that needed to be solved, said Franz, adding that most felt the delivery trucks were in and out in a very short time and to lose any parking, which was "golden," would hurt businesses. The town's traffic study committee also opposed the idea because of safety and logistic concerns, primarily because deliveries happen at all times of the day and many businesses are far from the proposed loading area.


apr13 Chatham

Increasing income disparity in Chatham

The affordable housing committee's Affordable Housing Production Plan, which serves as the town's primary guide for developing affordable housing opportunities, was unanimously approved by selectmen Tuesday. The five-year plan is available on the town's website and committee chairman Mary McDermott said it will help the town prioritize goals. Among other challenges the town faces, Chatham is losing young families and is struggling with increasing income disparities, increasing poverty and increasing housing costs. The fact that half of residents don't live in town full-time has also helped create an affordability gap. To afford a median priced home, $560,000, a family would have to have an income of $130,000. The plan states that more subsidized rental housing and affordable home ownership opportunities are needed and suggests a combination of friendly 40Bs, zoning changes, supporting the housing trust fund, community education and other avenues to reach goals.


apr13

Five chosen for county charter review panel

The speaker of the county's legislative board has chosen five people to serve on a charter review committee that is expected to examine potential changes to Cape Cod's regional government. Assembly of Delegates Speaker Ronald Bergstrom will serve as the chairman and sixth member, and the three-member board of county commissioners will choose a representative to fill a seventh spot on the committee. Bergstrom selected assembly delegates Julia Taylor from Falmouth and Suzanne McAuliffe from Yarmouth, Provincetown Selectman Austin Knight, Barnstable Town Councilor Ann Canedy and Sandwich Selectman Linell Grundman for the other five positions. He said his choices were based on making sure there were committee members from different parts of the Cape and ensuring that municipalities were represented. In 2012, a special commission recommended that the assembly and the commissioners merge into a seven-member legislative panel. In February, the assembly passed a resolution that called for five county commissioners but left the assembly untouched. The assembly voted last month to form the charter review committee to address these recommendations. The panel is expected hold meetings from mid-May through mid-October, including meetings specifically set aside to take public comment.


apr13

Outer & Lower Cape Wildlife sightings

A Pacific loon was seen at Herring Cove Beach in Provincetown on the 7th. Spring migrants noted at Wellfleet Bay sanctuary included a snowy egret, a sharp-shinned hawk, a yellow-bellied sapsucker, an Eastern phoebe, 2 killdeer, a purple martin, 2 pine warblers, and a savannah sparrow. A boat survey of the Stellwagen Bank marine sanctuary on the 5th produced 3 glaucous gulls, 5 Iceland gulls, an Atlantic puffin, 16 common murres, 3 thick-billed murres, and 10 razorbills. West Harwich Conservation Area on Bell's Neck Road continues to host some nice early spring birds, including 9 blue-winged teal, 48 green-winged teal, a black-crowned night-heron, 9 killdeer, 2 pectoral sandpipers, 4 lesser yellowlegs, 22 greater yellowlegs, 9 Wilson's snipe. Other sightings around the Outer & Lower Cape included a barn swallow and an American oystercatcher at Cahoon Hollow in Wellfleet, 4 pine siskins plus 20 red and 4 white-winged crossbills near Bound Brook Island in Wellfleet, and a glaucous gull at Corn Hill Beach in Truro.

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Friday, April 12, 2013

apr12 Wellfleet

CapeCast: Sizing up an epic river restoration project



apr12 Wellfleet

2013 Wellfleet Blossoms Weekend

Wellfleet is blossoming again on the weekend of April 12-14 as the second annual Wellfleet Blossoms Festival looks to be bigger and better than ever! Nearly 100 Outer Cape artists ranging in age from 9 to 95 will be exhibiting their work in the centerpiece Emerging Artists exhibition at Preservation Hall and a companion art show, "All About Wellfleet", celebrating Wellfleet's past and present at the Public Library. The theme of this three day festival is "Celebrating Our Emerging Artists" and is a great way to kick-off the season. It starts with a party at the Lighthouse Restaurant on Friday, starting at 4:30 p.m. featuring live music and complementary appetizers. The must-do event of the weekend is a fantastic art show at Preservation Hall including everything from oil painting to sculpture to jewelry, all created by local artists. Kevin Howard, Executive Director of the Arts Foundation of Cape Cod, will be the honored guest to welcome and celebrate the emerging artists at our gala reception at Preservation Hall on Saturday, April 13 beginning at 4:30 p.m. Preservation Hall and other local venues will also be humming all weekend long with a variety of workshops involving the arts. Unique to this festival will be a free workshop on "How to become a non-starving artist" with advice and practical guidance from practitioners, small business advisers and potential financial supporters. For a complete schedule of events and a much more information, go to the Wellfleet Blossoms website.


apr12 Wellfleet

Ira Wood on WOMR: Surprise Parties for Control Freaks

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



apr12 Wellfleet-Eastham

School vacation week programs at National Seashore

This month, interpretive programs offered at Cape Cod National Seashore will cover a diverse selection of topics relating to the significant stories and resources that define the Seashore and Cape Cod. Programs range from short, one-hour guided walks and talks, to more in depth three-hour explorations into remote areas. A presentation, "Ocean Futures: Cape Cod, Past, Present, and Future," by Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies Marine Education Director Jesse Mechling, will take place Saturday, April 13, at 1:30 p.m. at Salt Pond Visitor Center in Eastham. During school vacation week, April 13-21, there will be several special programs presented by park rangers. "Whaling and Lifesaving" will be presented Thursday, April 18, at 11 a.m. at Old Harbor Lifesaving Station at Race Point Beach in Provincetown. Look for right whales along shore, and visit the interior of this late 19th-century building. In Eastham, at Coast Guard Beach, April 15, 17, and 19, from 10 a.m. to12 noon and 1 to 3 p.m., rangers will be "on the lookout" for whales and other marine life seen from the beach or bluffs. National Junior Ranger Day will be celebrated Wednesday, April 17, from noon to 2:30 p.m., meet at the Highlands Center parking area, at the end of Dewline Road, North Truro. Children will participate in a weather balloon launch countdown at a special atmospheric observation station and participate in other fun, weather-related activities. International Marconi Day is Saturday, April 20, and the Seashore will celebrate by inviting families to join licensed radio operators from the Marconi Radio Club as they make two-way contacts with other operators around the world from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Coast Guard Station, Coast Guard Beach in Eastham. Parking is limited. Finally, in celebration of Wellfleet's 250th anniversary, the first program in the series of free hikes, "Exploring Wellfleet" will be held Wednesday, April 24, at 9:30 a.m. on Bound Brook Island, Wellfleet. Reservations are required by calling 508-255-3421, ext 18.


apr12 Eastham

Eastham event to focus on municipal water

The board of selectmen will hold an open house to explain the proposed municipal water system to the public from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday at town hall. Besides the selectmen, people who will be available to talk with residents about the water project include the town administrator, public works director, fire chief, consulting engineers and representatives of the finance committee and board of health. Tables will be set up to provide information on topics such as water quality, the proposed design and installation of the water system, financing, costs to the property owner, and the economic, public safety and health benefits of public water. The creation of a municipal water system will be voted on at town meeting May 6. It would provide town water to all residents and is estimated to cost the owner of a median-priced ($400,000) home $17,875 over a 29-year payment schedule, including inflation.


apr12 Provincetown

Report slams Provincetown harbormaster's office

A consultant has found record keeping and enforcement sorely lacking within the Provincetown harbormaster's office. Former Plymouth Police Chief Robert Pomeroy, now a management consultant, found Harbormaster Rex McKinsey keeps inadequate records and issued almost no citations to mariners in five years. McKinsey, who has been the harbormaster since 2005, said that many of the recommendations made in the report have been addressed or are in the process of being corrected. And the chairwoman of the Provincetown Public Pier Corp., which manages the town's marine facilities, has responded by accusing the town manager and police chief of trying to run the harbormaster's office as part of the police department. "If the town thinks the harbormaster's services should be regrouped under the police department, they should just say so," said Lee Ash, chairwoman of the pier corporation. Pomeroy was hired in December by the town to audit the harbormaster's office after a complaint by 16 MacMillan Wharf Realty Trust, owners of the Whydah Pirate Museum. Ken Kinkor, a MacMillan Wharf Realty trustee, said 35 mooring blocks had been moved from a town mooring field to a private rental mooring field managed by Selectman Francis John Santos. Kinkor's complaint led to a police investigation, but the police could not find evidence of any criminal activity since whatever happened occurred 17 years ago. The consultant's audit, released April 4, did not investigate Kinkor's complaints. But Pomeroy looked at record keeping and management practices within the harbormaster's office and found that there was little oversight of rental moorings. Currently, two private mooring fields are owned by Santos, in the West End of town, and the Cabral family, at Fisherman's Wharf. They pay the town $150 apiece for the 110 moorings that they each rent out to the public. But, Pomeroy said, the harbormaster has never checked to see if there are really 110 moorings inside each private rental field. Those moorings must be permitted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, but the harbormaster doesn't have copies of the permits.

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apr12 Provincetown

Beware: Spadefoot toads crossing road in Provincetown

Traffic on Province Lands Road will continue to be occasionally detoured to protect spadefoot toads, Cape Cod National Seashore announced today. The detour, which may be implemented from April through October on rainy nights, is intended to help protect the Eastern spadefoot toad. The spadefoot toad, which is listed as "Threatened" by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, uses shallow temporary ponds in the Province Lands for breeding and the surrounding uplands to feed. They migrate to and from these ponds on rainy nights, especially when the water table is high and temperatures are above 48 degrees. While spadefoot toads are not rare in the Province Lands, the National Seashore is one of their last strongholds in New England. Heavy mortality from vehicles, over the long term, could cause this population to decline. Province Lands Road is a popular crossing for many toads. The park will occasionally close Province Lands Road from just past (north of) the entrance to Herring Cove Beach to the intersection with Race Point Road. These closures will only occur at night, during or after rain, and will be infrequent. Because the water table in the Province Lands is high this year, resource specialists expect there will be high spadefoot toad activity this spring. Herring Cove Beach will remain accessible from Route 6 and Race Point Road will be unaffected, allowing continued access to Province Lands Visitor Center, Race Point Beach, Provincetown Airport, Race Point Ranger Station, and the oversand corridor.

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apr12 Provincetown

39 pounds of litter picked up at Race Point Beach

Volunteers cleared 39 pounds of litter from Race Point Beach last Friday during an hour-long clean-up organized by Whale and Dolphin Conservation, the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies and the Dolphin Fleet. Trash pickers turned in their spoils around 6 p.m., with an inventory of the debris offering a window into the wide and variegated cross-section of human life that uses, and pollutes, the marine environment. Items collected included 33 straws, 32 balloons, two shotgun shells, one newspaper, 15 Styrofoam cups, nine pieces of fishing line, seven piles of dog poop, 19 soda cans, 14 plastic bottles, two paper cups, 11 lobster trap vents, two condoms, 14 pieces of rope, seven tampon applicators, two buoys, 11 nets, 32 plastic bags, 32 bottle caps, 14 disks from the Hooksett, N.H. Wastewater Treatment Plant Release on March 6, 2011, 31 wrappers, one crayon and one syringe. Seven pounds of recyclables were retrieved. The beach clean-up was part of the sixth annual New England Whale Watch Naturalist Workshop, coordinated by Whale and Dolphin Conservation, to educate and update professionals in the field on the latest practices and scientific findings. Marine debris has been identified as one of the most pressing environmental issues facing the world's oceans, posing a threat to the survival of endangered whales and many other creatures.


apr12 Provincetown

Accord reached in Provincetown on parking plan for Herring Cove

"Sunset" will be safe if a proposal by a subcommittee of the National Seashore Advisory Commission wins approval. The group, charged with finding an alternative for public access to erosion-challenged Herring Cove, wants to relocate the north parking lot to an area 125 feet from the shore, allowing visitors to continue to enjoy the park-and-view privileges the lot affords in its current waterfront position. Striving to maintain the "visual access" that makes Herring Cove a gathering place for whale-watchers and devotees of the ritual sunset watch was one of the main objectives of the subcommittee, whose members include four scientists, one Seashore official, two representatives from the Provincetown community and an agent from the state office of Coastal Zone Management. Advisory Commission members Rich Delaney and Mark Robinson also serve on the subcommittee, which held its final meeting on Tuesday at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies. They agreed that taking out the existing lot and building a new one directly behind it, in the area currently occupied by a man-made dune, would accomplish that goal without harming the environment. With the rate of shoreline retreat estimated at an average of 2.5 feet per year, Seashore mapping specialist Mark Adams said that in its new location, 125 feet from shore, the rebuilt lot should last another 40 to 50 years. The removal of the existing lot, and the seawall supporting it, is expected to restore a more natural rhythm to the movement of sand in the area. Adams said that the structures, lying directly in the middle of a dynamic coastal zone, interrupt the supply of sand to the beach. Once they are gone, a more natural configuration will be restored to the shoreline, with a dune forming in front of the new parking lot.

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apr12 Provincetown

This weekend at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown

Jacolby Satterwhite, the second-year Fine Arts Work Center visual arts fellow who made a big splash with his green-screen studio last year, brings out his multi-media artwork again this year in a solo show this weekend at the Work Center. The show, "The Satterwhite Network," begins with an artist reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, April 12, in the Hudson D. Walker Gallery, 24 Pearl St., Provincetown. The show runs through April 16. Here to discuss the increasingly blurred lines between performance and visual art taking place at the Fine Arts Work Center and in the local galleries, visiting artist Robert Melee gives an artist talk about his work in painting, photography, installation, video and live performance. Melee's talk begins at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 13, in the Work Center's Stanley Kunitz Common Room, 24 Pearl St., Provincetown. Melee's work has been featured in solo shows, including one at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and group shows from New York City to Lisbon, Portugal. His performances have included two talent shows at New York City's Kitchen.


apr12 Provincetown

WOMR: This Place Matters with Susan Lindquist - Michael Locke and Jim Knieriem




apr12 Orleans

Bird walk in Orleans

Looking for something fun to do during April School vacation week? The Mass Audubon Society is coming to Snow Library in Orleans and will be giving a class on birding. Everyone is welcome to come on Thursday, April 18 from 10-11 a.m. for this free event. The class will be going outside for part of this program, so please dress accordingly. This program is sponsored by the Orleans Cultural Council. No registration required. Call 508-240-3760 for more information.


apr12 Orleans

Learn about disaster preparedness and who to vote for in Orleans

The Orleans Citizen's Forum is sponsoring two events in April, the first on April 23 is a presentation on emergency preparedness at 6:30 p.m. at the Jailhouse Tavern, and features the town's police chief and deputy fire chief as well as county representatives. A week later, at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 30, the forum is sponsoring a candidate's night to be held at the Nauset Middle School. The selectmen candidates are incumbent Jon Fuller, former selectman Mark Carron, and Alan McClennen, a retired planner and long-time open space committee member.


apr12 Brewster

Immigration forum in Brewster Sunday

First Parish Brewster opens a new forum series Sunday, April 14, at 2 p.m. when Massachusetts: The State of Immigration focuses on immigration rights at the state and local level. Panelists include Senator Dan Wolf, representing Cape Cod and the Islands; Jesse Jaeger, organizer for UUMassAction, a Unitarian Universalist movement for immigrant rights; and Tom Ryan from the United Council of Churches and an organizer for local immigrant issues. There will be representatives from immigrant population telling their stories. Admission is free. Childcare will be provided. First Parish Brewster is located at 1969 Main Street in Brewster.


apr12 Chatham

Police investigate Chatham construction site thefts

Police are investigating a rash of construction site thefts they believe happened over the weekend. "I wish we could say we caught the people," said police Lt. Michael Anderson of the breaks, the first of which was reported Saturday, with two more reported Monday. The thief or thieves targeted unoccupied homes in the area of Old Harbor Road, Westward Ho Drive and Champlain Road, he said. Copper downspouts and a case of tools were among the items stolen, Anderson said. An estimated $6,000 worth of materials was taken from the three sites, he said. Anyone with information related to the thefts is asked to call the Chatham Police Department at 508-945-1213 or the anonymous tip line at 508-945-8847, Anderson said. It can be difficult to catch those who steal from job sites, he said, but construction workers can take one precaution. "We ask workers to label their tools - which they're usually pretty good about - to help catch thieves."


apr12

To spray or not to spray? NStar contemplates herbicide use

Remember the controversy over NStar using herbicides to control vegetation along their power line right-of-ways on Cape Cod? While it dipped from the headlines after a flurry of stories, protests and subcommittee action in 2010, it's been percolating along. NStar's moratorium on spraying in 2011 continued through last year. While they filed a vegetation management plan for 2013 to 2017 in March that lists many Cape towns as municipalities in which NStar "proposes to use herbicides" that doesn't mean they will. "We haven't finalized our plans," said NStar spokesman Mike Durand. "The hearings are about our five-year plan as opposed to our yearly operational plan we finalize every year." Listed in the plan are Barnstable, Bourne, Brewster, Chatham, Dennis, Eastham, Falmouth, Harwich, Mashpee, Orleans, Sandwich, Truro, Wellfleet and Yarmouth. Provincetown is off the list because the transmission lines don't extend that far. "The five-year plan is a high level overview of the integrated vegetation management program," Durand explained. "It includes descriptions of all the tools we can use; mowing, hand cutting, tree removal and herbicides. The VMP (vegetation management plan) doesn't address specific actions planned on right-of-ways in individual communities." But listing all of them, and gaining approval is necessary so they could potentially be employed in a community.

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apr12

Research enables fishermen to harvest lucrative shellfish on Georges Bank

Fishermen to harvest ocean quahogs and surf clams in these offshore waters for the first time in more than two decades. Georges Bank fishery can produce up to 1 million bushels of surf clams and ocean quahogs a year. The shellfish industry estimates the Georges Bank fishery can produce up to 1 million bushels of surf clams and ocean quahogs a year, valued $10 - 15 million annually. There is a billion dollars' worth of shellfish product on Georges Bank that is property of the United States but that can't be harvested because of the threat of toxicity, and 99.9% of the time, it is good wholesome product. An elevated area of the sea floor between Cape Cod and Nova Scotia, Georges Bank is one of the best fishing grounds on Earth. But since 1990, it has been closed to harvesting of surf clams and ocean quahogs after harmful algal blooms (also referred to as "red tides") caused paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) that sickened fishermen. For decades scientists speculated the blooms on Georges Bank were fueled by coastal blooms in the Gulf of Maine. More recent research has shown that Georges Bank is home to a separate and distinct population of the toxic algae. It has been known for many years that the phytoplankton Alexandrium fundyense is the cause of the harmful algal blooms that occur to varying severity each spring and summer along the coastal Gulf of Maine, sometimes extending as far south as Cape Cod and the adjacent islands. The algae's seed populations or "cysts" germinate from seabeds starting in early spring and bloom at the sea surface, until all of the necessary nutrients in the water are consumed. As the nutrients run out, the cells form cysts and fall to the seafloor, as seed for the following spring. High concentrations of the toxic algae can cause closure of shellfish beds and cost the region many millions of dollars. Precisely why the blooms vary in severity has been much more difficult to determine, and has involved extensive seasonal sampling of water and sediments, study of coastal currents, environmental and oceanographic conditions, availability of nutrients, and the development of a computer program to model all of the variables.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

apr10 Provincetown

Race Point Light tour in Provincetown coming May 19

Free tours of Race Point Light, the restored 1950s lightkeeper's house, and a second restored building known as Whistle House will be given from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 19, according to property overseers, the nonprofit Cape Cod Chapter of the American Lighthouse Foundation. There will be free transportation on the sand road that leads to the lighthouse; there will also be refreshments. Visitors can meet at the lower level parking lot at Race Point Beach, which is at the northern end of Race Point Road. Donations are welcome. The nonprofit maintains the Race Point Light property, as well as Wood End Light and Long Point Light. For more information about Race Point Light, visit www.racepointlighthouse.org or contact Nikki Nunes at racepointlighthouse@comcast.net or at 508-487-9930.


apr10 Provincetown

Life is a cabaret this weekend at Provincetown's cabaret festival

For the past six years, Provincetown's Cabaret Fest has brought top stars from the cabaret circuit to The Crown & Anchor. This year's headliners are Dane Vannatter, Lynda D'Amour and Jan Peters, and friends and other cabaret performers will be joining the festival at The Crown, which spills over into other venues in town throughout the weekend. Drummer and bandleader Bart Weisman has helped shape Provincetown's Cabaret Fest since 2008, drawing larger and larger audiences each year. After some trial and error, Weisman and the Provincetown Business Guild have settled on the three days prior to the Boston Marathon as the sweet spot for Cabaret Fest. This year, that's this weekend, April 12-14. "There wasn't a lot going on in Provincetown," Weisman says of the April slot, adding that it's "an escape for people in Boston." Fans of cabaret also make the trip from New York and Connecticut, says Weisman, which helps the festival grow and gives it traction, he notes. By design, the three-day schedule gives travelers a chance to do other things in town, working around Friday night's opening concert, a Saturday night concert and a Sunday Brunch. "We brought some really big-name talent the first couple years," Weisman says. "We had Jim Caruso, who hosts Cast Party in New York City at Birdland, and he brought Billy Stritch, the pianist for Liza Minnelli. We thought that would be a hard act to follow, but since we've done it, our numbers have risen."

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apr10 Provincetown

Police use Taser to subdue man in Provincetown

Police arrested a man early Sunday morning after he allegedly attacked a person he was drinking with and hit the person with a beer bottle, according to the Provincetown police. Thomas Czyoski, who was listed by police as having an unknown address, was taken into custody at 1 a.m. near the town landing at Freeman Street, police said. As police approached, he is alleged to have armed himself with a chair, threatened to assault police officers and tried to tackle one. The police reported using a Taser to subdue Czyoski. He was arraigned Monday in Orleans District Court on charges of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, assault with a dangerous weapon, assault and battery, assault and battery on a police officer and resisting arrest, police said. A pretrial hearing is scheduled for May 14.


apr10 Orleans

Orleans panel features selectmen candidates

Three candidates vying for two open seats on the board of selectmen will participate in a panel discussion at 6:30 p.m. April 30 at Nauset Regional Middle School. Mark Carron, a bank consultant and former selectman, and Alan McClennen, chairman of the Open Space Committee, are competing for the seats along with incumbent Selectman Jon Fuller. The discussion, which will be moderated by attorney Duane Landreth, will have two segments: The first will concentrate on general issues, while the second will focus on wastewater. Both will be open to questions from the audience. This forum will also air several times on Channels 99 and 18 and on YouTube. The Orleans Citizens Forum, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, is sponsoring the event. For more information, visit www.orleanscitizensforum.org or email orleanscitizensforum@gmail.com.

apr10 Chatham

Property owners fight to clear Fox Pond in Chatham of weeds, algae

Property owners bordering tiny Fox Pond are worried their beloved pond will soon diminish their property values and the beauty of the neighborhood if it is allowed to turn into a stinking bog. With water lilies, algae blooms and an invasive pond weed threatening to overwhelm the shallow, less than 5-acre pond, the neighborhood association recently filed an appeal with the state Department of Environmental Protection and filed a complaint in Barnstable Superior Court against the Chatham Conservation Commission. The association is challenging the commission's Feb. 6 decision denying them permission to enact a plan they think will save the pond. The association wants to employ hydroraking - large machines that will remove the plants and deepen the pond - as well as herbicides and chemical treatments they hope will inhibit regrowth of the plants and algae. "This is akin to cancer," property owner Dick Drury said. "The mass of vegetation is like a big sloppy tumor that needs to be dug out and dealt with." Drury and his wife, Fox Pond Association President Joan Drury, moved into their pond-side home in 2009. The view out their window at this time of year reveals various species of migratory ducks diving into what looks like a beautiful ovoid mirror of the sky. In a few months, that cobalt blue surface will look more like the photos on display in front of the fireplace, showing a pond overrun with lily pads, a scum of algae, and invasive purple loosestrife lurking around the edges. With an average pond depth of less than 4 feet, the neighborhood worries that decaying vegetation will fill in the pond before it can be saved. The attitude of the conservation commission is that the pond is dying and it's time to let nature take its course, Drury said.

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Tuesday, April 9, 2013

apr09 Wellfleet

Wellfleet hosts night to meet the candidates

The Wellfleet Community Forum will host a Meet the Candidates night at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the public library at 55 W. Main St. The free event will be moderated by Ira Wood, former chairman of the board of selectmen, and is being held in preparation for the annual town election April 30. Candidates for elective town positions will discuss their stands on current issues. Three people are running for two open slots on the board of selectmen: incumbents Berta Bruinooge and Jerry Houk and newcomer Mary Ellen Manning. Two people are running for the town moderator job: incumbent Bruce Bierhans and newcomer Dan Silverman. The other positions on the ballot are uncontested. Questions will be taken from the audience. For more information, visit wellfleetforum.org or call Dick Elkin at 508-349-2853.


apr09 Wellfleet

Ira Wood on WOMR: Sex an Gender Identity with Anne Fausto-Sterling

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



apr09 Eastham-Nauset

Nauset girls hit the links

The Nauset girls' golf team got their season underway last week, as they look to rebound from losing one of the top players in program history from a year ago. "We lost her (Rachel Bernstein), but she was the only player from last season we lost, so we still have plenty of talent and experience to fall back on," said long-time coach, Bob Wilkinson. Led by their number one player, junior captain Carolyn Brooks, the Warriors will have a tough league to compete in as the Atlantic Coast League remains strong from a year ago. Nauset finished second in the eight-team ACL last year, just behind Barnstable. They went 9-3 during the regular season, but ended winning seven straight matches before the postseason kicked off, including a win over Barnstable. "They (Barnstable) basically have their whole team back, so I think it'll be between us, them, and Falmouth for the league title. Along with Brooks, the Warriors have Hayley Sanders, a senior; along with senior captain Mikaela McGuire playing in the three-position. They also have seniors Kayla Crosby and Anna Beltrandi, along with underclassmen Hannah Wilson, and Katie Hoffman. All three of Nauset's top players play throughout the year, but coach Wilkinson said he sees improvement in all his returning players. "We have seven of our nine players returning from last season, so we've got some experience. Nauset will face Duxbury next Tuesday at home, followed by a match against Falmouth two weeks later, April 23, at home.


apr09 Provincetown

Relocation of Herring Cove parking lot considered in Provincetown

Moving Herring Cove's north parking lot back from the shore to the area now overtaken by a sand dune is an option being weighed by a subcommittee of the National Seashore's Advisory Commission. The group, tasked with devising possible solutions to the problems posed by erosion at Herring Cove, will hold its final meeting at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9, at the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies. Relocating the north lot, where locals and visitors are able to park close to the water to watch the sun set or scan the horizon for whales, would address a number of concerns, said subcommittee member Rich Delaney, who is also chair of the Advisory Commission. It would allow public access to "retreat a little from the beach but maintain some of the amenities that allow people to enjoy the view of the beach," he said at a recent meeting of the commission. One of the worries expressed by residents is that immediate access to the waterfront could be lost if the park decides to eliminate the parking area, which is reinforced by an asphalt seawall that causes scouring and erosion. Coastal scientists have noted that the shoreline in the area is retreating at an average rate of two-and-a-half feet per year. Provincetown resident Mary-Jo Avellar, who serves on the subcommittee and who has advocated for maintaining direct access to Herring Cove, aka New Beach, said she was "very encouraged" by the proposal on the table. "It's the solution," she said. If the parking strip is pushed back, she said, "some other [Seashore] superintendent won't have to worry about it for another 50 years." Avellar said that moving the lot over the dune that currently sits behind it shouldn't harm the environment because the dune is actually just a pile of sand that was shoveled off the beach when the parking lot was put in decades ago. She characterized it as a "man-made dune," not a bonafide one. Dunes are protected by the state Wetlands Protection Act. Mark Adams, Seashore GIS specialist and subcommittee member, said the plan is to move the lot 120 feet back from where it is now. The sand in front of it could be planted and contoured to create a dune-like barrier substantial enough to protect the lot from waves but not so high that it would obstruct the view of the beach, he said.

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apr09 Provincetown

WOMR: Art Talk with Chris Busa - Sculptor Didier Corallo




apr09 Provincetown

WOMR: Talking Back with Paula Sperry - Personal Trainer Mary Ann DeMello




apr09 Orleans

Orleans votes to stand apart from all other Cape towns

The town took a step toward being like every other community on the Cape this week, but pulled back from the precipice. On the suggestion of Selectmen Chairman Jon Fuller, the board considered charging resident and non-resident taxpayer's $20 for a beach sticker. They are now free. But the rest of the board balked. "I don't think we should be charging any fee for residents. I think it is a unique feature," said Selectman David Dunford. "I just don't think that should be a revenue source." Fuller didn't argue vociferously, but did point out that with additional money being spent to help protect beachgoers from sharks, as well as the expense of trying to forestall a rapidly eroding coastline, and the funds needed to try and balance shorebird protection with public access - not to mention increasing difficulties in balancing the town's budget - a beach sticker fee may make sense. "Rather than tacking (everything) on the property tax," Fuller said. "We are the only town on the Cape that doesn't charge." Selectman Sims McGrath said he understood Fuller's line of argument, but he wasn't quite ready to jettison the time-honored perk. "I value tradition highly in this town," he said. The amount of money the fee would generate was also unclear. Fuller had suggested $20 for the first sticker and $10 for each additional sticker. There are now 8,000 stickers given out yearly, but some families - including McGrath's - have six. If the stickers cost money Town Administrator John Kelly, and McGrath, said the number bought would drop precipitously. But Kelly said revenue may increase in another way because non-residents pay $20 a day to park at Nauset Beach, and oftentimes the lot is full because residents may have two cars at the beach at the same time. Although Selectman Sue Christie eventually voted against the idea, she said it was something the town should continue to think about. Christie said Cape officials who had planned educational campaigns about the increasing number of great white sharks dropping in at bathing beaches were recently disappointed when hundreds of thousands in grant monies didn't come through. "I see a future that is concerning," she said. "I think is going to have to involve money."


apr09 Orleans

Daley says he won't disappoint Orleans

Years ago, in one of his first jobs, Tom Daley went before his new bosses to introduce himself, rather like he did Wednesday with the board of selectmen. After that long-ago interview, Daley, who starts as the town's new Director of Public Works and Natural Resources Monday, told selectmen he went home thinking, "Yikes" he had oversold himself, promising a number of a new initiatives that would save money. As it turns out, Daley continued, he delivered, so he made a similar promise this time around. "I am going to commit to you. you are going to be very pleased," Daley said Wednesday. "I am going to commit to the good folks in the community that I will serve you well." Daley said in a couple years, or sooner, the town will be happy with his performance and the whole new organizational structure he leads. The new hire, most recently the DPW director in Southbridge, will be helping Town Administrator John Kelly bring seven departments, including parks and recreation and highway, under one leader overseeing three divisions. The change in the town's structure was recommended by a consultant several years ago as a way to provide greater efficiencies and centralize close to 10 decentralized departments to improve services and save money. Daley, who will be paid about $108,000, has served as the DPW director, town engineer, or both, in several communities, including Newton, Duxbury and Marshfield. Kelly said he is a licensed professional engineer, with additional licenses in wastewater collection and water distribution, and has 22 years of experience. Orleans is poised to embark on an ambitious wastewater infrastructure program and residents have often lamented the lack of a town engineer to assess various consultants' proposals. "He was by far the most qualified candidate, and the best fit for Orleans," said Kelly, who hired him with an interviewing team.


apr09 Brewster

A dock too far? Brewster officials ponder pond project

Ocean Edge would like to see its proposed recreational docks at Blueberry Pond in Brewster chock full of folks as soon as this summer. Members of the Millstone and Blueberry Pond Associations want to see them only in their dreams. At another contentious discussion (the second) before the conservation commission Tuesday night attorney Greg McGregor stepped out of the audience to press for action on behalf of Ocean Edge. "The materials the two associations submitted at the last hearing, while sincere and well intentioned, are out of date and irrelevant," he asserted. "We seek approval of the project as filed and modified. We are seeking closure sooner rather than later." Later on Marty Lucenti summarized the associations' view. "Any project seeking a variance must demonstrate no adverse impacts and that no feasible alternative exists," Lucenti said. "Clearly an environmental impact statement will be required. You are inviting two to three thousand people to use this area. This is significantly increasing the usage load on this small pond." "You understand this is a great pond," McGregor reminded the commission. "There are riparian rights to approach and leave the shore. This project is dramatically less than a party can establish as a right." Ocean Edge owns 1600 feet of frontage on the 25-acre pond and they filed revised plans that address concerns raised at the first hearing March 19. "Ocean Edge is looking to provide a passive recreational access to the pond for members and guests," engineer John O'Reilly explained. "It's critical to them the amenities they seek to provide work in harmony with the pond frontage." The water would be accessed at two points, each with a 600-square foot seasonal dock for kayak and canoe launching, swimming, fishing etc. There would be elevated timber walkways over the pond-side vegetation and one areas (called Area 2 in the plans) would also get a 25-foot elevated observation deck with safety lighting.

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apr09 Brewster

Lilac time in Brewster (soon)

"April is the cruelest month, breeding lilacs out of the dead land" - T.S. Eliot. Opening Day is in April - and the Red Sox are unbeaten - so we would disagree with Mr. Eliot. But John Alexander, who opened his talk on lilacs to the Brewster Garden Club, with that quote, shares a delight with many gardeners as the lilac buds swell promising fragrant clouds of purple, violet, white, pink, blue and even yellow blooms. Alexander oversees 380 lilacs at the Arnold Arboretum in Boston and he and the staff are gearing up for Lilac Sunday (May 12), an annual event. "I love lilacs," Alexander told the gardeners. "We have lilacs over 100 years old at the Arboretum." They've been planting them a long time. The common lilac Syringea vulgaris (vulgaris means common) is native to the Balkans in Eastern Europe where it grows on rocky outcrops. It was imported to European gardens in the late 1500s and carried to the colonies not long after. Walking through the New England woods it isn't uncommon to come upon a cluster of purple lilacs that flag the site of an old homestead or camp. "Why doesn't my lilac bloom," Alexander said, quoting the most frequently asked question on Lilac Sunday. "Some don't get enough sun. Some don't get enough water. Don't plant them under a tree but one of the best to grow in the shade is 'Miss Kim.'" Alexander suggests mulching lilacs so they can withstand the summer drought we commonly get on Cape Cod. That way water won't evaporate so quickly when they're watered.

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apr09 Chatham

Chatham Orpheum Theater hires café team with local roots

While visitors to downtown Chatham have seen construction crews restoring the Main Street theater, which first opened in 1917, supporters of the non-profit have also made progress in mapping out plans for future day-to-day operations. At a recent Board of Trustees meeting, president Naomi Turner announced the Orpheum's executive committee had unanimously supported the selection of Haffmans Hospitality Group LLC, a Massachusetts-based corporation, to undertake and develop the theater's café and food service operations. The café will be named VERS, a Dutch word meaning "fresh," to emphasize its culinary dedication to in-house, freshly-made offerings. The menu is described as moderately-priced and will feature modern, coastal cuisine using fresh, natural, seasonal and mainly locally-grown vegetables, meats, seafood and dairy products. VERS will also feature several low-fat, gluten-free and vegetarian options. The café and restaurant is intended to provide a stream of daily, year-round revenue that will enhance income from movie ticket sales. Haffmans was chosen after a four-month search. Jonathan Haffmans, the company's Dutch president, most recently served as executive sous chef at Chatham Bars Inn. A Harwich resident, he has 18 years in culinary and management experience, including senior and executive positions at high-quality restaurants in New York City, Washington, D.C., Aruba, Bermuda, the United Kingdom and Belgium. Joining him as executive pastry chef will be co-founder of Vers, Stephen Jones, the former pastry chef at Chatham Bars Inn, who will provide baked-to-order cakes, baked goods and desserts, including home-made ice cream. Haffmans' wife and partner, Karen, will oversee day-to-day management of the upstairs café and downstairs patisserie. VERS is expected to provide employment for up to 26 staff. To prepare for a July, 2013 opening, the Orpheum's management search committee is seeking letters of interest and resumes for an executive director with solid experience in non-profits or small business, a theater manager and an administrative assistant. The original Orpheum theater was a mainstay on Main Street until it closed in 1987. When the CVS that occupied the building moved down the street, and the Regal Cinemas in Harwich closed about a year and a half ago a group of local residents set about to build a theater with two screening rooms - a smaller one for children's programming, indie films and documentaries and a large one for first-run movies.


apr09 Chatham

Feds back Chatham skydiving operation

After numerous complaints about public safety, selectmen asked the Federal Aviation Administration to weigh in on Skydive Cape Cod, which operates out of the town airport. The board recently got its answer. "They said basically it wasn't an unsafe operation and should continue," said Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Florence Seldin, referring to letters from the FAA and a conference call with the federal agency. The selectmen asked the airport commission to reach out to the FAA late last year after a number of residents said the constant drone from the airplanes operated by the skydiving company was driving them crazy and that with parachutists landing so close to the runways, as well as occasionally on golf courses and in neighborhoods, there was cause for concern. But FAA representatives complimented the team at Skydive Cape Cod, which has operated out of the airport for two years, saying not only was the drop zone located in an optimum spot, but that it was a "big plus" the company was certified by U.S. Parachute Association. "They were very complimentary quite frankly," said Terry Whalen, the town's administrator for principal projects and operations. According to a summary of the call, given by Whalen to update selectmen, the FAA would have offered suggestions for improvements, but those had already been made by the airport commission and agreed upon by the company. Those changes include reduced throttle settings, flying over water instead of homes to get to the required 10,000-foot altitude, and using a set flight path. Those changes, already agreed upon, will be formalized in a commission meeting next week. Richard Hunter, chairman of the airport commission, has said in the past the company has been very cooperative and in his letter to the FAA he wrote that the company had a lot of support in the community and if it ceased operation there would be a serious economic impact. Although selectman Tim Roper was satisfied with the report he thought that more could be done to explore how to minimize the noise, and thereby the number of irate neighbors. "I certainly think it's a good business, but I think that all good business should be good neighbors," he said. Keith Yocum, who lives on Overlook Drive, said he knew when he moved to town a short time ago that he was moving near an airport and there would be noise. What he didn't realize was there would be skydiving flights about 25 times a day in the summer and that they constitute about 65 percent of the airport's traffic. That's too much, he said, adding that property values will likely skydive if that continues. Seldin said that the operation's lease ends in October and the airport manager and commission can talk about limits on flights and other changes.


apr09 Harwich

Dennis man arrested after exposing himself on Harwich trail

A woman out for a walk at the Bells Neck Conservation area in Harwich Sunday reported to police that a man had exposed himself to her. According to Patrol Officer Aram Goshgarian, the victim was able to give police a detailed description of the man. Although officers searched the area Sunday without any luck, a suspect was located Monday during a follow-up in the area. Officer Peter Petell saw a man in a white truck matching the description given by the victim the day before. Officer Petell stopped the man and had the victim brought to the scene, where she positively identified 47-year-old Scott Baker of Dennis as the man who exposed himself to her at Bells Neck. Baker was placed under arrest and transported to the Harwich Police Station where he was booked and charged with open and gross lewdness. He was later arraigned in Orleans District Court.


apr09

Today is free ice cream cone day at Ben & Jerry's

Today, April 9, 2013, marks the beloved rite of spring called "Ben & Jerry's Free Cone Day". Each year the ice cream chain offers free cones at all of its scoop shops. Cape Cod boasts Ben & Jerry's scoop shops in Hyannis, Eastham and Provincetown. Free Cone Day is a tradition that goes back to 1979 when Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield offered free cones to celebrate their first anniversary in business. Over one million free cones are given away each year by the global ice cream chain. Stop by a Ben & Jerry's today to celebrate Ben & Jerry's "one in a million" campaign. It's that time of year again when Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream at 352 Main Street Hyannis, Rte. 6 at Brackett Road in North Eastham and Commercial Street in Provincetown give away ice cream comes from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. For the 34th annual event, select Ben & Jerry's Scoop Shops will allow customers to choose from one of its classic ice cream flavors, Greek Frozen Yogurt flavors, or new offerings, such as the Liz Lemon (a lemon Greek frozen yogurt with blueberry lavender swirl) and the Candy Bar Pie (peanut butter ice cream with fudge flakes, chocolate nougat and sweet and salty pretzel swirls). Nationwide they'll be handing out more than 1 million cones as a thank you to their customers.






Sunday, April 7, 2013

apr07 Wellfleet-Eastham-Truro-Provincetown

$25,000 donation keeps center open at Seashore

A donation of $25,000 will allow the seasonal Province Lands Visitor Center in Provincetown to open from May 25 through Sept. 2, seven days a week, rather than remain shuttered this summer because of automatic federal budget cuts. The nonprofit Friends of the Cape Cod National Seashore made the donation to pay for seasonal park rangers to staff the visitor center from Memorial Day through Labor Day, Seashore Superintendent George Price said Friday. Usually the visitor center on Race Point Road is open in May, September and October as well. The visitor center typically hosts about 260,000 people each season, Price said. The Salt Pond Visitor Center in Eastham, which is open year-round, will remain open seven days a week, he said. On Friday, Price released his final plans for eliminating $376,000 from the Seashore's current fiscal year budget, given the federal mandate March 1. The Seashore's ranger-led interpretive programs will be hard hit, he said, affecting up to 49,000 visitors. Interpretive programs include nature walks, snorkeling in kettle ponds, beach campfires, beach yoga, bird walks, wading programs, extended hikes in Truro and Provincetown, and children's activities. Additionally, the number of workers in natural resource management, maintenance and facility management and resource and visitor protection will be reduced, Price said. Vacancies because of retirements and transfers will remain unfilled, he said. This year, all six swimming beaches in the Seashore will be open and staffed with lifeguards, Price said. Access to off-road driving corridors will remain the same, with the usual exceptions for seasonal shorebird nesting sites. Additionally, visitor facilities and services at lighthouses, historic structures, and demonstrations of historic lifesaving techniques that are largely provided by volunteers and partners with the Seashore will remain open and available. The Seashore's boundaries include 44,000 acres across the Cape's six outermost towns. In 2012, the Seashore was the 12th-busiest park in the National Park Service, with 4.4 million visitors.


apr07 Wellfleet

Open University of Wellfleet

The inaugural session of the Open University of Wellfleet, at Wellfleet Preservation Hall and the Wellfleet Public Library, starts next week. Classes will be held once a week for two hours from April 9 to May 2. Tuition is $48 per course. This is the idea of Rhoda Flaxman, retired Brown University professor. All the courses have a Wellfleet or Outer Cape angle, with an emphasis on our local history and culture. Two courses will take place at the Wellfleet Library: "Creating a Wellfleet Historical "Map App" with Jeff Tash on Thursday, April 11, from 2 to 5 p.m., and "Outer Cape Lit with Rhonda Flaxman on Thursday, April 11, from 5 to 7 p.m. Tash's course is a "lab" where students will conduct "history research" culminating in a Wellfleet Historical Society web app built using Google map technology. Students will pinpoint places of historical interest along with corresponding images and write-ups accessible via mouse clicks or pointing gestures on laptops, tablets or smartphones. Flaxman's course will explore how the Outer Cape landscape has been the inspiration for many excellent writers. "We will read contemporary writers who both live on and write about the Outer Cape," Flaxman said. "Sampling works from four genres, we will read and discuss Annie Dillard's novel, "The Maytrees," Sinan Unel's screenplay "Race Point," poetry by Mary Oliver and Marge Piercy, and selected essays by Robert Finch and others. "The Meaning of Life, or What it is all about," with Brent Harold will start on Tuesday, April 9, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Wellfleet Preservation Hall. "Governing, Cape Cod Style," with Seth Rolbein, senior advisor to Sen. Dan Wolf, will open on Wednesday, April 10,from 6 to 8 p.m. at Wellfleet Preservation Hall. To register for the courses at the library, call the library at 508-349-0310 or email wpl@wellfleet-ma.gov. To register for the course at Wellfleet Preservation Hall, go to their website or stop by or call 508-349-1800 during regular business hours.


apr07 Eastham-Nauset

Nauset Superintendent's Excellence Award

Nauset Superintendent Richard Hoffman recently announced the two recipients of the Superintendent's Excellence Award: Davis Harnett of Yarmouth Port, and Aubrey McDonough of Wellfleet. These two outstanding students and their parents enjoyed an evening and dinner at the Cape Cod Regional Technical School, where all the honorees from surrounding districts were also honored. These awards are given to high school students who distinguish themselves in the pursuit of excellence during their high school careers, with a three-year cumulative average among the top five of their class.


apr07 Eastham

Eastham mother's journey to help opiate-addicted baby

Within the first month, she just knew she was pregnant. Even living the "junkie lifestyle," as she said, in a rented room with some "crazy people" and no thought of much besides finding and using heroin, she just knew. Being 24 and on drugs, and never having had a child before, made it impossible for her to understand how much a baby would change things. "Throughout the whole pregnancy, I just didn't get it," she said. The Eastham woman lived with her boyfriend, also a heroin addict, with no job, no car. Their families wouldn't take them in. They had criminal records. Most of their friends were on drugs. The pregnancy planted a seed of hope, but she didn't immediately stop using. Police seized about 200 grams of heroin - with a street value of $20,000 - from the dealer's home. "When he got raided, I was on my way to pick up," her boyfriend said. "I was about 20 minutes away from facing some serious (jail) time." So instead of being caught by police buying drugs, he lay in the bathtub of their home, in Brewster at the time, throwing up. Meanwhile, she was crawling on the ground upstairs looking for crumbs of heroin to stop her withdrawal sickness. "There was nothing left to live for except getting clean," she said. She was about five months pregnant the day she quit. Looking back, she probably wouldn't have been able to stop if it weren't for the pregnancy, or for the dealer getting busted, or if she and her boyfriend hadn't found a caring doctor. When they wanted to stop, the couple called all the detox units they could, but no beds were available. They called all the doctors prescribing withdrawal medications Suboxone or Subutex, but the doctors had no available appointments. They finally called Dr. Robert Friedman at Gosnold on Cape Cod. "He saw me within one hour of when I called," she said. Friedman offers far more than medication; he gives his patients his cellphone number. He provides counseling, and not just during the office visit. "There needs to be more Dr. Friedmans. If it wasn't for him, I don't know where I'd be," the young woman said.

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apr07 Truro

Holder of largest aquaculture grant appointed to Truro shellfish advisory board

Breon Dunigan, chair of the board of selectmen, called it "a tricky situation," but that didn't stop selectmen from unanimously appointing Dana Pazolt to the shellfish advisory committee. There was some question of conflict of interest because Pazolt is the largest aquaculture grant holder in Truro, with five of the 25 acres of the Aquaculture Development Area, as well as a grant in front of his North Truro property, the Sea Gull Motel. E. James Veara, who serves as town counsel, wrote in a letter of opinion that Pazolt may serve on the committee if he makes a full disclosure of his financial interest and involvement in Truro shellfishing and, after it is reviewed, "the board of selectmen, in writing, determines, if it does, that Mr. Pazolt's interest is not so substantial that it will affect the integrity of his services as a member of the committee." However, Ansel Chaplin, chair of the shellfish advisory committee, warned selectmen last week that because Pazolt has 20 percent of Truro's Aquaculture Development Area, his membership on the committee could pose a conflict of interest on many levels. It's very difficult to differentiate whether an advisory member is just sitting there or deliberating, he said, and he further wondered what the public would think of such a large grant holder giving advice on shellfishing rules and regulations. The committee's tasks include recommending shellfish harvesting regulations to the board of selectmen, Veara wrote, as well as developing policies. Though its role is advisory, he said that the selectmen often follow the committee's recommendations. The committee is further charged with submitting an annual written evaluation of the shellfish warden and assisting the town administrator when hiring for that position.

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apr07 Provincetown

New bathhouse nears completion at Herring Cove in Provincetown

The construction of the new Herring Cove Bathhouse complex is moving along on schedule, unimpeded by the severe winter weather that has proven so disruptive elsewhere on the Cape and by budget cuts that threaten to derail other National Seashore operations. The five buildings in the complex are framed and sheathed, their profiles clearly visible over the dunes on the approach from Moors Road or Route 6. Karst Hoogeboom, chief of maintenance for the Seashore, said he expects the contractor, Classic Site Solutions, to start going over the punch lists sometime next month. "We've got the buildings all wrapped in Tyvec, and they're moving forward, either on schedule or a couple days behind schedule, but we're still anticipating completion in May," Hoogeboom said. The facility will open to the public after the finishing touches are put on, a process that could take another month. Hoogeboom said the plan is to have the bathhouse ready by Fourth of July weekend. The five structures include a concessions stand, a bathroom facility, a building that will house changing rooms, a station for lifeguards and first aid, and a garage for storing ATVs, a surf rescue boat and other equipment. A network of ramps will connect the buildings and extend to the parking lot and beach. There also will be outdoor rinse-off stations and a shaded area for picnic tables, Hoogeboom said. The complex will be built to LEED silver standards, he added, with environmentally friendly features such as solar panels. More than 99 percent of the debris from the former bathhouse - everything from copper piping to cement - was recycled. The original, concrete bathhouse stood at Herring Cove for 60 years until the park demolished it last October. Though a local icon (Provincetown artist Jay Critchley paid tribute to it by taking over the building for 10 days of performance art just before it was torn down), the bathhouse was deemed structurally unsound and, with its wide, impermeable asphalt base, unfit to withstand shoreline erosion. The new buildings, wood-framed and constructed on pilings that elevate them three or four feet above the level of nearby roads, were designed with their changing environment in mind. Strengthening materials and stabilizing hurricane "clips" were incorporated into their frames so that, should erosion threaten, they may be picked up with a crane and moved back from the shoreline fairly easily. The process would take about a month, Hoogeboom said, but it would be more straightforward than other building relocation projects.

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apr07 Provincetown

CASAS' Carol MacDonald: kind-hearted caregiver to the cats & dogs of Provincetown

Carol MacDonald was brought up to be an animal lover. "My mother trapped, spayed, neutered and fed a large feral colony for years at the Glen Island (N.Y.) Casino Bridge," she says, until the bridge eventually was washed out by a hurricane. Knowing her now, that's certainly not surprising. Now, she is the president and perhaps most visible component of the Carrie A. Seaman Animal Shelter in Provincetown. MacDonald first became involved with CASAS about 12 years ago. "I was asked to judge the Canine Games during Carnival. I enjoyed working with the volunteers so much that I jumped at the chance when asked to join the board. By process of my being the only board person to say yes, I became president eight years ago." CASAS - a no-kill shelter for homeless, adoptable dogs and cats, founded in 1971 by the late Provincetown resident and lawyer Carrie Seaman - serves the entire Outer Cape from Provincetown to Eastham and is run totally by volunteer efforts. As president, MacDonald is the organization's dynamo. She has helped it grow from a series of random, virtually ad hoc "foster homes" for homeless animals into a reliable and humane organization. When discussing her involvement, a bit of MacDonald's quiet pride shows through her legendary modesty. "I take credit for the idea to purchase the property at 5 Sandy Hill Lane but give all the credit to the early board members who raised the money to put 50 percent down for the purchase. We depend on grants and generous donations from our supporters." Today, as CASAS prepares for its April 9 fundraising dinner at Crowne Pointe Bistro, the animal residences include sun-lit lounging areas and enclosed exercise areas with views of the out-of-doors. At this time the organization can only board cats and not dogs, but it finds foster homes for any dogs that need them. Local veterinarian Michael McDonnell, assisted by Manny Dimalculangan and Anita Butler, provides on-site services, including spaying and neutering free of charge. Although CASAS is officially only a temporary haven whose goal is to find permanent loving homes, a few of their guests seem to have settled in for the long haul.

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apr07 Provincetown

WOMR: Outer Cape News for April 5, 2013




apr07 Provincetown

WOMR: Focus on Energy with John Burns - April - NEED Program Update




apr07 Provincetown

WOMR: Talking Back with Paula Sperry - Clinical Psychologist Blaise Fortunata




apr07 Orleans

Red Cross honors Orleans firefighters

Samantha Abeid has tried to block out the day she almost died after being cut badly by the prop of an outboard motor. But she does remember firefighter Leslie Vasconcellos. "Leslie was stroking her hair and asking her to be as calm as she could," said Samantha's dad, Mike. Vasconcellos was one of eight members of the Orleans fire department honored yesterday at the Red Cross's Cape Cod and Islands Hero breakfast for saving Abeid's life on July 7, when the teenager was hurt in Little Pleasant Bay while boating with a friend. "She wouldn't be here if they didn't find her," said Mike Abeid, referring to the team that searched the waters for his daughter, now 15. Her injuries were so bad that when she was put in the ambulance, the rescuers, and her family, didn't know if she'd survive. "We will never forget it," said Abeid. When the rescuers arrived on the scene Samantha was still attached to the propeller and bleeding profusely. The crews jumped in to keep her head above water and keep her from going into shock. Dr. Terry Whelan, paramedics and EMTs were able to stabilize her and bring her to shore. "It was just a huge team effort," said Deputy Chief Tony Pike, who was there that day and also honored. Pike added that harbormaster's departments, from both Orleans and Chatham, as well as the Coast Guard, were involved. "It's indicative of the cooperation we have between departments." Pike said he had run into Whelan at the dock and commandeered him - "he didn't hesitate." He said the experience was "uplifting" for the rescuers who helped avert a horrible tragedy. "It turned out far better than I could have expected," Pike said. "What an amazingly courageous young woman." Samantha has defied the predictions of her doctors and, instead of taking a year off from school, was there for her first day as a freshman at Nauset High, and instead of using crutches for a year, she was off them in four months.

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apr07 Brewster

Bird talk in Brewster

The Cape Cod Bird Club will host Dr. Andrew Vitz speaking on "A Cup in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush - The Role of Shade Coffee in Migratory Bird Conservation" at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History April 8, at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Vitz, newly appointed Massachusetts State Ornithologist, will share his extensive research on the conservation value of shade coffee plantations.


apr07 Brewster

Pit bull chased horseback rider in Brewster

Out for a ride on the beach before the summer rush, a Chatham woman said a dog lunged at her and her horse Thursday, chasing them for miles before giving up. Jacqueline St. Thomas, 47, was out riding her 12-year-old Irish sport gelding, Stone, before 2 p.m. at Linnell Landing when she spotted two people with three dogs, she said. One of the three dogs took interest and "made a beeline" toward them, she said. A person was running after the dog, yelling for it to stop, but it continued its pursuit, St. Thomas said. Recognizing she should not act like prey, St. Thomas rode toward the dog, which initially caused it to back down, she said. The dog, which she said was a pit bull, began circling Stone. "I didn't realize how dangerous it was until it lunged toward us," she said. The dog tried to bite Stone's shoulder and throat, she said. When they turned to flee, the dog jumped toward Stone's hind end and then gave chase, St. Thomas said. "I have a GPS to track my rides, and he was chasing us for 3 miles," she said. "It was intent on biting my horse." She called Brewster police and filed a report with the animal control officer. Most of the details of St. Thomas' account were confirmed by Brewster police Capt. Heath Eldredge. "It did not appear the horse's skin was broken at all," Eldredge said. Police were unable to find the pit bull; the other two dogs, identified as retrievers; or their owners, Eldredge said.

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apr07

Outer & Lower Cape Dispositions & Arraignments at Orleans District Court

DISPOSITIONS in court 3/29, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4, 4/5
HARRIS, Richard, 29, 77 Bank St., Harwich; assault and battery, Feb. 14 in Harwich, dismissed.

PAQUIN, Mary, 55, 420A Commercial St., Provincetown; guilty of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI) Dec. 22, 2010, in Provincetown, 45-day license loss, one-year probation, $1,597.22 costs and $50 fee; admitted sufficient facts to negligent driving, same date, continued without a finding for one year, $250 costs and $50 fee; responsible for another traffic violation, filed.

COX, William, 43, 17 Martha's Lane, Harwich; guilty of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI) as a second offense and negligent driving, Feb. 2 in Harwich, two years in Barnstable County Correctional Facility with six months to serve and the balance suspended, three-year probation, eight-year license loss, $2,340 costs and $300 fees; not responsible for another traffic violation.

FONTAINE, Christopher, 44, 42 Stony Hill Road, Chatham; not guilty of two counts of aggravated assault and battery and violating a protective order, July 11 in Chatham.

GONSALVES, Michael, 57, 5 Parallel Road, Harwich; assault and battery, Dec. 26 in Harwich, dismissed.

McNULTY, James, 50, 4 Morris Ave., Truro; assault and battery, March 15 in Truro dismissed.

NOLIN, Raymond III, 53, 23 Harry Kemp Way, Provincetown; assault and battery and breaking and entering, Oct. 19 in Provincetown, dismissed.

SPADAFORE, Steven, 49, 61B Commercial St., Provincetown; admitted sufficient facts to OUI, Sept. 5 in Truro, continued without a finding for one year, 45-day license loss, $1,847.22 costs and $50 fee; negligent driving, dismissed; not responsible for another traffic violation.

TAYLOR, Valerie, 26, 113A Sisson Road, Harwich; assault and battery, Oct. 24 in Harwich, dismissed.

YOUNG, Derrick, 27, 30 Angus Ave., Yarmouth; guilty of assault, Aug. 20 in Chatham, two-year probation, $1,560 costs and $50 fee.

KENNEDY, Michael, 21, 255 Long Pond Road, Brewster; admitted sufficient facts to breaking and entering, March 19 in Brewster, continued without a finding for one year, $600 costs and $50 fee; vandalism, dismissed.

GADE, Arlene, 74, 70 Epanow Road, Eastham; admitted sufficient facts to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), March 29 in Eastham, continued without a finding for one year then case closed, 45-day license loss, $1,597.22 costs and $50 fee.

ARRAIGNMENTS in court 4/1, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4, 4/5
BRANDT, Peter, 72, 215 Underpass Road, Brewster; larceny of more than $250, April 1 in Brewster. Pretrial hearing May 3.

CLARK, James, 48 Cross St., Wellfleet; operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI) and negligent driving, March 30 in Wellfleet. Pretrial hearing April 26.

GADE, Arline, 74, 70 Epanow Road, Eastham; OUI, March 29 in Eastham. Pretrial hearing April 16.

NEWCOMB, Thomas, 25, 97 Great Western Road, Harwich; larceny of more than $250 by single scheme, check forgery and passing a false check, Nov. 16 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing April 8.

RAND, David, 22, 5780 Route 6, Eastham; possession of oxycodone with intent to distribute and possession of Xanax, March 29 in Eastham. Pretrial hearing May 2.

RODERICK, Paul, 49, 37 Conwell St., Provincetown; OUI, negligent driving and another traffic violation, March 31 in Truro. Pretrial hearing April 26.

MARASH, Robert, 55, Cortland Manor, N.Y.; OUI, negligent driving and another traffic violation, April 2 in Harwich. Pretrial hearing April 29.

VIERA, Lindsay, 23, 55 Old Strawberry Hill Road, Hyannis; larceny of more than $250, Jan. 17 in Eastham. Pretrial hearing May 30.

GERMER, Robert, 84, 89 Cliff Pond Road, Brewster; operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (OUI), reckless driving and another traffic violation, March 8 in Dennis. Pretrial hearing April 18.

RUFF, George, 48, 7 Jasmine St., Yarmouth; larceny of more than $250 by single scheme, March 8 in Chatham. Pretrial hearing May 6.

BARBARO, Lana, 64, 44 Harry Kemp Way, Provincetown; violating a harassment protection order and disorderly conduct, April 4 in Provincetown. Pretrial hearing April 12.

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apr07

On this day in 1630: Puritans leave England

On this day in 1630 the last well-wishers stepped off the ship Arbella and returned to shore. More than a week after the vessel first set out, the winds were finally favorable. The ship weighed anchor and sailed for New England. Governor John Winthrop and about 300 English Puritans were on board. They were leaving their homes in England to settle in a fledgling colony - Massachusetts Bay - on the other side of the Atlantic. There they would work "to do more service to the Lord." Governor Winthrop shepherded the Puritans through 12 years of enormous hardship. Under his leadership, Massachusetts Bay became the most populous English colony and Boston the largest city in North America.






Friday, April 5, 2013

apr05 Wellfleet-Eastham-Provincetown

Cape Cod National Seashore Sequestration and the 2013 Summer Season

Cape Cod National Seashore Superintendent George Price has announced that the 2013 summer program has been finalized with the incorporation of a $376,000 reduction to Cape Cod National Seashore budget from sequestration. The seashore sequestration plan included significant cuts to visitor services, including a complete closure of the Province Lands Visitor Center; elimination of most interpretive and educational programs, fewer biological technicians to monitor critical resources, and reduced custodial services. The good news is that a recent donation from Friends of the Cape Cod National Seashore will allow the Province Lands Visitor Center to be open seven days a week from Memorial Day weekend until Labor Day (Saturday, May 25, 3013 - Monday, September 2, 2013). This donation will cover staffing for basic information, orientation, and visitor safety rather than a comprehensive visitor services program. It does not include 83 days of the shoulder seasons that generally run from May 1 - October 31, but the facility will be available during the height of the summer season. Price said, "We are very grateful to the Friends of the Cape Cod National Seashore for their generosity and willingness to once again come to the assistance of the seashore in order to support the mission of protecting resources and serving visitors." Visitors will also be able to visit the Salt Pond Visitor, Eastham, MA, which will remain open seven days a week; enjoy the six life-guarded beaches (which are supported by parking fees); gain access to the Off Road Vehicle Corridor with the exception of closures for shore bird protection (supported by ORV pass fees); and visit our partner and concessioner facilities, such as the Highland Light, Highland House Museum, Highland Links, Nauset Light and Nauset Knoll Motor Lodge, according to their respective schedules. In addition, services provided by volunteers (including many from Friends), at the historic Captain Penniman House and Three Sisters Lighthouses, Eastham, and Old Harbor Life-Saving Station, Provincetown, will continue. According to Price, "A park the size of Cape Cod has a complex operation and intense use. Our staff has worked diligently to piece together a modest program within the budget constraints. We're happy to say that some of our signature programs, such as the Life Saving Drill at Old Harbor, which relies on permanent staff and volunteers, and canoe trips in Salt Pond that are funded by use fees have survived the cuts this year. And volunteers have come forward to assist with critical resource projects." The numbers and variety of interpretive programs this summer will be significantly reduced. Examples of eliminated programs include nature walks at locations like Nauset Marsh and Fort Hill; snorkeling in a kettle pond; beach campfires; beach yoga; the Provincetown tour; bird walks; shellfishing demonstrations; wading programs; extended hikes in Truro and Provincetown; and children's programs. Traditionally these ranger-guided activities serve over 49,000 visitors each year. Additional sequestration cuts include reduced personnel of the natural resource management, maintenance and facility management, and resource and visitor protection divisions. A number of vacancies due to retirements and transfers will remain unfilled. Schedules and priorities will have to be altered, but most impacts will not be obvious to the visiting public.


apr05 Wellfleet-Provincetown

Nonprofit tourism group donates to Seashore

A new tourism nonprofit organization made its first donation Wednesday, a $1,000 check to the Cape Cod National Seashore, for a visitor sign at the soon-to-be-completed Herring Cove Beach bathhouse in Provincetown. CARE for the Cape & Islands, based in Yarmouthport, was formed in 2012 to encourage visitors to the region and to preserve and protect its resources and culture. The sign will explain an outside exhibit about whales and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, the nationally protected underwater region north of Provincetown that is known as a whale habitat. The bathhouse is scheduled to open this summer, according to Seashore Superintendent George Price. CARE raised the money as part of an initiative with Wequassett Resort and Golf Club in Chatham, according to founder Jill Talladay. Guests at the resort were invited to make a donation of $1 per room per night, Talladay said Thursday. "It's really about asking our visitors to give back," she said.


apr05 Wellfleet

Ira Wood on WOMR: Our Nuke and the News

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



apr05 Truro

Truro selectmen candidates run unopposed

While there are several questions that ask for a Proposition 2 1/2 override on the ballot this year, there will be no contested board races on May 14. Neither selectmen Gary Palmer nor William Golden are vying for their seats on the board of selectmen, leaving room for the only two candidates who returned nomination papers, Bob Weinstein and Paul Wisotzky. Wisotzky moved to Truro full-time in 2007, joined the conservation commission, co-chaired the Puma Park building committee and is now the chair of the open space committee and a member of the community preservation committee. He is interested in challenges that Truro faces, he said by e-mail, including affordable housing, economic development, land use, water resources and solid waste management. "I believe I will add an open and informed voice and a track record of working with diverse groups of people to craft strategic, sustainable and effective solutions to complex problems," he wrote. "I have spent most of my professional life consulting with governments, non-profits and philanthropy helping these entities gather and use information to make better decisions related to programs and organization." Weinstein has lived year-round in Truro for about 40 years, and has served as everything from the chair of the zoning board of appeals and planning board to the vice chair of the charter committee. He sees the town's most immediate issue as that of the future of the Fire Dept. and is interested in the long-term financial aspects of the town. Weinstein has been involved with civic affairs for probably 35 years, he says, and he thinks he can bring his knowledge to the board of selectmen.

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apr05 Provincetown

P'town voters keep zoning, and loophole, intact

Voters at the annual meeting Wednesday night left the town's zoning bylaws unchanged despite efforts to fix what proponents of two zoning articles described as a loophole. Town meeting wrapped up last night. Two similar articles, 24 and 25, attempted to change part of the zoning bylaw covering the scale of new construction by closing a potential loophole for vacant lots that might allow oversized structures. Article 24 protected projects that were already in the pipeline; Article 25 did not. But voters ended up rejecting both after discussion about them and a construction project proposed for a vacant lot at 294 Bradford St. in the East End. Voters also rejected another zoning amendment from the proponent of Article 25, resident Jonathan Sinaiko. It would have required a special permit for removing earth in certain quantities from property. Voters indefinitely postponed a third zoning bylaw proposed by Sinaiko that would have required a special permit to remove certain quantities of natural ground cover. Sinaiko said Thursday he is not opposed to a building next to his property but that a builder should abide by the intent of the law and not "exploit loopholes." Supporters of the East End project told voters on Wednesday that the new building, a two-family residence, is being proposed under current laws and will be for families who intend to make Provincetown their home. Voters also indefinitely postponed a zoning amendment to broaden the definition of an art gallery so that it includes newer forms of art such as digital, video, film and sound performances, and conceptual art. And they approved a new general bylaw giving the town the legal authority to identify and remove abandoned bicycles, and setting guidelines for where bikes can be parked. While the discussion of a police station renovation kept voters in their seats past 11 p.m., it was the visit by a lobster that got the laughs. Austin Knight, chairman of the board of selectmen, dressed head-to-toe in a lobster costume, urged people to approve spending $22,000 to help pay for the town's annual July 4 fireworks display. "I stand before you very nervous this evening, the price of lobster at over $12 a pound, as a stocky lobster with a value of over $2,000, knowing that I could be in someone's big pot tonight, I ask you to support this article," Knight said. Voters approved the money.


apr05 Provincetown

Forum on Pilgrim nuke plant Sat. in Provincetown

A public forum entitled "The Pilgrim Nuclear Power Reactor: How Safe Is It?," will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 6, at the Unitarian Universalist Meeting House, 236 Commercial St., Provincetown. Sponsored by the UUMH Social Action Committee, the event will feature speakers David Agnew of Cape Downwinders, state Rep. Sarah Peake and state Sen. Dan Wolf. There will be a question and answer period after the speakers' presentations. Admission is free and all are welcome.


apr05 Provincetown

Hanna to step down as Provincetown film society & festival director

After 10 years as executive director of the Provincetown Film Society and 13 years with the organization, Gabrielle Hanna is stepping down at the end of July. Under Hanna's leadership, the Provincetown International Film Festival, now in its 15th year, grew from a five-day regional event to a year-round internationally recognized arts organization. Hanna spearheaded a three-year capital campaign, which has to date raised almost $1 million, dedicated to the purchase and renovation of the Waters Edge Cinema. The cinema now operates year-round in two screening rooms with state-of-the-art digital equipment and a video art gallery. "It has been a thrilling challenge growing the festival and the society," Hanna said in a recent press release from the Film Society, "and I am deeply grateful to the incredible staff and board of PFS. I am proud of the partnerships we have built with both local and national organizations, and that the society is poised to take the next leaps into the future. Most recently, she and a dedicated task force have laid the groundwork for the Provincetown Film Institute, expected to launch this fall, thus fulfilling Hanna's dream of creating and sustaining film as an art form in America's oldest art colony. In the same release, filmmaker John Waters, an advisory board member for the film society, said, "Gabby Hanna was a fearless executive director whose humor, hard work and relentless pursuit of financing, good programming and solving the everyday problems of running a film festival will be forever appreciated. The Waters Edge Cinema should actually be named after her since it was her baby right from the beginning."


apr05 Provincetown

Friday night art opening a sure sign of spring in Provincetown

The Patty DeLuca Gallery at 432 Commercial St., Provincetown, is hosting one of the season's first opening receptions from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 5. Artists whose work will be shown include Paul Rizzo, Kenneth Lockwood, Diane DeMassa and Cassandra Complex. Refreshments will be served.


apr05 Provincetown

WOMR: Arts Week with Jeannette de Beauvoir - Interview with Dorothy Palanza




apr05 Orleans

Piano concert in Orleans

Sunday, April 14, at 4 p.m., the historical society at Main Street and River Road will present Sue Keller on its new piano. Keller perform do a ragtime retrospective with music by Scott Joplin, James Scott, Joe Lamb, Charles Johnson, W.C. Handy and a bit of stride and novelty ragtime as well. Tickets are $20, table seating is limited. Reservations may be made by calling, 508-240-1329 or e-mailing orleanshs@verizon.net. Folks can also pick up a ticket at the historical society, Mon-Fri until noon.


apr05 Brewster

Volunteers sought for Brewster cleanup day

The second annual town cleanup day will be from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. April 20. Town employees, friends and neighbors are asked to help beautify the town in celebration of Earth Day on April 22, and in advance of the Brewster In Bloom weekend April 26-28. Fifteen teams, each led by a town employee or community organization leader, will be assigned to an area and provided with safety vests, bags and gloves. In 2012, teams collected 1,600 pounds of trash from Brewster roads and streets, according to a town press release. To volunteer, contact assistant coordinator Gwen Pelletier by email at gcpell@comcast.net or 508-280-7871.


apr05 Brewster

Brewster board pulls dog park plan

With a pack of dog park proposals floating around Brewster town meeting voters will find things a little easier at the May 7 confab - the selectmen pulled one plan from the warrant at their Monday night meeting. Gone, but not forgotten, is the proposal for a fenced-in dog park behind the Brewster Police Station on Route 124. That was article 27. Article 26, which posits a fenced in off-leash dog area at Drummer Boy Park remains on the warrant, as does the citizen's petition (article 25) which would permit dogs off-leash before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m. from May to October and all the time the rest of the time. New animal control (leash law) rules (article 24) will also be up for a vote. Another proposal by citizens, for a dog park off Route 137 on 15 acres of conservation commission controlled land, went before the cons-com Tuesday. Deficits, renewable energy, new school projects may be issues elsewhere but in Brewster it's dogs. "I suggest you pull 26 and 27 and leave the citizens petition as the one Drummer Boy option," urged selectmen Ed Lewis as the board refined the language of the two plans Monday and Peter Norton agreed. "We need to have an article on the warrant that represents a plan the board supports," selectman John Dickson countered. "My hunch is that's not either one of these two. So I believe we need an article about the other plan." The other plan, Route 137, wasn't on the agenda or up to the selectmen. The conservation commission will make that decision. But on Monday at least the 137 location, near the senior housing on Frederick Court, appeared promising - if beyond their control. "The reason 27 was created was to give an alternative to 26," chairman Dan Rabold said. "I don't see any problem leaving this on because we don't know the outcome of the other project."

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apr05 Brewster

Abutters blast Brewster dog park plan

Brewster's "dog park" may turn out to be the dog park in Dennis - anywhere but in Brewster - or so it seems. The 'compromise' proposal for a small fenced area on 15-acres of conservation land off Route 137 and near the Frederick Court Senior housing drew furious opposition Tuesday night at the conservation commission's discussion of the plan. One audience member even declared that people would die if the dog park were built. Nevertheless the plan is still alive and under consideration. And for the record, the potential fatality wouldn't come at the jaws of an excited poodle but because ambulance access to the senior housing would be blocked by dog-related traffic. The citizen's proposal would create nine parking spaces and park access via Brewster Road (which also provides access to Frederick Court). There would be two small black-chain-link fenced-in areas near the parking, one for large dogs, one for small. Natural vegetation would buffer the park from surrounding homes. The dog park proper would be under the trees, with underbrush cleared. Dogs would be on a leash unless they were inside the fence. The park would be funded by donations and gifts. Bags for waste clean-up would be provided. Initially there were complaints about dogs at Drummer Boy Park followed by discussions of numerous alternatives. They came to naught. Dogs were banned from Drummer Boy by the board of health. A lawsuit re-instated them although the town has appealed it. A large multi-use park behind the police Department was voted down at town meeting last fall and Monday night a proposed dog park behind the police station was pulled from the town warrant. A citizen's petition allowing unleashed dogs at Drummer Boy is on the May town meeting warrant, along with a fenced park at Drummer Boy that the selectmen do not really support. So the park off Route 137, recently conceived, looked appealing and has already met with approval from the selectmen, board of health, housing authority and town counsel. But the abutters felt left out.

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apr05 Chatham

Vote on Mitchell River Bridge

Townspeople are being asked to vote on stone cladding for the Mitchell River Bridge. There are four different options available and they are currently on display at town hall. The Mitchell River Bridge was deemed eligible for the National Historic Register and, under federal law, a group of "consulting parties" met for more than a year to hammer out the best way to protect the bridge, built in the mid-1800s. Although a contingent of preservationists said the all-wood timber drawbridge should be replaced with a wooden replica, the state department of transportation prevailed and the bridge will have a concrete substructure. The stone cladding will be placed on the central concrete pier and concrete abutments. The $11 million project to replace the deteriorating bridge is being paid for by federal and state monies under the accelerated bridge program.


apr05 Chatham

Chatham's "No Nukes" history still relevant

Resident Nancy Erskine said that Chatham has a "No Nukes" history so it's problematic that the Pilgrim Nuclear Power plant is operating right across the bridge. So Erskine and a contingent of supporters have lobbied - and received selectmen's approval - to get a non-binding ballot question before voters in May. The question, which is appearing on Town Meeting warrants and ballots across the Cape, asks that Gov. Deval Patrick ask the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reconsider their approval of re-licensing the plant in Plymouth. Erskine said Chatham has a "long history of nuclear concern" as evidenced by a "No Nukes" plaque that has hung in town hall since the early 1980s.


apr05 Chatham-Harwich-Monomoy

Monomoy school district chooses new school chief

The second superintendent of the newly created Monomoy Regional School District will be Scott Carpenter, the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District superintendent and high school principal. The vote by the Monomoy Regional School Committee at its meeting Wednesday night was unanimous, Chairman Brian Widegren said. "It wasn't easy to choose," said Widegren. "Each candidate had something that stood out. A lot of us felt he had the best combination of all the factors." Carpenter will replace Carolyn Cragin, who has been the superintendent since May 2011, soon after Harwich and Chatham voters authorized the creation of the Monomoy school district in 2010. Cragin oversaw the major shift to regionalization and the process of designing and funding a new regional high school in Harwich. She is retiring in June, and Carpenter, who still has to finalize some aspects of his contract, will start on July 1. While his educational background is largely in the sciences, Carpenter believes schools should produce well-rounded individuals. Still, he does support the state push to improve students' mastery of science, math and technology. "We need to have engaging but rigorous science and technology programs because jobs on the Cape, in the state and nationally that really provide the economic strength of the region, come from a strong understanding of science," he said Thursday. According to his resume, Carpenter has bachelor's and master's degrees in biology, as well as a master's of arts degree in teaching science. He graduated from Harvard University with a principal certification and another master's in 2003 and expects to complete coursework in a doctoral program in teaching, curriculum, learning and leadership at Northeastern University this July. In 13 years at Lincoln-Sudbury, Carpenter moved up from an assistant to the principal to a housemaster, overseeing one-quarter of the student body. He was named superintendent/principal in 2009. The regional high school has 1,600 students, and the district built a new $74 million facility in 2002. Carpenter served as the district's accountant, reviewing payments made from the construction and general budgets during the building process. As the new Monomoy superintendent, he will be the point man for the construction of another regional high school, this one designed for 700 students with a price tag of nearly $60 million.

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apr05 Harwich

Green thumbs-up! Ladybugs keep horticulture students busy

In the 80-degree greenhouse at Cape Cod Regional Technical High School in Harwich, five students huddle around floriculture teacher Nancy Knight as she uses a wand hose to wash their hands. Once their hands are clean and damp, Knight opens a small bag and begins gently pouring ladybugs into their cupped hands. The students take the ladybugs to various incredibly healthy looking plants and carefully disperse them. "Look, they're waking up," says Tayla Gimblett, a senior from Dennis. "Ladybugs are plant protectors to keep the plants healthy. They eat the bad insects like aphids." About every two months, horticulture students release a new batch of ladybugs, which come in pint-size cotton bags filled with excelsior from A-1 Unique Insect Control in California. The ladybugs are dispersed slowly over a three-week period. Knight releases just enough ladybugs to maintain a proper balance. The ones that haven't been freed live in the horticulture department's cooler, where the 35 degree temperature keeps them dormant. "We don't go and indiscriminately apply pesticides," Knight says. "We use different methods to control insect issues in the greenhouse and one of them is ladybugs, which are beneficial insects." While many insects such as praying mantises or lacewings can provide pest control, ladybugs are the most popular partly because they are so visually appealing. They are also hard workers, devouring many times their own weight during their life span. A young adult ladybug can eat up to 5,000 aphids. Since they only eat soft-bodied insects, vegetation is safe.

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apr05

County commissioners back charter review plan

County commissioners have thrown their support behind the Assembly of Delegate's proposal to form a county charter review committee. The commissioners voted unanimously during their regular meeting Wednesday to support the formation of the seven-member committee. The assembly approved the proposal on March 20. The three commissioners comprise the executive branch for Cape Cod's regional government. The 15-member assembly is the county's legislative body. At its meeting Wednesday, the assembly asked the review committee to consider - among other things - inserting a recall provision for elected county officials into the charter, said Ronald Bergstrom, speaker of the assembly. A measure that would have required the committee to report back to the assembly before issuing final recommendations was rejected by the assembly, Bergstrom said. In 2012, a special commission that included former and current civic leaders and officials recommended that the assembly and the commissioners merge into a seven-member legislative panel. In February, the assembly passed a resolution that called for five county commissioners but left the assembly untouched.






Thursday, April 4, 2013

apr04 Wellfleet

CapeCast: When money grew on trees



apr04 Wellfleet

The Local Food Report by Elspeth Hay: A Slow-Rise Bread with an Unusual Local Grain

Elspeth Hay is an avid locavore who lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30am on Morning Edition and Thursdays at 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30am.




Spelt is an ancient grain-a hybrid of regular bread wheat and another wheat variety called farro or emmer. On the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay talks with Ed Miller of Wellfleet about a slow-rise spelt bread made with locally grown grain.



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apr04 Wellfleet-Provincetown

On this day in 1934: Vast ice field sweeping into P'town Harbor

On this day in 1934 about 100 boats of the Provincetown fishing fleet, valued at $100,000, and around $500,000 worth of waterfront property faced destruction as the ice menace at the tip of Cape Cod reached the most serious proportions of the winter. The New York Times article began: "At the same time near-by Wellfleet reported that its harbor was choked with four-foot field ice which had ripped out most of the piles under the 300-foot pier supporting the Chequessett Inn, a Summer hotel, and that the $50,000 structure might collapse before morning."




apr04 Wellfleet-Provincetown-Orleans-Chatham-Harwich

Peek into a Masonic Lodge on April 6th

Cape Codders can discover the secrets of the Masonic Lodge - some of the secrets, at least - on Saturday, April 6, 2013. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., all 16 Cape Cod Masonic Lodges will be open to the public for "Spring Open House", a state-wide open house for the Masonic fraternity. If you ever wondered who the Masons are or what they do, this is your chance to peek behind the curtain. Members will offer tours, discuss the organization's history and describe Freemasonry's many charitable programs. The Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts boasts over 35,000 members attending 230 Lodges across the state. The 280 year old organization boasted such members as George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Paul Revere and more. Paul Revere personally chartered several Lodges here on Cape Cod during his term as Grand Master in the 1790s. Freemasonry seeks to bring together men of every country, religion, race, background and opinion to develop the bonds of friendship between them. The Masons take seriously their goal of "making good men better."

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apr04 Eastham

Three vie for two selectmen's seats in Eastham

Lisa Panaccione, president of the Eastham Chamber of Commerce, will try to win a seat on the board of selectmen in the May 21 town election. Panaccione is running against two incumbents, Selectmen Wallace "Wally" Adams and John Knight, for two seats on the board. These three candidates returned nomination papers by the deadline Tuesday. This is the only contested race, according to the town clerk's office.


apr04 Eastham

Eastham Water costs presented

The latest information about the proposed $114.8 million municipal water system was presented to interested citizens Tuesday, covering the topic of cost to the town and homeowners. The same topic will be covered tomorrow in another information session. The cost to a homeowner with a home assessed for $400,000 would be $17,875 over 29 years, Selectman Linda Burt, who chaired the meeting, told the large number of citizens who turned out. "We are well aware that this is a huge investment for the town," she said. "But the selectmen feel the more you know about this system, and the financing, and everything, the better decision you will be able to make when you finally have to vote." The first phase of the six-phase system will cost $40.8 million and will include one water tank, well development, and pipes, to connect 2,086 properties, including 80 percent of the commercial properties. This phase will deal with the properties near the landfill where 1,4 Dioxane, a possible human carcinogen, was found this past November in a monitoring well and three private wells. The town is providing bottled water to nine families in this area as a result of that discovery. The second phase of project will cost $15.5 million and will connect 1,036 properties. Phase 3 will cost $19.9 million and will include 13,600 properties, and Phase 6 will cost $4.1 million and connect 274 properties, including Cape Cod National Seashore and beaches. All six phases will be bonded. The cost to taxpayers will vary from $300 a year to $966. The average annual cost will be $616 a year of $52 a month. Those who hook up will pay an average yearly water bill of $250. Those connecting will also have to pay $12 to $16 a foot to hire someone to dig the trench for the water pipe to bring the water to the house, and they will need to pay about $250 to a plumber to connect the system in the house. Once the system is completed in 2016, Burt said, it would cost $1 million a year to operate it. The town will contract a private company to maintain, repair and collect the fees. It will not have to create a new town water department. "The reason we would bid this out is that special equipment and training is needed to run the system 24 hours a day, seven days a week," Burt said. The system will be able to connect every home on every street in town, whether it is a town road, a private or a dirt road. All property owners would be taxed for the system, but it will be up to each property owner to decide whether to connect to it or not.

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apr04 Eastham-Nauset

Warriors continue to court success

The Nauset girls tennis team got off to the start they were hoping for, as they rolled to 5-0 win over Sturgis on Wednesday afternoon. The girls officially kicked off their season with a battle against Cape Cod Academy on Monday, but that match had to be postponed at 2-2 due to darkness. Despite losing their number one player from a season ago, Warriors coach Kathleen Tringale said she expects her team to again be very competitive and will compete for an Atlantic Coast League title once again. "Falmouth is likely going to be our toughest league opponent. They didn't lose much from last season, and we were very even last season, so those will be close matches." Nauset went 18-2 last season, and secured the fifth seed in the Div. 2 South tournament, where they fell in a tight match against Westwood. This season, Nauset will look to their experienced ace Ally Dadoly for success. "She's a very strong number one, who'll really do very well this season," said coach Tringale, noting that competing in the off-season has been an important step in her top players development. The Warriors will also bank on the experience of Emma Gubbins, a junior who's been a strong singles player and will play in the number two spot for Nauset this season.

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apr04 Provincetown

Provincetown voters dump police station plan

Voters on Wednesday night shot down a proposal to rehab the town's deficient police station. They sided with the majority of the selectmen Wednesday by turning away a petitioned article proposing the use of up to $3 million to renovate the station. Article 30 was indefinitely postponed at about 11:10 p.m. Wednesday, the third and final night of town meeting. About 240 people attended. Finance committee member and Article 30 proponent Michael Canizales urged voters to speak up about what they want in a police station and save a year of further study. The petitioned article challenged town leaders who want to continue studying options for a new police station and bring a proposal to town meeting voters in the fall. Some of the article's opponents, such as Selectman Austin Knight, chairman of the board, said the proposed amount was unrealistic. Article 30 authorized the selectmen and town manager to spend the money but did not mandate the spending, Town Counsel John Giorgio had said in recent weeks. Specifically the article called for $2 million to be spent on design, site work and construction with $500,000 for contingencies and $500,000 for temporary housing of the police department. Proponents of Article 30 argued Wednesday that the price tag on a new police station was more than could be swallowed by property taxpayers and that more open discussion and clear direction is needed. An estimate in 2012 set the price at $14.6 million, but town officials and a town building committee organized to recommend a site and design have been working to pare the price down and refine what the police department needs for space. The current station was built in 1975 as funeral home and was purchased by the town for use as a police station in 1984. The lot at 26 Shank Painter Road is just under a half acre, and the building has about 6,000 square feet. A new station could need in the range of 14,000 square feet, town records from late 2012 indicate.

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apr04 Provincetown

Police on hot seat, all requests OK'd 2nd night of Provincetown Town Meeting

uesday night's Town Meeting began in reverse, with resident Barbara Rushmore announcing that she collected 10 voter signatures so that the fiscal 2014 operating budget for public safety, which was approved Monday night, could be reconsidered. She wanted $111,181 of it transferred from the public safety budget line to the harbormaster's - and thus keep cops off the pier. "I think that it's ridiculous to have the police on the wharf and for us to pay for it. I think it should be under the harbormaster," Rushmore said of the article she wanted amended. "It is my strong feeling that the harbormaster should run the wharf and the police should not be involved unless they're called. . It was running for at least 50 years that I know of with a harbormaster and we didn't have to have police stationed there." But Harbormaster Rex McKinsey preferred police presence over money. "I appreciate you wanting to almost double my budget . but its not going to have [the outcome you think]," he said. McKinsey said a police presence is necessary because the harbormaster's office has changed over time into "a multi-mode of transportation center." On a busy Saturday he said, 10,000 people cross the pier on their way into town, and there's the fishing fleet, whale watching and more. "Over the past 10 years that I've been on the pier, we've been through a number of changes." The harbormaster needs to delegate some work because it's so busy, he said and the marine patrol officer, or MPO, project, now in its second year, is intended to do that. "I ask you, I urge you, to vote down that amendment," McKinsey said. After a near hour-long deliberation, the voters did just that. The amendment failed with 114 opposed and 76 in favor. But the cops remained in the hot seat.

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apr04 Provincetown

'For the Love of the Music' comes back to Provincetown

For those who missed the sold-out screening of the folk-rock documentary "For the Love of the Music," shown back in the winter at Wellfleet Preservation Hall, community radio station WOMR 92.1, producer and host of "The Old Songs Home," is bringing the film to the Davis Space at the WOMR Schoolhouse, 494 Commercial St., Provincetown. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 5. Tickets, $10, are available by calling (508) 487-2619, at www.womr.org and at the door. Refreshments will be served. As a special treat, Betsy Siggins Schmidt, founder and director of New England Folk Music Archives, introduces the film and leads a post-screening Q&A.


apr04 Orleans

Orleans to stay in historical district

Despite discussion otherwise, it looks as though the town will remain part of the Old King's Regional Historic District after a selectmen's meeting Wednesday. Orleans is one of six towns making up the Old King's Highway Regional Historic District, and has been for decades. In the past months, board of selectmen Chairman Jon Fuller and Fire Chief William Quinn have said it was time for a change. But for now, the town will remain a part of the district, as a number of board members expressed concern over the rights and protections the distinction grants to property owners, and selectmen voted to remove the article from the town warrant. "I'm favoring withdrawal," said Selectman Sims McGrath, "but the protections may be something residents enjoy, rely on." Residents may have purchased their homes with the district in mind and would be upset if things changed, he said. Vice Chairman David Dunford agreed. "The issue to me is if you give up the regional protections, you give it up," he said of an alternative idea proposed that the town adopt a local historical district status. Towns pay thousands - Orleans about $10,000 each year - to be part of the district, which aims to preserve the unique history of the area. Established in 1973, the district is the largest historic district in the country. The district runs in the area north of Route 6 from Sandwich to Orleans and along Route 6A. But in Orleans, it veers off into neighborhoods, many of which are not historic.

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apr04 Orleans-Nauset

Nauset Middle School greenhouse fundraiser

It will be made of polycarbonate but you can buy a "brick" to help fund the construction of a greenhouse at Nauset Regional Middle School. The greenhouse will be a free-standing, 30 x 50 foot polycarbonate, atrium style structure to be built at the Nauset Middle School campus in Orleans. According to the project's website, the greenhouse will afford opportunities for students and community members to engage in:

  • Growing agricultural and horticultural products for the Nauset Community
  • Examining the physical properties of a variety of food and ornamental plants
  • Conducting scientific research and experimentation
  • Learning about ecologically sound growing practices
  • Exploring renewable energy sources and environmental stewardship
  • Connecting principles of engineering, science and entrepreneurship
  • Enhancing the visual arts through gardening design, decoration and painting
  • Fostering an appreciation for the uniqueness of Cape Cod plant life

To raise funds for this project, the Nauset Regional Middle School Greenhouse Building Project Fund, Inc. was formed as a 501(c)(3) public charity. The group is properly registered with both the IRS and the Massachusetts Attorney General's public charities division. Donors may contribute any amount they choose. Individual donors of $100 or more may commission a brick for the greenhouse walkway, which will be engraved with their family name, memorial or name of a Nauset student. Business donors of $300 or more may have a double brick with their business name. The group hopes to raise $120,000 to purchase, construct and equip the greenhouse. $30,000 has been raised thus far, according to the project website. To donate or learn more about the project, visit www.nrmsgreenhouse.org or call the school at 508-255-0016.

apr04 Orleans

Invitation issued to Orleans artists

The Art at the Orleans Senior Center Board invites artists and photographers from Orleans to enter their most creative original work in a juried summer-into-fall art exhibit from June 22 to Sept. 26 at the Orleans Senior Center. "The Goldman Show," in memory of E. Stanley Goldman, 1913-2013, a benefactor who endowed the permanent art collection at Orleans Senior Center, has an open theme. Works in oil, acrylic, watercolor, pastel and pencil, photography, mixed media collage, print making, computer art and outdoor sculpture are welcome. Entry is open to adult, living artists from Orleans. Art submitted must be suitably framed original work, minimum size 8-by-10-inches, maximum length of any side, 36 inches. Entries are due Friday, June 14, 1 to 5 p.m. at the Orleans Senior Center, 150 Rock Harbor Road. The jury fee is $12 per entry, maximum two entries. Prizes will be awarded at the combined Art Opening and Orleans Improvement Association annual Garden Tour reception June 22. Detailed information is available at the front reception counter at the senior center and online at www.atcapecod.com/aosc. For more information, 508-255-6333.


apr04 Brewster

Brewster races emerge for selectmen, schools

There will be races for the board of selectmen, the school committee and constable in the May 21 town election. The deadline to return nomination papers for elective office was Tuesday. Three people are running for two seats on the board of selectmen. Selectman Dan Rabold will run for re-election. Patricia Hughes and Ben deRuyter are also vying for a seat. Edward Lewis will not seek another term. Up for re-election on the Brewster School Committee, David Telman will face challenges from Patricia Hill and Jessica Larsen for the two open seats. Roland Bassett Jr. will seek re-election as constable, facing off against Scott Collum. The annual town election is May 21.


apr04 Brewster

Town will pick up Brewster school's special needs tab

Just like a gallant date, Brewster's selectmen have decided they will pick up the tab for a bump in special needs cost for Brewster's schools. The school committee spent the past month trimming costs to approach the town's target of a 2.75 percent increase ($6,657,028), but special needs costs had burgeoned 18.3 percent at Stony Brook Elementary School, in part to an out-of district placement. The school committee was left with a $33,222 shortfall and the selectmen agreed to their plea to use free cash to cover the higher cost. That represents a 3.95 percent increase over FY2013. "At the most recent meeting we reaffirmed these numbers feeling it would be extremely difficult to make additional reductions," said Nauset Regional School Superintendent Richard Hoffmann. "We felt we couldn't go any further without affecting the education of all the kids," agreed Dave Telman, chairman of the Brewster Elementary School Committee. "This is all about special needs," Selectman Ed Lewis concurred. "The law says what you have to do. In the future the Legislature has to figure out a way not to cut the education of non-special needs kids." The school department is taking in some money from renting class space at Stony Brook Elementary to the YMCA's preschool program and they've trimmed the cafeteria staffs from six to four.

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apr04 Chatham-Harwich-Monomoy

Monomoy picks L-S school chief as superintendent

The Monomoy school committee has selected Lincoln-Sudbury's Scott Carpenter as its next superintendent, and Carpenter has accepted pending a contract negotiation, according to the Cape Cod district. Carpenter, L-S's school chief since 2009, had been one of four finalists for the job. He was also in the running earlier this year for Harvard's superintendent, but eventually withdrew his candidacy. Monomoy, a relatively new regional school district, includes the towns of Chatham and Harwich.


apr04 Harwich

Two candidates for school board in Harwich

The deadline to return nomination papers was Tuesday, and there is just one contested race in the May 21 town election. Incumbent Edwin Jaworski will face off against challenger John O'Brien for the Monomoy Regional School Committee. Uncontested seats include incumbent Selectmen Linda Cebula and Ed McManus; incumbent Water Commissioner Danette Gonsalves; longtime Town Clerk Anita Doucette; and two candidates running for two seats on the Brooks Free Library board of trustees, incumbent William Crowell and Ann Emerson.


apr04 Harwich

Harwich author finds success with e-publishing

It's a tough, new world out there for writers and publishers. In recent years, sales of printed books, newspapers, and magazines have dropped as readers turn to electronic and web-based versions. But local author W. Matthew Hart, 68, has hit a vein of success with the digital publication of more than a dozen murder-mysteries. He sells them through Amazon. "It's amazing, after a decade of writing and not being published. I've done so well this year," said Hart, a South Chatham native who now lives in Harwich. "The old book publishing standards (and publishers) are going the way of the horse and buggy," he said. His sales numbers are impressive. Of his 15 books listed on Amazon, he has more than 2,000 sales so far, including 588 in the month of March. His downloadable books cost between $1 and $5. His printed ones range from $5 to $14. "The mistake I made years ago was thinking that my work would get published just because a company was interested," he said, explaining that one publisher said they liked his work but never took action. "The fact is that they just sat on it. They said they wouldn't act without a contract and one never emerged so I took them all back," he said. From a young age, Hart was fascinated with ocean voyages, mysteries, and thrillers. He especially liked stories that relied on problem solving with technology. The fact that he was drawn to the water was no surprise because for generations his relatives have been ship captains traveling the world. His grandfather, Walter Matthew Hart, was a sea captain of several large commercial boats, including the S.S. Deepwater, which was attacked in 1942 by a German submarine off New Jersey. The boat sank but he survived. Hart graduated from Chatham high school with a hope for exciting adventures. He became a U.S. Marine and specialized in electronics. In his seventh year he was injured in a helicopter accident but stayed in the reserves for another 11 years.

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Wednesday, April 3, 2013

apr03 Wellfleet

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch: Windfall Creates A Transcendent Carpet of Birds

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. He has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday morning at 8:35am and Tuesday afternoon at 5:45pm. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.




Many rewards in nature come from procrastination. On a Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch recounts a recent experience of walking out to get the mail and finding his wind-littered driveway alive with bright foraging birds.




apr03 Wellfleet

Ira Wood on WOMR: Pilgrim Nuclear Power Issues with Diane Turco and Bruce Taub

Ira Wood is an author, a teacher, a former publisher, a former selectman, and the host of a weekly radio program called The Lowdown on WOMR-FM, Cape Cod's Community Radio Station. For over 30 years Ira has made his home in Wellfleet. The Lowdown enables Ira to indulge his lifelong compulsion to pester people with questions.



apr03 Truro

Truro filmmaker teams up with Ugandan activist

Documentary filmmaker and North Truro resident Tim McCarthy and Ugandan gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights advocate Pepe Julian Onziema will begin a joint film project this month in Uganda. The project will explore the cultural and legal history of alternative sexual orientations in Uganda and record the personal histories of LGBT Ugandans. The film is meant to be shown primarily in Uganda. The pair is raising money for the film project through a Kickstarter.com campaign titled "Voices of the Abasiyazzi." Onziema is program director for Sexual Minorities Uganda, which filed a lawsuit in 2012 with help from the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York against Springfield-area minister Scott Lively. The lawsuit claims that since a 2002 visit to Uganda, Lively has waged a campaign with like-minded people in that country to persecute people there because of their gender, sexual orientation and gender identity. Lively, through his attorney, has said that Sexual Minorities Uganda is attempting in the lawsuit to suppress free speech in Uganda and use a U.S. law in a way that is beyond its original intent. In early January, Onziema visited McCarthy in North Truro and then on Jan. 7 attended a motion to dismiss hearing in the Springfield court. The judge in the case is still considering the arguments, according to court records.


apr03 Provincetown

Enthusiasts restore piece of Coast Guard history

One of the few remaining motorized Coast Guard surfboats has come back home to the Cape. Under the fluorescent lights of the garage at Coast Guard Station Chatham, volunteers have been painting the 26-foot wooden boat and restoring its Buda diesel motor. South Dennis resident Dick Boonisar donated it to the Cape Cod National Seashore. The boat, which has four rowing stations, will go on display at the Old Harbor Lifesaving Station in Provincetown. "I really felt it should stay on the Cape because that's where it came from. I thought the Seashore would be a good custodian of it," said Boonisar, noting that he also approached other maritime organizations. Boonisar has always had an interest in the Coast Guard. He remembers his summers growing up next to Gurnet Point Lifesaving Station in Plymouth. When the Coast Guard decommissioned the station he bought it and has spent years restoring it. When the old Coast Guard surfboat became available, Boonisar bought it from an Eastham man in 1973. "It was something I had room for," he said. "I bought it to use it and I did use it." But maintaining and storing the 4,000-pound boat got to be a bit much, Boonisar said. He ended up mothballing it and putting it on exhibit at the Gurnet station. Last month, it was taken to Chatham where Coast Guardsmen are among those who have volunteered their time to sand and repaint the boat and also restore the motor. The boat has a long history on the Cape. It was originally thought to have been built in the mid-1940s and was part of the Nauset Coast Guard Station in Eastham. It might have been on the Coast Guard cutter Bibb. It is one of only about three motorized surfboats in the country, said Richard Ryder, one of the volunteers helping to restore the boat. He is also a volunteer at the Old Harbor Lifesaving Station. Once on display, Ryder said, visitors to the Old Harbor Lifesaving Station will be able to see the evolution of surfboats from oars to engines.


apr03 Provincetown

$1 million OK'd to pave Commercial Street

On the second night of annual town meeting, voters Tuesday approved a second Proposition 2½ debt exclusion for $1 million to pave more of Commercial Street and additional road maintenance. The measure will add $38.21 in property taxes in the first year for a median single-family home with an assessed value of $603,650. On Monday, voters also approved $250,000 as a Proposition 2½ debt exclusion for new docks at MacMillan Pier, which were damaged in the Feb. 8-9 snowstorm. This would add $19.11 in the first year of taxes for the same type of property. The paving borrowing is over 10 years, and the pier borrowing is over five years. Both debt exclusions have to be approved by voters at the May 7 town election, as well. About 240 people attended the second meeting. Town meeting will continue tonight. On Monday, voters approved the first three sections of the $22.3 million operating budget for the next fiscal year. But on Tuesday voters chose to reconsider one aspect of what had been approved on Monday, namely the use of $111,000 for police officers at the town pier. The marine patrol officer program will be in its second year this summer, but resident Barbara Rushmore urged voters to eliminate the program by asking that the money be transferred from the police department back to the harbormaster's office. Voters also approved budgets of $3.1 million for public works, $901,724 for public services and $3.4 million for public schools on Tuesday. Voters agreed to spend about $400,000 in Community Preservation Act money for renovations of an old school that houses the WOMR/WFMR radio station, the exterior of the former high school, a historic cemetery, a Fine Arts Work Center barn and a basketball court in the East End. The police department received a nod to buy an animal control vehicle and a cruiser and to make further payments on two other cruisers, as well as buy bulletproof vests and speed signs, all for about $116,000 and paid from free cash. Voters approved $90,000 from a capital improvement fund to buy an all-terrain vehicle and a command vehicle for the fire and rescue department. The public works department was allowed to spend $100,000 on storm water management, $279,555 on vehicles and $45,000 on a building maintenance plan, among other items. Voters also OK'd additional parking lot maintenance costs of $144,000, $15,600 for a school fence and $40,000 for an emergency generator.

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apr03 Provincetown

We're off to see the 'Wizard' in Provincetown

Dust off your ruby slippers, get out your fine theater-going apparel and let Toto know that he's not in Kansas anymore. Provincetown Schools is putting on "The Wizard of Oz" this weekend. As usual, this latest in a long tradition of the schools' spring musicals involves everyone who wished to take part from the start - on stage, back stage and in any number of supporting positions. The cast, led by senior Molly Nelson as Dorothy, includes more than 30 students, ranging in age from 4 to 18 years old. With many small children of varying stage experience likely to be on stage all at once at any given time, audiences can expect charming, occasionally chaotic, pure entertainment, from the opening lilt of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" all the way to the final curtain. Theater arts teacher Eleanor Lincoln deserves enormous credit for directing the show and guiding virtually all aspects of this enterprise. She and school administrators selected this year's show, Lincoln says, "keeping in mind a school vision of inclusive performances where students of all ages can be involved, and with scripts and music that are appropriate for a family audience." The popular original film has seen many live stage reincarnations since its initial 1942 production by the Municipal Theatre of St. Louis. Lincoln notes that the script from this latest Provincetown production is an hour-long version from the Tams-Witmark Young Performer's Collection. A few scenes have been shortened or cut, and a cast favorite, "Jitterbug," has been added as a dance feature. "Jitterbug," shot for the original MGM film, never made it past the cutting room floor. Producers at the time deemed the jitterbug dance too dated and did not want their masterpiece stuck in any particular era. Some subsequent stage productions returned this lively ensemble piece. Even in rough rehearsal form, "Jitterbug" promises to be a showstopper. The young Provincetown troopers clearly enjoy strutting their stuff as they sing, dance and cavort in mock fear and high spirits. Giving credit to her troupe, Lincoln observes, "I think the play captures the imagination the way the film has for years. The Munchkins are still adorable, the flying monkeys a bit frightening and the lead quartet full of personality."

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apr03 Provincetown

Provincetown festival spotlights seven plays

Seven plays will premiere this week as part of the 2013 Spring Playwrights Festival at Provincetown Theater. Shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the 238 Bradford St. venue. More than two dozen actors, directors and writers - some doing double duty - will be involved with the seven new short plays, with topics ranging from a crime thriller to explorations of emotions, dreams and a mysterious box. Several were developed in the theater's playwrights lab and submissions were voted on anonymously by a group of readers.

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apr03 Provincetown

WOMR: COA Specially for Seniors - Gracenotes with Polly Saunders and Mary Abt




apr03 Orleans

WOMR: This Place Matters with Susan Lindquist - Orleans Chamber of Commerce Exec. Director Noelle Pina




apr03 Orleans

Town of Orleans announces taking of property for non-payment of taxes

According to a notice issued by the Tax Collector's Office Monday, the Town is planning to take twenty-one parcels of land for non-payment of property taxes. A deadline of 11 a.m. on Thursday, April 18, 2013 was set for payment to be made. If not received in full, the Town will take the parcels under MA General Law, Chapter 60, Section 53. The law gives towns and cities the right to take land fourteen days after a demand is made if the taxes are not paid. In all, the Town is looking to collect $128,454.76 in unpaid property taxes and water liens. The most owed by one owner is $21,542.73. The least owed is $37.47. The parcels are scattered across town and include private homes, business buildings and condo units:

  • $3,344.98, 265 South Orleans Road, owner of record: Estate of Philip C. Bergstrom, Joseph C. Bergstrom and Eva A. Bergstrom
  • $18,715.07 - 9 Cheney Road - owner of record: James L. Boardman
  • $3,696.54 - 55 Quanset Road - owner of record: Elizabeth Q. Brown
  • 8,467.28 - 22 Tonset Road - owner of record: Alan Carrier
  • $1,894.36 - 17 Franz Road - owner of record: John Chamberlain
  • $5,769.35 - 21 Namskaket Road - owner of record: Lillias H. Childs Etal.
  • $985.50 - 179 Skaket Beach Road - owner of record: Miriam C. Fern
  • $7,653.21 - 18 Ruggles Road - owner of record: Virginia K. Hamilton & Noel John Fenton; TRS/Realty Trust
  • $5,775.37 - 165 Route 6A - owner of record: Law Offices of William C. Henchy, PC
  • $5,948.46 - 28 West Road - owner of record: William L. Hirst
  • $10,474.57 - 9 Hubler Lane - owner of record: Brian G. Hubler
  • $8,880.38 - 9 Crescent Ridge Way - owner of record: Charles H. Hull Jr. and Jill M. Hull
  • $10,658.80 - 8 Cove Road - owner of record: Gerald E. Parent and Audrey S. Parent
  • $2,709.83 - 21 Bog Hollow Road - owner of record: Jan and Sean Smith
  • $1,440.36 - 257 Rock Harbor Road - owner of record: Sean C. Smith
  • $37.47 - 13 South Orleans Road Unit 34 - owner of record: Derek Stone TR/Stone Realty Trust
  • $2,208.35 - 2 Jack Knife Point Road - owner of record: Roger W. Vose
  • $21,542.73 - 81 Monument Road - owner of record: Mira Yamaoka TR/The Monument Raod Realty Trust
  • $1,526.60 - 27 Clayton Circle - owner of record: Michael A. Zawadzkas and Jane F. Zawadzkas
  • $2,741.71 - 25 Herring Brook Way - owner of record: Claudia Zohorsky, Elieen Donahoe, Matthew Chamberlain as Distributees of the Sutphin Trust

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apr03 Orleans

Farming, fertilizer use changes to face Orleans' voters

So, asked Selectman John Hodgson, what if my neighbor runs out and buys 200 chickens - would this new "right to farm" bylaw change the level of protection for him or me? Nope, said David Light of the Agricultural Advisory Council; the proposed bylaw would only codify already existing state regulations in the town's bylaws and help educate the public about the rights of farmers. It doesn't increase protections for those who farm, he said, but lets folks know the community supports farming. The right to farm bylaw was one of eight discussed at a public hearing last week, all of which will appear before town meeting voters in May. Selectmen supported the bylaw, which brought a host of farmers to town hall to speak on its behalf. Light said if the bylaw is passed Orleans will join 116 communities across the Commonwealth, three of which - Harwich, Falmouth and Yarmouth - are on the Cape. Along with being a tool for education, the bylaw is an emblem of the town's support for its heritage and the continuing culture of farming in town, explained Judy Scanlon, a farmer who also has the oldest farmstand in town. "It's been part of our history for several hundred years," said Scanlon who grows a variety of plants and vegetables along with raising chickens. Vince Ollivier, a cranberry grower, added the bylaw could be a boon to the economy as well. "I think there is a lot to be said for promoting it," he said. "Letting people know that if you buy local and grow local it is good for everybody around." Scanlon said after the meeting that she has hundreds of local customers and a trio of local businesses - Agway, Friends' Marketplace and Phoenix Fruit Market and Grocery Store - that support her small farm. "[Locally grown food] is important to people and they want to support the local farmer," she said. "Customers leave me sweet little notes [saying] thank you for being here. I get notes all the time."

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apr03 Orleans

Conservation mooring meeting in Orleans

A group of concerned residents have organized an informational meeting about conservation moorings at Snow Library Wednesday, April 10, from 1 to 3 p.m. Mary Hartley, one of the organizers, said she hopes people turn out to hear about the moorings, also called elastic moorings, which eliminate the scouring caused by traditional chain moorings. "I think everyone should know as much as possible about this subject, so we can make fair and informed decisions about this important issue," she said, adding the town has 1,300 moorings. Tom Hill of Hazelett Moorings and Royce Randlett of Helix Moorings, two of the top vendors in New England, will demonstrate their mooring systems. The Urban Harbors Institute at UMass Boston plans to send a representative to comment on its "Conservation Mooring Study, January 2013." The town, like others on the Cape, is struggling with nitrogen pollution and is looking into whether conservation moorings can help alleviate the problem. Since they don't drag on the bottom, researchers say the conservation moorings help protect eelgrass beds and reduce turbidity.


apr03 Brewster

Brewster home damaged by boiler explosion

A boiler explosion Tuesday night caused serious damage to a home on Thomegan Road. Two residents of the home, John and Victoria Petrowski, as well as neighbors heard and felt the explosion, which destroyed the oil-fired furnace, according to Brewster Fire Chief Robert Moran. The Petrowski's called the fire department and firefighters were dispatched to the home at 8:31 p.m. When they arrived, they found evidence of an explosion. Firefighters went to the basement area of the home and saw that an overhead garage door and the gable end of a wall had been blown outward several feet from the force of the blast, according to a fire department press release. There was extensive damage to the basement interior as well as to a vehicle parked in an adjoining garage. Large pieces of the furnace, walls, and other debris was scattered throughout the area. The floor directly above the basement boiler room was also dislodged and pushed upward and a oil fuel tank suffered some damage and had a minor leak.

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apr03 Brewster

Boiler explodes in Brewster

At 8:31 p.m. on Tuesday April 2, the Brewster Fire Department was dispatched to a service call for a reported boiler malfunction at 59 Thomegan Road. Upon arrival at the scene Engine 234 conducted an investigation of the basement area of the home and found the overhead garage door and the lower level of the west side gable end wall of the home pushed outward several feet and debris in the driveway from the force of a past boiler explosion. Further investigation of the basement found extensive interior destruction throughout the area including damage to a vehicle parked in the adjacent garage caused by large pieces of the furnace, debris, wooden partition walls, and storage being propelled throughout the area. In addition, the first floor directly above the basement boiler room was dislodged and pushed upward. The fuel oil tank was found to be displaced from its normal position and a minor leak was present. Fire personnel immediately secured the electric to the building, plugged the leak from the tank, and spread speedy dry throughout the area to absorb the spilled fuel. The Brewster Building Department responded to the scene to assess the structural damage to the residence. Based on the damage to the building, the fuel oil spill, and the utilities being shut down a determination to vacate the structure until a more thorough investigation could be conducted was made. NSTAR was contacted and responded to secure the utilities in the street and the DEP was notified of the fuel oil spill. Red Cross representatives were present and provided emergency housing for the residents of the home. All Brewster Fire units returned from the scene and were placed back in service at 10:15 p.m.


apr03 Harwich

Free STEM conference on Saturday in Harwich

A free STEM (science technology, engineering and mathematics) conference for early childhood educators will be from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Harwich Elementary School, 263 South St. The conference, "Growing Curiosity," will include a keynote address by Debra Murphy of Cape Cod Community College and workshops on STEM-related topics. Preregistration is required. For more information and to find out if space is still available, email fjoseph@monomoy.edu.


apr03 Harwich

Harwich High to hold workshop for parents

Harwich High School is hosting an adults-only community education workshop called "Raising Healthy Teens: Parents Make the Difference" on April 24. The free workshop will be presented by youth substance abuse prevention specialist Marilyn Belmonte (GetHealthyOutcomes.org) at 6:30 p.m. at Harwich High School, 75 Oak St. Topics will include alcohol, marijuana and prescription drugs, and how parents and caring adults are the crucial factor in keeping children safe and smart about the choices they face. Parents of middle school and high school-age students are encouraged to attend, as are school and town leaders, government representatives, media, community groups and concerned citizens. Baby-sitting will be available. Further information may be obtained by contacting Janis McGrory or Robin Titus at Harwich High School at 508-430-7207.


apr03 Harwich

Sen. Wolf urges caution on new budget and transportation bill

Sen. Dan Wolf (D-Harwich) said, indicating he did not know if he could support the plan, "I think the proposal that we've seen from the House and the Senate, while it does bridge some gaps, my initial read is that it falls short relative to our long-term ambitions and a long-term investment." "I think it's great that they've put out a proposal, but they definitely seem open to dialogue and discussion and discourse. So I don't think by any means this is the final word," Wolf said. House and Senate leaders on Tuesday roundly rejected Gov. Deval Patrick's plan for $1.9 billion in new transportation and education investments, rolling out a proposal that instead asks business, tobacco users and drivers to pay $500 million more a year to stabilize the transportation system. The plan - which would increase the cigarette tax by $1 per pack and raise the gas tax three cents a gallon - provides enough new revenue to close the MBTA budget gap without fare increases or service cuts this year, but does not rule them out in future years. It also allows the Massachusetts Department of Transportation by 2016 to pay employee salaries without borrowing, and increases local road and bridge repair aid by $100 million to $300 million in fiscal 2014. House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Senate President Therese Murray, however, said concerns about overburdening the middle class with tax hikes pushed them toward a scaled down proposal that raises no new revenue for Patrick's education agenda, and does not include specific financing for the proposed expansion of South Station, the extension of rail service to the South Coast or for the Green Line extension to Medford. The proposal also rejected Patrick's idea of recalibrating the state's income and sales taxes to produce a more "progressive" tax code that the governor said would ask wealthier residents to contribute more without increasing the tax burden on lower- to middle-class residents.

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apr03 Harwich

Harwich selectmen withdraw proclamation for CLC and CVEC

After withering criticism against Cape Light Compact and Cape and Vineyard Electric Co-op from several citizens, the board of selectmen withdrew its proclamation praising the organizations. Finance committee member Noreen Donahue questioned why the proclamation was necessary. She said the CVEC did not live up to the praise, particularly because of financial transparency issues, and she requested a public hearing on the matter. Selectmen Larry Ballantine defended the proclamation, but Harwich residents Shelia Bowen and Terry Hayden noted issues of financial transparency for CVEC in an assembly of delegates report. "This proclamation was never discussed, " said Hayden, " Mr. Worth was mistaken in signing this document." Barry Worth is the selectmen's representative to the CLC. Selectmen Angelo La Mantia said the glowing praise was "over the top."


apr03

Officials hail weekend rail service

Mary Regan of Needham isn't much of a beach person but that wouldn't stop her from hopping a train from South Station to Cape Cod once weekend rail service starts rolling down the tracks on Memorial Day weekend. "There are a lot of shops," Regan, 68, said about the Cape as she joined a throng at South Station watching the start of a press conference Tuesday to fete the seasonal offering. Regan said now that her brother lives on the Cape, she would probably visit more often. Besides, she said, "I like trains." If the stage full of politicians, state officials and Cape business leaders, and the crowd that gathered to watch them speak, are any indication, they're going to need a bigger train. Although the press event came on the same day Massachusetts House and Senate leaders released a budget plan that was less than what Gov. Deval Patrick had called for to make statewide transportation improvements, the pilot rail service known as CapeFLYER will be unaffected whatever the outcome of negotiations over taxes and infrastructure needs in the competing spending plans. To make the service permanent may require dedicated funding from the state, but for now money to operate CapeFLYER will come from fares and concessions on the rail cars, state Secretary of Transportation Richard Davey said. The Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority provided the state with $1.1 million in federal transportation funds to pay for improvements to the rail lines, said transit authority Administrator Thomas Cahir. The total operating cost, which Cahir has estimated at $180,000 to $190,000 for the season, should be covered by revenue from the service, he said.

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apr03

Murdoch puts Cape Cod Times up for sale

News Corp. is exploring the sale of its Dow Jones Local Media Group which is a collection of U.S. community newspapers including the Cape Cod Times. Owner Rupert Murdoch once referred to them as "those silly little Ottaway newspapers". Chief Executive Officer Pat Purcell and Chief Operating Officer William T. Kennedy of the Dow Jones Local Media Group said Tuesday Dow Jones "is currently engaged in a process that will likely result in the sale of local newspaper group and its assets". News Corp - the owner of Cape Cod Times says it has "retained the investment banking firm of Waller Capital Partners to handle potential bidders". The 77-year old Cape Cod Times was first published by businessman J.P. Dunn and Basil Brewer on October 19, 1936 as the Cape Cod Standard-Times, and was distributed jointly on the Cape with The New Bedford Standard-Times until the end of 1970. It was first published as an independent daily for Cape Cod on January 1, 1971 and renamed the Cape Cod Times on September 2, 1975.

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Tuesday, April 2, 2013

apr02 Truro

With breach filled, Truro hopes for best

Truro public workers have completed filling a breach in the barrier dunes at Ballston Beach and will plant beach grass in the coming days as the winter storm season subsides, public works director Paul Morris said Monday. "Hopefully, it will take hold," Morris said. The town moved about 40,000 yards of beach sand last week from Head of the Meadow Beach in North Truro to fill the breach that occurred during a storm on March 8 and 9. The rush of waves that broke through the dunes at Ballston Beach flooded the upper Pamet River Valley, inundating a freshwater marsh with seawater and sand, and leaving standing water in backyards of private homes and putting septic tanks and drinking water wells at risk of saltwater intrusion. Fencing is also being used to stabilize the beach at Ballston, and the town will work with a local environmental services company to further stabilize the new dune, Morris said. The cost to the town for the dune repairs, such as truck rentals, has not been tallied, he said. Town and Cape Cod National Seashore officials expect to hold a workshop in the late spring or early summer to look at a long-term solution to the occasional flooding of the river valley with seawater, according to Seashore Superintendent George Price.


apr02 Truro

CapeCast: Journey to an elusive resting place



apr02 Provincetown

Provincetown police lobby public for new police station

The police department invites residents and other interested people to open houses from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. April 10 and from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 4 at the station at 26 Shank Painter Road, as discussions about the need for a new police station and where it should be located continue. Articles at the special and annual town meetings this week attempt to address this issue, and talks will continue with the building committee and others in town hall through the fall. Police officers will be at the open houses to answer questions about the current and the proposed building. Voters at the special town meeting on Monday agreed to use another $41,000 to allow for further study of the town's options for a new station, but some voters wanted the money to be used specifically toward a renovation of the existing building on Shank Painter Road. The current police station was built in 1975 as a funeral home and was converted to a station about 30 years ago. In 2009 the newly-hired police chief Jeff Jaran sought a building needs assessment from The Center for Public Safety Inc. and Architects Design Group, both of Florida. That study found the current building deficient in 24 categories, ranging from parking and air conditioning to firearms storage to holding cells. The study, which included a three-day site visit, identified five critical deficiencies. The station has an unsafe and unsecured sally port, in the basement, for detainees to be unloaded. The study also identified an undersized and unsafe prisoner booking area. The six jail cells are easily flooded with water and sewage. The electrical wiring isn't designed for emergency communications equipment, and the station doesn't meet current codes for fire safety. Jaran used about $4,800 from the police department's drug forfeiture money fund to pay for the study. He has said since then that in this small fishing village with a volunteer fire department and a large influx of visitors during the summer, the police department is basically the town's 24-hour-a-day emergency operations center.


apr02 Provincetown

Provincetown Town Pier improvements OK'd

Town meeting Monday approved spending $250,000 above the limits of Proposition 2½ to pay for a new floating dock system at the town pier, including a study of a possible wave attenuator. The floating docks were damaged in the Feb. 8-9 snowstorm, and that damage has partly been blamed on the lack of a barrier to block waves coming from the east. A recommendation by the finance committee to lower the amount to $60,000, to first define what is needed with the wave attenuator and whether it will be worth the cost, failed. Several people called for a public decision-making process if town and pier officials determine that a wave attenuator is needed. The pier proposal is a debt exclusion, a temporary borrowing measure, Town Counsel John Giorgio said. The spending will also have to be approved at the town election on May 7. "We fully intend to keep the 40 fishermen who are down (at the floating docks) intact," Provincetown Public Pier Corp. board Chairman Lee Ash said at the meeting, in advising against the finance committee's proposal. The existing floating docks, which support about 40 seasonal fishing boats and generate about $100,000 in revenue each summer, have been repaired for the upcoming season with about $160,000 from the capital reserves of the Public Pier Corp. That money should be reimbursed from emergency money from state and federal sources, Ash said. The town doesn't carry insurance on the floating docks because the cost is too high, Harbormaster Rex McKinsey told the 280 voters attending Monday's special and annual town meetings.

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apr02 Provincetown

Provincetown Police Dept. joins PropertyRoom.com

Items that have been abandoned or lost in Provincetown, as well as town surplus items, will now be available for online auction. According to a Provincetown police release, the department has joined the online auction site PropertyRoom.com.   Founded in 1999 by former police officers, PropertyRoom.com partners with police departments and other municipal agencies including airports to offer items for auction to a wider audience than would be possible through traditional town-run auctions. Once items are bid on and won, PropertyRoom.com facilitates the transfer of the item and the proceeds are sent back to the town or agency. In March, the Provincetown Police Dept. sent several items to PropertyRoom.com for auction. Those items will be biddable for 7-8 days. According to the PropertyRoom.com website, over 2,700 departments/agencies are registered with the site and to date, nearly $50 million in proceeds have been sent to those clients. According to Provincetown police, if you believe something of yours is posted on PropertyRoom.com, you can check through the site and if you can proof it is yours, they will return it to you. Everything from jewelry to electronics, bikes and even cars are available for bidding. The Falmouth Police Department joined PropertyRoom.com in 2010 and the Barnstable Police Department joined in 2006.


apr02 Orleans

Swimming solution sought at Orleans' Meetinghouse Pond

For 14 years Meredith Mayo took her own children to swimming lessons at Meetinghouse Pond. A generation later she began taking close to a half a dozen grandchildren and this summer yet another grandchild was going to start, until the state intervened. Recent state regulations are forcing towns to post bathing beaches and because Meetinghouse Pond is close to a boat-launching ramp, which conflicts with another state law, selectmen decided to pull the plug on swimming lessons there. Meetinghouse Pond joins about eight other beaches where swimming is no longer allowed. Only Nauset, Skaket, Pilgrim and Crystal made the cut. "I just find this thing ludicrous," said Mayo. Mayo has started a campaign, calling around and appearing before selectmen last week, to try and find a solution to the problem before the summer season. She has come up with a few suggestions, including not allowing boat launching from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., when lessons occur or moving the moorings about 300 feet. Mayo said the water at the landing is so shallow the only boats that launch nowadays are kayaks. Selectmen are not unsympathetic, and understand that close to a hundred children are now without a place to learn how to swim. "We recognize there is a need for some kind of salt water swimming area," said Selectmen chairman Jon Fuller. He said the board is having Dawson Farber, director of natural resources, look into possible fixes at Meetinghouse Pond as well as other salt-water swimming spots. If Meetinghouse Pond is lost and no substitution found, said Mayo, there will be no place in Orleans where children can have salt water swimming lessons. And, she added, the town's other swimming lesson location is Pilgrim Lake, which is freshwater and is usually closed in August due to high bacteria counts. Also, she said, that is more than three decades of history, and countless memories, being swept away for no good reason. "I mean, what the heck?" she said.


apr02 Orleans

Arts and culture roundtable in Orleans

Friends of Arts & Culture in Orleans monthly roundtable will be held Friday, April 5, from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the Old Firehouse Gallery, Main Street. There will be an open conversation about increasing access, awareness, participation and the economic vitality of arts and culture in Orleans through a unified event calendar and distinct visual cues for specific events throughout the year. The meeting will focus on the summer season and beyond, to promote for-profit and philanthropic activities.


apr02 Brewster

Brewster Fin-Com tees off on Captains Course

The finance committee teed off on Captains Golf Course at their meeting March 19 and they didn't find the green. The course is now forecasting a $269,000 deficit for Fiscal Year 2014. The course was profitable as recently as FY2010 when it returned $84,407 to the town, but since the recession, it has slipped into the red, primarily due to they overhang from bonds that financed the course expansion from 18 to 36 holes in 1999. This year the course will lose about $180,000 (the forecast a year ago was for a loss of $88,000). "The operating budget (roughly $900,000) represents just 50 percent of the expenses of the golf course," noted FinCom member James O'Leary. He targeted the maintenance staff, noting Brewster had nine while according the report by the Golf Consulting Group five or six should be adequate. "Our overall labor cost, on the surface, seems very high, $750,000 in 2014," O'Leary said. "It's the most expensive by a wide margin when you compare by acreage. Maintenance costs are up 14-percent in three years." Then he took aim at the golfers. "Season pass holders account for 48 percent of the rounds played but only 28 percent of the revenue," O'Leary noted. "There is no cap on the number of rounds. Write a check once and you can play 365 rounds." Based on the greens fees a pass holder pays for 11 and a half rounds and plays 25 for free. "This is not an essential service. We are paying for your recreation," O'Leary declared. "I don't know how much red ink we have to get before we get a new direction." He noted that including next year the course will have lost $800,000 over four years. The cost of the course expansion bond climbs to $770,000 in 2020 when it will be finally paid off. Deficits are forecast through then, totaling $1.5 million dollars, not including FY2014. "We should be looking at a shared solution here," O'Leary said. "I don't understand why the last four years it's been up to the Brewster taxpayer to make up the deficit." He suggested the course do with one less maintenance person (saving about $60,000 a year) and golfers pay for one more round (i.e., bump their fees). He asked the selectmen to require the players and course to cover half the annual deficit.

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apr02 Chatham

Fishermen say seals are devastating fishing

The rebounding seal population won't get a gold seal of approval from local fishermen. The population of gray seals around Nantucket Sound is rising 20 percent a year (according to Betty Lentell of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute) to an estimated 15,000 but that's the wrong direction as far as some fishermen are concerned. "They should take the population to where it was 20 years ago and maintain it," surfcaster Craig Poosikian suggested during a break in Saturday's Cape Seal Symposium at Chatham High School, organized by Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association. "Make it a commercial venture." Seals are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 and the last bounty for a Massachusetts seal nose was paid in 1960. "There's no fish to catch - is that an impact?" Poosikian asked. "Every spring the for the last 10 years you get your typical inshore fishery; striped bass, bluefish, scup, they show up and then they scram by June 1. I used to go the Nauset Beach throw a line in the sea and get a two-pound flounder, striped bass, dogfish. I can't even get a skate off Nauset Beach anymore. I call it the gray curtain. I used to make a living on the beach." The gray curtain is the seal patrol as they fan along the outer Cape. "Now they're everywhere, in Sandwich, Cape Cod Bay. It's not a Chatham thing anymore," Capt. Tom Smith noted. "I grew up casting for bass and bluefish off Nauset Beach, all us kids, you can't do that now because of the seals. They ruined the surf fishing." Rebecca Gast of WHOI noted the three biggest haul-out spots are High Head in Truro, Jeremy Point in Wellfleet and North Island in Chatham. "Just the day before yesterday I came around Monomoy Point and counted no less than 4,000 seals hauled out on the beach," fisherman Bill Amaru said. "They were 15 to 20 deep in one section more than a quarter mile long." And seals eat fish. Sometimes right out of the fishermen's nets. They bite the belly out, leaving the bones, so that dinner won't show up in an analysis of stomach contents. That's one reason some fishermen want more action and less reflection.

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apr02 Harwich

Tech school makes case for building renovations

Cape Cod Regional Technical High School Superintendent Robert Sanborn said last week that he is preparing a Statement of Interest to be filed soon with the Massachusetts School Building Authority. The document is the first step in the process for any public school to seek state funds for facility renovations or repairs. This will be his fourth try in as many years to convince the state that the 214,000 square-foot school merits significant updates. "The school is in major need of repair and renovation. Almost the entire facility dates back to the late 1970s and warrants substantial improvement. This includes the plumbing, heating, and electrical systems. We need new science labs. It's hard to teach state of the art in a building that is declining," Sanborn said. A major electrical surge in 2011 from antiquated systems, for example, damaged at least 30 roof fans and motors in the school. Most classrooms have ceiling, flooring, and equipment deficiencies. The building is not in compliance with the ADA. To raise awareness around the issue, Sanborn has begun meeting with town officials in all of the 12 communities that send children to the district. The last time major work was done was 2004, when the roof was replaced and exterior walls were repaired. "I have gone to six schools so far and done PowerPoint presentations and provided the most recent SOI (Statement of Interest) to them. It's been very positive and there's been good feedback. The towns are essential to getting this work done," he said. Sanborn said that the cost has not been estimated yet. "That's part of the process with the MSBA. When an SOI is accepted, a detailed evaluation is done. There are a lot of factors that go into the cost. Work includes the plumbing, electrical and fire alarm system, the entrances and windows, handicap accessibility, and ventilation systems. Tech schools are very expensive to build because they aren't just normal classrooms," he said.

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apr02 Harwich

Harwich Selectmen seek action on new use for middle school

Selectmen Monday expressed urgency over the future of the Harwich middle school. They say the repurposing committee needs reorganizing. "It would be beneficial for the town administrator to encourage the county emergency dispatch to look at it,'" said selectman Ed McManus.


apr02 Harwich

Route 137 work delayed

Last fall, town Highway Department Director Lincoln Hooper had great hopes for the plan to have NStar, Verizon, and Comcast complete their utility relocation work during the winter months as part of the reconstruction of Route 137. "When the hot-mix plant is down we wanted to focus on the utility work. This helps move it ahead during the off-season," Hooper said. But that timeline was not to be, as competing regional projects and bad weather have slowed the winter timeline, pushing it out into the early spring. The $4 million roadway project was begun in the spring of 2012 and about two thirds of the construction was finished late last fall. Hooper estimated that due to utility work delays, the project might not finish until the fall of 2013. The project consists of rebuilding and widening Route 137 from the Brewster town line near Exit 11 to Queen Anne Road near the Chatham town line, including new sidewalks, new stormwater drainage, and a new traffic light near the entrance to Route 6. The utility delay has frustrated the town and contractor Lawrence Lynch as they have watched the months tick by with little progress. "It's not like we haven't tried," said Hooper, who described nearly weekly meetings with the contractor to plan the utility work. He said that utility companies NStar, Verizon, and Comcast must pay for the relocation of utility lines with their own funds and work like this can face competition from other town and city projects. "The good news is that NStar has now done their work. They had to go first. It took them a few weeks to do the work. But the request had to go up very high at MassDOT to get it done," he said.

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apr02

Love is in the air--if you are a turkey, that is

Birds do it. Bees do it. And so do turkeys. In fact, this time of year is prime turkey romance time on Cape Cod and pretty much anywhere else you find wild turkeys. This time of year, it isn't the tourists making you late for work--it's the turkeys. You see them in backyards, front yards, along paths and roadways and right smack dab in the middle of the road. They are feisty and active now because it is the middle of mating season and it's time for the males, or toms, to attract a girl, get a girl and start a family. And he attracts the girl, or girls--they gather a harem--by fanning his bright tail feathers and gobbling and according to National Geographic, that gobbling can be heard up to a mile away. According to MassWildlife, breeding season begins in mid-March and peaks in early May. This is when you will see the males at their most puffy and fluffy, trying to get the girl. Once they get their girl, she'll lay about 12 to 15 eggs and the chicks will hatch in about 28 days, according to MassWildlife. But that is where the daddy's contribution ends. He'll be off on his way while the chicks remain with mom for food and to learn the ropes. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, females, or hens, may "band" together with other females and their chicks for food and safety. At the end of the 19th century, turkeys were all but extinct in Massachusetts, but over the next century, the numbers have more than bounced back through carefully planned and implemented wildlife programs. In fact, the spring turkey hunt begins this year on April 29. For tons of turkey info, visit the MassWildlife website.








Monday, April 1, 2013

apr01 Wellfleet

Cahoon parking lot compromised

The town may be looking at removing beach parking lots and shuttling in beach-goers in the future, the selectmen were told Tuesday. Town Administrator Harry Terkanian told them consultant Coastal Zone Management has found a yearly loss of shoreline of 3.5 feet, which has been average for some time. He told the board that he learned earlier Tuesday from Suzanne Grout Thomas, beach administrator, that the erosion at Cahoon Hollow Beach is so great that less than half of the parking lot there "will remain." Thomas, who was at the meeting, told selectmen that she, Mark Vincent and Paul Lindberg, Department of Public Works director and deputy director, respectively, did a site inspection that morning. "Part of the fence is still up at the original eastern part of the eastern edge of the parking lot, but it has been cut and it is a 180 degree drop to the beach, she said. "If we cut back enough of the parking lot to allow the dune to achieve an angle of repose, to stabilize it for the summer people, this will take away half the lot." This is their recommendation, she said, "to end the parking lot far enough west to allow for employee parking, emergency access, enough room for the portable toilets pumping truck to get in and out, and to not to have paid parking or any sticker parking at Cahoon Hollow this summer." "What revenue are we losing by eliminating that parking lot?" Selectman Dennis Murphy asked. "I don't think we will lose it, we'll transfer it to the back lot of Whitecrest Beach," Thomas said. "Cahoon Hollow has been shrinking over the last 10 to 15 years," she added. Fifteen years ago at $10 a car, the lot made $47,000. "Last summer, at $20 a car, it made $31,000. The absolute number of cars you can squeeze into that lot has been decreasing. To keep it viable, there is a lot of hardening there, which means that it doesn't crumble gently, it falls off in great sheets. We have gotten to the great sheet fall-off phase now, and it is just not safe." The back lot of Whitecrest is generally not full, she said, "so people will have to get creative and park there." Selectman John Morrissey asked how many parking spaces have been lost in the past 10 years from Wellfleet's four ocean beaches. She said they have lost 75 to 100 parking spaces. "It's not going to stop. We will continue to lose it. What I will go forward with after the summer is the process for getting an archeological study and plant study for the town-owned land south of the back lot at Whitecrest Beach. It is topographically the least challenging place to put in additional parking. So I think we will have to look at remote lots and shuttles down the road." "Cahoon Hollow has been shrinking over the last 10 to 15 years," she added. Fifteen years ago at $10 a car, the lot made $47,000. "Last summer, at $20 a car, it made $31,000. The absolute number of cars you can squeeze into that lot has been decreasing. To keep it viable, there is a lot of hardening there, which means that it doesn't crumble gently, it falls off in great sheets. We have gotten to the great sheet fall-off phase now, and it is just not safe." The back lot of Whitecrest is generally not full, she said, "so people will have to get creative and park there."

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apr01 Wellfleet

Drunken-driving charge follows 2-car crash in Wellfleet

A local man was charged with drunken driving after a crash Saturday night at the intersection of Route 6 and Main Street. James Clark, 48, of Wellfleet, was turning from the highway onto Main Street in a 2003 Ford Explorer at 9:18 p.m. when he collided with a 2012 Toyota Camry driven by Bryan Williams of Truro. Williams was taken to Cape Cod Hospital, where he was treated and released. Clark was arrested and charged with operating under the influence and operating to endanger.

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apr01 Wellfleet-Provincetown-Orleans-Chatham-Harwich

Freemasons host open houses in all Cape Cod lodges

All 16 Cape Cod Masonic Lodges will open their doors to the public on Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for "Spring Open House," an annual state-wide public celebration of Freemasonry. If you've ever wondered who the Freemasons are, what they do, whether they are the descendants of the Knights Templars or what the inside of their lodge buildings look like, here's your chance to visit and learn more. Members will offer tours of their buildings, discuss the fraternity's history, provide video and printed information, talk about Masonic rituals and describe Masonry's many charitable programs. The Masonic Lodges of Cape Cod and the Islands are the following: Cawnacome Sunshine Lodge - 77 Valley Bars Road - Bourne, Fraternal Lodge - 1987 Falmouth Road - Centerville, Nauset Light Lodge - 52 Old Harbor Road - Chatham, Saint Martin's Lodge - 52 Old Harbor Road - Chatham, Mariners Lodge - 988 Main St. - Cotuit, Mount Horeb Lodge - 242 Old Bass River Road - Dennis, Marine Lodge - 160 Main Street - Falmouth, Pilgrim Lodge - 706 Main St. - Harwich, Union Lodge - 30 Main Street - Nantucket, Oriental-Martha's Vineyard Lodge - 52 Edgartown-Vineyard Haven Road - Oak Bluffs, Universal Lodge - 107 Main St. - Orleans, King Hiram's Lodge - 2 Masonic Place - Provincetown, DeWitt Clinton Lodge - 175 Main St. - Sandwich, Social Harmony Lodge - 2509 Cranberry Highway Route 28 - Wareham, Adams Lodge - Corner of Commercial & Bank - Wellfleet, Howard Lodge - 20 Davis Road - Yarmouth.


apr01 Truro

Get schooled in culinary & garden arts this spring at Truro's Castle Hill arts center

When executive director Cherie Mittenthal plans a new program at Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill, she does it large. Mittenthal enjoys combining aesthetics with the creatively practical. To that end, she has launched a distinctive series of culinary and garden arts classes that started last Thursday and will carry on into the fall. The first in the series was a cooking demonstration and tasting class, "Spring Tapas and Small Plates/Wine Pairing," conducted by local chef Adrian Cyr and wine connoisseur Jerry Swartz. Following that opener, on selected Sundays or Thursdays from April through September, people can consider an eclectic array of offerings, from knife skills, to fermentation, to Cape Cod shellfishing, from preparing your organic garden, to raising chickens, to making chocolate - and lots in between. A veritable bounty awaits the venturesome student. Take for example, Katie Reed's "Focus on Fermentation," on April 25. The class will focus on the basics of fermentation and students will learn how to make "a flavorful dairy-free cheese," according to the course description, as well as sauerkraut, kim chee and kombucha. These probiotic-rich foods are said to be great for replenishing good intestinal bacteria. After learning about the health benefits of fermented foods, participants will receive a recipe booklet to try out these culinary skills at home. Reed, founder of FarmMaid Foods, is certified as a Living Light Culinary Arts Institute chef and instructor. Later in the season, Reed will lead classes in juicing and chocolate making. On May 2, you can opt for an entirely different food adventure, "Fruits of the Flats: Exploring and Enjoying Cape Cod Shellfish." Josiah Mayo teaches the fine points of choosing, handling and preparing local shellfish and demonstrates how to open oysters safely. Bring a glove and a knife so you can practice opening techniques; or you can purchase such materials in class. Looking for something tasty, artful and slightly exotic? Try Chris Kelley's "Drawing and Painting with Chocolate" on May 9. Participants will learn how to use chocolate as an artist medium and how to expand decorating techniques and choices. In "Getting Ready to Plant Your Organic Garden," May 16, organic farmer Chris Murphy covers topics that include site choice, preparing and nourishing your soil, and keeping weeds and insects at bay. After an initial meeting at the Castle Hill Annex for informal discussion on cultivation, the class will visit Murphy's nearby one-and-a-half-acre farm.

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apr01 Provincetown

Provincetown plans for Pilgrims' 400th in big & local way

If all goes as planned, Provincetown will be seeing 20/20 in 2020 when the town braces for the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower Pilgrim landing. In a working outline of long-range goals to honor the occasion, presented recently to the board of selectmen by representatives of the town's visitor services bureau and Pilgrim Monument & Provincetown Museum, a budget of approximately $920,600 was announced, to be segmented over the six years leading up to the quadricentennial. "It's not just an event, it's a campaign" said Tony Fuccillo, the town's tourism director. Among the "Signature Events" highlighted in the outline draft are several that will work in tandem with the town of Plymouth. Plymouth, it was noted, has established a non-profit entity, Plymouth 400 Inc., to manage its various legacy projects and has already secured $2 million in private, grant and municipal funding. And while the VSB report takes pains to acknowledge that "Plymouth's place in the 'pilgrim story,' including popular mythology, has been established over four centuries and will be the epicenter of public focus for 2020," it also calls upon the town of Provincetown, which owns the Mayflower Compact, to develop it's own "cogent and indisputable story" with which to leave its mark on the extended celebration. "The important thing," said John McDonagh, executive director of PMPM, "is that we're not competing with Plymouth - we're all in this together." Starting in 2017 and continuing through 2020, a traveling exhibition will tour the Cape, including a stop at PMPM. On Nov. 9, 2019, the opening ceremony will kick off in Plymouth, launching a year of events that will conclude the following November with the "Compact Summit," also in Plymouth, as well as a re-enactment in Provincetown to mark the signing of the Compact on Nov. 21. (Nov. 11 on the Julian Calendar.) Restoration of the Bas Relief, which features the Compact signing, has been chosen as a key project in promoting the town for the big occasion and will be overseen by Fuccillo at the designation of Town Manager Sharon Lynn. Community Preservation Act funding and other sources of gra

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apr01

Provincetown Monument & Museum reopens April 1 with a exhibit honoring town's seafaring heritage

The April 1 opening of the Pilgrim Monument & Provincetown Museum is a sure sign that spring is finally here. And this year PMPM is opening with an exhibition that highlights the town's maritime history, "Fleet's In," a multi-media presentation and celebration of the Provincetown fishing fleet, as told through art, historic artifacts, fishing gear and personal memorabilia. It is a show that will appeal particularly to Provincetown residents who have a deep affection for its fishing history, but there will be plenty to catch the eye of less invested visitors as well. During a preview of this exhibition in the museum's spacious East Gallery, executive director John McDonagh explained the origins of this impressive show and offered insight into the cooperative nature of exhibit planning as he worked on the final stages of installation. From its conception, McDonagh says, he envisioned "an open, contemplative, uncluttered presentation, so people can walk around the exhibit slowly and take it all in." In process for over a year, "Fleet's In" was designed and developed by McDonagh, the museum staff and the collections committee, working in tandem with members of the community, including Mark Silva, David Mayo, Susan Leonard, Chris King and others. "We hope visitors will learn about Provincetown's fishing fleet from the late 1940s to the 1970s, and the vessels and their families," McDonagh says. "We installed special cases for the boats that were lost, including the Victory II, Patricia Marie and the Cap'n Bill. The eastern rig dragger vessels were a very important chapter in Provincetown's distinguished fishing heritage." "The featured models, built by the late Alfred Silva Sr.," he notes, "are on loan for this exhibit from Mr. Silva's sons."

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apr01 Provincetown

Just don't call it P'town

Provincetown reminds me of an accordion - a funky little folk instrument with a pleated interior. At first glance, it seems small - until you stretch out the bellows. The outermost tip of Cape Cod doesn't look anything like a big city, and yet, there's a ton of history and culture crammed into every crack and crevice of this tiny seaside village. That, and the obvious natural beauty, is what makes this place so appealing - or so says the culture mavens at the Smithsonian magazine, which in its latest issue, ranked Provincetown No. 10 on its list of the "Twenty Best Small Towns to Visit." "There are lists of the best places to get a job, retire, ski, golf and fall in love, best places lists for almost everything. We think any best place worth traveling to should have one quality above others: culture," the magazine explains. Because the Smithsonian editors believe there's "something encouraging about finding culture in small-town America," they hired a geographic information systems company to search its database for towns with a population of less than 25,000 that also have high concentrations of museums, historic sites, art galleries and other cultural amenities. Locals don't say "P'town." "It's such a touristy thing," she said. "It's like saying Xmas instead of Christmas, know what I mean?" Of course, just about everyone in town is expert in the "touristy thing." No longer the thriving fishing village it was once, today Provincetown is easily the most tourist-dependent town on the Cape. And yet, in talking to random locals across town, I learned that many have a "love-hate" relationship with the tens of thousands of visitors who will soon crowd Commercial Street.

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apr01 Orleans

Orleans' skateboard park opens Monday

Spring is here and the Finch Skate Park will open Monday, April 1, from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday. As in the past, operation is contingent on dry weather. Extended hours are possible with the support of volunteers. For more information, visit www.finchskatepark.tumblr.com or call 508-247-9838 during operation hours.


apr01 Chatham

Fleet meets lift the veil on fishing

Long-raker Mike Anderson has never had a job outside of the commercial fishing industry. "I love it. It's what I believe in," said Anderson, 69, who moved to Chatham in 1968 after college. Anderson's experience and passion for fishing were evident last week at "The Many Faces of Quahogs," part of the monthly series called "Meet the Fleet" presented by the Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association on Main Street. The association, known locally as "The Hook," aims to conserve marine resources through sustainable fishing and to educate the public about the Cape's fishing communities. In early 2012, the association launched Meet the Fleet to connect the community with the local fishermen in a fun, educational way, said John Pappalardo, chief executive officer. "It's sort of a win for the fishermen because it gives them a forum to talk about their lives," said Pappalardo, 41. The focus of Meet the Fleet changes each month. For last week's meeting, Nancy Civetta, the association's communications director, reached out to two Chatham fishermen who are quahog experts. "It's something of a lost art," Anderson told the audience of 60 in "The Barn," a cozy room in the Captain Nathan Harding House, the association's location since 2009. Anderson was joined by Dave Likos, a commercial shellfisherman for 18 years, who presented an overview of quahogs and described the day-to-day activities of a "scratcher," a fisherman who uses different types of rakes - three of which were on display for the audience - to scrape the ground in search of quahogs. The Meet the Fleet event is held at 5:30 p.m. on the last Tuesday of each month at the Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association office at 1566 Main St. in Chatham. April's meeting will focus on conch and will feature fisherman Jamie Eldredge and others. Please RSVP by calling 508-945-2432, ext. 111, or by emailing info@ccchfa.org. For more information, visit www.ccchfa.org.

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apr01 Chatham

Sewer flow in Chatham not black or white, has some seeing red

Selectmen granted the yet-to-built Chatham Orpheum Theater additional sewer flow this week, but the move highlighted a controversial issue that is likely to continue. The Orpheum was one of four properties, the others being Chatham Cookie Company and two private residences, that were allowed extra flow. Now that the town has a new sewage treatment plant, and parts of the town are being sewered, there are concerns about overdevelopment. In the past, Title V limited the amount of building, but that constraint has been eliminated. Some in town say regulations voters approved several years ago - knowing the sewer was coming - preclude rampant development and those regulations are being updated now and will likely be before voters in May. But others say the regulations have enormous loopholes that will lead to the loss of the town's character. Selectman Sean Summers said officials have always used extra flow (some businesses who need less capacity return it to the town for other businesses that may need more) judiciously. Now the town has a $200 million investment and voters needs to decide if they want a town board to be able to foster establishments like the Orpheum, which needs more flow because it wants to have a 43-seat restaurant. In the past other businesses, including a Laundromat, were given additional flow because they were considered a public benefit. The flow has to come from somewhere, such as the "sewer bank" that had reserves from restaurants, for instance, that became retail establishments so were using far fewer gallons a day. "Is the Orpheum a good thing for this town? Do we want to be able to make those kind of decisions? That is really the fundamental question," he said. Or will having a board make those decisions mean "the world will end and skyscrapers will rise," he added. Resident Elaine Gibbs, and others, don't feel the issue is that black and white. She said changes in policy - in how flow is allocated and what development is "good" - should be decided by the public, not a board. The water and sewer commissioners are working on updating regulations and their effectiveness will likely continue to be a topic of conversation as Town Meeting looms closer.


apr01 Chatham

Chatham cafe fix up to voters

Attorney Bill Riley said he would be "dead, gone, buried and dust" before a sewer gets to South Chatham, so a different fix is needed for the Box Office Café's wastewater problem. And the proposed solution will likely go before voters in May. Selectmen voted this week to endorse the concept of a "nitrogen aggregation plan" that uses town property near the bike trail. "The restriction prevents further construction; it does nothing to injure the town or restrict use of the bike trail," Riley, attorney for the Café's owners, told the board Tuesday. The board's non-binding approval allows Jade and Paul Schuyler to continue working with the board of health and continue collecting a hundred signatures so they can put the plan before special town meeting this May. Since the popular South Chatham eatery is on a small lot in a sensitive area it is limited in the amount of seats it can have. When the decade-old establishment changed its business model to serving dinner on china plates, the number of seats it could have was drastically reduced because they would be using a lot more water. To try and solve the problem the couple, backed by a petition signed by close to a 1,000 people, began working with the board of health and the innovative aggregation plan was hit on. The aggregation plan would basically use the three acres of town-owned land to supplement the café's land. The café isn't actually using the land; the development potential is being transferred from one property to the other. The Schuylers will also have to put in a new innovative septic system. And if town meeting, the board of health, and the state approve of the plan the number of seats in the café can increase from the nine currently allowed to close to 50. Since the town has to declare the property surplus and allow the Schuylers a "subsurface" easement, there are a few bureaucratic steps that also need to be taken, said Town Counsel Jason Talerman, of Blatman, Bobrowski and Mead. The selectmen will be ruling on those motions in the coming weeks. Selectman Len Sussman compared the easement, which only affects property under the bike trail, to commercial airlines using air space or utilities crossing town property. Selectman Sean Summers said restaurants can be considered a public good, particularly since the town had lost close to 500 restaurant seats - which were transformed into shops or housing - in the last several years. But, he said, he wanted to make sure the Box Office owners didn't redevelop the property and that it remained a restaurant. Robert Duncanson, director of health and environment, said that caveat could be written into the restrictions.


apr01 Chatham

April Fool's in Chatham

Folks in Chatham woke up to an April Fool's on Main Street that poked fun at the renovation of a historical shop - calling it a strip mall - and two citizen activists that have worked to protect the character and culture of the community over the years. Gloria Freeman, one of those citizen activists featured in the spoof wasn't pleased about the sign on David Oppenheim's property. Oppenheim, a developer, received approval to build a two-story connector between two historic properties late last year. The new structure would house more stores and a two-story apartment. "The sign, on David Oppenheim's property, reflects, I suppose, that he is still furious about the 1186 signatures from townspeople - residents, business owners, people who live in and work in Chatham - all of whom were in strong opposition to his Mayflower Project because they wanted to retain the historic streetscape, the open space of our downtown village, and the special character of Chatham," said Freeman.


apr01 Harwich

Harwich students attend Sudan summit

Ten Harwich High School students attended the Sudan Emergency Action Summit in Arlington, Virginia on March 10-11. The students, members of the HHS STAND chapter (Students Taking Action Now: Darfur), went to participate in discussions with Sudanese exiles and national anti-genocide movement leaders about how to stop the suffering in Sudan and South Sudan. Approximately 200 people were at the summit, very few of which were students. Much of the summit focused on firsthand accounts of the conditions in Darfur, South Sudan, the Nuba mountains, the Blue Nile region, and other areas. The students also got to meet and talk with leaders like Carl Wilkens, an American hero who saved hundreds of lives in the Rwandan genocide. As part of the summit, the students also travelled to Capitol Hill to lobby Congress on Sudan policy, meeting with foreign policy staff for Sen. Warren and Rep. Markey, who joined the Congressional Sudan Caucus following the students' request. Based on what they learned, the students are working on developing events to raise money and awareness to combat the ongoing atrocities in Sudan. For more information, check out the group's blog at hhsstand.blogspot.com.